Connect with us

Latest Stories

Students IGNORE Rule of Six in nightclub queue

Published

on

students ignore rule of six in nightclub queue

Scores of students flouted the new Rule of Six restrictions last night as they queued outside a nightclub in Portsmouth and descended onto the streets of the coastal city to enjoy a night of heavy partying. 

Young revellers, including Portsmouth University students who had recently arrived to the city in Hampshire to begin their academic year, swapped a night in at home to queue outside The Astoria in Guildhall Walk and hit the numerous pubs and bars.

Crowds of alcohol-fuelled revellers appeared in high spirits as they huddled in large groups without face masks and walked onto the streets into the small hours to celebrate with their friends amid the coronavirus pandemic. 

According to The Astoria, every group is allocated a table that seats a maximum of six people once inside the club.  

Upon entry guests are also asked to sanitise their hands, must stay within their ‘party bubble’ and a thermal imaging system is also in operation.

The scenes come as Portsmouth University warned the thousands of students due to arrive to the city to begin the start of the new academic term on October 5 that they face temporary suspension and even permanent exclusion if they break the new regulations set out by the Government. 

A group of party-goers flout social distancing guidelines as they queue outside a nightclub in Guildhall Walk in the coastal city of Portsmouth

A group of party-goers flout social distancing guidelines as they queue outside a nightclub in Guildhall Walk in the coastal city of Portsmouth

A group of party-goers flout social distancing guidelines as they queue outside a nightclub in Guildhall Walk in the coastal city of Portsmouth

A group of revellers huddle in a group without masks as they gather on the streets in Portsmouth amid the coronavirus pandemic

A group of revellers huddle in a group without masks as they gather on the streets in Portsmouth amid the coronavirus pandemic

A group of revellers huddle in a group without masks as they gather on the streets in Portsmouth amid the coronavirus pandemic

Revellers and students break social distancing guidelines as they gather together in the city without face masks into the small hours

Revellers and students break social distancing guidelines as they gather together in the city without face masks into the small hours

Revellers and students break social distancing guidelines as they gather together in the city without face masks into the small hours

A group of people flout social distancing measures as hundreds of students begin to arrive to the city to begin the academic year

A group of people flout social distancing measures as hundreds of students begin to arrive to the city to begin the academic year

A group of people flout social distancing measures as hundreds of students begin to arrive to the city to begin the academic year

It also came just a day after Britons were banned from gathering in groups of more than six under new government guidelines to curb Covid infection rates.  

In a statement this week Portsmouth University told The News: ‘Students are expected to take personal responsibility for their own safety and the safety of other students, staff and the wider community by adhering to the university’s student contract and code of student behaviour, safety measures put in place, and by following government guidelines. 

‘As with other members of our local community, students are advised of a £100 fine if they break the law banning social gatherings of more than six people, and this amount doubles for any subsequent breaches. This applies to halls of residence as well as private accommodation.’ 

The university added: ‘The vast majority of our students adhere to requirements. However, if they do not, penalties for student misconduct range from temporary suspension to permanent exclusion.’ 

Earlier this month thousands of students across the UK were warned about spreading coronavirus and warned they face ‘serious police action’ if they hold mass gatherings during Freshers’ Week. 

Ministers discouraged young people preparing for university from attending Freshers’ events, with Health Minister Lord Bethell urging freshers and returning university students to resist going to mass social gatherings ‘in pubs, clubs and bedrooms’.

Meanwhile, Universities Minister Michelle Donelan furiously warned large event organisers that police will take ‘serious action’ against them, following reports that some companies have been advertising mass social Freshers’ events.

And Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, pleaded with students to ‘follow the rules’ for ‘the sake of your education and your parents’ and grandparents’ health’. 

Revellers walk in a group as the enjoy their Tuesday night out in Portsmouth despite the Rule of Six measures now in place

Revellers walk in a group as the enjoy their Tuesday night out in Portsmouth despite the Rule of Six measures now in place

Revellers walk in a group as the enjoy their Tuesday night out in Portsmouth despite the Rule of Six measures now in place

Young party-goers huddle in a group without face masks as they enjoy a night of heavy partying in Portsmouth on Tuesday

Young party-goers huddle in a group without face masks as they enjoy a night of heavy partying in Portsmouth on Tuesday

Young party-goers huddle in a group without face masks as they enjoy a night of heavy partying in Portsmouth on Tuesday

A line of part-goers queue outside Dirty Disco nightclub in Portsmouth just days after the Rule of Six regulations come into force

A line of part-goers queue outside Dirty Disco nightclub in Portsmouth just days after the Rule of Six regulations come into force

A line of part-goers queue outside Dirty Disco nightclub in Portsmouth just days after the Rule of Six regulations come into force 

Crowds of people begin to enter The Astoria in Portsmouth on Tuesday night amid the coronavirus pandemic

Crowds of people begin to enter The Astoria in Portsmouth on Tuesday night amid the coronavirus pandemic

Crowds of people begin to enter The Astoria in Portsmouth on Tuesday night amid the coronavirus pandemic

Some people stand outside a pub as they swap a night in a home for a night out with their friends in Portsmouth on Tuesday

Some people stand outside a pub as they swap a night in a home for a night out with their friends in Portsmouth on Tuesday

Some people stand outside a pub as they swap a night in a home for a night out with their friends in Portsmouth on Tuesday

A man throws flames into the air as revellers begin to queue outside a nightclub and enjoy a night out in the city

A man throws flames into the air as revellers begin to queue outside a nightclub and enjoy a night out in the city

A man throws flames into the air as revellers begin to queue outside a nightclub and enjoy a night out in the city 

It comes as 510,000 young people prepare to start university this autumn amid the coronavirus pandemic.

This month Health Minister Lord Bethell said: ‘We are deeply concerned about the spread among students. Some of that spread will take place in universities, and I pay tribute to the efforts of vice-chancellors to put in place social distancing arrangements in universities; we hope that they will have an impact.

‘However, some of the effect is in their social life – in pubs, clubs and bedrooms up and down the country.

‘That is the responsibility of the students themselves, and we are looking at measures to enhance and enforce the social-distancing measures that will stop the spread of this disease.’

Ms Donelan warned students: ‘As a Government, we have clearly set out the consequences for anyone who risks spreading the virus, whether that’s through illicit social gatherings or organising large events.

‘The police and local authorities will take serious action where it is necessary. Health advice only works if we all follow it. I urge students, just like the wider public, to do their bit and act responsibly to ensure campuses can remain open for them to use and enjoy.’

While Health Secretary Matt Hancock pleaded with university students to ‘follow the rules’, telling MPs: ‘If you are a student who is about to return to university or go to university for the first time then please, for the sake of your education and your parents’ and grandparents’ health, follow the rules and don’t gather in groups of more than six.’ 

A group of revellers gather outside a bar in Guildhall Walk in Portsmouth without masks amid the coronavirus pandemic

A group of revellers gather outside a bar in Guildhall Walk in Portsmouth without masks amid the coronavirus pandemic

A group of revellers gather outside a bar in Guildhall Walk in Portsmouth without masks amid the coronavirus pandemic

Party-goers walk along the street in Portsmouth just days after the Government's Rule of Six comes into force in the UK

Party-goers walk along the street in Portsmouth just days after the Government's Rule of Six comes into force in the UK

Party-goers walk along the street in Portsmouth just days after the Government’s Rule of Six comes into force in the UK

Part-goers without face coverings gather outside in Portsmouth, Hampshire, on Tuesday as they enjoy a night out

Part-goers without face coverings gather outside in Portsmouth, Hampshire, on Tuesday as they enjoy a night out

Part-goers without face coverings gather outside in Portsmouth, Hampshire, on Tuesday as they enjoy a night out

People begin to queue outside a nightclub in Guildhall Walk in Portsmouth without face coverings amid the coronavirus pandemic

People begin to queue outside a nightclub in Guildhall Walk in Portsmouth without face coverings amid the coronavirus pandemic

People begin to queue outside a nightclub in Guildhall Walk in Portsmouth without face coverings amid the coronavirus pandemic 

At a Downing Street press conference this month, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said: ‘My message to students is simple. Please, for the sake of your education, for your parents’ and your grandparents’ health, wash your hands, cover your face, make space, and don’t socially gather in groups of more than six now and when term starts.

The Universities of Greenwich, Leeds Trinity, Coventry and Queen Mary in London opened their campuses to freshers earlier this month while LSE, Birmingham City, and the Universities of Nottingham and the West of England are expected to hold their Freshers’ Week from September 21.

Leicester de Montfort, the University of Bristol, the University of Durham and University College London will host Freshers’ Week from September 28.

Meanwhile, Cambridge and Oxford, Birkbeck and Essex are among the last to host Freshers’ Week for new students from October 5.

Powered by: Daily Mail

Latest Stories

Video of woman washing her boyfriend’s pillows for the first time in 10 YEARS horrifies social media

Published

on

By

video of woman washing her boyfriends pillows for the first time in 10 years horrifies social media

A woman has filmed herself washing her boyfriend’s stained pillows for the first time in 10 years — and social media users are horrified by the state of them. 

In the viral video, the TikToker claimed her boyfriend refuses to replace his decade-old pillows, noting that he never washed them once in all of the time he has had them.

She documented the entire cleaning process, washing three of the dingy pillows — which were yellowed and filthy — and the result is astounding.

Filthy: A TikTok user filmed a video of herself cleaning her boyfriend's pillows for the first time in 10 years, explaining that he refuses to replace them

Filthy: A TikTok user filmed a video of herself cleaning her boyfriend's pillows for the first time in 10 years, explaining that he refuses to replace them

Filthy: A TikTok user filmed a video of herself cleaning her boyfriend's pillows for the first time in 10 years, explaining that he refuses to replace them

Filthy: A TikTok user filmed a video of herself cleaning her boyfriend's pillows for the first time in 10 years, explaining that he refuses to replace them

Filthy: A TikTok user filmed a video of herself cleaning her boyfriend’s pillows for the first time in 10 years, explaining that he refuses to replace them 

While her boyfriend was at work, she placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets.

She then poured some Borax powder into the tub before adding bleach into the mixture.

The TikToker proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows, and then tossed them into the washing machine.

Surprisingly, the pillows came out completely white — a stark contrast to their dark yellow and brown shade before the wash. 

Getting started: She placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets

Getting started: She placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets

Getting started: She placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets

Getting started: She placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets

Getting started: She placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets

Next up: The TikToker also added Borax power and bleach to the water

Next up: The TikToker also added Borax power and bleach to the water

Next up: The TikToker also added Borax power and bleach to the water

Next up: The TikToker also added Borax power and bleach to the water

Next up: The TikToker also added Borax power and bleach to the water 

The video has since gone viral on TikTok, gaining over 1.7 million views and leaving users in shock at the state of the pillows before they were washed. 

‘With that alone, I would replace the boyfriend. Hygiene is everything,’ one person wrote, while another added: ’10 years of sweat, dead skin, dirt, oil and bacteria’ 

Someone else commented: ‘They are meant to be replaced every two years… they come with expiry dates on them…’

Social media users certainly had reason to be appalled, considering pillows are supposed to be replaced every one or two years and washed at least four times a year.   

Getting them clean: She proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows

Getting them clean: She proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows

Getting them clean: She proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows

Getting them clean: She proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows

Getting them clean: She proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows

Amazing: After throwing the soaked pillows in the wash, they came out perfectly white

Amazing: After throwing the soaked pillows in the wash, they came out perfectly white

Amazing: After throwing the soaked pillows in the wash, they came out perfectly white

Amazing: After throwing the soaked pillows in the wash, they came out perfectly white

Amazing: After throwing the soaked pillows in the wash, they came out perfectly white

An expert from Christy England, which supplies to Wimbledon and the royal family, told FEMAIL in April that ‘pillows should be washed every three months because, similar to bedding, they contain a build-up of sweat and dead skin.’ 

And while most people think that a whirl in the washing machine will thoroughly clean their clothes and linens — but it turns out that some fabrics may be retaining a horrifying buildup of dirt.

‘Stripping’ laundry is the special trick that gets everything super clean, removing the grime that washing machines won’t.

The technique involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent, similar to what the TikToker did to her boyfriend’s pillows. 

Like new: The Tiktoker joked that she 'can sleep better knowing those nasty pillows are clean'

Like new: The Tiktoker joked that she 'can sleep better knowing those nasty pillows are clean'

Like new: The Tiktoker joked that she 'can sleep better knowing those nasty pillows are clean'

Like new: The Tiktoker joked that she 'can sleep better knowing those nasty pillows are clean'

Like new: The Tiktoker joked that she ‘can sleep better knowing those nasty pillows are clean’

33536796 8765053 image a 90 1600879674088

33536796 8765053 image a 90 1600879674088

33536784 8765053 image a 91 1600879677225

33536784 8765053 image a 91 1600879677225

Say what? Social media users were horrified by the filthy brown pillows

Say what? Social media users were horrified by the filthy brown pillows

Say what? Social media users were horrified by the filthy brown pillows 

People have been stripping their laundry for ages, but the process is reaching a new generation after going viral on TikTok in recent months. 

Nurse Lauren Elms shared several walk-throughs on the app, first stripping her workout clothes on April 22 and then doing her towels on April 24.

The video of her stripping her towels was viewed more than six million times.

In the clip, she filled a tub with hot water and added a quarter cup of baking soda, a quarter cup of Borax, and a generous scoop of powder detergent and places her laundry in the tub.  

Lauren advised stirring the clothes every couple of hours, but she showed that just ten minutes in, the water was already dirty. After seven hours, the water was a filthy, dark brown color.

She pointed out that her clothes and towels were actually ‘clean’ when they went in the tub, so this was all buildup. She told viewers to finish up by re-washing their laundry as they normally would in a machine. 

Get stripping! Most people think that the washing machine will thoroughly clean their clothes and linens — but it turns out that some fabrics may be retaining a horrifying buildup of dirt

Get stripping! Most people think that the washing machine will thoroughly clean their clothes and linens — but it turns out that some fabrics may be retaining a horrifying buildup of dirt

Get stripping! Most people think that the washing machine will thoroughly clean their clothes and linens — but it turns out that some fabrics may be retaining a horrifying buildup of dirt

Mix it up: 'Stripping' laundry involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent

Mix it up: 'Stripping' laundry involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent

Mix it up: 'Stripping' laundry involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent

Mix it up: 'Stripping' laundry involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent

Mix it up: ‘Stripping’ laundry involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent

Yuck! After soaking the laundry in the solution, it may leave behind water that looks like this

Yuck! After soaking the laundry in the solution, it may leave behind water that looks like this

Yuck! After soaking the laundry in the solution, it may leave behind water that looks like this

She also showed that the bottom of her drained tub was dirtied with a surprising residue from the soak.

Lauren’s video set off a trend, and several others have mimicked her with their own clips. Some just shared shocked and horrified reactions, while others replicated the experiment with their own clothes.

According to The Spruce, ‘body soil and bacteria’ can get stuck in fabrics, especially terry cloth towels.

That’s why some older towels and gym clothes may smell clean immediately after coming out of the wash, but will start to smell as soon as they get damp.

When laundry is thrown in the wash, the soap is doing a lot of the work to clean it — but it’s still circulating in dirty water, which gets reabsorbed into the fabric.

Stripping can get rid of some of the dirt and bacteria, while smells can be killed by adding vinegar to a wash.

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Latest Stories

PAUL THOMAS on… our military Covid marshals

Published

on

By

paul thomas on our military covid marshals
33546296 8766691 image a 34 1600910835132

33546296 8766691 image a 34 1600910835132

To order a print of this Paul Thomas cartoon or one by Pugh, visit Mailpictures.newsprints.co.uk or call 0191 6030 178. 

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Latest Stories

Chief Scientific Officer Sir Patrick Vallance has £600,000 of shares in vaccine maker GSK

Published

on

By

chief scientific officer sir patrick vallance has 600000 of shares in vaccine maker gsk

Sir Patrick Vallance has a £600,000 shareholding in a pharmaceuticals giant which is racing to develop a Covid vaccine for the Government, a report has revealed.

The Chief Scientific Adviser holds the deferred bonus of 43,111 shares in GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) from his time as president of the multinational company.

Sir Patrick has already sold more than £5 million in shares he received during his tenure from 2012 to 2018, when he was appointed by the Government.

Accounts seen by the Telegraph show that Sir Patrick held 404,201 GSK shares when he resigned, worth £6.1 million at today’s price.

Sir Patrick Vallance speaking to the nation on Monday night. He and Chris Whitty outlined why the Government was announcing a raft of new lockdown measures

Sir Patrick Vallance speaking to the nation on Monday night. He and Chris Whitty outlined why the Government was announcing a raft of new lockdown measures

Sir Patrick Vallance speaking to the nation on Monday night. He and Chris Whitty outlined why the Government was announcing a raft of new lockdown measures

Sir Patrick, who also chairs the Government’s expert panel on vaccines, predicted at a news conference this week that the first effective doses of a jab might become available on a limited basis by the end of this year.

GSK is one of more than 20 drugs companies around the world in the race to provide the cure for coronavirus – an achievement which would be colossally lucrative.

Sir Patrick’s former employer has deals with the British and US governments to supply them with Covid-19 vaccines, subject to terms in a final contract.

A senior Conservative MP and ex-Cabinet minister told The Telegraph that Sir Patrick should have declared his stake in GSK.

‘The policy of this Government is to try to suppress Covid at every opportunity until we get a vaccine,’ the MP said. ‘That makes it more likely that a vaccine will be prioritised by the Government and he happens to be holding shares in one of the leading companies that are developing it. It is a potential conflict of interest.

‘If he is making decisions on vaccines and advising the Government on them, then he either needs to divest himself of the shares or make a declaration every time he touches on the subject. In the Commons, every time MPs raise an issue in which there is a registered interest, they have to declare it. Every time he is talking about vaccines or on TV, he should put it on the table.’

The GlaxoSmithKline pharmaceuticals headquarters in Brentford, west London

The GlaxoSmithKline pharmaceuticals headquarters in Brentford, west London

The GlaxoSmithKline pharmaceuticals headquarters in Brentford, west London

A government spokesman said that Sir Patrick holds a deferred share bonus which will mature in April but declined to comment on the size of the holding or its value.

‘Upon his appointment, appropriate steps were taken to manage the Government Chief Scientific Adviser’s (GCSA) interests in line with advice provided at the time,’ the spokesman said.

The Government’s spokesman added that while Sir Patrick chairs the Government’s expert panel on vaccines, he ‘has no input into contractual and commercial decisions on vaccine procurement,’ which are the province of ministers.

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.