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Statue of Scouts founder Lord Baden-Powell will be REMOVED from seafront

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statue of scouts founder lord baden powell will be removed from seafront

A seaside statue of Scout and Girl Guide founder Robert Baden-Powell is to be hauled down today after protesters branded him racist and homophobic as the campaign to remove approaching 80 historic monuments in Britain hurtles on.

Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole (BCP) Council leader Vikki Slade, a Liberal Democrat, says the statue on Poole Quay will be taken down and put in ‘safe storage’, adding that Dorset Police had advised its removal.

She said: ‘Whilst famed for the creation of the Scouts, we also recognise that there are some aspects of Robert Baden-Powell’s life that are considered less worthy of commemoration.

‘Therefore, we are removing the statue so that we can properly involve all relevant communities and groups in discussions about its future, including whether a more educational presentation of his life in a different setting might be more appropriate.’

Lord Baden-Powell was honoured with a statue in Poole 12 years ago because he founded the world Scout Movement that has helped tens of millions of children – and it looks out to Brownsea Island where he held the first Scout camp in 1907.

But critics have claimed he was enthusiastic about the fascism and Nazism, including Hitler’s Mein Kampf – although his supporters including his biographer Tim Jeal have said that it was more that he distrusted communism.

But there is some anger locally over the statue’s planned removal with local Tory MP Conor Burns tweeting: ‘The removal of the statue of Lord Baden Powell from Poole is a huge error of judgement. Very concerned by the idea it is on advice from @dorsetpolice. Urgent clarity needed. Put it back’. While Andrew Williams, the chairman of Poole Scout District Executive, revealed that nobody had contacted him and told the Bournemouth Echo newspaper that initially he thought it ‘must have been a hoax’. 

The ‘topple the racists’ campaign began on Sunday after Black Lives Matter supporters toppled the statue of slave trader Edward Colston in Bristol and threw it in the harbour. It was fished out by the city council at dawn today. 

Internationally-renowned Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital in London revealed yesterday it will consider whether to remove a statue of its founder Sir Thomas Guy – but will not change its name – as a senior minister backed a Black Lives Matter campaign. In the capital on Tuesday anti-racism protestors forced the removal of 18th Century slave dealer Robert Milligan from outside the Museum of London in West India Quay, Docklands.

As debate rages over the future of many of Britain’s most famous monuments, it has also emerged:

  • The statue of Edward Colston, which was toppled on Sunday and sparked the campaign, has been dragged from Bristol harbour; 
  • Oxford University’s vice-chancellor Prof Louise Richardson has claimed Nelson Mandela would not have taken a ‘simplistic solution to a complex problem’ like removing Cecil Rhodes’ statue from Oriel College;
  • ITV’s Saturday Night Takeaway latest TV show to be removed and hosts Ant and Dec issue apology for ‘impersonating people of colour’ as footage of those sketches are taken down;
  • In America Donald Trump has refused to rename Army bases linked to the Confederacy as Richmond’ Virginia’s statues of Jefferson Davis – former president of the Confederacy – is ripped down overnight; 
This statue of Scouting founder Robert Baden-Powell in Poole will be removed today after the local council said parts of his life are 'considered less worthy of commemoration' and police also advised it should be taken down

This statue of Scouting founder Robert Baden-Powell in Poole will be removed today after the local council said parts of his life are 'considered less worthy of commemoration' and police also advised it should be taken down

This statue of Scouting founder Robert Baden-Powell in Poole will be removed today after the local council said parts of his life are ‘considered less worthy of commemoration’ and police also advised it should be taken down

The statue of Edward Colston has been pulled out of the harbour by Bristol City Council this morning. Its removal on Sunday sparked the 'topple the racists' campaign

The statue of Edward Colston has been pulled out of the harbour by Bristol City Council this morning. Its removal on Sunday sparked the 'topple the racists' campaign

The statue of Edward Colston has been pulled out of the harbour by Bristol City Council this morning. Its removal on Sunday sparked the ‘topple the racists’ campaign

A 'hit list' of 78 statues and memorials to some of Britain's most famous figures has been created by an anti-racism group urging local communities to remove them because they 'celebrate racism and slavery'

A 'hit list' of 78 statues and memorials to some of Britain's most famous figures has been created by an anti-racism group urging local communities to remove them because they 'celebrate racism and slavery'

A ‘hit list’ of 78 statues and memorials to some of Britain’s most famous figures has been created by an anti-racism group urging local communities to remove them because they ‘celebrate racism and slavery’

The next in line? BLM supporters have pinpointed a list of their next targets, but the most widely shared are  (top left to bottom right) 1) Lord Nelson – tried to stop abolition (Nelson's column) 2) Sir Thomas Picton 3) Thomas Guy - London, Guy's Hospital 4) Sir Robert Peel 5) Sir Francis Drake 6) William Beckford 7) Henry Dundas 8) Clive of India 9) John Cass 10) General Sir Redvers Buller 11) Lord Kitchener 12) Ronald Fisher 13) Lord Grey - Grey's Monument - Newcastle Upon Tyne, Grainger Street 14) Oliver Cromwell – Statue - London, Houses of Parliament 15) Colin Campbell, Lord Clyde – Statue - Glasgow, George Square 16) William Ewart Gladstone 17) William Leverhulme – Statue - Wirral, outside Lady Lever Art Gallery 18) William Armstrong - Memorial - Newcastle Upon Tyne, Eldon Place 19) King James II – Statue - London, Trafalgar Square 20) General James George Smith Neill, Wellington Square, Ayr

The next in line? BLM supporters have pinpointed a list of their next targets, but the most widely shared are  (top left to bottom right) 1) Lord Nelson – tried to stop abolition (Nelson's column) 2) Sir Thomas Picton 3) Thomas Guy - London, Guy's Hospital 4) Sir Robert Peel 5) Sir Francis Drake 6) William Beckford 7) Henry Dundas 8) Clive of India 9) John Cass 10) General Sir Redvers Buller 11) Lord Kitchener 12) Ronald Fisher 13) Lord Grey - Grey's Monument - Newcastle Upon Tyne, Grainger Street 14) Oliver Cromwell – Statue - London, Houses of Parliament 15) Colin Campbell, Lord Clyde – Statue - Glasgow, George Square 16) William Ewart Gladstone 17) William Leverhulme – Statue - Wirral, outside Lady Lever Art Gallery 18) William Armstrong - Memorial - Newcastle Upon Tyne, Eldon Place 19) King James II – Statue - London, Trafalgar Square 20) General James George Smith Neill, Wellington Square, Ayr

The next in line? BLM supporters have pinpointed a list of their next targets, but the most widely shared are  (top left to bottom right) 1) Lord Nelson – tried to stop abolition (Nelson’s column) 2) Sir Thomas Picton 3) Thomas Guy – London, Guy’s Hospital 4) Sir Robert Peel 5) Sir Francis Drake 6) William Beckford 7) Henry Dundas 8) Clive of India 9) John Cass 10) General Sir Redvers Buller 11) Lord Kitchener 12) Ronald Fisher 13) Lord Grey – Grey’s Monument – Newcastle Upon Tyne, Grainger Street 14) Oliver Cromwell – Statue – London, Houses of Parliament 15) Colin Campbell, Lord Clyde – Statue – Glasgow, George Square 16) William Ewart Gladstone 17) William Leverhulme – Statue – Wirral, outside Lady Lever Art Gallery 18) William Armstrong – Memorial – Newcastle Upon Tyne, Eldon Place 19) King James II – Statue – London, Trafalgar Square 20) General James George Smith Neill, Wellington Square, Ayr

Who was Robert Baden-Powell and why is he a controversial figure? 

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29477534 8409331 image m 21 1591857986771

Lord Baden-Powell was honoured with a statue in Poole because he founded the world Scout Movement.

The man who became known as B-P was born Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell in London on 22 February, 1857, the son of an Oxford University professor.

B-P got his early education from his mother, but he later won a scholarship to Charterhouse School. At Charterhouse, he began to turn his attention to the great outdoors, hiding out in the woods around the school to track wildlife, and even catch and cook rabbits, being careful not to let the tell-tale smoke give his position away.

During the holidays, the young adventurer would head out with his brothers in search of adventure. On one occasion, they went sailing around the south coast of England. On another, they paddled up the the River Thames by canoe to its source. 

He joined the Army and in 1876, headed to India with his new regiment. As a young army officer, he specialised in scouting, map-making and reconnaissance, and soon began to train the other soldiers in what were essential skills for any soldier of the time.   

He became a national hero after the Second Boer War in South Africa when he was a Lieutenant-General and he and a small garrison of British troops defended the town of Mafeking from 5,000 Boer soldiers for 217 days until reinforcements arrived.

He arrived home in 1903 and began laying the ground work for the scouting movement, holding the first camp on Brownsea Island off Poole in 1907. Millions of children worldwide have benefitted from the scheme run mainly by volunteers.

But Baden-Powell was a controversial figure was said to be enthusiastic about the fascism which was spreading through Europe after World War I.

After visiting Italy in 1933, he wrote about Benito Mussolini and called him a ‘boy-man’ who had absorbed the Boy Scouts message and turned it into a nationalist youth movement.  

And if were up to him, the Boy Scouts may have formed close ties with Hitler Youth.

Baden-Powell also admired most of Hitler’s values and wrote in a 1939 diary entry that Mein Kampf was a ‘wonderful book with good ideas on education, health, propaganda, organisation etc’.    

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The campaign to tear down monuments in towns and cities across Britain gathered pace today as a ‘hit list’ of statues and memorials deemed to be ‘celebrating racism and slavery’ reached 78.

A website called ‘Topple The Racists’ has controversially identified dozens of landmarks from Sir Walter Raleigh Gilbert’s Bodmin Beacon to Lord Kitchener’s memorial in the Orkney Islands that they say need to be removed ‘so that Britain can finally face the truth about its past’.

Organisers have said they were inspired by the ‘direct action taken by Bristolians’, referring to the tearing down of slave trader Edward Colston’s statue on Sunday in the city, before it was thrown into the harbour.

In details showing how statues are chosen, the website says the hit list includes ‘cases where there is responsibility for colonial violence’, adding that ‘judgement calls’ had been on cases where history is more ‘complicated’.

Memorials to monarchs such as King Charles II and King James II make appearances on the list, as well as Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell.

Monuments have been targeted in 39 towns and cities, with 12 located in London, and six in Bristol. Five of the one in Bristol celebrate Colston, including two schools, a tower and a renowned music venue which is set to change its when it reopens in the autumn. 

Responding to the suggestions that some buildings built with the profits of the slave trade could be torn down, the group said they can ‘just be renamed’.

Boris Johnson’s Business and Industry Minister Nadhim Zahawi, who was born in Iraq and moved to the UK with his Kurdish parents aged nine, has since said there should be no statues of slave traders in Britain.

Mr Zahawi said they should not be torn down illegally like Edward Colston’s in Bristol, but said: ‘Any slave trader should not have a statue. But I wouldn’t be breaking the law to take statues down, it should be done through our democratic process. It should be up to local people to decide what they want to do. If the majority of people decide that we want the statues down, then they should be taken down’. 

There are at least five statues of two-time British prime minister Sir Robert Peel also under threat because his MP father, also called Robert Peel, campaigned for slavery to continue. His son is considered the father of the modern police, after setting up the Met as Home Secretary in 1829. Some BLM supporters are also angry because of his links to policing.  

Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital in London has revealed it will consider whether to remove a statue of its founder Sir Thomas Guy – but will not change its name – as a senior minister backed a Black Lives Matter campaign. Sir Thomas helped set up the hospital near London Bridge in 1721 having made his fortune in the 17th and 18th centuries as a major shareholder of a company selling slaves to the Spanish Colonies. 

Hospital bosses have welcomed Mayor of London Sadiq Khan’s review of statues and street names in the capital and said the future of its own monument to its founder outside the Guy’s building should be considered.  

A spokesman said: ‘We recognise and understand the anger felt by the black community and are fully committed to playing our part in ending racism, discrimination and inequality’, adding: ‘There are no plans to change the name of the hospital’.

The removal of a statue of the so-called ‘Tyrant of Trinidad’ Sir Thomas Picton from Cardiff city hall is nearing success as all of Labour’s 130 UK local authorities agreed to draw up a list of controversial statues in their communities which could be ripped down after Edward Colston’s was destroyed in Bristol on Sunday.  

Cardiff City Council’s leader Huw Thomas has backed the campaign to rip it down calling it an ‘affront’ to black people in the Welsh capital because he executed dozens of slaves. He was even put on trial in England for illegally torturing a 14-year-old girl – extremely rare at the turn of the 19th century – but after being convicted he successfully appealed. 

While noting Picton’s statue commemorated his part in the Napoleonic Wars and being the highest ranking officer to die at Waterloo, Councillor Thomas said: ‘The growing awareness and understanding of the brutal nature of his governorship of Trinidad and his involvement in slavery makes it, in my view, very difficult to reconcile his presence in City Hall’. 

A 25ft obelisk dedicated to him on the outskirts of Carmarthen town centre, which has been there since 1888, is also subject to a petition for removal. It stands on Picton Terrace, which also faces calls to be renamed.  

A statue of Sir Thomas Guy, sits outside Guy's Hospital,  which he founded in 1721 with £19,000 of his own money, equivalent to £2million today. Yesterday the NHS Trust admitted it would consider its removal in a review set up by Sadiq Khan demands it because he made his money from slavery. Former bookseller Thomas Guy made his fortune through the ownership of shares in the South Sea Company, which had a monopoly on trafficking slaves to Spain's colonies in South America in 1713

A statue of Sir Thomas Guy, sits outside Guy's Hospital,  which he founded in 1721 with £19,000 of his own money, equivalent to £2million today. Yesterday the NHS Trust admitted it would consider its removal in a review set up by Sadiq Khan demands it because he made his money from slavery. Former bookseller Thomas Guy made his fortune through the ownership of shares in the South Sea Company, which had a monopoly on trafficking slaves to Spain's colonies in South America in 1713

A statue of Sir Thomas Guy, sits outside Guy’s Hospital,  which he founded in 1721 with £19,000 of his own money, equivalent to £2million today. Yesterday the NHS Trust admitted it would consider its removal in a review set up by Sadiq Khan demands it because he made his money from slavery. Former bookseller Thomas Guy made his fortune through the ownership of shares in the South Sea Company, which had a monopoly on trafficking slaves to Spain’s colonies in South America in 1713

The next to fall? This tribute to Sir Thomas Picton in Cardiff City Hall is expected to fall after the council's leader also demanded its removal

The next to fall? This tribute to Sir Thomas Picton in Cardiff City Hall is expected to fall after the council's leader also demanded its removal

There are at least five statues of two-time British prime minister Sir Robert Peel also under threat because his MP father, also called Robert Peel, campaigned for slavery to continue. Sir Robery Peel is also known as the 'Father of Modern Policing' after he set up the Metropolitan Police Force in 1829.

There are at least five statues of two-time British prime minister Sir Robert Peel also under threat because his MP father, also called Robert Peel, campaigned for slavery to continue. Sir Robery Peel is also known as the 'Father of Modern Policing' after he set up the Metropolitan Police Force in 1829.

The next to fall? This tribute to Sir Thomas Picton in Cardiff City Hall is expected to fall after the council’s leader also demanded its removal.  There are at least five statues of two-time British prime minister Sir Robert Peel (right in Parliament Square) also under threat because his MP father, also called Robert Peel, campaigned for slavery to continue

An aerial view of the Sir Thomas Picton obelisk on Picton Terrace in Camerthen, Wales, which is also on the BLM supporters' hit list. Picton was known as the 'Tyrant of Trinidad' owing to his brutal regime as governor of the Caribbean island. In 1806 he was convicted of ordering the illegal torture of a 14-year-old girl, Louisa Calderon. A charge that was later overturned.

An aerial view of the Sir Thomas Picton obelisk on Picton Terrace in Camerthen, Wales, which is also on the BLM supporters' hit list. Picton was known as the 'Tyrant of Trinidad' owing to his brutal regime as governor of the Caribbean island. In 1806 he was convicted of ordering the illegal torture of a 14-year-old girl, Louisa Calderon. A charge that was later overturned.

An aerial view of the Sir Thomas Picton obelisk on Picton Terrace in Camerthen, Wales, which is also on the BLM supporters’ hit list. Picton was known as the ‘Tyrant of Trinidad’ owing to his brutal regime as governor of the Caribbean island. In 1806 he was convicted of ordering the illegal torture of a 14-year-old girl, Louisa Calderon. A charge that was later overturned.

Thomas Guy: The London bookseller who made his fortune through shares in slave trading firm… then sold them to found hospital in his name   

Former bookseller Thomas Guy made his fortune through the ownership of shares in the South Sea Company, which had a monopoly on trafficking slaves to Spain’s colonies in South America in 1713.

The British firm was created predominantly to sell enslaved people and had a target to trade 4,800 adult men every year.

Guy sold his shares in the company at the top of the market in 1720, letting £50,000 of stock go for more than £250,000 – the equivalent of £400million in modern-day prices.

Having created almshouses, he founded Guy’s Hospital close to this London birthplace with the aim of providing care to ‘incurables and lunatics’.

He died in 1724 and his will was so complex and so high in value that an Act of Parliament was needed to enact it, and he left nearly £220,000 to the hospital.

The bulk of his estate was left in trust to complete work on the hospital, while a further sum was set aside for the release of prisoners in the capital who owed debts.

In Edinburgh SNP city council leader Adam McVey said he would feel ‘no sense of loss’ if a statue to Henry Dundas, who delayed the abolition of slavery, was removed, amid mounting calls for action in the Scottish capital. 

Also in Scotland a memorial to General James George Smith Neill, which stands in Wellington Square, Ayr, is also under threat. General Neill served during the Indian rebellion of 1857 and accused of ordering the deaths of many Indians following the Bibighar massacre. 

Plymouth council said a public square named after slave trader Sir John Hawkins would be renamed while in nearby Exeter council chiefs will review the future of the city’s statue of General Buller, who is rumoured to have had a hand in the introduction of concentration camps seen during the Boer War. 

A debate has erupted over the legacy of 19th century prime minister Sir Robert Peel after those calling for his statues to be removed were accused of targeting the wrong man.

Lancashire-born Sir Robert, who is best known for founding the Metropolitan Police, is immortalised in a number of statues across the north of England and Scotland.

Five of these – in Leeds, Glasgow, Bury, Manchester and Preston – were included on a map of possible other targets following the toppling of the monument to Edward Colston in Bristol.

The Glasgow statue was daubed with graffiti at the weekend.

But many people have come to the two-time PM’s defence, suggesting anti-racist campaigners may have got the wrong Sir Robert.

References to him being a vocal opponent of the abolition of slavery because it threatened his fortune in the cotton trade appear to have confused him with his father, also called Sir Robert Peel.

At a press conference in Leeds on Wednesday, Leeds City Council leader Judith Blake said: ‘There seems to be now a recognition that there has been some misunderstanding about the Robert Peel whose statue is in Leeds and that it was actually his father who worked in the cotton trade.

The 78 ‘racist’ statues BLM supporters would like to be destroyed

 

1) Lord Kitchener, Orkney

2) Duke of Sutherland, Golspie

3) Jim Crow, Dunoon

4) Henry Dundas, Edinburgh

5) Lord Roberts, Glasgow

6) Thomas Carlyle, Glasgow

7) Sir Robert Peel, Glasgow

8) Colin Campbell, Glasgow

9) John Moore, Glasgow

10) James George Smith Neill, Ayr

11) William Armstrong, Newcastle

12) Captain James Cook, Great Ayton

13) Robert Peel, Bradford

14) Robert Peel, Leeds

15) Robert Peel, Preston

16) Robert Peel, Bury

17) Robert Peel, Manchester

18) Bryan Blundell, Liverpool

19) Christopher Columbus, Liverpool

20) Martin’s Bank, Liverpool

21) Admiral Nelson, Liverpool

22) William Leverhulme, Wirral

23) Henry Morton Stanley, St Asaph

24) Henry Morton Stanley, Denbigh

25) William Gladstone, Hawarden

26) Elihu Yale, Wrexham

27) Green Man, Ashbourne

28) Robert Clive, Shropshire

29) Robert Peel, Tamworth

30) Robert Peel, Birmingham

31) Ronald A Fisher, Cambridge

32) Cecil Rhodes, Bishops Stortford

33) Thomas Phillips, Brecon

34) General Nott, Carmarthen

35) Thomas Picton, Carmarthen

36) Henry Austin Bruce, Cardiff

37) Thomas Picton, Cardiff

38) Codrington Library, Oxford

39) Cecil Rhodes, Oxford

40) Edward Colston (school 1), Bristol

41) Edward Colston (school 2), Bristol

42) Edward Colston (statue), Bristol

43) Edward Colston (tower), Bristol

44) Edward Colston (hall), Bristol

45) George Alfred Wills, Bristol

46) William Beckford, London

47) Robert Geffrye, London

48) Francis Galton, London

49) King Charles II, London

50) King James II, London

51) Robert Clive, London

52) Oliver Cromwell, London

53) Robert Clayton, London

54) Henry De la Beche, London

55) Christopher Columbus, London

56) Thomas Guy (1/2), London

57) Thomas Guy (2/2), London

58) Robert Milligan, London

59) Francis Drake, London

60) Robert Blake, London

61) Admiral Nelson, London

62) Captain Edward August Lendy, London

63) East India Estate, London

64) Stephen Clark, London

65) Charles James Napier, London

66) Earl Mountbatten, London

67) Jan Smuts, London

68) Admiral Horatio Nelson, London

69) Lord Kitchener, Chatham

70) Edward Codrington, Brighton

71) William Ewart Gladstone, Brighton

72) Drax family, Wareham

73) Robert Baden-Powell, Poole

74) Redvers Buller, Exeter

75) Francis Drake, Tavistock

76) Walter Raleigh, Bodmin

77) Nancy Astor, Plymouth

78) Francis Drake, Plymouth  

‘It’s very interesting looking at comments over in the North West where he was born in Bury. There’s a really strong reaction that actually Robert Peel was a reformer and did do many things that have had a lasting impression and impact, not least establishing a police force that doesn’t carry arms.’

Mayor of Greater Manchester Andy Burnham said: ‘I think there is a feeling there is a misunderstanding here which is that his father had links to the slave trade rather than Peel himself, or the Peel who is commemorated in different places in Greater Manchester.

Dozens more monuments are expected to fall after all 130 Labour-led authorities in England, Wales and Scotland have come together to promise to ‘review the appropriateness of local monuments and statues on public land and council property’. 

The 130 Labour councils won the blessing of Sir Keir Starmer’s central party, but senior Tories have lined up to admonish the behaviour.

Andrew Rosindell, Conservative MP for Romford, told MailOnline the wave of statue scrutiny was being driven by ‘a politically-correct gang of anarchists who hate everything about this country’. 

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan is also conducting his own review of statues in the capital and believes all the city’s slave trader monuments should be axed.  

Campaigners have set their sights on statues on private property, such as the monument of Cecil Rhodes at Oxford University, where yesterday crowds of protesters rallied. 

A statue of the colonialist who claimed Bermuda as part of the British Empire has been vandalised amid anti-racism protests.

The word ‘murderer’ has been daubed across an information board next to the bronze figure of Sir George Somers in Lyme Regis, Dorset.

Somers discovered the island in 1609 after his ship, destined for Virigina, US, was blown off course by a hurricane.

He died there just a year later by which time the region had been claimed by the British Crown.

A bustling slave trade later emerged on the island in the 1640s.

By 1720 there were more than 3,500 slaves among a population of just 8,000 people.

Many have since argued that Somers’ discovery paved the way for slavery – which is believed to be why his statue has now been targeted.

Yet another 19th century statue – of the man who found lost explorer Dr David Livingstone in an African jungle looks set for the chop.

A petition to remove the statue of Sir Henry Stanley from the centre of Denbiegh in Wales – where he was born – has already attracted more than 1,500 signatures.

The tribute to Sir Henry was installed by Denbigh Town Council ten years ago and re-creates the moment he uttered the famous phrase – ‘Dr Livingstone, I presume?’ – when he found the explorer in East Africa in 1871.

There was criticism at the time amid claims that the 19th-century explorer was guilty of crimes against humanity and supported slavery.

Organiser Simon Jones said: ‘Out of respect to the Black Lives Matter campaign, the statue of Stanley should be removed from Denbigh town centre immediately.

‘He was known for his brutal treatment of Africans to the extent that he used to shoot black children from his boat to calibrate his rifle sights while sailing down river.

‘A statue to a man like that has no place in Welsh society in 2020. It is an insult to African people that it stands pride of place in the town.’ 

Black Lives Matter demonstrators were joined by a police chief constable taking the knee at a special event in memory of George Floyd.

Kent Police’s Alan Pughsley is believed to be the first top cop in the UK to kneel in solidarity with the 46-year-old’s death in Minneapolis, USA. 

Mr Pughsley was filmed performing the symbolic gesture at an event in Gravesend, Kent while other officers also joined the socially distanced group of more than 50 people.

Last night in London there was a commemoration event, organised by Stand Up To Racism, to mark George Floyd’s funeral in Houston, Texas, with police forming a ring of steel around statues including Sir Winston Churchill’s in case it is attacked again.

Workmen were yesterday seen uprooting a statue of Robert Milligan from its spot on West India Quay in London’s docklands to cheers from spectators. Protesters had drawn up a hit list of 60 ‘racist’ monuments to be taken down, including Milligan’s.

Amid growing pressure to act, the charity Canal and River Trust worked with the Museum of London and the London Borough of Tower Hamlets to remove the bronze figure of the Scottish merchant who owned 526 slaves at his Jamaican sugar plantation. 

Statues glorifying slave traders and colonialists have come into sharp focus in recent days, as part of a broader movement inspired by the Black Lives Matter protests that started in the United States following the death of George Floyd on May 25.

On Sunday, protesters in Bristol tore down the statue of slave trader Edward Colston and threw it in the harbour, receiving a mixed reactions of celebrations from anti-racism campaigners and protestors while some politicians and officials questioned the ‘anti-democratic’ manner in how the statue was taken down.

And in Oxford yesterday more than 1,000 demonstrators have demanded the removal of a statue of colonialist Cecil Rhodes, an imperialist who provided philanthropical support to Oriel College in Oxford University where the monument stands. 

The Canal and River Trust, which owns the land where Milligan’s statue is located, issued a statement on Twitter following a petition launched by Tower Hamlets Labour councillor Ehtasham Haque, which demanded the removal of the figure and reached over 1,000 signatures in 24 hours. 

Exeter City Council, a Labour authority, will review the future of the city's statue of General Redvers  Buller - who was linked to the introduction of concentration camps in the Boer War. The Old Etonian was awarded the Victoria Cross in the Zulu War after rescuing a number of comrades under fire, before being promoted to the Head of the Army and sent to South Africa at the outbreak of the Boer War in 1899.

Exeter City Council, a Labour authority, will review the future of the city's statue of General Redvers  Buller - who was linked to the introduction of concentration camps in the Boer War. The Old Etonian was awarded the Victoria Cross in the Zulu War after rescuing a number of comrades under fire, before being promoted to the Head of the Army and sent to South Africa at the outbreak of the Boer War in 1899.

Exeter City Council, a Labour authority, will review the future of the city’s statue of General Redvers  Buller – who was linked to the introduction of concentration camps in the Boer War. The Old Etonian was awarded the Victoria Cross in the Zulu War after rescuing a number of comrades under fire, before being promoted to the Head of the Army and sent to South Africa at the outbreak of the Boer War in 1899. 

The word 'murderer' has been daubed across an information board next to the bronze figure of Sir George Somers in Lyme Regis, Dorset. Sir Somers was English privateer who claimed the English colony of Bermuda, also known as the Somers Isles.

The word 'murderer' has been daubed across an information board next to the bronze figure of Sir George Somers in Lyme Regis, Dorset. Sir Somers was English privateer who claimed the English colony of Bermuda, also known as the Somers Isles.

The word ‘murderer’ has been daubed across an information board next to the bronze figure of Sir George Somers in Lyme Regis, Dorset. Sir Somers was English privateer who claimed the English colony of Bermuda, also known as the Somers Isles.

The equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington with a traffic cone on his head and wearing a face mask in Glasgow

The equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington with a traffic cone on his head and wearing a face mask in Glasgow

The equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington with a traffic cone on his head and wearing a face mask in Glasgow

A Black Lives Matter campaigner hugs a police officer following a march from Green Park to Trafalgar Square in London today

A Black Lives Matter campaigner hugs a police officer following a march from Green Park to Trafalgar Square in London today

A BLM campaigner hugs a police officer

A BLM campaigner hugs a police officer

A Black Lives Matter campaigner hugs a police officer following a march from Green Park to Trafalgar Square in London

The 130 Labour councils considering whether they should pull down imperialist statues

Majority Labour  

Amber Valley. Barking and Dagenham. Barnsley. Barrow-in-Furness. Bassetlaw. Birmingham.  Blackburn with Darwen. Blackpool. Bradford. Brent. Bristol. Bury. Calderdale. Cambridge. Camden. Cardiff. Chesterfield. Chorley. Copeland. Corby. Coventry.  Crawley. Croydon. Doncaster. Durham. Ealing. Enfield. Exeter. Gateshead. Gedling. Gravesham.  Greenwich. Hackney. Halton. Hammersmith and Fulham. Haringey. Harlow. Harrow. Hastings. High Peak. Hounslow. Hyndburn. Ipswich. Islington. Kingston upon. Hull. Kirklees. Knowsley. Lambeth. Leeds. Leicester. Lewisham. Lincoln. Liverpool. Luton. Manchester. Merton. Neath. Port Talbot. Newcastle upon Tyne. Newham. Newport. North Tyneside. Norwich. Nottingham. Oldham. Oxford. Plymouth. Preston. Reading. Redbridge. Rhondda Cynon Taf.  Rochdale. Rossendale. Rotherham. Salford. Sandwell . Sefton.  Sheffield. Slough. South Tyneside. Southampton. Southwark.  St Helens. Stevenage. Sunderland. Swansea. Tameside. Telford and Wrekin. Tower Hamlets. Trafford. Wakefield. Waltham Forest.  Warrington. West Lancashire. Wigan. Wolverhampton.

Labour in coalition

Cannock Chase. Cheshire East. Cheshire West and Chester. Cumbria. Dumfries and Galloway. East Lothian. Flintshire. Inverclyde. Lancaster. Lewes. Mansfield. Midlothian. Milton Keynes. North Ayrshire. North Hertfordshire. North Lanarkshire. North Somerset  Nuneaton and Bedworth. Pembrokeshire. Pendle. Rother. Scarborough. South Ayrshire. Southend-on-Sea. Stirling. Stockport. Stockton-on-Tees. Stroud. Swale. Thanet. Vale of Glamorgan. Waverley West Lothian. Wirral. Wyre Forest.

It earlier said: ‘We recognise the wishes of the local community concerning the statue of Robert Milligan at London Docklands and are committed to working with London Borough of Tower Hamlets, the Museum of London Docklands and partners at Canary Wharf to organise its safe removal as soon as possible.

‘The Trust stands with out waterside communities against racism. We promote equality, diversity and inclusion, using our canals to enrich the lives of all those alongside our waterways from every community.’ 

A video shows people cheering and clapping as workers used a crane to remove the statue from its plinth. 

‘While it’s a sad truth that much of our city and nation’s wealth was derived from the slave trade, this does not have to be celebrated in our public spaces,’ said London Mayor Sadiq Khan in a tweet with a photo of the statue. 

John Biggs, the mayor of Tower Hamlets, posted a video of himself at the scene, in which he says: ‘This has become the focus of a lot of anxiety and anger in our community. We need to take it, put it into storage and then talk about what we can learn from this and how we can help these events to make us a stronger community.’ 

Meanwhile, a spokesman for the Museum of London said it ‘recognises that the monument is part of the ongoing problematic regime of white-washing history, which disregards the pain of those who are still wrestling with the remnants of the crimes Milligan committed against humanity.’ 

The commemorative statue, sculpted by Richard Westmacott, was commissioned by the West India Dock Company, of which Milligan was Chairman, following his death in May 1809. He also has a street in the area named after him, Milligan Street, near Westferry DLR station.

The museum also tweeted: ‘The statue presently stands shrouded with placards and is now an object of protest, we believe these protests should remain as long as the statue remains.’ 

The decision follows huge crowds of Black Lives Matter supporters gathering outside Oriel College at the University of Oxford last night to campaign for a monument of imperialist Cecil Rhodes to be removed.

The demonstration was organised by the Rhodes Must Fall campaign group and came after activists identified 60 UK statues they want removed for ‘celebrating slavery and racism’ as councils and museums rushed to bring down their controversial monuments.

Some of Briton’s most famous people on the hit list include the Edinburgh statue of former Home Secretary Henry Dundas, who delayed the abolition of slavery, and a statue of Sir Francis Drake on Plymouth Hoe. 

The interactive map, called ‘topple the racists’, was set up by the Stop Trump Coalition in support of the Black Lives Matter movement, and lists plaques and monuments in more than 30 towns and cities across the UK. The online list is unregulated and can be added to by the public. 

Who is Nadhim Zahawi, the Iraqi-born minister saying slave trader statues should not exist

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29457690 8405641 image a 10 1591811325503

Nadhim Zahawi was born in Baghdad to Kurdish parents in 1967. Under threat of persecution from Saddam Hussein’s regime, his family immigrated to the UK when he was nine. He grew up in Sussex and was educated at King’s College School in West London and University College London where he studied Chemical Engineering.

In 2000 he founded YouGov, a leading market research company which has since become famous for the accuracy of its political polling. Having started life in an office in Mr Zahawi’s garden shed, YouGov now employs over 400 people on three continents. He floated the company on the London Stock Exchange in 2005 and was named Entrepreneur of the year by Ernst & Young in 2008.

In January 2010 he stood down from YouGov to run for election as Member of Parliament for Stratford-on-Avon. Upon winning the seat, he was elected to the Business, Innovation and Skills Select Committee, which scrutinises the impact of government policy on business.

In 2011 he co-authored Masters of Nothing with fellow MP and now Health Secretary Matt Hancock, detailing an account of the human behaviour behind the banking crash and offering policy recommendations designed to prevent a future crisis.

In January 2018 then Prime Minister Theresa May appointed him as Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department for Education.

Mr Zahawi was appointed as Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on 26 July 2019.

He was previously Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department for Education from 9 January 2018 to 26 July 2019.

Continuing his career in politics he was later elected as Conservative MP for Stratford-on-Avon in May 2010.

At last night’s Oxford protest, organisers placed chalk crosses on the floors in either side of the street outside the entrance to the college, to enforce social distancing. 

The crowd took to their knees for eight minutes 46 seconds, to reflect the time Mr Floyd, a father-of-two, spent with a police officer kneeling on his neck which killed him in America last month. 

Hours before the rally began Oxford City Council’s leader Susan Brown wrote to Oriel College inviting them to apply for planning permission to remove the statue, after 26 councillors signed a letter saying it is ‘incompatible’ with the city’s ‘commitment to anti-racism’.

Councillor Brown said: ‘Typically such actions are only allowed in the most exceptional of circumstances. But these are exceptional circumstances, and as a city council we are keen to work with Oriel to help them find the right balance between the laws that protect our historic buildings and the moral obligation to reflect on the malign symbolism of this statue.’ 

Oriel College has said it will ‘continue to debate’ the issue – but did not commit to removing it.

Ndjodi Ndeunyema, an Oxford University law student and a former Rhodes scholar, organised las night’s Oxford rally after starting the Rhodes Must Fall campaign for its removal five years ago, and said: ‘The statue remaining is an affront on the university’s support for movements such as Black Lives Matter. 

‘Rhodes is not worth of veneration or glorification because of the racism and subjugation he represents’.  

Protesters also packed into Leicester city centre last night during another evening of demonstrations against racism.

It comes as the University of Leicester has increased its efforts to ‘decolonise the curriculum’ in subjects like English, history and law in recent months – and it is launching a scheme to recruit more BAME academics in teaching roles.

Professor Nishan Canagarajah, vice-chancellor of the university, said: ‘It is about a sense of belonging in the university. That comes from having students who are diverse, from having staff who are diverse, and from having a curriculum that is diverse.

‘It’s not something you can easily fix because I think the students have certain perceptions and that’s not going to change overnight.

‘They see certain universities as not welcoming for them. That may not be true, but that might be what they have been feeling since they were very young.

‘I think if you go and visit Oxford and places like Bristol you will think they’re welcoming for ethnic minorities, but there is a gap between that reality and what the community outside perceives them to be, as not really representing them. I know these universities are taking a lot of action to address that.

More than half (52%) of students are from a BAME background at the University of Leicester but currently only 14.2% of teaching staff and 9.8% of professors are from a BAME background. 

BLM had their first success last night after the Museum of London and Tower Hamlets Council agreed to remove a statue of Robert Milligan, a slave trader and plantation owner, from Docklands

BLM had their first success last night after the Museum of London and Tower Hamlets Council agreed to remove a statue of Robert Milligan, a slave trader and plantation owner, from Docklands

BLM had their first success last night after the Museum of London and Tower Hamlets Council agreed to remove a statue of Robert Milligan, a slave trader and plantation owner, from Docklands

Member of the public Graham Newby leaves a sign that reads 'Leave her alone who as ever done this hang your head in shame' on a statue of Queen Victoria in Woodhouse Moor, Leeds

Member of the public Graham Newby leaves a sign that reads 'Leave her alone who as ever done this hang your head in shame' on a statue of Queen Victoria in Woodhouse Moor, Leeds

Member of the public Graham Newby leaves a sign that reads ‘Leave her alone who as ever done this hang your head in shame’ on a statue of Queen Victoria in Woodhouse Moor, Leeds

Graffiti on a statue of Robert Viscount Melville in Edinburgh - who delayed the abolition of slavery -  as the city council leader said he would not be unhappy if it want

Graffiti on a statue of Robert Viscount Melville in Edinburgh - who delayed the abolition of slavery -  as the city council leader said he would not be unhappy if it want

Graffiti on a statue of Robert Viscount Melville in Edinburgh – who delayed the abolition of slavery –  as the city council leader said he would not be unhappy if it want

A Winston Churchill statue has been vandalised at Woodford Green in North London

A Winston Churchill statue has been vandalised at Woodford Green in North London

A Winston Churchill statue has been vandalised at Woodford Green in North London

Oxford University chancellor Chris Patten accuses Cecil Rhodes statue protesters of ‘hypocrisy’ because imperialist’s trust funds scholarships for 20 African students a year 

Lord Chris Patten, who has no power to remove the Rhodes statue, located at Oxford University's Oriel College, said a trust set up after the mining magnate's death pays for the education of more than a dozen African students at the prestigious each year

Lord Chris Patten, who has no power to remove the Rhodes statue, located at Oxford University's Oriel College, said a trust set up after the mining magnate's death pays for the education of more than a dozen African students at the prestigious each year

Lord Chris Patten (pictured left), who has no power to remove the Rhodes statue (pictured right), located at Oxford University’s Oriel College, said a trust set up after the mining magnate’s death pays for the education of more than a dozen African students at the prestigious each year.

The chancellor of Oxford University has hit out at the ‘hypocrisy’ around protests to remove a statue of imperialist Cecil Rhodes.

Lord Chris Patten, who has no power to remove the Rhodes statue, located at Oxford University’s Oriel College, said a trust set up after the mining magnate’s death pays for the education of more than a dozen African students at the prestigious university each year.

But he also called for a ‘sensible discussion’ over the removal of Rhodes’ statue, which has become a focal point amid continuing anti-racism protests from the Black Lives Matter movement – who at the weekend toppled a statue of slave trader Edward Colston in Bristol. 

Meanwhile, concern continues that Oriel College chiefs may be reluctant to remove the statue over fears they face the loss of millions of pounds in funding, as revealed by a leaked report in 2016.  

Commenting on the protests, Lord Patten, who was the last Governor of Hong Kong from 1992 to 1997 and Chairman of the Conservative Party from 1990 to 1992,  told BBC Radio Four’s Today Programme: ‘Firstly I am very pleased the demonstrations were peaceful and secondly I don’t make the decision on whether the statue comes down’.

The university has launched a £1.5 million annual scheme to create three funded PhD studentships and ten postgraduate scholarships to attract students from BAME backgrounds into academia.

And from this year, the English BA at Leicester has been changed to include more diverse texts and authors set and written in countries across the world.

The reading list now includes Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin, Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys and NW by Zadie Smith.

A history teacher who was standing opposite the Cecil Rhodes statue revealed he had travelled from London to ‘guard it’ as he felt that it should not be brought down.

The 32-year-old, who did not want to give his name, said: ‘I am here to make sure they do not tear it down. I am a history teacher and about seven years ago I went to the grave of Cecil Rhodes in Zimbabwe after sitting with the Matabele chiefs.

The teacher wore a tweed suit and a fedora hat, while clutching a paperback copy of a book called ‘1066 and all that’ behind his back.

He added: ‘Accounts of Cecil Rhodes that are being printed are one-sided and while I definitely think a plaque or something would be a good idea, we do not tear things down and we certainly do not do it without due process. I am going to talk to my school about the monuments and the children will debate the legacy and the history.

‘If you dig into most of the statues in London, you get some pretty horrible things. I do not suppose that tearing things down just because 2,000 people ask for it is in any way correct.’

The teacher watched as a woman organiser began to speak though a megaphone and chanted ‘down with the king of the blood diamond’ and ‘take it down’ which the crowd of several hundred people echoed.

She said: ‘It is about time you started to listen to the people of this city and not your funders. We want this statue down. We declare ourselves anti-racist and we do not want this statue in our city. It does not reflect our own views, it does not reflect our values.’

Sadiq Khan has called for the removal of all slave trader statues in the capital as he promised to personally ‘review and improve’ the diversity of the capital’s landmarks. The Mayor of London has launched his own Commission for Diversity in the Public Realm after Black Lives Matter protesters pulled down the monument to Edward Colston in Bristol and hurled it in the city’s harbour.

Mayor Khan said he wouldn’t ‘pre-empt’ the commission’s findings on the suitability of London’s street names, murals, statues and memorials, but admitted he would like any statues of slave traders removed in London and to build more ‘people of colour, black people, women, those from the LGBT community’. 

The Queen Victoria Statue in Woodhouse Moor Park in Leeds, West Yorkshire which has had 'Black Lives Matter', 'BLM' and 'Slave Owner' spray painted on it. Queen Victoria became the British monarch in 1837, four years after the Abolition of Slavery Act.

The Queen Victoria Statue in Woodhouse Moor Park in Leeds, West Yorkshire which has had 'Black Lives Matter', 'BLM' and 'Slave Owner' spray painted on it. Queen Victoria became the British monarch in 1837, four years after the Abolition of Slavery Act.

The Queen Victoria Statue in Woodhouse Moor Park in Leeds, West Yorkshire which has had ‘Black Lives Matter’, ‘BLM’ and ‘Slave Owner’ spray painted on it. Queen Victoria became the British monarch in 1837, four years after the Abolition of Slavery Act. 

Black Lives Matter and 'slave owner' were among the phrases daubed on the statue of Queen Victoria in Woodhouse Moor Park in Leeds before being removed

Black Lives Matter and 'slave owner' were among the phrases daubed on the statue of Queen Victoria in Woodhouse Moor Park in Leeds before being removed

Black Lives Matter and ‘slave owner’ were among the phrases daubed on the statue of Queen Victoria in Woodhouse Moor Park in Leeds before being removed

Who are the men behind the statues BLM activists want to tear down

Cecil Rhodes

Where is his statue?

A 4ft statue of Rhodes stands outside Oriel College at Oxford university

Who was he?

Cecil Rhodes (1853 – 1902) was the Former Prime Minister of the Cape Colony, the modern day South Africa. He was a British supremacist, imperialist, mining magnate, and politician in southern Africa who drove the annexation of vast swathes of Africa.

What did he do?

The bad

• Colonised much of Southern Africa for Victorian Britain and established a vast new British territory in Rhodesia, today’s Zimbabwe and Zambia

• Rhodes believed that the British were ‘the first race in the world, and that the more of the world we inhabit the better it is for the human race’

• He secured control of Rhodesia by swindling the king of Matabeleland, and showed scant regard for his African employees, whom he dismissed as ‘n***ers’

• Founded De Beers mining company, trading diamonds mined with slave labour

The good

• Established Rhodes Scholarships, which paid for brilliant young students from former British possessions to study at Oxford, among them the former U.S. President Bill Clinton and former Australian Prime Minister, Tony Abbott  

Thomas Guy

Where is his statue?

Outside Guy’s Hospital in London, England

Guy was founder of Guys’ Hospital, London. He made his fortune through ownership of a very large amount of shares in the South Sea Company, whose main purpose was to sell slaves to the Spanish Colonies. The South Sea Company supplied 4800 slaves each year for 30 years to Spanish plantations in Central and Southern America

What did he do ?

The bad

• He bought £42,000 shares in the South Sea Company, amassing a fortune when he sold them in 1720

• The South Sea Company supplied 4800 slaves each year for 30 years to Spanish plantations in Central and Southern America

The good

• He became a governor of St Thomas’ Hospital, after building three wards

• He later opened Guy’s Hospital opposite St Thomas’ which cost him £19,000

• In his will Guy bequeathed financial support for prisoners with debt in London, Middlesex and Surrey to be released

William Beckford – Slave owner and politician

Where is his statue? In the Guildhall in London

William Beckford (1709-1770) was born in Jamaica, the son Peter Beckford, one of the most powerful slave-owners of the colonial era.

Peter had purchased sugar plantations on the Caribbean island in 1661, where he also served as Speaker of the legislature. When both Peter and William’s elder brother – also Peter – died, he inherited the enormous fortune and estate which included 13 plantations and over 1,000 slaves.

By the time of his death, Beckford’s plantations were raking in over £50,000 each year and he is estimated to have amassed £1million in the bank – an eye-watering sum in 18th century Britain.

In the early 1700s he returned to London and used his riches to buy the sprawling Fonthill estate in Wiltshire, which he stuffed with art and expensive furniture.

The house burned down in 1755, but Beckford poured money and resources into rebuilding it. He later embarked on a political career and was elected as an MP in 1754 before serving twice as Lord Mayor of London in 1762 and 1769.

Beckford also used his money to bankroll the rise of future prime minister William Pitt the Elder and ferociously lobbied in favour of the West Indies sugar industry. In 1758, when Pitt was in the cabinet, Beckford advised him to attack the French in the island of Martinique because of the lucrative haul of slaves they could capture.

Beckford had nine children, eight of which were out of wedlock. The only son he had with his wife, Maria Marsh, was the novelist William Thomas Beckford.  Despite enslaving scores of men, at home he banged the drum for liberties, and once even answered back to King George after he arrested notorious critic John Wilkes.

What did he do?

• Inherited and oversaw 13 sugar plantations and more than 1,000 slaves in Jamaica.

• Campaigned for civil liberties as an MP and in 1770 demanded the King dissolve parliament to remove evil ministers.

But he said he did not think statues such as of Sir Winston Churchill’s in Parliament Square should be included in the review it was tagged with ‘racist’ on Sunday. He said Londoners needed to be educated about famous figures ‘warts and all’ and that ‘nobody was perfect’, including the likes of Churchill, Gandhi and Malcolm X.   

The leader of Oxford City Council has invited Oriel College to make a planning request to remove the statue of imperialist Cecil Rhodes, which has been at the centre of a long-running row.

Councillor Susan Brown said: ‘I’m clear in my support for the Black Lives Matter movement and I have a great deal of sympathy with the Rhodes Must Fall campaign. The question of statues and their historical context is not a simple matter, but sometimes acts of symbolism are important. I know my views are shared by a majority of my fellow councillors.

‘It would be better for the statue to be placed in a museum, such as the Ashmolean or the Museum of Oxford, to ensure this noteworthy piece of the story of our city isn’t lost to history.

‘Of course, bringing down statues alone isn’t sufficient to address the issue of racism in our society and continued action on this should involve all our city’s key institutions.

‘I have written to Oriel College to invite them to apply for planning permission to remove the statue, as it is a Grade II* listed building’.

In 2016, Oriel College decided to keep the statue despite widespread student demands to remove it. Campaigners from the Rhodes Must Fall group argued that the row illustrated Britain’s ‘imperial blind spot’.

In a statement ahead of the protest, Oriel College pledged to discuss the issues raised by protests against the Rhodes statue. 

The statement read: ‘Oriel College abhors racism and discrimination in all its forms. 

‘The Governing Body are deeply committed to equality within our community at Oriel, the University of Oxford and the wider world.

‘As an academic institution we aim to fight prejudice and champion equal opportunities for everyone regardless of race, gender, sexuality or faith. We believe Black Lives Matter and support the right to peaceful protest.

‘The power of education is a catalyst for equality and inclusiveness. 

‘We understand that we are, and we want to be, a part of the public conversation about the relationship between the study of history, public commemoration, social justice, and educational equality. 

‘As a college, we continue to debate and discuss the issues raised by the presence on our site of examples of contested heritage relating to Cecil Rhodes.

‘Speaking out against injustice and discrimination is vital and we are committed to doing so. 

‘We will continue to examine our practices and strive to improve them to ensure that Oriel is open to students and staff of all backgrounds, and we are determined to build a more equal and inclusive community and society.’

Monuments that could be under threat in London would include statues of William Beckford at London’s Guildhall, John Cass on Jewry Street and one Thomas Guy, which stands in the courtyard at Guy’s Hospital. 

Campaigners are targeting statues all over the UK including a Edinburgh statue of Henry Dundas, who delayed the abolition of slavery in Scotland, while in Glasgow Barclays Bank has confirmed the ‘Buchanan’ name will be dropped from a major riverside development over its connection with the slave trade.

The Sir Francis Drake statue on Plymouth’s Hoe, where he was playing bowls when he learned Britain was set to be invaded by the Spanish Armada in 1588, is also said to be under threat after BLM supporters set up a ‘topple the racists’ website mapping more than 30 statues and monuments organisers claim ‘celebrate slavery and racism’.  

Sadiq Khan said he ‘hopes’ the new Commission for Diversity in the Public Realm will recommend some memorials in the capital should be removed.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, the Mayor of London: ‘One of the things that I realise is that I’ve not got ownership of the statutes or indeed some of the land that these statues are on. But it is a wider conversation I want to have about the diversity of the public realm in our city.

‘When you look at the public realm – street names, street squares, murals – not only are there some of slavers that I think should be taken down, and the commission will advise us on that, but actually we don’t have enough representation of people of colour, black people, women, those from the LGBT community.’ 

But critics have called his approach ‘distracting and divisive’, with Shaun Bailey, Tory candidate for Mayor of London ,saying: ‘He [Mayor Khan] is seeking to distract Londoners from the fact he failed to support his police service during the protests, allowing a small group to hijack a largely peaceful protest and betray the cause of fairness that the vast majority were there to promote. He should be focusing on keeping all Londoners safe and promoting opportunities for all people of colour’.  

Andrew Rosindell, MP for Romford, told MailOnline: ‘I think the Mayor of London should be focusing on issues that matter to Londoners. Like the bankrupt TFL, the recent crime wave and many other issues.

‘Ripping down our history is not something the Mayor was elected to do. Our history is who we are and you can find something bad in everything, be it prime ministers or anyone. 

‘The idea of going around London tearing down statues and renaming streets is absurd.

‘He is pandering to a politically correct gang of anarchists who hate everything about this country – they are anti-British.’

City Hall called London ‘one of the most diverse cities in the world’, but said the capital’s statues, plaques and street names largely reflect Victorian Britain. 

Football hooligans and far-Right activists call for ‘ring of steel’ around Churchill and Cenotaph this weekend as Tommy Robinson slams ‘soft-handed police’

Police fear far-Right thugs could descend on London this weekend to take on anti-racism protesters, with football hooligans planning counter-protests to ‘defend’ memorials and statues.

The Democratic Football Lads Alliance, founded in 2017 with a supposed aim of opposing terrorism, has urged members to defend war memorials at Whitehall this Saturday from midday.

It urged people to ‘defend what our war heroes done for this country and their honour’, with members expected to gather by the Winston Churchill statue and the Cenotaph. 

And former English Defence League leader Tommy Robinson called for opposition protests in a two-minute video in which he accused police of being ‘soft-handed’ at Black Lives Matters marches.

Black Lives Matter protesters clash with opponents next to the Winston Churchill statue in Westminster yesterday. The clashes follow week-long protests across the world in response to the death to George Floyd in America.

Black Lives Matter protesters clash with opponents next to the Winston Churchill statue in Westminster yesterday. The clashes follow week-long protests across the world in response to the death to George Floyd in America.

Black Lives Matter protesters clash with opponents next to the Winston Churchill statue in Westminster yesterday. The clashes follow week-long protests across the world in response to the death to George Floyd in America.

The Democratic Football Lads Alliance, founded in 2017 with a supposed aim of opposing terrorism, urged members to defend monuments

The Democratic Football Lads Alliance, founded in 2017 with a supposed aim of opposing terrorism, urged members to defend monuments

The Democratic Football Lads Alliance, founded in 2017 with a supposed aim of opposing terrorism, urged members to defend monuments

Former English Defence League leader Tommy Robinson

Former English Defence League leader Tommy Robinson

Robinson called for opposition protests in a two-minute video in which he accused police of being 'soft-handed' at BLM marches

Robinson called for opposition protests in a two-minute video in which he accused police of being 'soft-handed' at BLM marches

Former English Defence League leader Tommy Robinson called for opposition protests in a two-minute video in which he accused police of being ‘soft-handed’ at BLM marches

Mr Newby cleans graffiti from the statue of Queen Victoria at Woodhouse Moor in Leeds

Mr Newby cleans graffiti from the statue of Queen Victoria at Woodhouse Moor in Leeds

Mr Newby cleans graffiti from the statue of Queen Victoria at Woodhouse Moor in Leeds

He accused officers of failing to act because there were ‘too many people who aren’t white’.

Ken Marsh, chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, said: ‘We have got the perfect storm ahead of us this weekend, we have got planned protests and now Tommy Robinson and his agitators.’

Several football ‘firms’ plan further demonstrations. A group of Millwall fans spent part of yesterday guarding the statue of Churchill in Parliament Square. 

Other fans from as far as Cardiff and Blackpool also descended on London and said they were prepared to use force to prevent vandalism.

The Democratic Football Lads Alliance has urged members to defend monuments, but Hope Not Hate chief executive Nick Lowles said ‘their real objective’ is simply violence.

The plans echo a ‘Unite the Right’ rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017, when neo-Nazis clashed with counter-demontrators over plans to remove a statue of General Robert E. Lee, the American Confederate. It culminated with a white supremacist ramming his car into a crowd, killing a woman and injuring 19.

Black Lives Matter activists in Britain have compiled a list of 60 ‘racist statues’ they want removed for ‘celebrating slavery’.

Coventry City fans sit under the Lady Godiva statue at Broadgate Square yesterday to celebrate promotion into the Championship after the League One season was ended early

Coventry City fans sit under the Lady Godiva statue at Broadgate Square yesterday to celebrate promotion into the Championship after the League One season was ended early

Coventry City fans sit under the Lady Godiva statue at Broadgate Square yesterday to celebrate promotion into the Championship after the League One season was ended early

As protests continue to grow over monuments linked to colonialism, hundreds of demonstrators surrounded an Oxford college last night demanding a monument to Cecil Rhodes be torn down.

Protesters gathered in Oxford High Street kneeling for eight minutes and 46 seconds – the time George Floyd had a white police officer kneeling on his neck which led to his death in Minneapolis.

The crowd chanted ‘take it down’ as police stood guard at the entrance to Oriel College.

Rally organiser Ndjodi Ndeunyema, a law student and former Rhodes scholar whose education has been partially funded by a trust set up by the 19th century colonialist, said: ‘The statue remaining is an affront on the university’s support for movements such as Black Lives Matter. 

A man holds a cross with an England flag on top of it as police guard the statue of Winston Churchill at Parliament Square yesterday afternoon

A man holds a cross with an England flag on top of it as police guard the statue of Winston Churchill at Parliament Square yesterday afternoon

A man holds a cross with an England flag on top of it as police guard the statue of Winston Churchill at Parliament Square yesterday afternoon

‘Rhodes is not worthy of veneration or glorification because of the racism and subjugation he represents’.

Elsewhere, vandals in Leeds targeted a memorial to Queen Victoria, daubing the word ‘slave owner’ on the plinth even though she was crowned four years after the abolition of slavery.

Last night a Downing Street spokesman urged police to make their own decisions about whether to intervene if protesters try to pull down statues.

It comes after officers stood by while a statue of Edward Colston was thrown into Bristol harbour.

Racists or heroes? It’s not black or white: Black Lives Matter want to topple statues of some of the most famous Britons because of their links to colonialism and slavery – but they also gave fortunes away, and helped build Britain and a modern world 

ByMilly Vincentand Jack Elsom For Mailonline


Black Lives Matter activists are calling for the removal of 60-plus statues of slave owners and racists across Britain.

Top of their target list is the statue of Cecil Rhodes and petitions also exist to remove the statue of slave-trading West India Docks founder Robert Milligan, and the statue of former Home Secretary Henry Dundas who delayed the abolition of slavery and that stands atop a column in Edinburgh.

But on a website called Topple The Racists, set up by Black Lives Matter activists, members are invited to propose other statues that should be torn down across Britain.

There, a wide range of figures from Britain’s colonial past are being proposed for destruction.

Among them are leaders who held undeniably racist views and others who performed evil acts against people of colour, such as slave owners and Thomas Picton who ruled Trinidad with an iron fist and ordered the torture of a 14-year-old accused of theft.

But others also played a leading role shaping the cities and institutions that form modern day Britain.

The statues targeted by BLM activists are: 

Cecil Rhodes

Cecil Rhodes (1853 - 1902)

Cecil Rhodes (1853 - 1902)

A 4ft statue of Rhodes stands outside Oriel College at Oxford university.

A 4ft statue of Rhodes stands outside Oriel College at Oxford university.

Cecil Rhodes (1853 – 1902). A 4ft statue of Rhodes stands outside Oriel College at Oxford university

Where is his statue?

A 4ft statue of Rhodes stands outside Oriel College at Oxford university. 

Who was he?

Cecil Rhodes (1853 – 1902) was the Former Prime Minister of the Cape Colony, the modern day South Africa. He was a British supremacist, imperialist, mining magnate, and politician in southern Africa who drove the annexation of vast swathes of Africa.

What did he do?

The bad:

  • Colonised much of Southern Africa for Victorian Britain and established a vast new British territory in Rhodesia, today’s Zimbabwe and Zambia
  • Rhodes believed that the British were ‘the first race in the world, and that the more of the world we inhabit the better it is for the human race’ 
  • He secured control of Rhodesia by swindling the king of Matabeleland, and showed scant regard for his African employees, whom he dismissed as ‘n***ers’ 
  • Founded De Beers mining company, trading diamonds mined with slave labour

The good:

• Established Rhodes Scholarships, which paid for brilliant young students from former British possessions to study at Oxford, among them the former U.S. President Bill Clinton and former Australian Prime Minister, Tony Abbott  

Who wants the statue removed?

University of Oxford campaigners claim that forcing ethnic minority students to walk past the Rhodes memorials amounts to ‘violence’ as he helped pave the way for apartheid. 

Robert Milligan

Robert Milligan (1746-1809) was a Scottish merchant and slave owner. His statue stands at West India Quay outside the Museum London Docklands

Robert Milligan (1746-1809) was a Scottish merchant and slave owner. His statue stands at West India Quay outside the Museum London Docklands

Robert Milligan (1746-1809) was a Scottish merchant and slave owner. His statue stands at West India Quay outside the Museum London Docklands

Where is his statue?

West India Quay outside the Museum London Docklands, where it has stood since 1997 after being moved from its original plinth nearby in 1813. 

Who was he?

Robert Milligan (1746-1809) was a Scottish merchant and slave owner. He was born in Dumfries, Scotland, but soon moved to Kingston, Jamaica, where he managed his wealthy family’s sugar plantations.

He returned to London in 1779 where he became instrumental in the construction of the West India Docks on the Isle of Dogs. According to the inscription on the bronze statue’s plinth, it was to Milligan’s ‘genius, perseverance and guardian care’ that the docks owed their ‘design, accomplishment and regulation’.

From the Docks, ships would sail to West Africa where shipowners such as Milligan bought enslaved Africans.

The ships then crossed the seas to the Caribbean to buy sugar, rum and coffee before returning to England.

At the time of his death in 1809, 526 slaves were registered on Milligan’s Jamaican plant called Kellet’s and Mammee Gully.

What did he do?

The Bad:

  • Used slaves to amass great wealth through trade
  • Was a vocal opponent of the abolition of slavery 

The good:

  • Built London’s docks: Pooled together a group of wealthy businessmen to create the West India Docks which brought in shiploads of produce to England 

Who wants the statue removed?

 Tower Hamlets councillor Ehtasham Haque has started a petition for the statue of Robert Milligan to be removed from Canary Wharf. He said: ‘He has no place in London, and he does not deserve the honour of a statue’.

Horatio Nelson 

Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson was a British flag officer in the Royal Navy known for inspirational leadership. Nelson's column, Trafalgar Square, London (right)

Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson was a British flag officer in the Royal Navy known for inspirational leadership. Nelson's column, Trafalgar Square, London (right)

Nelson's column, Trafalgar Square, London

Nelson's column, Trafalgar Square, London

Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson (1758 – 1805) was a British flag officer in the Royal Navy known for inspirational leadership. Nelson’s column, Trafalgar Square, London (right)

Where is the statue?

Nelson’s column, Trafalgar Square, London has not been targeted. But another statue of Nelson has been at Deptford Town Hall, a department at Goldsmiths University, London.  

Who is he? 

Horatio Nelson was born in a Norfolk rectory in 1758, and secured his first command 20 years later through the influence of his uncle, who was a senior naval officer. The outbreak of the French Revolutionary Wars opened the way for a long succession of triumphs, the earliest taking place in the Mediterranean, where he was blinded in his right eye. He distinguished himself commanding HMS Captain at the 1797 Battle of Cape St Vincent against a larger Spanish force off the coast of Portugal, and mislaid his right arm in the unsuccessful action at Santa Cruz de Tenerife. In the following year, he commanded a British fleet in the first of his historic victories at the Battle of the Nile.

Nelson’s reputation — for personal courage, aggression and tactical brilliance — won him the adoration of his captains and indeed crews. In 1801, he secured another victory, this time over the Danes, at Copenhagen, bequeathing to folklore the story that he ignored an order to withdraw by putting a telescope to his blind eye to read the flag signal. He subsequently commanded fleets involved in a blockade of French ships in Toulon harbour, and in unsuccessful pursuit of the French and Spanish fleets to the West Indies.

Only on October 21, 1805, did he finally bring the enemy to battle off Spain’s Cape Trafalgar, which became his greatest victory and secured Britain against invasion by the vast army Napoleon had assembled on the Channel coast. At Trafalgar and in the actions that immediately followed, the French and Spanish lost 24 ships of the line, more than Nelson commanded when he engaged. He was shot down by a sharpshooter in the tops of the French Redoubt-able, and died three hours later.

However some believe Nelson was a white supremacist, citing Nelson’s friendships with West Indian slave traders, and his description of the ideals of abolitionist William Wilberforce as ‘a damnable and cruel doctrine’.  

Nelson’s finest John Sugden, believes Nelson was exemplarily kind to black sailors who did good service on his ships, and in 1802 wrote another letter in support of a proposal by one of his own officers to employ free Chinese labour in the West Indies instead of slaves. 

What did he do ? 

The good: 

  • Secured victory for the British in the Battle of Trafalgar, the greatest naval victory in British history 
  • The greatest British naval hero ever to have lived 

The bad:

  •  He described of ideals of abolitionist William Wilberforce as ‘a damnable and cruel doctrine’  

Who wants the statue removed? 

Goldsmiths Anti-Racist Action student group.

Sir Robert Peel 

Sir Robert Peel (1788 - 1850), served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Sir Robert Peel (1788 - 1850), served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Statues of Sir Robert Peel stand in London's Parliament Square, Glasgow's George Square, Bury and Manchester's Piccadilly Gardens

Statues of Sir Robert Peel stand in London's Parliament Square, Glasgow's George Square, Bury and Manchester's Piccadilly Gardens

Sir Robert Peel (1788 – 1850), served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (left). Statues of Sir Robert Peel stand in London’s Parliament Square (right), Glasgow’s George Square, Bury and Manchester’s Piccadilly Gardens

Where is the statue?

Statues of Sir Robert Peel stand in London’s Parliament Square, Glasgow’s George Square, Bury and Manchester’s Piccadilly Gardens. 

Who wants the statue removed? 

Several petitions have been started by locals in Manchester – both to keep and remove the statue. 

Who is he? 

Sir Robert Peel (1788 – 1850), served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and is regarded as the father of modern British policing having founded the Metropolitan Police Service. He is also a founder of the The Conservative Party. 

Black Lives Matter activists have targeted statues of the former Prime Minister due to his father’s involvement with the slave trade. A petition to remove Peel’s statue in central Manchester was started by Sami Pinarbasi, who said Sir Robert is a ‘icon of hate and racism’.

His father Sir Robert Peel, 1st Baronet, (1750 – 1830), was a British politician, industrialist and textile manufacturer. He amassed wealth through industry and became one of ten known British millionaires in 1799. However to ‘protect the cotton industry’ in Manchester Peel petitioned against the Foreign Slave Trade Abolition Bill.    

 What did he do ?

Good:

  • Issued the Tamworth manifesto in 1834, laying down the founding principles for Britain’s modern day Conservative party 
  • Regarded as the father of British policing, founding Metropolitan Police in 1829  – and was against having an armed police force
  • Pushed the Catholic Emancipation Bill through parliament in 1828, reducing restrictions placed on Roman Catholics – but said ‘though emancipation was a great danger, civil strife was a greater danger’
  • Supported the repeal of The Corn Laws (1815) to help provide food during the Irish Potato Famine (1845 – 1852) 
  • Brought in The Factories Act 1844, to regulate conditions of industrial employment  

 Bad:

  • His father petitioned against the Foreign Slave Trade Abolition Bill as he viewed it as a ‘threat’ to cotton industry in Manchester, he presented petition May 1806  

Robert Clive

Robert Clive was an East India Company officer

Robert Clive was an East India Company officer

His statue stands in Shrewsbury Square and King Charles Street, London (pictured)

His statue stands in Shrewsbury Square and King Charles Street, London (pictured)

Robert Clive (left) was an East India Company officer whose statue stands in Shrewsbury Square and King Charles Street, London (pictured right)

Where is the statue?  

His statue stands in Shrewsbury Square and King Charles Street, London.  

Who is he? 

Robert Clive was an East India Company officer who helped Britain seize control of much of the subcontinent in the mid-18th century and was hailed back in Westminster for delivering important military victories without formal field training.

But his reputation was muddied by his spell as Governor of Bengal from 1755 when he faced accusations of corruption.

Amid a fierce backlash to his rule in India, as well as sliding health, he took his own life in 1767.

At the time of his death, Clive’s fortune was worth about £500,000 – around £33million today.

What did he do ?  

The bad: 

  • Conquered Bengal at the Battle of Plassey, and helped himself to £160,000 from the defeated Nawab’s treasury
  • Caused the Bengal famine of 1770 with his taxes on Indians and changes to agricultural practices that killed an estimated 10 million Indians
  • Amassed a personal fortune by conquering Bengal and subjugating the population
  • Paved the way for the British Raj in India which ruled the subcontinent for 200 years

Who wants the statue removed?

Two petitions started by locals including David Parton call for the Shrewsbury Square statue to be removed.

Sir Thomas Picton

Sir Thomas Picton (1758 - 1815) a military officer who enjoyed a prolific career before being killed at the Battle of Waterloo.

Sir Thomas Picton (1758 - 1815) a military officer who enjoyed a prolific career before being killed at the Battle of Waterloo.

His statue inside Cardiff City Hall

His statue inside Cardiff City Hall

Sir Thomas Picton  (1758 – 1815) (left) a military officer who enjoyed a prolific career before being killed at the Battle of Waterloo. His statue Inside Cardiff City Hall (right)

Where is the statue?

Inside Cardiff City Hall

Who wants his statue removed?

Cardiff Lord Mayor Daniel De’Ath asked the council to remove the state in an open letter which has received support from council leader Huw Thomas.  

Who was he?

A military officer who enjoyed a prolific career before being killed at the Battle of Waterloo. He was the Governor of Trinidad from (1797–1803).

What did he do?

The bad:

  • Known as the ‘tyrant of Trinidad’ for his ‘arbitrary and brutal’ rule of the island
  • His motto was ‘let them hate so long as they fear’
  • Ordered the torture of a 14-year-old girl accused of theft

The good:

  • Highest ranking officer killed fighting with Wellington at Waterloo 

Sir Francis Drake  

Sir Francis Drake (1540 - 1596) was an English admiral and renowned Elizabethan seaman who circumnavigated the globe

Sir Francis Drake (1540 - 1596) was an English admiral and renowned Elizabethan seaman who circumnavigated the globe

A statue of Sir Francis Drake at Plymouth Hoe Bowling Club, Devon

A statue of Sir Francis Drake at Plymouth Hoe Bowling Club, Devon

Sir Francis Drake (1540 – 1596) was an English admiral and renowned Elizabethan seaman who circumnavigated the globe. His statues stand on Plymouth Hoe and in Tavistock, respectively

Where is the statue?

Two identical statues memorialise Drake, on Plymouth Hoe and in Tavistock, respectively.

 Who wants his statue removed?

A petition to Plymouth City Council claiming to be in support of Black Lives Matter, has amassed over 1,000 signatures.

Who was he?

Sir Francis Drake (1540 – 1596) was an English admiral and renowned Elizabethan seaman who circumnavigated the globe.

He spent much of his career plundering ports in South America and the Carribean, particularly those owned by the Spanish, who branded him a pirate.

He was knighted for his efforts and made Vice Admiral of the Navy where he was instrumental during the successful defence of the Spanish Armada in 1588.

What did he do?

The good: 

  • Successfully fended off invasion from the Spanish fleet in 1588 as the Navy’s Vice Admiral
  • Was the first captain to complete circumnavigation of the globe in a single voyage
  • Marauded Spanish ports and ransacked goods to bring back to England, for which he was hailed a hero

The bad:

  • His early voyages aboard his cousin John Hawkins’s ships to fetch African slaves before selling them on in Europe
  • In 1562 the pair sailed from Plymouth with three ships and captured about 400 Africans in Guinea, later trading them in the West Indies
  • Drake and Hawkins are believed to have enslaved around 1,400 Africans between 1562 and 1967

Henry Dundas

Henry Dundas (1742 – 1811) was a Conservative politician, Scottish Advocate and the first Secretary of State for War

Henry Dundas (1742 – 1811) was a Conservative politician, Scottish Advocate and the first Secretary of State for War

His state, 150ft high, on the top of the Melville Monument in St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, Scotland

His state, 150ft high, on the top of the Melville Monument in St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, Scotland

Henry Dundas (1742 – 1811) was a Conservative politician, Scottish Advocate and the first Secretary of State for War (left). His state, 150ft high, on the top of the Melville Monument in St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, Scotland

Where is the statue?

On the top of the Melville Monument in St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, Scotland.

Who wants his statue removed? 

A petition to the Scottish government was started by Nancy Barrett last week. She proposes Dundas street should be re-named after Joseph Knight, a Scottish-Jamaican slave who won a court case and then an appeal in 1778 to free himself, by proving that slavery didn’t exist in Scots Law.

Who was he? 

Henry Dundas (1742 – 1811) was a Conservative politician, Scottish Advocate and the first Secretary of State for War – he is best known for delaying the abolition of slavery in 1792.  

During his time as Home Secretary Dundas proposed that slavery be abolished in ‘three stages’ over a decade, which prolonged the suffering and cost thousands of lives. 

He gained the nickname of ‘The Great Tyrant’ which he lived up to when he was caught misusing public money in 1806 and impeached.      

What did he do?

The bad: 

  • Dundas proposed that slavery be abolished in ‘three stages’ over a decade, which prolonged the suffering and cost thousands of lives  
  • Blocked British reformer William Wilberforce’s efforts to abolish the slave trade
  • He was influential in the expansion of British Influence in India  the affairs of the East India Company     

The good: 

  • Instrumental in the encouragement of the Scottish Enlightenment – a period of intellectual and scientific accomplishments 

Thomas Guy

A statue of Thomas Guy is seen outside Guy's Hospital on June 08, 2020 in London, England

A statue of Thomas Guy is seen outside Guy's Hospital on June 08, 2020 in London, England

A statue of Thomas Guy is seen outside Guy’s Hospital on June 08, 2020 in London, England

Where is the statue?

 Outside Guy’s Hospital, in London, England.

Who wants the statue removed? 

He was named on the Topple The Racists’ site.

 Who is he? 

Thomas Guy (1644 – 1724) was a British bookseller, stock speculator, governor of St Thomas’ Hospital and founder of Guys’ Hospital, London – which he built with profits of the slave trade.

He made his fortune through ownership of a very large amount of shares in the South Sea Company, whose main purpose was to sell slaves to the Spanish Colonies.

The South Sea Company was responsible for the transportation of around 64,000 enslaved Africans between 1715 and 1731 to Spanish plantations in Central and Southern America.

After selling his shares in South Sea Company at the peak of their value, Guy used his massive fortune to establish Guy’s Hospital for ‘the poorest and sickest of the poor’ in London.  

What did he do ? 

The bad:   

  • He bought £42,000 shares in the South Sea Company, amassing a fortune when he sold them in 1720
  • The South Sea Company supplied 4800 slaves each year for 30 years to Spanish plantations in Central and Southern America 

The good:

  • He became a governor of St Thomas’ Hospital, after building three wards
  • He later opened Guy’s Hospital opposite St Thomas’ which cost him £19,000

Sir John Cass 

Sir John Cass (1661- 1718) was a merchant, politician and Alderman. His statue stands outside London Metropolitan University (pictured June 8)

Sir John Cass (1661- 1718) was a merchant, politician and Alderman. His statue stands outside London Metropolitan University (pictured June 8)

Sir John Cass (1661- 1718) was a merchant, politician and Alderman. His statue stands outside London Metropolitan University (pictured June 8)

Where is the statue? 

Outside London Metropolitan University.

Who wants the statue removed? 

He is named on the Topple The Racists’ site.

Who is he? 

Sir John Cass (1661- 1718) was a merchant, politician and Alderman for the ancient London ward of Portsoken, in 1711 was elected a Sheriff of London and later knighted.

Cass was responsible for helping the slave trade to establish across the Atlantic. He dealt with slave agents in the African forts and Caribbean. He also founded an educational charity, Sir John Cass’s Foundation, which still exists to this day.

Cass was a member of the Court of Assistants of the Royal African Company between 1705 and 1708 and bequeathed shares in the Royal African Company on his death. 

The Royal African Company was established by Royal  Charter under King Charles II. It gave a monopoly to the on trading in Slaves from ports in West. British slave trader Edward Colston played a large part in the running of the company.

What did he do? 

The bad:

  • Helped to establish slave trade deals across the Atlantic with slave agents in the African forts and Caribbean  
  • Cass was a member of the Court of Assistants of the Royal African Company between 1705 and 1708 

 The good: 

  • He founded an educational charity, Sir John Cass’s Foundation for 50 boys and 40 girls in the City of London, which still exists to this day 
  • He was Alderman for the ancient London ward of Portsoken, elected a Sheriff of London in 1711 and was knighted in 1712

William Beckford  

William Beckford (1709-1770) was a Slave owner and politician. His statue stands In the Guildhall in London (pictured)

William Beckford (1709-1770) was a Slave owner and politician. His statue stands In the Guildhall in London (pictured)

William Beckford (1709-1770) was a Slave owner and politician. His statue stands In the Guildhall in London (pictured)

Where is his statue?

In the Guildhall in London.

 Who wants his statue removed?

He is named on the Topple The Racists’ site. 

Who was he? 

William Beckford (1709-1770) was a Slave owner and politician. He was born in Jamaica, the son Peter Beckford, one of the most powerful slave-owners of the colonial era.

Peter had purchased sugar plantations on the Caribbean island in 1661, where he also served as Speaker of the legislature.

When both Peter and William’s elder brother – also Peter – died, he inherited the enormous fortune and estate which included 13 plantations and over 1,000 slaves.

By the time of his death, Beckford’s plantations were raking in over £50,000 each year and he is estimated to have amassed £1million in the bank – an eye-watering sum in 18th century Britain.

In the early 1700s he returned to London and used his riches to buy the sprawling Fonthill estate in Wiltshire, which he stuffed with art and expensive furniture.

The house burned down in 1755, but Beckford poured money and resources into rebuilding it.

He later embarked on a political career and was elected as an MP in 1754 before serving twice as Lord Mayor of London in 1762 and 1769.

Beckford also used his money to bankroll the rise of future prime minister William Pitt the Elder and ferociously lobbied in favour of the West Indies sugar industry.

In 1758, when Pitt was in the cabinet, Beckford advised him to attack the French in the island of Martinique because of the lucrative haul of slaves they could capture.

Beckford had nine children, eight of which were out of wedlock. The only son he had with his wife, Maria Marsh, was the novelist William Thomas Beckford.

Despite enslaving scores of men, at home he banged the drum for liberties, and once even answered back to King George after he arrested notorious critic John Wilkes.

What did he do?

The good: 

  • Campaigned for civil liberties as an MP and in 1770 demanded the King dissolve parliament to remove evil ministers  

The bad: 

  • Inherited and oversaw 13 sugar plantations and more than 1,000 slaves in Jamaica
  • In 1758 Beckford advised Pitt to attack the French in the island of Martinique because of the lucrative haul of slaves they could capture 

General Sir Redvers Buller

General Sir Redvers Buller (1839 -1908) was an aristocratic Army officer

General Sir Redvers Buller (1839 -1908) was an aristocratic Army officer

His statue stands near St David's Church in Exeter, Devon

His statue stands near St David's Church in Exeter, Devon

General Sir Redvers Buller (1839 -1908) was an aristocratic Army officer (left). His statue stands near St David’s Church in Exeter, Devon

Where is the statue?

Near St David’s Church in Exeter, Devon.  

Who was he?

General Sir Redvers Buller (1839 -1908) was an aristocratic Army officer who had a long career subduing colonial Africa, particularly in the Zulu and Boer wars.  

What did he do?

The bad:

  • Ruthlessly defeated the Zulu people in what is now modern day South Africa
  • Rumoured to have helped set up African concetration camps for prisoners during the Boer War

The good:

  • Won the Victoria Cross by rescuing two fellow officers during a pitched battle in the Zulu War 

Who wants to remove the statue?   

He is named on the Topple The Racists’ site.

Lord Kitchener

Lord Horatio Kitchener (1850-1916) was a renowned Field Marshall and Secretary of State for War

Lord Horatio Kitchener (1850-1916) was a renowned Field Marshall and Secretary of State for War

His statue stands on Khartoum Road in Chatham, Kent, where he was Earl

His statue stands on Khartoum Road in Chatham, Kent, where he was Earl

Lord Horatio Kitchener (1850-1916) (left) was a renowned Field Marshall and Secretary of State for War. His statue stands on Khartoum Road in Chatham, Kent, where he was Earl (right)

Where is the statue?

A bronze statue of Kitchener atop a his favourite horse, Democrat is located on Khartoum Road in Chatham, Kent, where he was Earl.  

Who is he? 

Lord Horatio Kitchener (1850-1916) was a renowned Field Marshall and Secretary of State for War who commanded British troops in several imperial conflicts.

He is well known for appearing on WW1 recruitment posters along with the call to arms: ‘Your country needs YOU’.

What did he do?

The good:

  • Won the Battle of Omdurman in 1898 and securing the Sudan for the British 
  • Amassed the biggest volunteer army ever in Britain during the First World War
  • Commanded British troops in Egypt, where the controller-general branded Kitchener ‘the most able soldier’ he had ever known

The bad:

  • Kitchener masterminded the use of concentration camps to imprison Boers during the Second Boer War in South Africa at the turn of the 20th century
  • Thousands of men, women and children died in these horrific prisons, many from disease and starvation

Who wants his statue removed?

Kitchener’s statue is named as a target on the website Topple The Racists. 

William Ewart Gladstone

William Ewart Gladstone (1809 – 1898) served as a Liberal British Prime Minister for 12 years

William Ewart Gladstone (1809 – 1898) served as a Liberal British Prime Minister for 12 years

A plaque celebrates Gladstone at the Royal Albion Hotel, Brighton

A plaque celebrates Gladstone at the Royal Albion Hotel, Brighton

William Ewart Gladstone (1809 – 1898) served as a Liberal British Prime Minister for 12 years. A plaque celebrates Gladstone at the Royal Albion Hotel, Brighton (right)

Where is the statue?

A plaque celebrates William Ewart Gladstone at the Royal Albion Hotel, Brighton.  

Who is he? 

William Ewart Gladstone (1809 – 1898) served as a Liberal British Prime Minister for 12 years, across four terms from 1868 to 1894.

He was involved in claims that his father was one of the largest owners of slaves in the Caribbean as well as a driving figure of the West India lobby. 

His father Sir John, the owner of large sugar plantations in the Caribbean, was compensated with the equivalent of about £83 million today after slavery was abolished in 1833. 

The bad: 

  • Gladstone supported the Slave Compensation Act 1837, an act which payed compensation for slave-owners but nothing to newly liberated people
  • He supported the system of apprenticeship which required slaves to continue labouring for former masters for four to six years in exchange for provisions 

The good:

  • Championed political reform, home rule for Ireland and working-class rights
  • Campaigned against the excesses of British imperialism 

Who wants his statue removed?

Gladstone’s plaque is named as a target on the website Topple The Racists.

Sir Henry De La Beche

Sir Henry De La Beche was a renowned geologist and paleontologist in the 19th century

Sir Henry De La Beche was a renowned geologist and paleontologist in the 19th century

Sir Henry De La Beche was a renowned geologist and paleontologist in the 19th century

Where is the statue?

Inside Imperial College, where several buildings are named after him too. 

Who wants the statue removed?

Students at Imperial College have long been campaigning to remove him, and he is named on the Topple Racism website.  

Who was he?

Sir Henry De La Beche (1796 – 1855) was a renowned geologist and paleontologist in the 19th century, he founded the Geological Survey of Great Britain.

The bad:

  • Owned plantations in Jamaica where slaves were used

The good:

  • Organised the first geological survey of Great Britain
  • Mapped the Jurassic and Cretaceous fossils of Devon and Cornwall 

Ronald Fisher  

Ronald Fisher (1890 - 1962) was a mathematician and geneticist who is viewed as the father of modern statistics

Ronald Fisher (1890 - 1962) was a mathematician and geneticist who is viewed as the father of modern statistics

A stained glass window in the dining hall of Caius College, Cambridge, commemorates Fisher

A stained glass window in the dining hall of Caius College, Cambridge, commemorates Fisher

Ronald Fisher (1890 – 1962) was a mathematician and geneticist (left) A stained glass window in the dining hall of Caius College, Cambridge, commemorates Fisher (right)

Where is the statue?

A stained glass window in the dining hall of Caius College, Cambridge, commemorates Fisher. 

Who is he? 

Ronald Fisher (1890 – 1962) was a mathematician and geneticist who is viewed as the father of modern statistics.

He was also a pioneer in evolutionary theories and helped revive Darwinism in the 20th Century.

One of the ‘finest minds of his era’, Fisher held academic posts at University College London and Cambridge.

The bad: 

  • Fisher’s fascination of genetics led him to discover eugenics, of which he became an advocate
  • He also held staunch views on race and in the aftermath of WW1 criticised UNESCO for trying to coordinate a united condemnation of racism, stating his belief that races differed  

 The good 

  • In 1925 he published Statistical Methods for Research Workers which popularised the ‘p-value’, now widely used in research to calculate probabilities
  • Fisher publicly acknowledged the link between lung cancer and smoking

Who wants to remove it? 

 The window is on a list of targets featured on the Topple the Racists website.

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Secret diary of the Queen’s first confidante Alathea Fitzalan Howard

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secret diary of the queens first confidante alathea fitzalan howard
Alathea Fitzalan Howard ecame a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court

Alathea Fitzalan Howard ecame a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court

Alathea Fitzalan Howard ecame a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court

Alathea Fitzalan Howard was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II after her parents separated. 

There she became a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court. 

1940 

Sunday, January 21 

LiLibet [Princess Elizabeth, aged 13 and living with her family at Royal Lodge in Windsor] rang up to ask me to skate. She, [Princess] Margaret and the King picked me up in the car and we drove to the lake. Queen came down and watched. Played hockey with about six other people — policemen and chauffeurs etc from Royal Lodge. Great fun. Lilibet is so much nicer by herself than at Guides. 

Wednesday March 20 

[At] Royal Lodge we all dragged an old garden cart down to the rubbish heap below the vicarage and filled it with old iron etc and dragged it back to the garden (the detective helping)! then we played charades indoors. Margaret’s rather silly but she’s very sweet. Lilibet’s stopped wearing socks. Crawfie [governess Marion Crawford] kissed me goodbye! Heavenly day. 

Monday, May 6 

The princesses came to tea today. Nasty damp day but we went out and played in the garden till about six, then came in and did two charades, which were great fun. Friday, may 10 Hitler invaded Holland and Belgium at 3am! 

Tuesday, May 14 

The princesses have moved to Windsor [Castle] for greater safety. Somehow it does feel lonely to know they’re not next door.  

Friday, June 7 

Lilibet and Margaret and Crawfie met me at the door and we walked down to the guardroom for tea with some officers. enormous tea — cakes galore, ices, cherries, with which we had competitions. once Lilibet and I looked at each other and nearly laughed. Lilibet and Margaret for the first time (that I’ve seen) weren’t dressed alike. 

Monday, June 17 

Heard that France has given in, so now we are left to face Germany alone. Naturally if we are beaten we must all hope for death as our only release. 

Tuesday, July 2 

I went to the York Hall for a rehearsal of the concert on Saturday. Lilibet will tap dance in ‘An Apple For the teacher’ (she’s the teacher). Margaret is in it too. they both play the piano on the stage and then Margaret is the Dormouse in the Mad Hatter’s tea Party. it’s very good, but everyone I’ve met says it’s making them much too cheap. they really shouldn’t do it. they ought to get up little plays of their own with their friends but not dance with all the evacuees like this. 

Saturday, July 13 

Crawfie was in a bad mood. I think she’s rather cross because I borrowed her purse last week for the programme money and now can’t remember what i have done with it. the princesses were rather cross too, because Lilibet played the piano badly and the curtain fell on Margaret’s head!

Thursday, August 15 

We all drew outside. Afterwards, i tidied as usual in Lilibet’s room and she told me her silk stockings cost eight and six. typical! 

Sunday, August 25 

I went to bed about ten and was in the middle of praying when three terrible explosions shook my windows. We all went down to the cellar amid more bombs and guns. 

Tuesday, August 27 

Biked to the Castle with hiking things. We were divided into two [Guides] groups with Lilibet and me in charge. We made a fire and cooked sausages on sticks. 

Monday, September 23 

Biked to the Castle for tea. We all listened to the King’s speech on the wireless in the nursery and knitted. 

Tuesday, October 1 

At nine o’clock [a] time bomb went off [nearby]. I lay in speechless horror watching my walls rock violently from side to side. i know that people in the future will read about this war and look upon it in horror as comparable only to the French or Russian Revolutions and they will pity the generation whose youth was wasted by it. 

Princess Elizabeth (pictured left) reads to her sister Princess Margaret and Jane the corgi by a window in Windsor Castle. Princess Elizabeth is the future Queen Elizabeth II of England.

Princess Elizabeth (pictured left) reads to her sister Princess Margaret and Jane the corgi by a window in Windsor Castle. Princess Elizabeth is the future Queen Elizabeth II of England.

Princess Elizabeth (pictured left) reads to her sister Princess Margaret and Jane the corgi by a window in Windsor Castle. Princess Elizabeth is the future Queen Elizabeth II of England.

Saturday, November 9

[Alathea was staying at the castle for the weekend.] I played a French game with L and M and Monty [French governess Mrs Montaudon-Smith], then we all had lunch with the K and Q and household. then L and M, Crawfie and I went out in the rain and messed about till the Queen joined us, when we gave some scarves to some soldiers, then unblocked a stream. M pushed me into some barbed wire, tearing my good stocking! us three had tea with the K and Q and afterwards played [card game] Racing Demon with the Queen. At seven L and i went to our baths. L and i had supper in our night things in the nursery. At about eight, L and I and Bobo [nursery maid Margaret MacDonald] walked down to their shelter, miles away. L and M sleep on two bunks on top of each other (M on top) and Mrs Knight [nanny] on a bed in the same room. I was put in an adjoining room. M made us laugh a lot. The K and Q looked in on me to say good night. 

Sunday, November 10 

Came up from the shelter at a quarter to eight and dressed. Lunch 1.15. Two Eton boys came, the Spencer boy [later Earl Spencer, father of Princess Diana] and another. L and I had to make conversation to [sic] them! Afterwards L, M and I went for a long walk in the Home Park with the K and Q and ran into the Archbishop of Canterbury. tea with them and cards with the Q again after. She was very chatty to me. I simply love her. bath then supper. Marched down to the shelter again complete with apples, clocks, books, etc! I left the door open to talk and I went into [the princesses’] room twice to get something and they came into mine when an emergency [light] came on in my room. M made me die with laughter by asking me if I thought L and her and myself were pretty! We went to sleep after the news, about 9.15, as we bring the wireless down. 

Monday, November 11 

We Got up soon after 7.30 and went upstairs through miles of icy cold corridors and staircases. Lovely cheerful nursery breakfast. In that Castle, with its gilded rooms and red corridors, there is an atmosphere of happy family life that I myself have never known. 

Sunday, November 17 

I do want more than anything in the world to be a lady-in-waiting when i grow up, but I should like always to be Lilibet’s friend whatever happens. 

Tuesday, December 3 

Lilibet’s hair is worse now that it is curled than before, I think, because she’s got it in little flat curls close to her head all round the back, very tight in front. 

Tuesday, December 21 

Lilibet did shortbread [at Guides], and I did bread pudding. Lilibet actually likes washing-up and does more of it than the rest of us put together! I much prefer needlework, which L hates! 

Alathea Fitzalan Howard documents her life after was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II

Alathea Fitzalan Howard documents her life after was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II

Alathea Fitzalan Howard documents her life after was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II

1941 

Thursday, March 6 

Lilibet, M and i set off for the Red Drawing Room, where we were joined by three Grenadier officers. then all the RAF officers filed by, shaking hands with L. Lilibet finds making conversation very difficult, like me, but she did very well, as she had to stand by herself for over an hour talking to each one in turn. She insisted on bringing the dogs in because she said they were the greatest save to the conversation when it dropped!

Sunday, March 9 

L turned her hair under and asked me if i liked it and I said no. We played cards till lunch, then went outside. We laughed a great deal and had great fun spitting over a bridge into a stream, trying to hit leaves as they floated by! Crawfie is such fun; I don’t think Monty would approve of spitting! Didn’t get back till 4.30 and we got very giggly and silly at the end because we were so exhausted! Crawfie and I were walking slowly arm-in-arm down the steep slope from the terrace and L pushed us and we hurtled down and collapsed into a bush and laughed so much we couldn’t get up. 

Saturday, March 15 AnnabeL [daughter of Sir Cecil Newman] thinks Lilibet has an enormous chest! It is a great pity as it’ll be awful one day. 

Saturday, March 22 

We had dressed crab that the King and Queen had brought back live from Plymouth. Ate chocolates with the Queen afterwards, then we went out with Crawfie before tea with the K and Q. He asked me if I was ‘hair conscious’ too, as Lilibet is always fiddling about with her hair now. So i said, ‘Yes!’ the Queen asked me if i powdered my face. She is so sweet and kind and without being beautiful she has such irresistible charm one could not help loving her. She has won my unswerving adoration — oh, if only I had a mother like that. 

Thursday, April 3 Last lesson for this term [Alathea was sharing weekly drawing lessons with the princesses at Windsor Castle]. Afterwards, we played cards till tea. they said something about Philip, so I said, ‘Who’s Philip?’ Lilibet [aged 14] said, ‘He’s called Prince Philip of Greece’ and then they both burst out laughing. I asked why, knowing quite well! Margaret [ten] said, ‘We can’t tell you,’ but L said, ‘Yes, we can. Can you keep a secret?’ then she said that P was her ‘boy’. Monty asked me if i had one, and in the end, I told them it was Robert Cecil [guardsman at Windsor, and future Marquess of Salisbury], which amused L. M said she was so glad I had a ‘beau’! We all laughed terribly. I must say Lilibet is far more grown-up than I was two years ago. When I left, she said, ‘We part today the wiser for two secrets,’ and I biked home feeling very proud at being let into such a great secret, which I shall never betray. 

Wednesday, April 9 

Biked to Forest Gate and met the princesses [and three other friends]. We drove to a lovely part of the forest, where we stopped and went for a walk, picking primroses. Had tea on rugs, which we spread out under the trees. Lit a fire to warm ourselves by. I was very surprised that the princesses came by themselves without [nanny] Mrs Knight — I think it must have been about the first time; of course, they had a detective. Packed up and set off in the cars to look for the German plane shot down in the forest last night. took some time finding it, but when we did, it was well worth it. It was a huge thing, completely smashed, and we picked up bits as souvenirs. 

Tuesday, April 15 

Hugh Euston [Grenadier guardsman at Windsor Castle — also earl of Euston and descendant of Charles ii and his mistress Barbara Villiers] came to dinner and we had great fun. 

Monday, April 28 

Letter from Lilibet [who had turned 15 a week before] — very nice, quite long. it was signed ‘with love from Elizabeth’. I’m wondering whether one oughtn’t to begin calling her Princess now she’s older. 

Monday, may 5 

Letter from Sonia [daughter of eminent radiologist Dr Harold Graham Hodgson] saying she’s been to tea with the princesses and they talked about young men. L told her that she adored Hugh Euston, so S said that I did, too, so they laughed and laughed! L [also] told her that she had a beau but didn’t say who. 

Saturday, may 17 Walked to Royal Lodge and was met by the princesses. Said, ‘How do you do,’ to the K and Q who were sitting on a bench in the garden and soon after the K drove us back to Castle in his own open sports car, which was an exciting experience! The Q gave me her silk scarf to put over my head. If only she knew how much I adored her! 

Saturday, May 24 

Dancing [lesson]. Had biscuits and orange juice in nursery with the princesses. After tea the Q, the princesses and I played Racing Demon in her sitting room. I would gladly die for that family if there were a Revolution. 

Thursday, May 29 

Biked to drawing, which we had under the [Castle] terrace. M and I found it hard to stop talking! Monty asked me, ‘Admirez-vous Lord Euston?’ and I said, ‘oui.’ She said she thought so by the way I talked to him on Saturday! We all laughed terribly and M asked if he was my beau, knowing quite well he is!!! She’s very old for her age in those ways — indeed in most ways. 

Saturday, June 7 

After [dancing] class i changed in M’s room as she always bags me but L says i’m to go to hers next time! At lunch, i hoped Hugh e would sit next to me but he was put between the Q and Lilibet. M caught my eye and laughed! After lunch we went out with the K and Q. the K played golf, so we strayed off and presently it poured with rain and we rushed for the tunnel and had to remain there about half an hour as we had thin shoes and no coats. the Q was sweet and very chatty to me and we all sang. M asked me if I liked her, as she said she wasn’t sure!! How could one not like her? She’s inherited all her mother’s charm, more than L. 

Thursday, June 12 

BiKed to the Castle. I said I loved coming to tea. Margaret laughed and said, ‘She adores us,’ and made one of her enchanting faces!!! 

Friday, July 4 [Alathea had been invited to spend the weekend at the castle] At 4pm, Lilibet and I watched their new chameleon on the syringa [lilac] tree, then she and I and Crawfie walked down to Frogmore, where we punted on the lake. Rolled our stockings down to prevent tearing them. After tea we lay on the grass and talked and laughed. We had supper in our dressing gowns in nursery at eight, then L and I sat in her room and read and talked till bed. 

Saturday, July 5 

Breakfast in nursery. Messed about afterwards while Lilibet did lessons, then changed into my blue chiffon for dancing. At lunch, I sat next to Hugh e. [At] 4, we came in and got ready to go to Adelaide Cottage [home of Sir Jackie Philipps, commander of the Castle Company] with the officers. We had tea with the Philipps and three of the officers and after we played the usual games. 

Sunday, July 6 

After breakfast we sat about and also went for a little walk with Crawfie. L said nothing about me staying till Monday, so much against my secret hopes I had to resign myself to leaving this evening; L is funny in some ways — v. matter of fact and uncurious and above all untemperamental. but one can’t have everything. [After] church, we fed the chameleon and then to Frogmore with Crawfie and Monty pulling Margaret, who’d just got up, in a basket on wheels. Got into punt, and then found a nice place to eat our picnic lunch. Great fun — we drank ginger beer out of bottles! We lay out on a rug and talked and read. We had great fun getting back, what with Crawfie’s hat and two dogs falling into the water! 

Wednesday, July 23 

Arrived [at the castle for a dance] and was miserable at first because everyone had long white gloves [and] I should have liked to have worn them. We all filed through into the Red Drawing Room, shaking hands with the K and Q and the princesses. there were nearly 200 there. the Q danced all the ‘funny dances’ and looked lovely in a full frock of white tulle, covered with silver sequins and the princesses wore dresses rather the same as the Q, also from Hartnell, in white lacy stuff embroidered with pale blue marguerites, and they had flowers in their hair and at their waist. No Eton boys, for which I was glad, as we then only had the dashing young ‘cavaliers’ [officers]! I was terrified I wasn’t going to dance with Hugh e but then I met him at the buffet and he said, with that great charm of his, ‘oh, Alathea, I’ve been looking for you all the evening, we must have a dance!’ it wasn’t true but still!! He asked me how many times I danced with him and said she was rather hurt because he only had the first one with her because he was asked to and then not again. We said goodbye about 3.15[am] — P Margaret [aged ten] stayed up till the very end. 

Thursday, July 31 

Lilibet said she had something to show me and when I went into her room to tidy, she took a letter out of a drawer for me to read — it was to Colonel Legh from Hugh E thanking for the dance — she said she’d stolen it and was going to keep it! He’s got nice writing. S

Sunday, August 17 

Mummy and I went for a walk and began talking about Daddy, and she said she didn’t think she could go on living with him after the war. I listened with dry eyes and a heavy heart — somehow I wasn’t surprised. their temperaments differ too widely. but this has affected me deeply. I only wish that tradition demanded they should remain together and make the best they could of the wreck of their own unhappiness. 

Thursday, August 21 

Mummy and I had a conversation about me — she said i’m old fashioned in the ‘old-maidish’ way, which is awful (underlined). I went to bed in tears — life seemed to me so, so hopeless. 

Saturday, August 23 

Went to bed early tonight. oh, how I longed for Hugh to come to me — but this night and the next and many more, I must spend alone, until one day when that greatest desire of every girl will be satisfied. 

Friday, August 29 

Ming-Ming [her younger sister’s nanny, real name Miss Smith] suggested I should do a little mending for myself and I lost my temper and getting a needle I made long scratches on my arm till I drew blood — it relieved my feelings but still I could find no outlet for my pent-up, angry soul. 

Saturday, October 11 

Had tea with Libby Hardinge [daughter of Sir Alexander Hardinge, private secretary to George Vi). two sweet little boys were there — how I long to have a child of my own. I should love it to be Hugh’s too. L told me that he has left the Castle — my heart sank. I shall lose sight of him and he’s sure to marry someone else and meanwhile I’ve got nobody! Lilibet will be sad he’s gone too. 

Extracted from the Windsor diaries: A childhood With the Princesses by Alathea Fitzalan Howard, edited by Isabella Naylor Leyland, to be published by Hodder & Stoughton on October 8, £25. © Isabella Naylor Leyland 2020 to order a copy for £21.25 go to www.mailshop.co.uk/books or call 020 3308 9193. Free UK delivery on orders over £15. Offer price valid until 10/10/2020.

How her treasured diaries came to light 

Alathea came into my life in 1975, when I met my husband, Philip. She was his aunt, and I liked her immediately: she was composed, generous, forthright and loved to laugh. When she died in 2001 she left me her diaries, of which there are 64 and in her words ‘not one day’s exception from 1940!’ A year earlier, she had written: ‘My diaries must be preserved and published.’ Alathea Alys Gwendolen Mary Fitzalan Howard, born in 1923, was the elder daughter of Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, and of Joyce Langdale, who later became Countess Fitzwilliam. Her mother had little interest in children and at the beginning of the war Alathea was sent to live with her rather staid grandfather and maiden aunt Magdalen. Hers was a lonely childhood and the diaries were her greatest friend. She wrote down all her hopes, fears and frustrations and could tell her diary what no one else knew: a perfect confidant. Her only other solace was the friendship she had with Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret. In adulthood the Queen kept up their friendship, and occasionally they would lunch together. In 2001 she was diagnosed with an advanced brain tumour. During a spell in hospital she received two bunches of flowers and I couldn’t resist looking at the cards to find out who had sent them. One was from Jools Holland, the other the Queen. Alathea died at our home, in what had always been her room, on March 5, 2001.

 Isabella Naylor Leyland

 

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The Secret Garden classic has been remade and can explore the stunning film locations

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the secret garden classic has been remade and can explore the stunning film locations

For over a century, Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden — about Mary Lennox, an orphan sent to live with her uncle, only to find a magical garden on his estate — has enchanted children. 

The latest film version with Colin Firth and Julie Walters will wow a new generation. 

Director Marc Munden used some of Britain’s idyllic locations to create a magical world. 

And you can visit them, too . . . 

The Laburnum Arch in Bodnant Garden, North Wales. The vibrant yellow flowers usually attract 50,000 visitors when they bloom for just three weeks each spring

The Laburnum Arch in Bodnant Garden, North Wales. The vibrant yellow flowers usually attract 50,000 visitors when they bloom for just three weeks each spring

The Laburnum Arch in Bodnant Garden, North Wales. The vibrant yellow flowers usually attract 50,000 visitors when they bloom for just three weeks each spring

A glorious arch of golden laburnum

Bodnant Garden, North Wales

Julie Walters and Colin Firth walk under a stunning arch of flowering laburnum in this scene filmed at Bodnant Garden.

Described by the National Trust as ‘the height of spring’, the Laburnum Arch is 180ft long and was created in 1880.

Julie Walters and Colin Firth walk under a stunning arch of flowering laburnum in this scene for The Secret Garden (2020) filmed at Bodnant Garden

Julie Walters and Colin Firth walk under a stunning arch of flowering laburnum in this scene for The Secret Garden (2020) filmed at Bodnant Garden

Julie Walters and Colin Firth walk under a stunning arch of flowering laburnum in this scene for The Secret Garden (2020) filmed at Bodnant Garden

The vibrant yellow flowers usually attract 50,000 visitors when they bloom for just three weeks each spring. 

So while you will have to wait to see the arch in its full glory, the rest of the garden — featuring manicured lawns, flower-filled terraces, meadows and water gardens — is currently open, with adult tickets for £8 (half-price for children).

  • 01492 650460; nationaltrust.org.uk/bodnant-garden
Built in 1758, Helmsley Walled Garden in North Yorkshire has a starring role in the new film

Built in 1758, Helmsley Walled Garden in North Yorkshire has a starring role in the new film

Built in 1758, Helmsley Walled Garden in North Yorkshire has a starring role in the new film

The big star of the show

Helmsley Walled Garden, North Yorkshire

Nestled at the foot of the North York Moors and built in 1758, the walled garden has a starring role in the new film. 

It was originally designed to provide vegetables, fruit and flowers to the Feversham family, who lived at nearby Duncombe Park (which appears as Misselthwaite Manor in the film). 

It was originally designed to provide vegetables, fruit and flowers to the Feversham family, who lived at nearby Duncombe Park (which appears as Misselthwaite Manor in the film). Pictured: Filming at Helmsley Walled garden for The Secret Garden

It was originally designed to provide vegetables, fruit and flowers to the Feversham family, who lived at nearby Duncombe Park (which appears as Misselthwaite Manor in the film). Pictured: Filming at Helmsley Walled garden for The Secret Garden

It was originally designed to provide vegetables, fruit and flowers to the Feversham family, who lived at nearby Duncombe Park (which appears as Misselthwaite Manor in the film). Pictured: Filming at Helmsley Walled garden for The Secret Garden

Tickets for the garden cost from £7, children go free. It’s open from Thursday to Sunday.

  • 01439 772314; helmsley walledgarden.org.uk
Triffid-like Elephant’s Rhubarb plants tower over two children at Trebah Gardens, Cornwall

Triffid-like Elephant’s Rhubarb plants tower over two children at Trebah Gardens, Cornwall

Triffid-like Elephant’s Rhubarb plants tower over two children at Trebah Gardens, Cornwall

Fun among giant triffids 

Trebah Gardens, Cornwall 

Actress Dixie Egerickx (who plays Mary Lennox) peers through the twilight world of Gunnera Passage at Trebah Gardens.

Actress Dixie Egerickx (who plays Mary Lennox) peers through the twilight world of Gunnera Passage at Trebah Gardens

Actress Dixie Egerickx (who plays Mary Lennox) peers through the twilight world of Gunnera Passage at Trebah Gardens

Actress Dixie Egerickx (who plays Mary Lennox) peers through the twilight world of Gunnera Passage at Trebah Gardens

Its huge, Triffid-like Elephant’s Rhubarb plants are native to the mountains of south-east Brazil, with leaves up to 2.5m wide and stems as thick as a man’s wrist. 

Open Saturdays to Wednesdays, tickets from £11.

  • 01326 252200; trebahgarden.co.uk
Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire was established by monks almost 900 years ago

Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire was established by monks almost 900 years ago

Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire was established by monks almost 900 years ago

Today, the atmospheric ruins provide the backdrop to elegant water gardens with mirror-like lakes and ponds. Pictured: A still from the latest film version of The Secret Garden

Today, the atmospheric ruins provide the backdrop to elegant water gardens with mirror-like lakes and ponds. Pictured: A still from the latest film version of The Secret Garden

Today, the atmospheric ruins provide the backdrop to elegant water gardens with mirror-like lakes and ponds. Pictured: A still from the latest film version of The Secret Garden

The wonder of a ruined abbey  

Fountains Abbey, North Yorkshire

The magnificent abbey was established by monks almost 900 years ago. 

Today, the atmospheric ruins provide the backdrop to elegant water gardens with mirror-like lakes and ponds. 

Tickets cost £13 (children go half-price).

  • 01765 608888; nationaltrust.org.uk/fountains-abbey-and-studley-royal-water-garden
Award-winning grounds of Iford Manor Estate, Wiltshire are Grade I-listed, have magnificent rural views and are interspersed with architectural gems hidden throughout

Award-winning grounds of Iford Manor Estate, Wiltshire are Grade I-listed, have magnificent rural views and are interspersed with architectural gems hidden throughout

Award-winning grounds of Iford Manor Estate, Wiltshire are Grade I-listed, have magnificent rural views and are interspersed with architectural gems hidden throughout

Silver-screen debut for a historic gem

Iford Manor Estate, Wiltshire

Sitting in the middle of a 900-acre estate, the award-winning grounds are Grade I-listed, have magnificent rural views and are interspersed with architectural gems hidden throughout. 

Big-screen debut: The Secret Garden, film 2020 filmed in Iford Manor

Big-screen debut: The Secret Garden, film 2020 filmed in Iford Manor

Big-screen debut: The Secret Garden, film 2020 filmed in Iford Manor

They’ve appeared on TV before — in Sanditon recently — but this is their big-screen debut. 

The estate will reopen in April 2021.

  • 01225 863146; ifordmanor.co.uk
Situated in the Forest of Dean, Puzzlewood is a breathtaking collection of twisted woodland which has provided scenery for everything from Star Wars to Doctor Who

Situated in the Forest of Dean, Puzzlewood is a breathtaking collection of twisted woodland which has provided scenery for everything from Star Wars to Doctor Who

Situated in the Forest of Dean, Puzzlewood is a breathtaking collection of twisted woodland which has provided scenery for everything from Star Wars to Doctor Who

From star wars to a forest of dreams

Puzzlewood, Forest of Dean

Situated in the Forest of Dean, Puzzlewood is a breathtaking collection of twisted woodland with more than a mile and a half of paths, bridges and view points. 

Pictured: Dixie Egerickx as Mary Lennox in a scene filmed in Puzzlewood

Pictured: Dixie Egerickx as Mary Lennox in a scene filmed in Puzzlewood

Pictured: Dixie Egerickx as Mary Lennox in a scene filmed in Puzzlewood

The ancient boughs have provided scenery for everything from Star Wars to Doctor Who, so if you enjoy walking through breathtaking scenery, you’ll love Puzzlewood. 

There are even cottages to stay in, too.

  • 01594 833187; puzzlewood.net

The Secret Garden is in cinemas and on Sky from October 23.

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Renters betrayed as new evictions approach after housing secretary ‘tears up his pledge’

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renters betrayed as new evictions approach after housing secretary tears up his pledge

Renters have been plunged into turmoil as evictions are set to resume after the housing secretary ‘tore up his pledge’ to protect them. 

Robert Jenrick introduced a ban at the start of the Covid pandemic which halted all hearings of possession cases as he championed that ‘no renter who lost income due to coronavirus will be forced out of their home’.

But, six months later, the government will allow evictions to resume in England and Wales from Monday.

Robert Jenrick (pictured) introduced a ban at the start of the Covid pandemic which halted all hearings of possession cases as he championed that 'no renter who lost income due to coronavirus will be forced out of their home'

Robert Jenrick (pictured) introduced a ban at the start of the Covid pandemic which halted all hearings of possession cases as he championed that 'no renter who lost income due to coronavirus will be forced out of their home'

Robert Jenrick (pictured) introduced a ban at the start of the Covid pandemic which halted all hearings of possession cases as he championed that ‘no renter who lost income due to coronavirus will be forced out of their home’

Alicia Kennedy, who has directed the campaign Generation Rent, told The Times: ‘Robert Jenrick has torn up his pledge to protect renters.

‘There is now nothing stopping tenants who have been given a Section 21 [eviction] notice from being forced out of their home. 

‘Even renters in severe financial distress can only buy themselves an extra six weeks’ grace.

‘These new rules provide no comfort and do nothing to prevent hardship and homelessness.’

UK courts can usually grant automatic eviction notices if a tenant falls eight weeks into rent arrears. 

The ban on evictions has already been extended twice since March as figures from YouGov and Shelter suggest that 322,000 renters have fallen behind on their monthly payments due to the impact of the pandemic.    

The ban on evictions has already been extended twice as figures from YouGov and Shelter suggest that 322,000 private renters have fallen behind on their monthly payments due to the impact of the pandemic (stock image)

The ban on evictions has already been extended twice as figures from YouGov and Shelter suggest that 322,000 private renters have fallen behind on their monthly payments due to the impact of the pandemic (stock image)

The ban on evictions has already been extended twice as figures from YouGov and Shelter suggest that 322,000 private renters have fallen behind on their monthly payments due to the impact of the pandemic (stock image)

The government has instructed that bailiffs are still forbidden from evicting those in areas of local lockdown or in the run up to Christmas – apart from in exceptional circumstances. 

Labour is also calling for a further extension of the ban similar to that seen in Scotland and Northern Ireland where renters will not face eviction until March 31. 

Defending the decision, Mr Jenrick said it was ‘right that we strike a balance between protecting renters and ensuring landlords whose tenants have behaved in illegal or anti-social ways have access to justice’.

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