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Senior Tories plot ‘Parliamentary lock’ to subject Covid emergency measures to a vote by MPs

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senior tories plot parliamentary lock to subject covid emergency measures to a vote by mps

Senior Tories are planning a parliamentary lock to prevent Boris Johnson having the final say on new lockdown measures, according to The Sunday Telegraph

Altrincham and Sale West MP Sir Graham Brady is planning to table an amendment that would force ministers to put any new measures to a vote first.

MPs will vote next week on reauthorising the government’s use of such emergency powers under the Coronavirus Act 2020.

Sir Graham Brady (centre) is looking to force a vote by MPs on emergency coronavirus measures amid concerns that restrictions on the public's freedom are being imposed without parliamentary scrutiny. Senior Tory MPs are said to be angry that they are not able to debate new measures, such as the Rule of Six and £1000 fines for flouting self-isolation, which takes effect next week. Brady said there was 'no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes' now parliament is in session (file photo).

Sir Graham Brady (centre) is looking to force a vote by MPs on emergency coronavirus measures amid concerns that restrictions on the public's freedom are being imposed without parliamentary scrutiny. Senior Tory MPs are said to be angry that they are not able to debate new measures, such as the Rule of Six and £1000 fines for flouting self-isolation, which takes effect next week. Brady said there was 'no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes' now parliament is in session (file photo).

Sir Graham Brady (centre) is looking to force a vote by MPs on emergency coronavirus measures amid concerns that restrictions on the public’s freedom are being imposed without parliamentary scrutiny. Senior Tory MPs are said to be angry that they are not able to debate new measures, such as the Rule of Six and £1000 fines for flouting self-isolation, which takes effect next week. Brady said there was ‘no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes’ now parliament is in session (file photo).

A Downing Street spokesman told The Telegraph: ‘It’s absolutely vital that MPs are engaged in this process as these decisions will have a huge impact on them and their constituents and we will continue to discuss these plans with all MPs.’

But some senior Tory MPs are angry about new restrictions on the public’s freedom, such as the Rule of Six, being introduced without a debate in the Commons.

Drinkers are seen out on the town in Nottingham on Saturday. Fears of a second wave of coronavirus have prompted Boris Johnson to institute harsh new rules to limit the virus' spread. But some in his party are displeased with changes that they feel unfairly restrict the freedom of their constituents.

Drinkers are seen out on the town in Nottingham on Saturday. Fears of a second wave of coronavirus have prompted Boris Johnson to institute harsh new rules to limit the virus' spread. But some in his party are displeased with changes that they feel unfairly restrict the freedom of their constituents.

Drinkers are seen out on the town in Nottingham on Saturday. Fears of a second wave of coronavirus have prompted Boris Johnson to institute harsh new rules to limit the virus’ spread. But some in his party are displeased with changes that they feel unfairly restrict the freedom of their constituents.

Fines of up to £1000 for breaching self-isolation were also approved without parliamentary scrutiny.

Sir Brady, who is chairman of the 1922 Committee of Tory backbenchers, said that parliament has been sitting since April.

‘There is now no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes.’ 
 

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France bans Islamist group as part of crackdown on extremists following teacher’s beheading

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france bans islamist group as part of crackdown on extremists following teachers beheading

France will ban an Islamist group named after the late Sheikh Yassin as part of a crackdown on militants following the murder of a French schoolteacher last week.

Samuel Paty was beheaded on October 16 by an 18-year-old of Chechen origin seeking to avenge his victim’s use of caricatures of the Prophet Mohammad in a class on freedom of expression. 

Police shot the attacker dead.

Government spokesman Gabriel Attal said today: ‘This is a battle over security, culture and education.’

The banned group is named after Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, a Palestinian Muslim leader and co-founder of the Hamas movement, who was assassinated in 2004. 

Hamas has denied any links with the French group.

Teacher Samuel Paty (pictured) was beheaded in Paris on Friday after he shared cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in class. His killer shared a video of the victim's severed head online

Teacher Samuel Paty (pictured) was beheaded in Paris on Friday after he shared cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in class. His killer shared a video of the victim's severed head online

Investigations are focusing on Brahim Chnina (pictured), father of a 13-year-old girl in Paty's class, who denounced the teacher online and gave details of the school. He has since been arrested

Investigations are focusing on Brahim Chnina (pictured), father of a 13-year-old girl in Paty's class, who denounced the teacher online and gave details of the school. He has since been arrested

Teacher Samuel Paty (left) was beheaded in the Paris suburbs on Friday after he shared cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in class, leading Brahim Chinina (right), the father of a girl in his class, to issue what France’s interior minister called a ‘fatwa’ against him 

France will ban an Islamist group named after the late Hamas co-founder Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, government spokesman Gabriel Attal (pictured) said today

France will ban an Islamist group named after the late Hamas co-founder Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, government spokesman Gabriel Attal (pictured) said today

France will ban an Islamist group named after the late Hamas co-founder Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, government spokesman Gabriel Attal (pictured) said today

It comes after it was revealed today police interrogated the French schoolteacher over Prophet Mohammed cartoons following a complaint from a parent whose daughter didn’t attend the class.

‘I did not commit any offence,’ Samuel Paty told officers four days before he was beheaded by a jihadist outside his school in the Paris suburbs.

The 47-year-old was summoned to the police station after the schoolgirl’s father complained that his showing cartoons of Mohammed amounted to ‘dissemination of pornographic images.’

But Paty told officers that the child was absent from his class on October 6 and that her story was founded on ‘student rumours’ with the intention to ‘damage my image, the college and the institution.’ 

Flowers are laid outside the middle school during a vigil march, dubbed a 'Marche Blanche' (White March), on Tuesday night in Conflans Saint-Honorine, near Paris

Flowers are laid outside the middle school during a vigil march, dubbed a 'Marche Blanche' (White March), on Tuesday night in Conflans Saint-Honorine, near Paris

Flowers are laid outside the middle school during a vigil march, dubbed a ‘Marche Blanche’ (White March), on Tuesday night in Conflans Saint-Honorine, near Paris

The terrorist's body lying in the middle of the road after he was killed by French police following his refusal to surrender

The terrorist's body lying in the middle of the road after he was killed by French police following his refusal to surrender

The terrorist’s body lying in the middle of the road after he was killed by French police following his refusal to surrender 

Paty’s colleagues told France Info that the history and geography teacher had been deeply upset by an online video branding him a ‘thug’ which was allegedly circulated by the girl’s outraged father.

Paty was decapitated in broad daylight outside his school in the Parisian suburbs last Friday by Chechen Aboulakh Anzorov, 18, who paid a 14-year-old schoolboy €300 (£270) to identify the history and geography tutor.

French newspaper receives threats over republishing Hebdo cartoon in solidarity with slain teacher

A French newspaper has received threats after republishing a Charlie Hebdo cartoon on Mohammed to highlight Islamic extremism following the teacher’s murder.

Loire Valley paper La Nouvelle Republique has made a legal complaint citing five comments on Facebook which were particularly egregious.

On Sunday, the paper published an earlier satirical cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed in solidarity with beheaded school teacher Samuel Paty, 47, who had shown Charlie Hebdo cartoons in a class on freedom of expression.

A journalist at La Nouvelle Republique, Christophe Herigault, spoke on TV last night to reveal that while the vast majority praised the paper for its front page of the Hebo cartoon, there had been a small number of threats. 

‘There were four or five threats, notably on Facebook, which has led us to lodge a judicial complaint, as a matter of principle,’ Herigault told BFM TV.

Officials at the local police department could not immediately be reached.

Paty’s murder has shocked France, and carried echoes of the attack five years ago on the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, after the magazine had also published cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad in 2015.

 

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Anzorov had been in contact with the father of a girl in Paty’s class who instigated a campaign against him over the cartoons.   

The father, Brahim Chnina, is in custody after France’s interior minister accused him of launching a ‘fatwa’ against Paty.    

Chnina had put his phone number on a Facebook post with a video calling for protests against Paty, and later published details of the teacher and his school.

Chnina, along with six others, including two teenagers who were allegedly paid by Anzorov for information, are due to appear in court today. Nine others were arrested as part of the investigation but have since been released. 

When questioned about a claim that he’d asked the Muslims in his class to leave, Paty told officers: ‘I suggested that my students look away for a few seconds if they thought they were shocked for one reason or another.

‘At no time did I tell the students: “Muslims, you can go out because you are going to be shocked.” And I did not ask the students who were of the Muslim faith. My goal when I asked them to look away was that they didn’t feel offended.’

Following the interview, Paty made a complaint of defamation against the father of the girl over his online video.

The school’s principal had supported Paty at his police interview. 

The French government will today honour Paty with a posthumous Legion d’Honneur, France’s highest order of merit, in a ceremony at the Sorbonne. 

The murder has led to a renewed crackdown on extremism in France where ministers plan to shut down two Islamic organisations and a Paris mosque. 

One imam apologised today after his mosque shared details of Paty and his school on Facebook following a campaign by an outraged Muslim father. 

‘Given what happened we regret having published it, said imam M’hammed Henniche, according to France Info

‘We are currently seeing how in the future to take a step back before getting carried away on things like that.’ 

While ISIS has not claimed responsibility for Paty’s killing, the magazine has previously urged people to emulate the Charlie Hebdo attack in Paris which was also seen as revenge for blasphemy against Mohammed. 

The Charlie Hebdo attackers were ‘leaving a clear path for others to follow’ because Western governments would not ‘carry out the punishment for the blasphemy prescribed by Islam’, the ISIS magazine said

The 2015 killings were the first in a series of terror attacks which have rocked France in recent years, including Paty’s beheading last Friday. 

According to the SITE Intelligence Group, a US-based monitor, supporters of al-Qaeda have also been ‘celebrating’ the attack and sharing graphic images online.

French MPs pay tribute in front of the National Assembly building in Paris today with a picture of Samuel Paty displayed on the steps

French MPs pay tribute in front of the National Assembly building in Paris today with a picture of Samuel Paty displayed on the steps

French MPs pay tribute in front of the National Assembly building in Paris today with a picture of Samuel Paty displayed on the steps 

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen speaks to the media as she attends a vigil for Paty in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine on Monday evening

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen speaks to the media as she attends a vigil for Paty in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine on Monday evening

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen speaks to the media as she attends a vigil for Paty in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine on Monday evening 

Head of right-wing party Rassemblement National Marine Le Pen pays tribute to history professor Samuel Paty in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine

Head of right-wing party Rassemblement National Marine Le Pen pays tribute to history professor Samuel Paty in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine

Head of right-wing party Rassemblement National Marine Le Pen pays tribute to history professor Samuel Paty in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine

A man looks at flowers layed outside the Bois d'Aulne secondary school in homage to slain history teacher Samuel Paty, who was beheaded by an attacker for showing pupils cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in his civics class

A man looks at flowers layed outside the Bois d'Aulne secondary school in homage to slain history teacher Samuel Paty, who was beheaded by an attacker for showing pupils cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in his civics class

A man looks at flowers layed outside the Bois d’Aulne secondary school in homage to slain history teacher Samuel Paty, who was beheaded by an attacker for showing pupils cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in his civics class

Armed police stand guard outside the secondary school where Samuel Paty taught, while mourners lay flowers at the scene alongside a placard declaring 'Je suis Samuel'

Armed police stand guard outside the secondary school where Samuel Paty taught, while mourners lay flowers at the scene alongside a placard declaring 'Je suis Samuel'

Armed police stand guard outside the secondary school where Samuel Paty taught, while mourners lay flowers at the scene alongside a placard declaring ‘Je suis Samuel’ 

There have also been posts from ISIS and al-Qaeda supporters ‘claiming [the killer] will inspire other lone wolves’, according to SITE director Rita Katz. 

Meanwhile, Paris prosecutors said they had opened an investigation into a French neo-Nazi website hosted abroad that republished the photo of Paty’s corpse.  

The teacher’s murder has led to renewed promises of action against Islamic extremists in France, with police conducting a series of raids on Monday.  

Law enforcement carried out 40 raids on Monday, mostly around Paris, with many more planned.

‘We want to harass and destabilise this movement in a very determined way,’ one government source said.

In addition, a 14-year-old French schoolboy has admitted identifying Paty to the terrorist who beheaded him after accepting the equivalent of €300 (£270) in cash. 

The boy who accepted the money shared it among three friends, who are also all in custody. None of the children are thought to be Muslim and it is not suggested that they knew of Anzorov’s terrorist plans. 

‘Anzarov said he simply wanted to film the teacher and ask him to apologise for showing the drawings to his class,’ said an investigating source.

Interior minister Gerald Darmanin vowed there would be ‘not a minute’s respite for enemies of the Republic’, after tens of thousands took part in nationwide rallies.

Darmanin said the government would also tighten its grip on institutions and charities with suspected links to Islamist networks.

Dramatic footage shows the fatal stand-off between French police and the terrorist they shot dead last Friday after he beheaded a school teacher who showed cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed to his class

Dramatic footage shows the fatal stand-off between French police and the terrorist they shot dead last Friday after he beheaded a school teacher who showed cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed to his class

Armed police yelled at the killer to 'throw your gun' and 'get on the ground' during the showdown in the Paris suburbs, but the terrorist ignored the repeated warnings and refused to drop his weapon

Armed police yelled at the killer to 'throw your gun' and 'get on the ground' during the showdown in the Paris suburbs, but the terrorist ignored the repeated warnings and refused to drop his weapon

Dramatic footage filmed from a nearby house shows the fatal stand-off between French police and the terrorist they shot dead last Friday after he beheaded a school teacher who showed cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed to his class

Officials named two groups they would target for closure – the Collective Against Islamophobia in France that says it monitors attacks against Muslims, and BarakaCity, which describes itself as a humanitarian organisation.

In a social media post, BarakaCity accused Darmanin of ‘going mad’ and said he was taking advantage of a tragedy.

Darmanin also ordered the closure of a Paris mosque, accusing its imam of encouraging intimidation of the teacher and publicising the school’s address.  

Paty was attacked on his way home from the secondary school where he taught in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, 25 miles from central Paris.

Anzorov was shot dead after refusing to put down his weapons in a dramatic stand-off with police soon after he murdered Paty.   

The terrorist had arrived in France with his family from the predominantly Muslim Russian region of Chechnya more than a decade ago.

Flowers are layed in front of the middle school (college) during a vigil march, dubbed a 'Marche Blanche' (White March) to pay respect to the teacher Samuel Paty who was assassinated in Conflans Saint-Honorine

Flowers are layed in front of the middle school (college) during a vigil march, dubbed a 'Marche Blanche' (White March) to pay respect to the teacher Samuel Paty who was assassinated in Conflans Saint-Honorine

Flowers are layed in front of the middle school (college) during a vigil march, dubbed a ‘Marche Blanche’ (White March) to pay respect to the teacher Samuel Paty who was assassinated in Conflans Saint-Honorine

Flowers and signs reading "I am Samuel Paty' are displayed at a makeshift memorial during a march (marche blanche) in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine

Flowers and signs reading "I am Samuel Paty' are displayed at a makeshift memorial during a march (marche blanche) in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine

Flowers and signs reading “I am Samuel Paty’ are displayed at a makeshift memorial during a march (marche blanche) in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine

Signs and flowers paying tribute to the slain school teacher in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine

Signs and flowers paying tribute to the slain school teacher in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine

Signs and flowers paying tribute to the slain school teacher in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine

Four members of the killer’s family were among those detained. 

The people under investigation also include the father of a 13-year-old schoolgirl who was in Paty’s class when he showed the controversial images during a lesson about freedom of expression. 

Paty had given Muslim children an opportunity to leave the classroom, but the lesson nonetheless led to uproar. 

The father, Brahim Chnina, launched an online campaign against the teacher and has now been arrested along with a known Islamist radical. 

Chnina he wanted the teacher removed and went to see the principal of the school to complain, prosecutors said. 

That evening, he put out another Facebook video, giving the name of the teacher and identifying the school.     

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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70 artworks are damaged in mysterious ‘hushed up’ attack at German museum

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70 artworks are damaged in mysterious hushed up attack at german museum

Vandals have damaged more than 70 artworks and artifacts at some of Berlin‘s most renowned museums in a targeted attack that was kept quiet by authorities for more than two weeks.

Paintings, stone sculptures and sarcophagi at three institutions on the German capital’s UNESCO-listed Museum Island were sprayed with an ‘oily liquid’ which left visible stains, Berlin police have said.

The Pergamon Museum, Neues Museum and Alte Nationalgalerie were all targeted with local media calling the episode ‘one of the biggest attacks on art and antiquities in German post-war history’.

It comes just weeks after a political activist spread outlandish conspiracy theories about the institutions and branded the Pergamon as the centre of a ‘global satanist and corona criminal scene’ where ‘they sacrifice humans at night and abuse children’. 

Paintings, stone sculptures and sarcophagi at three institutions on the German capital's UNESCO-listed Museum Island were sprayed with an 'oily liquid' which left visible stains (damaged sarcophagus of Prophet Ahmose at the Neues Museum pictured)

Paintings, stone sculptures and sarcophagi at three institutions on the German capital's UNESCO-listed Museum Island were sprayed with an 'oily liquid' which left visible stains (damaged sarcophagus of Prophet Ahmose at the Neues Museum pictured)

Paintings, stone sculptures and sarcophagi at three institutions on the German capital’s UNESCO-listed Museum Island were sprayed with an ‘oily liquid’ which left visible stains (damaged sarcophagus of Prophet Ahmose at the Neues Museum pictured)

Friederike Seyfried, director of the Neues Museum, points to the damage caused by an 'oily liquid' leaving visible stains on exhibits in the Egyptian

Friederike Seyfried, director of the Neues Museum, points to the damage caused by an 'oily liquid' leaving visible stains on exhibits in the Egyptian

Friederike Seyfried, director of the Neues Museum, points to the damage caused by an ‘oily liquid’ leaving visible stains on exhibits in the Egyptian

More than 70 artworks and artifacts were damaged at three of Berlin's most renowned museums - the Pergamon Museum, Neues Museum (left) and Alte Nationalgalerie (right) - in a targeted attack that was kept quiet by authorities for more than two weeks

More than 70 artworks and artifacts were damaged at three of Berlin's most renowned museums - the Pergamon Museum, Neues Museum (left) and Alte Nationalgalerie (right) - in a targeted attack that was kept quiet by authorities for more than two weeks

More than 70 artworks and artifacts were damaged at three of Berlin’s most renowned museums – the Pergamon Museum, Neues Museum (left) and Alte Nationalgalerie (right) – in a targeted attack that was kept quiet by authorities for more than two weeks

Police believe the vandalism occurred on October 3, Germany Unity Day, during opening hours at the museums. 

‘The state criminal investigation office of the Berlin police has opened a probe over property damage to artworks and artifacts on display,’ spokesman Martin Dams said in an emailed statement. 

Dams did not say why neither the museums nor the police had communicated earlier about the attack, which was first reported late Tuesday in German media.

He also did not provide any information about a possible motive.

But a report by Die Zeit and public broadcaster Deutschlandfunk noted that Attila Hildmann, an activist who has railed against government measures to contain the coronavirus, had spread outlandish conspiracy theories about the Museum Island in August and September.

Using his Telegram channel, Hildmann claimed the Pergamon Museum, which has been closed for part of the summer due to the pandemic, held the ‘throne of Satan’.

He said the institution was the centre of a ‘global satanist and corona criminal scene’ where ‘they sacrifice humans at night and abuse children’, in an echo of the international QAnon conspiracy movement.

Activist Attila Hildmann (pictured during a rally against the government's coronavirus restrictions) had spread outlandish conspiracy theories about the Museum Island in August and September

Activist Attila Hildmann (pictured during a rally against the government's coronavirus restrictions) had spread outlandish conspiracy theories about the Museum Island in August and September

Activist Attila Hildmann (pictured during a rally against the government’s coronavirus restrictions) had spread outlandish conspiracy theories about the Museum Island in August and September

Hildmann branded the Pergamon Museum (pictured) as the centre of a 'global satanist and corona criminal scene' where 'they sacrifice humans at night and abuse children'

Hildmann branded the Pergamon Museum (pictured) as the centre of a 'global satanist and corona criminal scene' where 'they sacrifice humans at night and abuse children'

Hildmann branded the Pergamon Museum (pictured) as the centre of a ‘global satanist and corona criminal scene’ where ‘they sacrifice humans at night and abuse children’

Berlin daily Tagesspiegel said that museum visitors who had booked tickets for October 3 had been contacted by police to ask for help with the investigation.

Berlin’s Museum Island, a UNESCO World Heritage site, is home to precious artifacts including a legendary bust of the Egyptian Queen Nefertiti and Babylon’s Ishtar Gate.

It attracts around three million visitors each year and is undergoing a major renovation and expansion.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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South Shields football team hits back at Wetherspoons for reporting them for breaking Covid rules

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south shields football team hits back at wetherspoons for reporting them for breaking covid rules

An amateur football team has hit back at Wetherspoons staff for reporting them to police for breaking Tier 2 Covid rules after ‘taking their money and letting them drink outside’.

Josh Robertson, 26, said he was among the players fined for gathering at The Wouldhave in South Shields after a match on Sunday.

They were mid-pint when a concerned staff member challenged them, only to be told by the men they were from the same household.

But the worker called police to report a breach of the coronavirus regulations and officers issued the group with fines.

Mr Robertson, a painter, has rejected the story told by Northumbria Police, claiming the team never said they lived in the same house.

Josh Robertson (centre) said he was among those caught as his side drank at The Wouldhave Wetherspoon in South Shields after a match on Sunday. It is not clear if the two men picture were also there

Josh Robertson (centre) said he was among those caught as his side drank at The Wouldhave Wetherspoon in South Shields after a match on Sunday. It is not clear if the two men picture were also there

Josh Robertson (centre) said he was among those caught as his side drank at The Wouldhave Wetherspoon in South Shields after a match on Sunday. It is not clear if the two men picture were also there

They were mid-pint when a concerned staff member at the pub (pictured) challenged them, only to be told by the men they were from the same household

They were mid-pint when a concerned staff member at the pub (pictured) challenged them, only to be told by the men they were from the same household

They were mid-pint when a concerned staff member at the pub (pictured) challenged them, only to be told by the men they were from the same household

He wrote: ‘We didn’t get challenged or anything no-one said anything and no-one said we all lived together. What we gonna say we all lived in the big brother house like?

‘We went in and were told to sit on tables of four which we did and eight of them were outside in the beer garden when the fines were issued.

‘If they were at risk of getting a fine why didn’t they tell us to leave or refuse entry before letting us sit there and order drinks before phoning the police.’

He added: ‘But I forgot ya can only get the disease in a pub and not on a football pitch where 22 people are playing a contact sport.’

South Tyneside is currently under Tier 2 restrictions meaning residents cannot socialise with people from other households in any indoor setting.

Mr Robertson, 26, has rejected the story told by Northumbria Police and the pub, claiming the group never said they lived in the same house

Mr Robertson, 26, has rejected the story told by Northumbria Police and the pub, claiming the group never said they lived in the same house

Mr Robertson, 26, has rejected the story told by Northumbria Police and the pub, claiming the group never said they lived in the same house

Social media users slammed Mr Robertson under a police Facebook post on Wednesday.

One wrote: ‘Suck it up. Because the sport you love will.be closed again if cases don’t start going down.

Another added: ‘Stick to the rules!! COVID spreader.’

Chief superintendent Janice Hutton, of Northumbria Police, said: ‘This group showed a flagrant disregard for the rules which are in place to help prevent the spread of coronavirus.

‘Actions like this undermine the efforts being made by the majority of others in order to protect themselves, their family, friends and wider communities.

‘We will continue to work closely with our communities and offer advice to people who have mistakenly broken the restrictions.

‘However, as we have made clear, where individuals are choosing to ignore the measures in place, we are committed to taking enforcement action to protect our communities.’

The force declined to name the football team, or the pub.

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34656828 8863173 image a 23 1603279214574

 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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