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The cost of lockdown on Britain’s economy ‘is not worth the lives saved’, study claims 

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the cost of lockdown on britains economy is not worth the lives saved study claims

The spiralling cost of lockdown has not been worth the lives saved in stark economic terms, a leading economist has warned.

The damage to the economy is an astonishing £70billion greater than the value of the years of life saved, when applying an NHS formula.

The study by former Bank of England policymaker David Miles, with co-authors Mike Stedman and Adrian Heald, urges the Government to ditch blanket lockdown policies designed to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

They claim that the losses caused by continuing with strict restrictions on economic activity – such as social distancing restrictions which limit capacity in restaurants and pubs – outweigh the lives saved.

The spiralling cost of lockdown has not been worth the lives saved in stark economic terms, a leading economist has warned (pictured: Boris Johnson visits families at RAF Lossiemouth, Moray, July 23)

The spiralling cost of lockdown has not been worth the lives saved in stark economic terms, a leading economist has warned (pictured: Boris Johnson visits families at RAF Lossiemouth, Moray, July 23)

The spiralling cost of lockdown has not been worth the lives saved in stark economic terms, a leading economist has warned (pictured: Boris Johnson visits families at RAF Lossiemouth, Moray, July 23)

Lockdown measures should now be focused only on those people who are most at risk, the report adds.

Even by the most conservative estimates, the study’s authors argue, lockdown has cost at least £200billion.

This is ignoring further losses caused by lower economic output in successive years, the disruption to education and vital non-Covid medical procedures being delayed. By contrast the ‘value’ of lives saved is a comparatively small £132billion, the study claims.

Even by the most conservative estimates, the study's authors argue, lockdown has cost at least £200billion (pictured: A deserted Piccadilly Circus looking towards Leicester Square during the first Saturday night in London after the government lockdown, March 2020)

Even by the most conservative estimates, the study's authors argue, lockdown has cost at least £200billion (pictured: A deserted Piccadilly Circus looking towards Leicester Square during the first Saturday night in London after the government lockdown, March 2020)

Even by the most conservative estimates, the study’s authors argue, lockdown has cost at least £200billion (pictured: A deserted Piccadilly Circus looking towards Leicester Square during the first Saturday night in London after the government lockdown, March 2020)

It calculates that 440,000 lives have been saved by lockdown and the average person who has died from Covid-19 would have lived for another ten years, according to life expectancies.

So lockdown saved 4.4million quality years of life – each valued at £30,000 by NHS guidelines – that the pandemic would otherwise have erased.

This means the value of the years of life saved is £132billion, according to the study.

But public sector debt is at nearly £2trillion, ballooning larger than the size of the economy in May for the first time in more than 50 years.

The authors will argue that although lockdown was effective in slowing the rate of infection and deaths from Covid-19, it is ‘very far from clear’ whether tight restrictions should have been kept in place until the end of June, given the economic cost.

The study will be published next Wednesday by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

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Local lockdowns AREN’T working as data shows Covid-19 outbreaks are still spiraling in hot-spots

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local lockdowns arent working as data shows covid 19 outbreaks are still spiraling in hot spots

Economically-crippling local lockdowns are failing to curb coronavirus outbreaks, analysis shows.

More than 17million Britons in 48 towns, cities and boroughs are currently living with even more limited freedoms than the rest of the country.

Many have been barred from meeting friends or family in person and university students in the locked-down areas are practically confined to their halls of residence.

But data shows that Luton is the only area which has successfully managed to drive down its case far enough for the draconian rules to be lifted. 

However, there are fears the Bedfordshire town could be slapped with restrictions once again after cases rose fivefold in the last week, from 26 per 100,000 to 159 per 100,000.

Stockport and Wigan also managed to break free from the shackles of local lockdowns but had measures reimposed on Friday after infections rebounded.

The other 46 regions in lockdown are all recording rises infections, according to the latest Government data. 

Bolton was this week named as Britain’s Covid-19 hotspot after suffering more than 200 cases per 100,000 in the last week. Cases have more than tripled in the last three weeks despite the Greater Manchester town going into a local lockdown earlier this month.

The data is worrying because it implies the economically-damaging and socially restrictive nationwide measures announced last week – including the ‘rule of six’ and 10pm curfew – do little to stop coronavirus’s spread. 

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Public Health England figures show Luton suffered one of the largest increases in Covid-19 cases in the country this week.

The town, which has gradually relaxed its local lockdown in the last month, saw cases rise by 505 per cent  between September 18 and September 25.

There are now concerns, like Stockport and Wigan, Luton could be forced back into a form of lockdown.

Manchester Mayor says 10pm curfew is doing ‘more harm than good’ 

Boris Johnson‘s 10pm coronavirus curfew is doing ‘more harm than good’ the mayor one of the UK’s biggest cities warned this morning – as weekend scenes showed kicked-out drinkers dancing to a brass band in the street. 

Mayor of Greater Manchester Andy Burnham said the government’s drinking deadline was pushing crowds into supermarkets to buy booze to drink on the curbs or in homes.

He warned the curfew was acting as an incentive for behavior which was the opposite of what the measures were aiming to achieve.

The former Labour leadership contender said: ‘I think there needs to be an urgent review of the emerging evidence from police forces across the country. My gut feeling, is that this curfew is doing more harm than good.’

It came as scores of drinkers were spotted in trendy Moseley, Birmingham, on Saturday night twirling around to a brass bands, despite restrictions urging social distancing.

The city is also currently under heavier lockdown rules than much of the UK with people banned from mixing with people they do not live with. 

West Midlands Police were alerted to the potentially dangerous breach and spoke to people to tell them to go home.

The PM’s curfew – which he announced last week – has been widely panned due to these predicable consequences. 

One Tory MP texted Politico: ‘Which clown-faced moron thought it would be a good idea to kick thousands of p***** people out from the pubs into the street and onto the tube at the same time?

‘It’s like some sort of sick experiment to see if you can incubate a second wave.’

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Of the places still in localised shut downs, Leicester saw the biggest rise during the same time frame, with infections shooting up by 152 per cent.

The city of 320,000 people – which was the first in the UK to be put in a local lockdown in July –  recorded 94 cases per 100,000 in the week ending September 25, up from 37 the previous seven days.

Bury, in Greater Manchester, saw infections more than double from 75 per 100,000 to 157,000 in the same recording period. 

Salford recorded a 70 per cent spike in infections in the last week, with cases rising from 79 per 100,000 to 127. 

The Wirral and Rochdale saw an almost identical increase of 59 per cent week-on-week – suffering 121 and 124 cases per 100,000 on September 25, respectively. 

Meanwhile, the likes of Bolton, Blackburn and South Tyneside – which are all living with tighter restrictions than most of the UK – continue to have the worst case rates.

Bolton now tops the Covid-19 hotspot charts, with  201 infections per 100,000 recorded in the week ending September 25.

The Greater Manchester Town is seconded by South Tyneside, which only had measures introduced on September 17. Since then, however, cases more than doubled from 74 per 100,000 to 178 per 100,000.

Blackburn, which has consistently ranked among the worst three Covid-19 infection rate in the country, suffered 167 cases per 100,000 last week. 

Professor Hugh Pennington, emeritus professor of bacteriology at the University of Aberdeen, told The Telegraph: ‘I have to agree that local measures are often having disappointing results. The same in Glasgow and surrounding areas.

‘National lockdown using the same control measures would very likely have the same poor result. In my view all this shows that much more community testing is needed to identify cases and that contact tracing isn’t yet good enough.

Robert Dingwall, professor of sociology at Nottingham Trent University, told the newspaper the figures do not give him confidence the national measures will be successful in driving down the virus’s transmission.

He added: ‘Since March, we should have been giving the evaluation of social interventions as much attention as we have been giving to evaluating therapies or vaccines. The rumoured ban on households meeting has no better basis of evidence beyond the desire to be seen to do something.’

Official data shows that local lockdowns appear to have short term benefits which slowly fade over time. 

Leicester, for example, had a local lockdown announced by the Government on June 30 when there were 30 cases per 100,000 people in a week – the highest in the country at the time.

Shops, restaurants and bars were banned from reopening just as the rest of the country started to emerge from the national shutdown. 

Cases were squashed to below 20 per 100,000 by the end of July, which allowed restrictions to slowly be lifted in August.

Yet by mid-September they had jumped back to 90 per 100,000, prompting ministers to introduce even stricter measures preventing people from mixing with people outwith their own homes.  

Similarly many areas in Greater Manchester, Lancashire and West Yorkshire – which were hit with lockdown rules on July 31 – saw restrictions loosened at the start of September, only to have them reimposed 16 days later.   

Salford, Tameside, Rochdale and the city of Manchester have seen no relaxation of restrictions since they were imposed at the end of July after numbers never dropped off. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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More than TEN MILLION download NHS track and trace app in first three days

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more than ten million download nhs track and trace app in first three days

 More than 10 million people have downloaded the NHS Covid-19 app since it launched on Thursday after pubs and restaurants are turning away customers who don’t have it. 

 The app has been plagued with problems since it launched with the latest fiasco seeing up to 70,000 users blocked from logging their test results.  

Despite glitches that stopped thousands from logging their test results, pubs and restaurants are starting to turn customers away unless they’ve downloaded the app, with QR codes on display for punters to use. 

Government advice tells businesses they ‘must’ display the ‘official NHS QR poster’ and apply for a code to be connected to the app. 

One punter wrote on Twitter today: ‘Last night I was denied a meal because I didn’t have a Gvt phone app!!!!

‘You may think I’m being over dramatic but you must now get the point. What else are we soon going to be denied access to unless we have a government phone app. Please, please, please people wake up.’

Pubs and restaurants have started turning away customers who don't have the app

Pubs and restaurants have started turning away customers who don't have the app

Pubs and restaurants have started turning away customers who don’t have the app

One user, Chloe James, wrote: ‘I’m in a pub and apparently they’ve been told they can’t serve anyone unless they have the track and trace app.’ 

Matt Hancock said on social media it was an ‘absolutely fantastic’ response so far, and urged more people to download it. 

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said that six million people had downloaded the app the first day it launched, and this had since risen to 10 million by midday on Sunday.

More than 1.5 million venue check-ins were recorded on Saturday while more than 460,000 businesses have downloaded and printed QR code posters that can be scanned by the app to check-in to premises, it added.

These QR codes allow contact tracers to reach multiple people if an outbreak is identified in a venue.

Mr Hancock said: ‘The enthusiastic response of over 10m people downloading the app in just three days has been absolutely fantastic.

‘This is a strong start but we want even more people and businesses getting behind the app because the more of us who download it the more effective it will be.

Despite problems more than ten million people have downloaded the app

Despite problems more than ten million people have downloaded the app

Despite problems more than ten million people have downloaded the app

‘If you haven’t downloaded it yet I recommend you join the growing numbers who have, to protect yourself and your loved ones.’

His comments come a day after an issue preventing users of the NHS Covid-19 app in England logging a positive test result was resolved, but people who book a test outside the app still cannot log negative results.  

 

Have you been refused entry to a venue because you didn’t have the track and trace app? E-mail aliki.kraterou@mailonline.co.uk 

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 However NHS hospitals warn the test and trace systems in England isn’t ready for the demands of winter. 

 NHS Providers is calling for testing capacity to be quadrupled within three months, a dramatic improvement on turnaround times and a clear plan for regular testing of health workers, according to the BBC.  

 Concerns were expressed when it emerged people tested in NHS hospitals or Public Health England (PHE) labs, or those taking part in the Office for National Statistics infection survey, could not enter their results on the newly-launched app. 

 The app has been available for download across England and Wales since Thursday, but the problem existed only in England.

A tweet from the official app account on Friday confirmed that certain test results could not be recorded, after a user tweeted to say he was being asked for a code – which he did not have – in order to enter his result.

On Saturday evening, a spokeswoman said: ‘Everyone who receives a positive test result can log their result on the app.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Turkey is accused of deploying F-16 fighter jets in Azerbaijan-Armenia conflict

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turkey is accused of deploying f 16 fighter jets in azerbaijan armenia conflict

A new proxy war is brewing in the Middle East today as Turkey flexed its muscles by backing Azerbaijan in a bitter dispute with Armenia amid heavy fighting which has left at least 39 people dead. 

Armenian separatists claim they were attacked by Turkish mercenaries and F-16 fighter jets in the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region, which belongs to Azerbaijan but is mainly inhabited by ethnic Armenians.

Separatist leader Arayik Harutyunyan accused Turkey of an ‘aggressive and expansionist policy’ in the region while Ankara vowed complete support for ‘our Azerbaijani brothers’ following some of the worst clashes in years. 

While Azerbaijan and Turkey are close allies, sharing cultural and linguistic ties, relations between Turkey and Armenia are still scarred by the early 20th-century genocide in which which as many as 1.5million Armenians were deported and killed. 

The proxy conflict could also draw in Russia, an ally of mainly Christian Armenia which has a military base in the country, and bring chaos to global oil and gas supplies which pass through pipelines in the South Caucasus region.  

An image grab taken from a video made available on the official web site of the Armenian Defence Ministry on September 27, allegedly shows destroying of Azeri military vehicles during clashes between Armenian separatists and Azerbaijan in the breakaway region of Nagorno-Karabakh

An image grab taken from a video made available on the official web site of the Armenian Defence Ministry on September 27, allegedly shows destroying of Azeri military vehicles during clashes between Armenian separatists and Azerbaijan in the breakaway region of Nagorno-Karabakh

An image grab taken from a video made available on the official web site of the Armenian Defence Ministry on September 27, allegedly shows destroying of Azeri military vehicles during clashes between Armenian separatists and Azerbaijan in the breakaway region of Nagorno-Karabakh

Azerbaijan's president said his military had suffered losses in the fighting over the disputed separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh

Azerbaijan's president said his military had suffered losses in the fighting over the disputed separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh

Azerbaijan’s president said his military had suffered losses in the fighting over the disputed separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh

Armenia also claimed that two Azerbaijani helicopters were shot down and three Azerbaijani tanks were hit by artillery, but Azerbaijan's defence ministry has rejected that claim

Armenia also claimed that two Azerbaijani helicopters were shot down and three Azerbaijani tanks were hit by artillery, but Azerbaijan's defence ministry has rejected that claim

Armenia also claimed that two Azerbaijani helicopters were shot down and three Azerbaijani tanks were hit by artillery, but Azerbaijan’s defence ministry has rejected that claim

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Armenian Genocide that still scars relations today  

As many as 1.5million Armenians were rounded up, deported and massacred by their Turkish rulers in the early-20th century massacre. 

The mainly Christian Armenians had clashed with the Turks as the Ottoman Empire fell apart in the late 19th century, and matters came to a head during World War I. 

The Ottoman Empire entered the war on the side of Germany and Austria-Hungary in 1914, and many Armenians were suspected of supporting the Russian enemy.  

On April 24, 1915, thousands of Armenians suspected of harbouring nationalist views and being hostile to Ottoman rule were rounded up. 

On May 26, a special law authorised deportations ‘for reasons of internal security’.  

The Armenian population of Anatolia and Cilicia, labelled ‘the enemy within’, was forced into exile in the Mesopotamian desert.

A large number were killed on the way or in the detention camps.  

Many were burned alive, drowned, poisoned or fell victim to disease, according to foreign diplomats and intelligence services at the time. 

Others starved to death, or were shot or bayoneted by Ottoman Turkish soldiers. 

Turkey rejects the term ‘genocide’, questioning the numbers involved and saying there were fatalities on both sides. 

In 2014, Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan spoke of ‘shared pain’ over the killings, but last year he slammed France for officially commemorating the ‘genocide’.  

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Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan promised support for traditional ally Azerbaijan, said Armenia was ‘the biggest threat to peace in the region’. 

Erdogan called on ‘the entire world to stand with Azerbaijan in their battle against invasion and cruelty.’ 

‘We defend our territory, our cause is right!’ Azerbaijan’s president, Ilham Aliyev, said in an address to the nation.  

Armenia’s ambassador to Russia said that Turkey had sent around 4,000 fighters from northern Syria to Azerbaijan and that they were taking part in the fighting. 

However, an aide to Aliyev called the allegation ‘another provocation by the Armenian side and complete nonsense’.  

Armenia’s hostility to Turkey is rooted in the massacre of as many as 1.5million Armenians the Ottoman Empire during World War I. 

More than 30 countries have recognised the killings as genocide, although Ankara fiercely disputes the term. 

Ethnic Armenian separatists seized the Nagorny-Karabakh region from Baku in a 1990s war that claimed 30,000 lives, but the region’s independence is not officially recognised by any country – not even Armenia.   

President Donald Trump said on Sunday that the United States would seek to end the violence. 

‘We’re looking at it very strongly,’ he told a news briefing. ‘We have a lot of good relationships in that area. We’ll see if we can stop it.’ 

Democratic nominee Joe Biden urged the White House to push for more observers along the ceasefire line and called for Russia ‘to stop cynically providing arms to both sides.’ 

Russian president Vladimir Putin spoke by phone to Armenian prime minister Nikol Pashinyan, but no details of the conversation were available. 

Russia has a military base in Armenia and considers it to be a strategic partner in the South Caucasus region, supplying the ex-Soviet country with weapons. 

The Kremlin has cast itself as a mediator but Azerbaijan claimed last month that Moscow was ‘intensively arming Armenia’ after the earlier clashes in July. 

‘Construction materials are usually not supplied in aeroplanes, there are other tools for that,’ an Azerbaijan official said after Russia said Il-76 strategic airlifters were merely carrying building materials. 

Russian foreign minister Sergey Lavrov ‘is conducting intensive contacts in order to induce the parties to cease fire and start negotiations to stabilise the situation,’ foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said.

The EU, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and Pope Francis have all called for both countries to stop their military actions. 

Albanian prime minister Edi Rama, chairman of the OSCE, called on both sides to stop fighting.

The long-running and unsuccessful negotiations for resolving the territory’s status have been conducted under the auspices of the OSCE. 

An Azerbaijani service member drives an armoured carrier and greets people, who gather on the roadside in Baku on Sunday

An Azerbaijani service member drives an armoured carrier and greets people, who gather on the roadside in Baku on Sunday

An Azerbaijani service member drives an armoured carrier and greets people, who gather on the roadside in Baku on Sunday 

People line up along the roadside to greet Azerbaijani service members, who drive a truck in Baku

People line up along the roadside to greet Azerbaijani service members, who drive a truck in Baku

People line up along the roadside to greet Azerbaijani service members, who drive a truck in Baku

A still image from a video released by the Armenian Defence Ministry shows what is said to be Azerbaijani armoured vehicles, one of which is destroyed by Armenian armed forces

A still image from a video released by the Armenian Defence Ministry shows what is said to be Azerbaijani armoured vehicles, one of which is destroyed by Armenian armed forces

A still image from a video released by the Armenian Defence Ministry shows what is said to be Azerbaijani armoured vehicles, one of which is destroyed by Armenian armed forces

A frame grab from handout video provided by the Armenian Ministry of Defence allegedly shows Azerbaijani tanks at the frontline of the self-proclaimed Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh, between Armenia and Azerbaijan, above and below

A frame grab from handout video provided by the Armenian Ministry of Defence allegedly shows Azerbaijani tanks at the frontline of the self-proclaimed Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh, between Armenia and Azerbaijan, above and below

A frame grab from handout video provided by the Armenian Ministry of Defence allegedly shows Azerbaijani tanks at the frontline of the self-proclaimed Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh, between Armenia and Azerbaijan, above and below

Both ex-Soviet countries declared martial law after shelling which Azerbaijan claimed had killed as many as 550 separatist troops, although Armenia denied this. 

The separatists said on Monday that 15 more of their fighters had been killed, bringing the total reported death toll from both sides to 39.

It was not immediately clear what sparked the fighting, the heaviest since clashes in July killed 16 people from both sides. 

Seven civilian fatalities were reported earlier, including an Azerbaijani family of five and a woman and child on the Armenian side.

Azerbaijan has yet to announce military casualties but defence ministry spokeswoman Shushan Stepanyan claimed that ‘dozens of corpses of Azerbaijani soldiers’ lay on territory won back overnight.  

She said heavy fighting continued on Monday morning and claimed Armenian forces had won back positions taken on Sunday by Azerbaijan. 

But Baku claimed further advances, with the defence ministry asserting that ‘the enemy is retreating’.

Azerbaijani forces ‘are striking enemy positions using rocket artillery and aviation… and have taken several strategic positions around the village of Talysh’. 

Sixteen people have been killed and more than 100 wounded after fighting erupted anew between Armenian and Azerbaijani forces on Sunday, according to officials.

Armenia also claimed that two Azerbaijani helicopters were shot down and three Azerbaijani tanks were hit by artillery, but Azerbaijan’s defence ministry denies this. 

Nagorno-Karabakh broke away from Azerbaijan in a conflict that broke out as the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991.

Although a ceasefire was agreed in 1994, after thousands of people were killed and many more displaced, Azerbaijan and Armenia frequently accuse each other of attacks around Nagorno-Karabakh and along the separate Azeri-Armenian frontier.  

Artur Sarkisian, deputy head of the Nagorno-Karabakh army, said that 16 people were killed and more than 100 wounded

Artur Sarkisian, deputy head of the Nagorno-Karabakh army, said that 16 people were killed and more than 100 wounded

Artur Sarkisian, deputy head of the Nagorno-Karabakh army, said that 16 people were killed and more than 100 wounded

Earlier, the Armenian human rights ombudsman said a woman and child had been killed in the shelling

Earlier, the Armenian human rights ombudsman said a woman and child had been killed in the shelling

Earlier, the Armenian human rights ombudsman said a woman and child had been killed in the shelling

A still image from a video released by the Armenian Defence Ministry shows what is said to be Azerbaijani armoured vehicles, one of which is destroyed by Armenian armed forces in the breakaway region of Nagorno-Karabakh, in this still image from footage released September 27

A still image from a video released by the Armenian Defence Ministry shows what is said to be Azerbaijani armoured vehicles, one of which is destroyed by Armenian armed forces in the breakaway region of Nagorno-Karabakh, in this still image from footage released September 27

A still image from a video released by the Armenian Defence Ministry shows what is said to be Azerbaijani armoured vehicles, one of which is destroyed by Armenian armed forces in the breakaway region of Nagorno-Karabakh, in this still image from footage released September 27

In this handout photo taken from a footage released by Azerbaijan's Defense Ministry on Sunday, Azerbaijan's forces destroy Armenian anti-aircraft system at the contact line of the self-proclaimed Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh

In this handout photo taken from a footage released by Azerbaijan's Defense Ministry on Sunday, Azerbaijan's forces destroy Armenian anti-aircraft system at the contact line of the self-proclaimed Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh

In this handout photo taken from a footage released by Azerbaijan’s Defense Ministry on Sunday, Azerbaijan’s forces destroy Armenian anti-aircraft system at the contact line of the self-proclaimed Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh

Fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan broke out Sunday around the separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh and the Armenian Defense Ministry said two Azerbaijani helicopters were shot down

Fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan broke out Sunday around the separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh and the Armenian Defense Ministry said two Azerbaijani helicopters were shot down

Fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan broke out Sunday around the separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh and the Armenian Defense Ministry said two Azerbaijani helicopters were shot down

What is the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict? 

The Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is an ongoing dispute between Armenia and Azerbaijan over the landlocked region of the South Caucasus.

The mountainous Nagorno-Karabakh region was traditionally inhabited by Christian Armenians and Muslim Turks.

In Soviet times under Joseph Stalin, it became an autonomous region within the republic of Azerbaijan. 

The present conflict began in 1988, when the Karabakh Armenians demanded that Karabakh be transferred from Soviet Azerbaijan to Soviet Armenia.

Armenian artillery position of the self-defense army of Nagorno-Karabakh in Martakert, Nagorno-Karabakh Republic, on April 3, 2016. A four-day escalation in April 2016 became the deadliest ceasefire violation to date

Armenian artillery position of the self-defense army of Nagorno-Karabakh in Martakert, Nagorno-Karabakh Republic, on April 3, 2016. A four-day escalation in April 2016 became the deadliest ceasefire violation to date

Armenian artillery position of the self-defense army of Nagorno-Karabakh in Martakert, Nagorno-Karabakh Republic, on April 3, 2016. A four-day escalation in April 2016 became the deadliest ceasefire violation to date

The conflict escalated into a full-scale war from 1992 – 1994. 

As many as 230,000 Armenians from Azerbaijan and 800,000 Azerbaijanis from Armenia and Karabakh have been displaced as a result of the conflict. 

Around 30,000 people were killed. 

A Russian-brokered ceasefire was signed in May 1994. Since then, both Azerbaijan and Armenia have reported over 7,000 breaches of the ceasefire.

A four-day escalation in April 2016 became the deadliest ceasefire violation to date. The exact number of casualties is unknown, but both sides have admitted to at least 60 dead soldiers and several civilians. 

It is possible that the figures have been under-reported. 

 

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