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Second UK pub bans under 25s

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second uk pub bans under 25s

Another British pub has temporarily banned under 25s due to what its landlady claims is a lack of social distancing among young drinkers.

The Red Lion in Whinmoor announced the move on Facebook on Monday, confirming those in the age bracket will be unable to enter between Friday and Sunday.   

The landlady, who wished to remain anonymous, said the decision was made in order to protect staff at the establishment alongside its regular customers from coronavirus.

She added the Red Lion has some ‘good young customers’ who follow the social distancing guidelines, but a minority ‘spoil it for others’ as they have to keep reminding them to respect the guidelines in place to stop the spread of the virus.

The decision comes after official data showed that rising Covid-19 cases across July and August were being driven by people in their teens and 20s. 

The Red Lion in Whinmoor announced the move to ban under 25s on Facebook on Monday, confirming those in the age bracket will be unable to enter between Friday and Sunday

The Red Lion in Whinmoor announced the move to ban under 25s on Facebook on Monday, confirming those in the age bracket will be unable to enter between Friday and Sunday

The Red Lion in Whinmoor announced the move to ban under 25s on Facebook on Monday, confirming those in the age bracket will be unable to enter between Friday and Sunday

She said: ‘It’s only a minority of young people that don’t listen, a lot of the young customers are lovely. This decision is not going to last, it’s just to give them a shake so they realise that this is serious.

‘We’re all in this together, we don’t want anyone to get poorly, we want to get back to normal as soon as we can.

‘I just don’t want to keep repeating myself (asking young people to social distance). It’s very stressful.

‘We want to do it for a short time, to be honest. We are going to review it in a week or two.

‘We’ve got some really lovely young customers, it’s just a small minority you just have to keep repeating to them the guidelines. This is just to say: “Come on guys, this is serious”.’

Another pub on the outskirts of Leeds announced it was banning customers in the 18-25 age bracket last week.

The Oddfellows Arms in Sherburn-in-Elmet said it took the decision to avoid ‘teetering on the risk of closure’.

They said: ‘In light of recent events and an escalation in cases we are now not serving anyone in the age bracket 18-25.

‘We have thought about this very carefully, we will continue to try and ensure our community, customers and staff are all kept safe in these difficult times.

The Oddfellows Arms in Sherburn-in-Elmet announced it was banning customers in the 18-25 age bracket last week

The Oddfellows Arms in Sherburn-in-Elmet announced it was banning customers in the 18-25 age bracket last week

The Oddfellows Arms in Sherburn-in-Elmet announced it was banning customers in the 18-25 age bracket last week

The decision comes after official data showed that rising Covid-19 cases across July and August were being driven by people in their teens and 20s

The decision comes after official data showed that rising Covid-19 cases across July and August were being driven by people in their teens and 20s

The decision comes after official data showed that rising Covid-19 cases across July and August were being driven by people in their teens and 20s

‘Before anyone tries to say we are wrong, think of the implications for us as a business.

‘This is not where we want to be. We would rather have a safe environment than a place which is teetering on the risk of closure.

‘Please see that we are acting for everyone’s best intentions at this time.’ 

The Oddfellows Arms decision came after rising Covid-19 cases were reportedly being driven by people in their teens and 20s, where cases have tripled since July, official data shows.

MailOnline analysis shows infections surged from 9.2 to 28 cases per 100,000 since July 4, or ‘Super Saturday’, in those aged 20 to 29 in England.

And the case rate also quadrupled among those aged 10 to 19 years old over July and August, before schools reopened, from 4.1 cases per 100,000 people to 16.2.

But cases in those over 80 have dropped drastically since the height of the pandemic, when they made up the majority of Covid-19 cases, and have halved since July.

Scientists have said older groups are more likely to take social distancing rules seriously and to continue staying home to protect themselves because they understand the risks of the virus.

Health officials last week warned young people to stop going to parties and large gatherings and to respect the social distancing laws.

 Matt Hancock appeared on Radio 1 on September 7 to tell youngsters ‘Don’t kill your gran’ as deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam said people had ‘relaxed too much’. 

Calling the figures ‘concerning’, Mr Hancock told LBC radio: ‘The message to all your younger listeners [on LBC] and everybody is that even though you are at a lower risk of dying from the coronavirus, if you’re that age, if you’re under 25, you can still have really serious symptoms and consequences.’

He said the most important point to get across was that the uptick in cases in the past few days have been in younger people under 25, ‘especially 17 to 21 year olds’.

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Drunk woman, 31, who daubed ‘all lives matter’ on a London’s RAF memorial gets £630 fine

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drunk woman 31 who daubed all lives matter on a londons raf memorial gets 630 fine

A woman who drunkenly smeared ‘all lives matter’ in paint across London‘s Bomber Command Memorial has been spared jail but handed a £630 court bill. 

Charlie Barnes, 31, wandered over to The Royal Air Force Bomber Command Memorial in Green Park with a tin of blue paint in hand on 10 June this year.

A court heard she claimed to have no awareness of her actions due to her drink being spiked. 

The Bomber Command Memorial features seven statues of a Bomber Command aircrew – a tribute to the 55,573 Bomber Command crew who lost their lives fighting the Germans in the Second World War.

Veterans and families of the deceased regularly visit the memorial to pay tributes to their loved ones, the court heard.

Charlie Barnes, 31, daubed 'all lives matter' in blue paint on The Royal Air Force Bomber Command Memorial in Green Park, London, in June, after claiming her drink was spiked

Charlie Barnes, 31, daubed 'all lives matter' in blue paint on The Royal Air Force Bomber Command Memorial in Green Park, London, in June, after claiming her drink was spiked

Charlie Barnes, 31, daubed ‘all lives matter’ in blue paint on The Royal Air Force Bomber Command Memorial in Green Park, London, in June, after claiming her drink was spiked

Appearing at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on Friday wearing a black and white chequered, she dress admitted to criminal damage of the historic memorial.

The 31-year-old claims she did not remember defacing the memorial and was a champion of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Prosecutor Arfan Ahmed said: ‘This matter took place on 10 June and it relates to criminal damage of the walls inside the Bomber Command Memorial.

‘The defendant took in a tin of paint and placed it on the floor.

‘She then picked up a paintbrush and painted the words in blue paint ‘all lives matter.’

‘This is all captured on CCTV, she is also seen in possession of and swinging a bottle of what appears to be brandy.

‘If any family members of The Royal Air Force were to see that, they would have been caused serious alarm or distress, seeing those words painted, and the memorial defaced in that manner.’

The Bomber Command Memorial in Green Park, London which was unveiled by Queen Elizabeth II in 2012 has been defaced a number of times, most recently in June this year

The Bomber Command Memorial in Green Park, London which was unveiled by Queen Elizabeth II in 2012 has been defaced a number of times, most recently in June this year

The Bomber Command Memorial in Green Park, London which was unveiled by Queen Elizabeth II in 2012 has been defaced a number of times, most recently in June this year

Mr Ahmed said the memorial stone walls were scrubbed clean after the incident and cost a total of £500 to fix.

He continued: ‘It’s premeditated, it’s a planned attack – you don’t walk down to the Bomber Command Memorial with a tin of paint.

‘It’s aggravated because it’s a public memorial and the content of the writing.’

Mr Ahmed told the court Barnes’ actions were not only premeditated, but political.

He said: ‘The nature of the event seems to be stemming from a political event.

‘The nature of these offences seem to be politically motivated.’

But defence solicitor Laura Bayles told bench chair Lucinda Lubbock: ‘There was nothing said about political motivations.

‘There is no evidence of that’

‘She is very clear that she supports the Black Lives Matter movement.’

Ms Bayles argued Barnes had no awareness of what she had done because she believed she had been spiked.

Barnes’ solicitor said: ‘She believes her drink may have been spiked, she said that she had no awareness of this until she was shown the CCTV by police at interview.

‘But it is a serious offence given the fact that the memorial that was defaced.

‘On the first blush it seems to be incredibly distasteful – whilst I don’t seek to say that it wasn’t distasteful and reckless, there were some underlying features that Ms Barnes was experiencing at the time.’

Ms Bayles advised the magistrates to bear in mind Barnes’ personal difficulties and ‘limited means’ when passing the sentence, but noted that she was ‘doing everything right.’

Ms Bayles said:’Ms Barnes is doing everything right at the moment and is at a turning point.

‘She has stable housing, she has held an address for five years, that is somewhat unusual in London for someone that has dealt with issues like her.

The court heard Barnes wanted to pay back the damage she had caused and was extremely remorseful for what she had done.

‘I would be minded that no additional costs are put on top,’ Ms Bayles added.

Barnes, of Shepherd’s Bush Road, west London, admitted criminal damage to property.

She was ordered to pay £500 in compensation and £130 in costs.

What was Bomber Command? RAF body oversaw Britain’s strategic bombing from pre-WWII in 1936 into the Cold Wars years until 1968

The RAF Bomber Command controlled the RAF’s bomber forces from 1936 to 1968, including Squadron XV, and was responsible for the strategic bombing of Germany during the Second World War.

When the command was founded in 1936 it was only intended to be a deterrent, but the reality when war broke out three years later was very different.

Bomber command crews suffered incredibly high casualty rates. A total of 55,573 died out of 125,000 (44.4 per cent mortality rate), 8,403 were injured and 9,838 became prisoners of war.

Most who flew were very young and the vast majority were still in their late teens. Crews came from across the globe – from the UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and all corners of the Commonwealth, as well as from occupied nations including Poland, France and Czechoslovakia.

It took astonishing courage to endure the conditions they faced. Flying at night over occupied Europe, running the gauntlet of German night fighters, anti-aircraft fire and mid-air collisions.

The RAF Bomber Command controlled the RAF's bomber forces from 1936 to 1968 and was responsible for the strategic bombing of Germany during the Second World War

The RAF Bomber Command controlled the RAF's bomber forces from 1936 to 1968 and was responsible for the strategic bombing of Germany during the Second World War

The RAF Bomber Command controlled the RAF’s bomber forces from 1936 to 1968 and was responsible for the strategic bombing of Germany during the Second World War

But it was not until 1942 that the Bomber Command gained a real sense of direction, with the introduction of Air Marshal Arthur ‘Bomber’ Harris.

Harris was appointed as commander in chief of Bomber Command in February 1942, with instructions to start attacking German industry, much of which was located in large cities.

His objective was to destroy Germany’s industrial might and create a collapse in the morale of the civilian workforce, breaking Germany’s will to fight on.

Times were hard. Victory seemed distant, and chivalric notions of war fighting had been burned away in the fire of the Blitz. U-Boats were roaming the Atlantic, sinking merchant shipping in an effort to starve Britain into submission. 

The prospects of success were uncertain. Morale among British workers had largely held firm in the teeth of prolonged attacks by the German Air Force.

Harris, however, firmly believed that through a combination of improved aircraft like the Lancaster and Halifax, better training and navigational aids, and a ruthless will to press the attack, Bomber Command could knock Germany out of the war.

Bomber command crews suffered incredibly high casualty rates. A total of 55,573 died out of 125,000 (44.4 per cent mortality rate), 8,403 were injured and 9,838 became prisoners of war. Pictured: Wellington Bomber air crew who took part in the raid on Heligoland 

Bomber command crews suffered incredibly high casualty rates. A total of 55,573 died out of 125,000 (44.4 per cent mortality rate), 8,403 were injured and 9,838 became prisoners of war. Pictured: Wellington Bomber air crew who took part in the raid on Heligoland 

Bomber command crews suffered incredibly high casualty rates. A total of 55,573 died out of 125,000 (44.4 per cent mortality rate), 8,403 were injured and 9,838 became prisoners of war. Pictured: Wellington Bomber air crew who took part in the raid on Heligoland 

In May 1942, Harris launched his first ‘thousand bomber raid’ against Cologne.

The scale of the attacks shocked Germany, but the country continued to fight. Further attacks did have a devastating effect on the Nazi war economy.

Albert Speer, the German armaments minister, believed that a series of raids like that on Hamburg in August 1943, repeated in quick succession, might well have compelled Germany to surrender. But that wasn’t the case.

Other more specialised operations also took place. The famous ‘Dam Busters’ raid of May 1943 shocked the world with its audacity, as Guy Gibson’s 617 Squadron launched a daring raid on the dams surrounding the Ruhr Valley.

Other attacks, like that on the battleship Tirpitz the following year, eliminated the German navy’s last major surface ship. 

Raids in 1944 and 1945 against German ‘V weapon’ launch sites were also a crucial defensive measure, helping to limit attacks from flying bombs and rockets on British cities.

Bomber Command switched its attentions to tactical objectives in early 1944, helping to pave the way for D-Day, the allied invasion of occupied Europe.

It played a vital and highly effective role attacking infrastructure around the invasion beaches. Attacking railways, roads and other transport links created chaos behind German lines, preventing the defending forces from massing to repel the landings.

The closing months of the war saw arguably the most controversial operations, such as the raid on Dresden in February 1945.

In four huge raids by the RAF and United States Army Air Force, a firestorm destroyed the city centre and killed thousands of civilians.

It took astonishing courage to endure the conditions they faced. Flying at night over occupied Europe, running the gauntlet of German night fighters, anti-aircraft fire and mid-air collisions. Pictured: Bomber Command crews prepare for the raid on Heligoland

It took astonishing courage to endure the conditions they faced. Flying at night over occupied Europe, running the gauntlet of German night fighters, anti-aircraft fire and mid-air collisions. Pictured: Bomber Command crews prepare for the raid on Heligoland

It took astonishing courage to endure the conditions they faced. Flying at night over occupied Europe, running the gauntlet of German night fighters, anti-aircraft fire and mid-air collisions. Pictured: Bomber Command crews prepare for the raid on Heligoland

The planners of the raid argued the city was a vital communications hub and needed to be targeted. The critics said that Germany was well beaten and the bombing was needless.

The truth is that it was a time of total war, and ideas about the boundaries of conflict were very different than those we have today.

Bomber Command did not win the Second World War independently – but the war could not have been won without their efforts.

The RAF’s attacks forced Germany to divert invaluable men, guns, aircraft and equipment to defend its airspace, effectively opening a second front long before D-Day.

The young men of Bomber Command faced dangers that today we can barely imagine, all in defence of our freedom. Their sacrifice and extraordinary courage should never be forgotten. 

Source: Bomber Command Memorial 

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Hezbollah ‘has European weapons stores including explosives’

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Hezbollah has stores of weapons across Europe including the explosive chemical that blew up Beirut, the US government claimed last night. 

Hezbollah operatives have moved ammonium nitrate through Belgium, France, Greece, Italy, Spain and Switzerland since 2012, the State Department said as it ramped up the pressure on Europe to ban the Iran-backed group. 

Counter-terrorism official Nathan Sales said Hezbollah had been smuggling the substance in first-aid kits, with ammonium nitrate hidden in cold packs. 

The fertiliser can be used to make explosives and can be highly dangerous in storage – as demonstrated by the Beirut blast which killed nearly 200 people and devastated huge swathes of the city last month.   

The disaster in Beirut on August 4, when a stash of ammonium nitrate exploded and devastated huge swathes of the Lebanese capital

The disaster in Beirut on August 4, when a stash of ammonium nitrate exploded and devastated huge swathes of the Lebanese capital

The disaster in Beirut on August 4, when a stash of ammonium nitrate exploded and devastated huge swathes of the Lebanese capital 

The US government issued the warning on Thursday night as it appealed to Europe to ban the organisation, which has long been under US sanctions.   

Washington differs with the EU by regarding all of Hezbollah as a terrorist organisation, while Brussels distinguishes between its political and military wings. 

‘Why would Hezbollah stockpile ammonium nitrate on European soil?’ Sales said. ‘The answer is clear: Hezbollah put these weapons in place so it could conduct major terrorist attacks whenever it or its masters in Tehran deemed necessary.’

Hezbollah’s stores of ammonium nitrate are believed to be still in place around Europe, possibly in Greece, Italy and Spain, the US government says.  

The elected arm of Hezbollah has been part of Lebanese governments in recent years which were widely blamed for the August 4 disaster. 

Some individual countries including Britain and Germany have outlawed the group in its entirety. 

But France, the former colonial power in Lebanon which is leading reconstruction efforts in Beirut, says Hezbollah’s political arm has a legitimate role. 

That has led to pressure from the US, which warns that Hezbollah’s weapons stores could undermine Emmanuel Macron’s efforts at reform. 

Hezbollah is a ‘unitary organization that cannot be subdivided into a military and so-called political wing,’ Sales said. 

‘The European approach to Hezbollah since 2013 has not worked,’ he said. 

‘It is fiction that terrorist activities can be cordoned off from the other activities of Hezbollah.’ 

The aftermath of the port blast in Beirut which prompted an outpouring of anger at corruption and incompetence among the country's elite

The aftermath of the port blast in Beirut which prompted an outpouring of anger at corruption and incompetence among the country's elite

The aftermath of the port blast in Beirut which prompted an outpouring of anger at corruption and incompetence among the country’s elite 

Without a full ban, the group can still raise money and recruit operatives, he added. ‘Hezbollah is one organization,’ he said. ‘It is a terrorist organization.’ 

Sales made the remarks in an online forum hosted by the American Jewish Committee, which has called upon more countries to ban Hezbollah. 

The Shi’ite militant group is backed by Iran, which is being targeted by US sanctions after Donald Trump pulled out of the 2015 nuclear deal two years ago. 

Lebanon’s political leaders yesterday missed a French deadline to form an emergency government after the blast which disfigured Beirut.  

Macron had imposed a two-week deadline to agree on a line-up of experts to tackle the country’s crises, but it expired on Wednesday with no result.    

The explosion led to an outpouring of anger at a ruling elite widely seen as corrupt and incompetent, prompting the government to resign.  

France and other international powers have refused to provide desperately-needed aid until serious reforms are made. 

The two main Shi’ite groups in Lebanon’s usual power-sharing arrangement have insisted on retaining the finance ministry, frustrating efforts at an agreement.  

‘I am fully aware that we do not have the luxury of time,’ prime minister-designate Mustapha Abib said in a brief statement after meeting President Michel Aoun. 

The French president’s office said it regretted the failure to form a government, but said it was not too late to do so. 

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Cyborgs: Two-thirds of Western Europeans would consider augmenting their bodies with technology

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cyborgs two thirds of western europeans would consider augmenting their bodies with technology

Two-thirds of Western Europeans would consider augmenting their bodies with technology if it improved their lives — and especially their health — a study found.

Commissioned by Moscow-based cybersecurity firm Kaspersky, a survey found that 63 per cent of people on average would be interested in getting an ‘upgrade’ or two.

However, results varied from country-to-country, with only 25 percent of Britons interested in augmentation compared to 60 per cent in Portugal and Spain.

Two-thirds of Western Europeans would consider augmenting their bodies with technology if it improved their lives — and especially their health — a study found. Pictured, Star Trek's Captain Jean-Luc Picard after joining the Borg, a race of cybernetically enhanced beings

Two-thirds of Western Europeans would consider augmenting their bodies with technology if it improved their lives — and especially their health — a study found. Pictured, Star Trek's Captain Jean-Luc Picard after joining the Borg, a race of cybernetically enhanced beings

Two-thirds of Western Europeans would consider augmenting their bodies with technology if it improved their lives — and especially their health — a study found. Pictured, Star Trek’s Captain Jean-Luc Picard after joining the Borg, a race of cybernetically enhanced beings

‘Human augmentation is one of the most significant technology trends today,’ said Kaspersky’s European director of global research and analysis, Marco Preuss.

‘Augmentation enthusiasts are already testing the limits of what’s possible.

‘We need commonly agreed standards to ensure augmentation reaches its full potential while minimising the risks,’ he added.

The study, conducted by Opinium Research, polled 14,500 people across 16 European countries — including Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal and Spain.

The researchers found that the French as Swiss were almost as apprehensive about augmentation as the British — with only 32 and 36 per cent of citizens, respectively, saying that they would consider it.

Potential augmentations might include significant modifications to turbo-charge the brain or help guard against cancer — to more low-key upgrades like embedding chips into one’s arms to unlock cars or electronic doors.

The survey also revealed that most people want human augmentation to work for the betterment of humanity, though there were concerns that it would be dangerous for society and open to exploitation by hackers.

The majority of respondents also said that they felt that only the rich would be able to afford access to human augmentation technology

Last month, Elon Musk’s neuroscience start-up — Neuralink — unveiled a pig named Gertrude that has had a coin-sized computer chip in its brain for two months that can track her brain activity, much like a ‘FitBit for the mind’.

The implant is intended as a demonstration of an an early step towards similar devices that could help cure human conditions like dementia or Parkinson’s disease — or even to control electronic devices mentally.

HOW DO MICROCHIPS IMPLANTED UNDER HUMAN SKIN WORK?

Several Swedish firms are implanting their employees with microchips under their skin which can be used to replace keys, credit cards and train tickets.

The small implants use Near Field Communication (NFC) technology, the same as in contactless credit cards or mobile payments.

When activated by a reader a few centimetres (inches) away, a small amount of data flows between the two devices via electromagnetic waves.

The implants are ‘passive,’ meaning they contain information that other devices can read, but cannot read information themselves. 

Near Field Communication (NFC) as contactless bank cards, and London’s oyster cards, suggesting it could be used further afield one day.

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