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Sir Keir Starmer overtakes Boris Johnson in poll revealing who people think would be a better PM

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sir keir starmer overtakes boris johnson in poll revealing who people think would be a better pm

Sir Keir Starmer has overtaken Boris Johnson as the man voters think would make the best Prime Minister, according to exclusive new research seen by The Mail on Sunday.

The analysis, conducted by former Conservative deputy chairman Lord Ashcroft, will cause alarm in Downing Street as Mr Johnson grapples with the rise in Covid-19 infections, the economic damage caused by lockdown measures, and rebellious Tory backbenchers angered by the restrictions imposed by No 10.

A total of 37 per cent of voters think that Sir Keir would make the best Prime Minister, ahead of Mr Johnson on 30 per cent. 

And when asked to choose between the parties under their current leaders, 53 per cent opt for Labour, with 47 per cent for the Conservatives.

A poll conducted by Lord Ashcroft asked voters to choose between Conservatives and Labour under their current leaders - 53% opted for Labour, with 47% choosing the Conservatives

A poll conducted by Lord Ashcroft asked voters to choose between Conservatives and Labour under their current leaders - 53% opted for Labour, with 47% choosing the Conservatives

A poll conducted by Lord Ashcroft asked voters to choose between Conservatives and Labour under their current leaders – 53% opted for Labour, with 47% choosing the Conservatives 

A total of 37 per cent of voters think that Sir Keir would make the best Prime Minister, overtaking Mr Johnson in the poll on 30 per cent

A total of 37 per cent of voters think that Sir Keir would make the best Prime Minister, overtaking Mr Johnson in the poll on 30 per cent

A total of 37 per cent of voters think that Sir Keir would make the best Prime Minister, overtaking Mr Johnson in the poll on 30 per cent

The research also suggests that support for the Tories in ‘Red Wall’ seats where Labour voters switched to the Conservatives in their thousands to hand an 80-seat majority to Mr Johnson last year is also reasonably soft, with 31 per cent saying they would switch back to Labour, while 69 per cent would stick with the Tories.

No 10 will be unsettled by Lord Ashcroft’s finding that only 27 per cent believe Mr Johnson is doing a good job, while 21 per cent think he would be a good PM ‘under different circumstances’ and 39 per cent think he would not be a good Premier whatever the situation.

Voters are split equally between those who think his Government is doing a ‘reasonable job’ and those who think it has ‘handled things badly’, both of which rank at 45 per cent.

But 34 per cent think that a Labour Government would have handled the crisis better, with 22 per cent saying worse.

These findings are reflected in the leading politicians’ personal ratings, with Chancellor Rishi Sunak alone among the London politicians in recording a positive figure – plus 2. Sir Keir is on zero and the Prime Minister is on minus 11.

Lord Ashcroft’s focus groups were complimentary about Mr Sunak, with one participant saying: ‘Rishi has stood out for me. How he addressed the public was quite reassuring. He’s the most confident and competent of all of them.’

Lord Ashcroft's analysis found that only 27 per cent believe Mr Johnson is doing a good job, while 21 per cent think he would be a good PM 'under different circumstances'

Lord Ashcroft's analysis found that only 27 per cent believe Mr Johnson is doing a good job, while 21 per cent think he would be a good PM 'under different circumstances'

Lord Ashcroft’s analysis found that only 27 per cent believe Mr Johnson is doing a good job, while 21 per cent think he would be a good PM ‘under different circumstances’

Another said: ‘I felt like I was being looked after. I think he’s a star.’

Opinion on Mr Johnson was divided, with some using terms such as ‘indecisive’, ‘overwhelmed’ and ‘flaky’. Others said that he was ‘doing as good a job as he can in these times’ and ‘he’s in a difficult position challenge so we should cut him some slack’.

Lord Ashcroft also detected growing irritation with the 10pm curfew on pubs and restaurants and other measures.

One respondent called it ludicrous, while another said: ‘It’s getting silly now. It’s starting to look like a dictatorship. Stopping people seeing their families, shutting the economy down, it’s getting out of hand. Not even one per cent of the population have got it and most have recovered. It’s blown out of proportion.’

S8,051 adults were interviewed online from September 17 to 20. Data weighted to be representative of all UK adults.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Coronavirus UK: Fears of London gridlock before second lockdown

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coronavirus uk fears of london gridlock before second lockdown

Britons are plotting to head away from cities to rural areas during a second UK lockdown days after Paris saw huge traffic jams as people left city.

The Mail revealed last night that Boris Johnson is expected to announce a second nationwide lockdown next week.

Social media users reacted quickly to say they would flee London and other cities for the countryside before the new restrictions are put in place.

Piers Corbyn and a small number of anti-lockdown protesters were also on the streets of London last night.  

It comes as the roads out of Paris were jammed on Thursday after France‘s second lockdown was ordered yesterday.

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Britons have claimed they will head away to rural areas for the second UK lockdown days after Paris saw huge traffic jams as people left city

Britons have claimed they will head away to rural areas for the second UK lockdown days after Paris saw huge traffic jams as people left city

Britons have claimed they will head away to rural areas for the second UK lockdown days after Paris saw huge traffic jams as people left city

Social media users in the UK indicated they would act in the same way to the country’s impending lockdown.

One wrote: ‘So we got until Wednesday for Lockdown 2 rumour has it. 

‘Right the plan is: get a 24 hour covid test tomorrow, if you’re negative we takeover a great big mansion in the countryside for a month and put on shows and make movies and hangout in a giant bubble. Who’s in?’

Another said: ‘I can see a lockdown coming to London soon ….leave London now…it’s going to get horrible!!!’

One said: ‘We staying at grandmas house cus no way I’m gonna be in London in lockdown again.’

Piers Corbyn was on the streetsof London last night with a small number of anti-lockdown protesters

Piers Corbyn was on the streetsof London last night with a small number of anti-lockdown protesters

Piers Corbyn was on the streetsof London last night with a small number of anti-lockdown protesters

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35049212 8899251 image a 102 1604105232473

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Scientists from the Sage committee yesterday presented No 10 with bleak figures showing that Covid is spreading ‘significantly’ faster than even their original ‘worst-case scenario’ prediction.

Last night a Cabinet source told the Mail that the dramatic move will be announced next week. 

It was not clear exactly what form the new lockdown would take, or what would be ordered to close or how long it would last.

The Government now faces a critical weekend to determine the shape of the measures before an announcement.

The Prime Minister and Chancellor Rishi Sunak are said to have agonised over the decision because of fears it would leave the economy in tatters. 

But the scientists – backed by Health Secretary Matt Hancock and senior minister Michael Gove – told them the virus was on track to kill 85,000 this winter, and that it was too late for a so-called ‘circuit break’.

Tens of thousands of Parisians last night caused massive traffic jams in a desperate attempt to flee the French capital ahead of the start of Emmanuel Macron's new national shutdown

Tens of thousands of Parisians last night caused massive traffic jams in a desperate attempt to flee the French capital ahead of the start of Emmanuel Macron's new national shutdown

Tens of thousands of Parisians last night caused massive traffic jams in a desperate attempt to flee the French capital ahead of the start of Emmanuel Macron's new national shutdown

Tens of thousands of Parisians last night caused massive traffic jams in a desperate attempt to flee the French capital ahead of the start of Emmanuel Macron's new national shutdown

Tens of thousands of Parisians last night caused massive traffic jams in a desperate attempt to flee the French capital ahead of the start of Emmanuel Macron’s new national shutdown 

View of traffic jams in Paris as traffic records have been broken in Paris ahead of the new shutdown coming into force

View of traffic jams in Paris as traffic records have been broken in Paris ahead of the new shutdown coming into force

View of traffic jams in Paris as traffic records have been broken in Paris ahead of the new shutdown coming into force

Parisians flocked to the Gare de Lyon to avoid confining themselves to the French capital during the shutdown

Parisians flocked to the Gare de Lyon to avoid confining themselves to the French capital during the shutdown

Parisians flocked to the Gare de Lyon to avoid confining themselves to the French capital during the shutdown

It comes as Parisians fleeing for the countryside jammed the roads on Thursday ahead of France’s lockdown to slow the spread of the resurgent coronavirus.

There was only a sprinkling of people hurrying along city sidewalks Friday as the nationwide restrictions went into effect.

Dystopian images of logjams that stretched for 435 miles (700km) at one point Thursday evening – exacerbated by the upcoming long holiday weekend – were a grim sign of a return to the dark days of the spring. 

With infections hitting record levels in some countries, many are now resorting to severe restrictions again .

In France, concerns were growing that rising infections would swamp the country’s health system, so authorities ordered another four-week lockdown beginning Friday. 

There was only a sprinkling of people hurrying along city sidewalks in Paris on Friday as the nationwide restrictions went into effect

There was only a sprinkling of people hurrying along city sidewalks in Paris on Friday as the nationwide restrictions went into effect

There was only a sprinkling of people hurrying along city sidewalks in Paris on Friday as the nationwide restrictions went into effect

A man walks by the empty Tuileries gardens in the centre of Paris. French authorities ordered another four-week lockdown beginning Friday

A man walks by the empty Tuileries gardens in the centre of Paris. French authorities ordered another four-week lockdown beginning Friday

A man walks by the empty Tuileries gardens in the centre of Paris. French authorities ordered another four-week lockdown beginning Friday

Many areas of the French capital resembled a regular lazy weekend morning – on what would normally have been a bustling weekday. 

Those who were out frequently clutched permission forms proving they had an exemption that allowed them to to be on streets.

The only places that were busy were grocery stores and markets as people stockpiled food and other necessities.

All of France’s 67 million people have been ordered to stay at home at all times with no visitors, or risk steep fines or prosecution. 

There are a handful of exceptions, such as being allowed out for one hour of exercise a day within a half-mile (1km) of home, to go to medical appointments, to a place of work, or to shop for essential goods. 

Restaurants and cafes are shuttered, apart from those that offer takeout.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Coronavirus UK: 46% familes WILL stick to Christmas lockdown rules

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coronavirus uk 46 familes will stick to christmas lockdown rules

Almost half of families in the UK intend to stick to coronavirus rules at Christmas even if they prevent them from seeing their loved ones. 

An exclusive poll for MailOnline found 46 per cent of people said they will fully adhere to the rules and not celebrate with relatives or friends from other households indoors if that is what the restrictions in their local area demand. 

The survey of 3,000 people, conducted by Redfield & Wilton Strategies on October 28, found that just 19 per cent intend not to fully adhere to the rules and still celebrate indoors with people from outside their immediate household.  

Just over one in 10, some 14 per cent, said they would try to stick to restrictions and meet loved ones outdoors in a public space on the big day while five per cent intend to celebrate overseas and 17 per cent were unsure what they will do. 

Just 19 per cent of people said they intend not to adhere to coronavirus rules over Christmas if there is a ban on households gathering indoors

Just 19 per cent of people said they intend not to adhere to coronavirus rules over Christmas if there is a ban on households gathering indoors

Just 19 per cent of people said they intend not to adhere to coronavirus rules over Christmas if there is a ban on households gathering indoors 

The Government is facing a major headache over what to do about coronavirus rules over the Christmas period. 

Ministers believe it is inevitable that many people will travel to be with their families even if restrictions say they should not do so. 

However, there are fears that lifting the rules temporarily to allow families to meet would result in a ‘spreading event’ which would cause a significant spike in coronavirus infections. 

Today’s poll found that the nation is split on whether the Government understands the economic and social damage its lockdown restrictions are doing. 

Some 47 per cent of respondents said the Government does understand the impact on the public but 37 per cent think the Government does not. 

Meanwhile, four in ten Britons (39 per cent) said they would support restrictions like the Rule of Six being relaxed over Christmas and 31 per cent would oppose such a much.  

The debate over what to do during the Christmas period remains ongoing in Whitehall with ministers insisting that it is too early to make decisions on the matter. 

Police chiefs have said that if rules banning household mixing are in place over Christmas then officers could break up family gatherings. 

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick said yesterday that ‘the police have a duty and a responsibility to enforce the rules’.

‘We obviously want to ensure that families can gather for Christmas,’ he told Sky News.

‘I want to be with my own family at Christmas. That is some way off.

‘What we have to do now is take action, decisive action now against the virus to give us the best possible chance of being able to achieve that and that is exactly what we are trying to do.’

Tory MPs have urged the Government to give families a ‘break’ and allow them to meet after a ‘dreadful year’.   

They also blasted the suggestion that police could crackdown on families meeting for Christmas dinner as they said ‘this is not some totalitarian state like China’.  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Philophobia: Low budget film hits cinemas as James Bond postponed

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philophobia low budget film hits cinemas as james bond postponed

The director of a low-budget coming of age film has said he cold-called the box office of local cinemas to get them to show his movie after the latest James Bond film was delayed.

Guy Davies, 29, from Stroud, Gloucestershire, said while Cineworlds and Picturehouses have temporarily closed, the delay of No Time To Die until 2021 has left cinemas that remain open in need of new releases – and so he decided to try his luck with his feature debut Philophobia.

He said: ‘It happened that it just created more space for us when cinemas decided to stay open.

The UK cinema industry was deeply disappointed when film bosses delayed the release of the 25th James Bond film for a second time - prompting two major chains to close down again temporarily

The UK cinema industry was deeply disappointed when film bosses delayed the release of the 25th James Bond film for a second time - prompting two major chains to close down again temporarily

The UK cinema industry was deeply disappointed when film bosses delayed the release of the 25th James Bond film for a second time – prompting two major chains to close down again temporarily

The film's director Guy Davies, 29, from Stroud, Gloucestershire, rang up cinemas across the country seeing if they would like to show his movie as many big producers are holding back their big releases or putting them online

The film's director Guy Davies, 29, from Stroud, Gloucestershire, rang up cinemas across the country seeing if they would like to show his movie as many big producers are holding back their big releases or putting them online

The film’s director Guy Davies, 29, from Stroud, Gloucestershire, rang up cinemas across the country seeing if they would like to show his movie as many big producers are holding back their big releases or putting them online

The low-budget movie is going to be shown in 50 cinemas and is loosely based on the writer-director's own life

The low-budget movie is going to be shown in 50 cinemas and is loosely based on the writer-director's own life

The low-budget movie is going to be shown in 50 cinemas and is loosely based on the writer-director’s own life

‘It’s worked out really well, I got a little bit frustrated or tired of trying to work the distribution process, we had offers but they weren’t necessarily going to be doing all the things I wanted to do with the film, so I thought “Why not?”

‘There is a space in the cinemas right now because studios are pulling their films out and we’ve got a film that has done well on the festival circuit, so I just thought I would have a crack.

‘I started with local cinemas because I was only trying to get four or five to be honest, and then once I had a few I thought maybe I should try and expand this so I went a little bit further afield.

‘Then once I got a few more I started receiving phone calls from cinema programmers saying ‘We have seen the trailer, it looks good, can we check it out?’, and it spread really quickly in matter of a few days after I got the first few.’

The film will now open in almost 50 cinemas around the UK, including in London’s Leicester Square.

He said: ‘I made a list of cinemas, starting with independent cinemas, that I thought would be good for the film, and scoured the internet for the contact details of the people who book the films and if I couldn’t find them I just rang the box office at the cinema and asked who to talk to.’

Davies has taken a DIY approach to everything about the movie, including securing funding.

He said: ‘The Stroud News And Journal have been incredibly supportive the entire way through this process.

Cinema owners hoped No Time To Die could save 2020 for the industry, but the film's producers decided to postpone its release for a second time

Cinema owners hoped No Time To Die could save 2020 for the industry, but the film's producers decided to postpone its release for a second time

Cinema owners hoped No Time To Die could save 2020 for the industry, but the film’s producers decided to postpone its release for a second time

Guy Davies said he wanted his film to be released in the cinema instead of streaming it online

Guy Davies said he wanted his film to be released in the cinema instead of streaming it online

Guy Davies said he wanted his film to be released in the cinema instead of streaming it online

‘I got in touch with them and they wrote a little piece saying I was doing this film, someone read it and got in touch and we went to a cafe and that is how I got my first chunk of money, and then I just went from there.

‘I made a list of local people that had some kind of influence or might know people that might want to invest and politely got in touch, but 90 per cent of the money was funded locally, maybe even 95 per cent per cent.’

While many films have skipped the theatrical release and gone straight to streaming, Davies said he was always determined to show his debut in cinemas.

‘It was important because it was my first film and it was shot for cinema, that is just what I did.

‘I really had cinemas in mind from the beginning, it was always part of the goal and I feel the film plays a lot better in cinemas because I made it for there.’

Philophobia is out now in UK cinemas.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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