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Taking cholesterol-lowering drug could reduce severity of coronavirus to the level of common cold

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taking cholesterol lowering drug could reduce severity of coronavirus to the level of common cold

Two scientists researching a potential treatment for coronavirus believe they may have success with a common remedy used to lower cholesterol. 

Professor Yaakov Nahmias, of Hebrew University of Jerusalem, has been working for the past three months with Dr Benjamin tenOever at New York’s Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

In lab studies, the cholesterol-lowering drug Fenofibrate (Tricor) showed extremely promising results, they reported. 

The pair’s research appears in this week’s Cell Press Sneak Peak.

The two have focused on the ways in which COVID-19 changes patients’ lungs in order to reproduce itself. 

Scientists working in New York and Jerusalem believe they may have found a useful drug

Scientists working in New York and Jerusalem believe they may have found a useful drug

Scientists working in New York and Jerusalem believe they may have found a useful drug

They discovered that the virus prevents the routine burning of carbohydrates. As a result, large amounts of fat accumulate inside lung cells, a condition the virus needs in order to reproduce, MedicalXpress reported. 

The team believe their findings may help explain why patients with high blood sugar and cholesterol levels are often at a particularly high risk to develop COVID-19.

Viruses are parasites that lack the ability to replicate on their own, so they take control of our cells to help accomplish that task. 

‘By understanding how the SARS-CoV-2 controls our metabolism, we can wrestle back control from the virus and deprive it from the very resources it needs to survive,’ said Nahmias.

Professor Yaakov Nahmias of Hebrew University of Jerusalem has been leading the research

Professor Yaakov Nahmias of Hebrew University of Jerusalem has been leading the research

Professor Yaakov Nahmias of Hebrew University of Jerusalem has been leading the research

He has been working with Benjamin tenOever in New York to investigate potential solutions

He has been working with Benjamin tenOever in New York to investigate potential solutions

He has been working with Benjamin tenOever in New York to investigate potential solutions

Nahmias and tenOever then began to screen FDA-approved medications that interfere with the virus’ ability to reproduce.  

More than 3.7 million Americans have become infected with COVID-19

More than 3.7 million Americans have become infected with COVID-19

More than 3.7 million Americans have become infected with COVID-19

‘By allowing lung cells to burn more fat, fenofibrate breaks the virus’ grip on these cells, and prevents SARS CoV-2’s ability to reproduce,’ the site said. 

‘In fact, within only five days of treatment, the virus almost completely disappeared.’

Nahmias said the decision could be vital in the fight against the pandemic. 

‘With second-wave infections spiking in countries across the globe, these findings couldn’t come at a better time,’ he said.

‘Global cooperation may provide the cure.’  

The cholesterol medicine is widely available but appears to show interesting results

The cholesterol medicine is widely available but appears to show interesting results

The cholesterol medicine is widely available but appears to show interesting results

While there are many international efforts currently underway to develop a coronavirus vaccine, studies suggest that vaccines may only protect patients for a few months. 

Therefore, blocking the virus’ ability to function, rather than neutralizing its ability to strike in the first place, may be the key to turning the tables on COVID-19. 

‘If our findings are borne out by clinical studies, this course of treatment could potentially downgrade COVID-19’s severity into nothing worse than a common cold,’ Nahmias concluded.

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Man dies in Rochdale after being attacked and hit by a passing car 

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man dies in rochdale after being attacked and hit by a passing car

A man has died after he was assaulted and then hit by a car.

Greater Manchester Police said the man, in his 30s, was hit by the car after being attacked and left lying in the road in Rochdale in the early hours of Sunday.

Police were called to the car park off The Esplanade shortly after 3am.

The man was pronounced dead at the scene and enquiries are ongoing to identify and inform his next of kin, the force said.

Greater Manchester Police said the man, in his 30s, was hit by the car after being attacked and left lying in the road in Rochdale in the early hours of Sunday

Greater Manchester Police said the man, in his 30s, was hit by the car after being attacked and left lying in the road in Rochdale in the early hours of Sunday

Greater Manchester Police said the man, in his 30s, was hit by the car after being attacked and left lying in the road in Rochdale in the early hours of Sunday

Detectives believe he was attacked following a conversation with three men, who left the scene in the direction of Rochdale Memorial Gardens.

A short time later he was hit by a passing vehicle.

The driver stopped at the scene and no arrests have been made, police said.

Detective Inspector Dan Clegg said: ‘This was a devastating incident during which a man was killed.

Police were called to the car park off The Esplanade shortly after 3am, where the man was pronounced dead. Enquiries are ongoing to identify and inform his next of kin

Police were called to the car park off The Esplanade shortly after 3am, where the man was pronounced dead. Enquiries are ongoing to identify and inform his next of kin

Police were called to the car park off The Esplanade shortly after 3am, where the man was pronounced dead. Enquiries are ongoing to identify and inform his next of kin

‘A post-mortem is yet to take place to establish the cause of death. We are in the process of identifying his next of kin so we can inform them.

‘Specialist officers will then provide them with support.

‘Our investigation is in the early stages but we are currently searching for three men.

Detectives believe he was attacked following a conversation with three men, who left the scene in the direction of Rochdale Memorial Gardens

Detectives believe he was attacked following a conversation with three men, who left the scene in the direction of Rochdale Memorial Gardens

Detectives believe he was attacked following a conversation with three men, who left the scene in the direction of Rochdale Memorial Gardens

‘We know there were a number of people in the town centre at the time and I ask anyone who has information to contact us as soon as possible.

‘We know incidents like this cause concern but, as ever, extensive enquiries are ongoing. Extra officers have been deployed to the area and anyone with concerns can speak with them.’

Anyone with information should contact police on 0161 856 3400 quoting 563 of 20/09/20 or call Crimestoppers, anonymously, on 0800 555 111. 

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Modern flats could be unmortgageable amid crisis over building safety

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modern flats could be unmortgageable amid crisis over building safety

Thousands of moderns homes will be unmortgageable for years amid a crisis over building safety standards in the housing market.

Owners of up to 1.5 million high-rise flats could have to wait as long as a decade to get sign-off to prove they are safe in the wake of the Grenfell Tower fire.

The tragedy in 2017, which killed 72 people, exposed decades of ‘utter rubbish’ building work and regulatory failure that left flammable materials on the building to feed the blaze that ripped through dozens of homes. 

Now one in 16 homes in England need to be checked for similar types of cladding, as well as insulation, balconies and wall structures to make sure they comply with safety rules. 

Thousands of moderns homes will be unmortgageable for years amid a crisis over building safety standards in the housing market. Pictured: Surveyors have said flats in London's Olympic Village marketed at £600,000 are now almost worthless

Thousands of moderns homes will be unmortgageable for years amid a crisis over building safety standards in the housing market. Pictured: Surveyors have said flats in London's Olympic Village marketed at £600,000 are now almost worthless

Thousands of moderns homes will be unmortgageable for years amid a crisis over building safety standards in the housing market. Pictured: Surveyors have said flats in London’s Olympic Village marketed at £600,000 are now almost worthless

Without the proof, banks will not give out mortgages meaning owners cannot sell, meaning hundreds of looking to move up the property ladder are now stuck.

Checks on the flats could take ‘five to 10 years’, according to experts.

Rob Leary and girlfriend bought a one-bedroom flat in Stratford three years ago, but when they split up in 2018, they agreed he would stay in the east London flat and buy her out of her share.

To raise the money he approached Santander to remortgage the flat, which had cost £340,000. 

‘We got to the stage of a surveyor coming round and it all seemed fine, and then I started to get a series of calls saying they needed information on the cladding,’ he told Homes and Property

Rob Leary and girlfriend bought a one-bedroom flat in Stratford three years ago, but after trying to remortgage the property he was denied lending because of unchecked cladding on the side of the building

Rob Leary and girlfriend bought a one-bedroom flat in Stratford three years ago, but after trying to remortgage the property he was denied lending because of unchecked cladding on the side of the building

Rob Leary and girlfriend bought a one-bedroom flat in Stratford three years ago, but after trying to remortgage the property he was denied lending because of unchecked cladding on the side of the building

Rob’s home is in a block covered in ceramic rain screen cladding, which while not actively condemned, have also not received the safety all-clear in the fallout from the Grenfell fire. 

As a result, blocks with cladding need to be inspected to ensure they comply — a job which should be carried out by the managing agent or building owner, in Aurora’s case One Housing Group.

But eight months on the cladding has not been inspected by the managing agent or the building owner One Housing Group, leaving Rob in limbo.

‘As things stand my flat is worth zero,’ he says. ‘I am not the only one. There are people at Aurora who want to sell, and this is holding up people’s lives.

‘And obviously there is the safety issue. We do not know if this cladding is combustible or not. There are families in the block, children, old people, young people. It is a big worry.’

Rob added that he is fortunate that his ex is understanding about being owed a five-figure sum. 

Under leasehold law, flat owners must pay for repairs. Typical cladding bills are £30,000 a flat, but have reached £115,000 in one Manchester block

Under leasehold law, flat owners must pay for repairs. Typical cladding bills are £30,000 a flat, but have reached £115,000 in one Manchester block

Under leasehold law, flat owners must pay for repairs. Typical cladding bills are £30,000 a flat, but have reached £115,000 in one Manchester block

But even when owners do get a safety check, any flat that does not pass will be billed for repairs, which owners will forced to pick up.

So far, nine in 10 blocks have failed new safety checks, an investigation has revealed.

Under leasehold law, flat owners must pay for repairs. Typical cladding bills are £30,000 a flat, but have reached £115,000 in one Manchester block.

Costs that could be incurred include £4,000 to replace flammable balconies,  £29,000 for unsafe types of cladding and insulation and £1,000 each for smoke control systems or adding fire breaks. 

The tragedy in 2017, which killed 72 people, exposed decades of 'utter rubbish' building work and regulatory failure that left flammable materials on the building to feed the blaze that ripped through dozens of homes

The tragedy in 2017, which killed 72 people, exposed decades of 'utter rubbish' building work and regulatory failure that left flammable materials on the building to feed the blaze that ripped through dozens of homes

The tragedy in 2017, which killed 72 people, exposed decades of ‘utter rubbish’ building work and regulatory failure that left flammable materials on the building to feed the blaze that ripped through dozens of homes

In the Olympic village in London, the leaseholders of flats that Boris Johnson called ‘swankier than the swankiest Marbella timeshare’ about 360 flats in 11 tower blocks have small amounts of the cladding that fuelled the Grenfell fire. 

The rest of the village’s 63 block also lack detailed fire report, including ‘external wall system’ (EWS1) forms, to prove the safety of the cladding, insulation and walls.

In some cases, surveyors have valued flats marketed at £600,000 as worthless. 

Rachael Grundy, 29, and her best friend own only 25 per cent of their flat in East Village but would be liable for 100 per cent of work costs under the shared-ownership agreement. 

‘I’ve never suffered from mental health issues,’ she told The Sunday Times. ‘Now, I am an extremely anxious person.’

About 700,000 people are still in high-rise flats with dangerous cladding. Millions more face waiting up to a decade for the safety sign-off they need to sell or get a new mortgage

‘They’re trapped and they’ve got nowhere to go . . . If the property chain is broken, the whole housing market could be affected,’ said Clive Betts MP, who chairs Parliament’s housing committee. 

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Dyson engineer wins unfair dismissal claim after manager told her ‘I don’t like Muslims’ 

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dyson engineer wins unfair dismissal claim after manager told her i dont like muslims

An engineer who helped develop Sir Richard Dyson’s electric car has won a religious discrimination and unfair dismissal claim against the company after her manager told her ‘I don’t like Muslims’.

Zeinab Alipourbabaie, 39, told an employment tribunal that senior technical project manager Kamaljit Chana also said: ‘Muslims are violent’ and ‘Pakistani men are grooming our girls.’

Ms Alipourbabaie worked at Dydon in Wiltshire for four years but resigned in 2018 after months of harassment and discrimination by Mr Chana, according to the Times

Zeinab Alipourbabaie

Zeinab Alipourbabaie

Kamaljit Chana

Kamaljit Chana

Zeinab Alipourbabaie (left) told a tribunal that senior technical project manager Kamaljit Chana (right) also said: ‘Muslims are violent’ and ‘Pakistani men are grooming our girls.’

Mr Chana, who is Sikh and also a Conservative councillor in Harrow, northwest London, denied making the comments but a tribunal found Ms Aliporbabaie’s account of the one-to-one meeting ‘compelling and persuasive’.

 In the tribunal’s judgement, it said: ‘He asked if she was a Muslim and she replied that she came from a Muslim family […] he said ‘that he did not like Muslims’.’

The judgement went on to describe how Mr Chana also talked about 9/11 and that Pakistani men ‘are grooming our girls’.

The court also heard Mr Chana excluded Ms Alipourbabaei from meetings and emails and advised against promoting her. 

The court found that Iranian national Ms Alipourbabaie’s resignation amounted to constructive unfair dismissal.

Mr Chana was handed a final written warning but kept his job at Dyson after an internal investigation also found he had bullied and harassed Ms Alipourbabaie.

Dyson told the Times: ‘It said: ‘These allegations were investigated fully and disciplinary action was taken against Kamaljit Chana who was found to have acted inappropriately.

British billionaire Sir James Dyson said his electric car was cancelled for being ‘too risky’

British billionaire Sir James Dyson said his electric car was cancelled for being ‘too risky’

British billionaire Sir James Dyson said his electric car was cancelled for being ‘too risky’

‘We have since launched mandatory ‘respect’ training for all our people.’ 

Earlier this year, British billionaire Sir James Dyson said his company’s electric car was cancelled for being ‘too risky’.

The aborted ‘N526’ Dyson electric car, which Dyson piled £500 million of his own money into before pulling the plug, was a 16-foot-long seven-seater, electric SUV.

The 2.6 tonne-vehicle featured an aluminium body, quiet-running tyres and quick-charging battery cells that would have provided enough power to drive 600 miles on a single charge.

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