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Tracey Emin, 57, reveals she lost her mother to a bladder tumour four years ago

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tracey emin 57 reveals she lost her mother to a bladder tumour four years ago

Tracey Emin today revealed she lost her mother four years ago to the same bladder cancer that left her critically ill and claimed she predicted her own diagnosis in a painting. 

The artist, 57, discovered she had a tumour in her bladder in June and feared she would be dead by Christmas, but is now in remission after doctors removed the growth and put her on chemotherapy.  

Miss Emin was diagnosed with squamous-cell bladder cancer, an illness she was tragically familiar with. ‘My mother died of the same cancer,’ she told the Telegraph. ‘Four years ago today.’ 

Her mother, Pam, died in October 2009 aged 88, after doctors decided following a course of radiotheraphy that it would not be possible to operate.

Tracey Emin is pictured with her mother Pam in 2009, who died from the same cancer she has been diagnosed with four years ago

Tracey Emin is pictured with her mother Pam in 2009, who died from the same cancer she has been diagnosed with four years ago

Tracey Emin is pictured with her mother Pam in 2009, who died from the same cancer she has been diagnosed with four years ago 

Pam was regularly seen supporting her daughter at shoots, and the artist has described how losing her felt unreal and ‘so untrue’. 

She took the surname Cashin, and admitted in an interview that because of this ‘not many people’ knew she was Miss Emin’s mother.  

The artist realised something was wrong with her own body when she began to feel tired in the spring, and would wake up in the morning after dinner the night before hungover and vomiting. 

She added: ‘During lockdown, I realised it would be impossible for me to have a UTI, because I hadn’t been out of the house for 12 weeks. Then, during lockdown, I became more and more ill.

‘I got an appointment with my urogynaecologist, and she found a giant tumour. I had an MRI scan the next day, and a phone call that night saying, ‘You’re going nowhere, you’re doing nothing – you’re going straight to hospital.’

The artist was working on a large red canvas at the time she saw her urogynaecologist, and felt that in some way it predicted the terrible news she was to receive. 

WHAT IS BLADDER CANCER?

Bladder cancer is caused by a tumour developing in the lining of the bladder or the organ’s muscle.

Around 10,200 new cases are diagnosed in the UK each year and 81,400 people in the US, according to figures.

It is the 10th most common cancer in the UK – but a little more prevalent in the US – and accounts for about three per cent of all cases.

The cancer is more common in men and has a 10-year survival rate of about 50 per cent. Around half of cases are considered preventable.

Symptoms of the disease include blood in the urine, needing to urinate more often or more urgently than normal and pelvic pain.

However, unexpected weight loss and swelling of the legs can also be signs of the killer disease.

Smoking and exposure to chemicals in plastics and paints at work can increase the risk of getting bladder cancer.

Treatment varies depending on how advanced the cancer is, and may include surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

Source: NHS Choices

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After returning home from the MRI scan, she walked over the painting to inspect it. 

‘It looked finished, but it wasn’t – I could paint more on it, paint over it,’ she said. ‘I was wondering what it was, looking at it, for something like two hours.’

Shortly afterwards Miss Emin heard the news, she was suffering with very aggressive squamous cell cancer, which surgeons feared would kill her in months if it spread to her lymph nodes.

As a result, a decision was made to remove not only her bladder but also her uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, lymph nodes, urethra and part of her colon and vagina.

Prior to the surgery, Miss Emin said, she stayed up for 24 hours with her solicitor rewriting her will before sending an email to 70 friends breaking the news of her cancer and instructing them: ‘Do not contact me’. 

But now, following a six-and-a-half-hour operation carried out by 12 surgeons in July, she is in remission.

She has been left with a stoma bag as a result of having ‘half my body chopped out’ and is still struggling to find the energy to paint.

In another frank interview with The Times, Miss Emin admitted that if she had received the diagnosis last year she ‘probably would have topped myself’.

But, she said, she was now glad finally to be talking about the illness, as it would stop people assuming she was just hungover when too unwell to attend events.

Discussing her ordeal she said: ‘It was squamous cell cancer, which means it’s really rapid, really aggressive. It’s known as bad cancer.’

She recalled her surgeon telling her: ‘We have to move fast. But the good news is, your bladder is really c**p and what we’re going to do is just take all your bladder out and the cancer will be gone.’ But, she added: ‘It didn’t turn out like that.’ 

Miss Emin was told if they found cancer in her lymph nodes during surgery she would be dead before Christmas. ‘That’s what the stakes were.’

Remembering her conversation with the surgeon, she recounted: ‘He said, ‘So we’re going to remove your bladder and we’re going to remove your uterus, your fallopian tubes, your ovaries, your lymph nodes, part of your colon, your urethra.’

‘I said to him, ‘Oh my God, anything else?’ And he said, ‘Yes, part of your vagina.’ And I went, ‘Oh ****ing hell’.’  

Miss Emin was diagnosed with cancer earlier this year and is in remission after an operation. She is picture (above) in a selfie taken in August but released yesterday

Miss Emin was diagnosed with cancer earlier this year and is in remission after an operation. She is picture (above) in a selfie taken in August but released yesterday

Miss Emin was diagnosed with cancer earlier this year and is in remission after an operation. She is picture (above) in a selfie taken in August but released yesterday

Miss Emin had suffered from frequent bladder infections as a result of having to self-catheterise since doctors discovered her bladder had ‘blown out and stopped working’ when she was in hospital for appendicitis five years ago.

However she decided to seek help from a Harley Street urologist in June after finding her catheters blood-stained and experiencing pain that felt ‘really wrong’.

An MRI scan detected the growth and she underwent the dramatic surgery a month later, she told The Times. 

Following the diagnosis Miss Emin joked: ‘I said to the doctors, ‘So I’m going to lose a load of weight and have a really tight vagina – and this is bad?’ ‘ Of the surgery, she added: ‘I managed to keep all of my clitoris. Not that it’s working.

‘But they had to cut away a whole side of the vaginal wall and sew it back together, so it’s really, really sealed.’

She said she hoped that would not be permanent but will require a series of therapies. Despite her upbeat attitude to her ordeal, Miss Emin admitted: ‘If it was a year ago I probably would have topped myself anyway, because I was so depressed.’

She added that while she was now on the road to recovery she had not yet been able to do the thing she loves most – paint.

Miss Emin told The Times it had been a relief to her that she was childless, explaining: ‘There was one big problem I didn’t have to face, did I? Didn’t have to look my children in the face and say, ‘Mummy might be dying’.’ 

In a separate interview, with art website Artnet, she said: ‘Yesterday, I was crying because I wanted to paint and I didn’t have the energy to do it.’ 

The artist said that following her recovery she was hoping to find love.

When asked about her future ambitions she said: ‘Well, it’s a lot different from what it was before.

‘To get past Christmas would be a good one. I would like to be with someone who really, really loved me for who I am. But also they’d have to really love my art.’

Pictured, arriving at the annual British Book Awards (known as the Nibbies) at Grosvenor House, Park Lane on April 20, 2005 in London

Pictured, arriving at the annual British Book Awards (known as the Nibbies) at Grosvenor House, Park Lane on April 20, 2005 in London

Pictured, arriving at the annual British Book Awards (known as the Nibbies) at Grosvenor House, Park Lane on April 20, 2005 in London

Miss Emin said: ‘I can feel more than ever that love is allowed. At my age now, love is a completely different dimension and level of understanding. I don’t want children, I don’t want all the things that you might subconsciously crave when you’re young – I just want love.

‘And as much love as I can possibly have. I want to be smothered in it, I want to be devoured by it. And I think that is okay.’

Squamous cell cancer of the bladder accounts for about five in 100 of all bladder cancers.

The survival rate for women at one year is 64.5 per cent and falls to 43.9 per cent at five years. Miss Emin, who lives in Margate, Kent, was nominated for the Turner Prize in 1999. Her famous works include her unmade bed installation.

She is gearing up for the launch of her latest exhibition Details Of Love, but she will not be at the opening in Brussels this Friday.

Next month Miss Emin will exhibit her never-before-seen paintings alongside works by Norwegian expressionist Edvard Munch as part of a ‘landmark exhibition’ at the Royal Academy. 

Tracey Emin/Edvard Munch: The Loneliness Of The Soul will focus on themes of grief, loss and longing, with Miss Emin picking 19 oil paintings and watercolours by Munch, including his 1907 painting The Death Of Marat, to explore his complex relationship with women.

These will sit alongside 25 of her own pieces, including paintings – some of which will be on display for the first time – neons and sculpture.        

Highlights of Tracey Emin’s career 

1995, Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-95: This piece first brought Tracey Emin to wider fame, both in the art world and among the general public

1995, Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-95: This piece first brought Tracey Emin to wider fame, both in the art world and among the general public

1995, Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-95: This piece first brought Tracey Emin to wider fame, both in the art world and among the general public

1999, My Bed: The piece is Emin's record of several days spent in bed in the grip of depression. The bed is unmade and the sheets are stained. All around are strewn a variety of items such as condoms, contraceptive pills, underwear stained with menstrual blood, money, and cigarette ends. The work was nominated for the Turner prize in 1999 and received a hugely mixed response from the public and press

1999, My Bed: The piece is Emin's record of several days spent in bed in the grip of depression. The bed is unmade and the sheets are stained. All around are strewn a variety of items such as condoms, contraceptive pills, underwear stained with menstrual blood, money, and cigarette ends. The work was nominated for the Turner prize in 1999 and received a hugely mixed response from the public and press

1999, My Bed: The piece is Emin’s record of several days spent in bed in the grip of depression. The bed is unmade and the sheets are stained. All around are strewn a variety of items such as condoms, contraceptive pills, underwear stained with menstrual blood, money, and cigarette ends. The work was nominated for the Turner prize in 1999 and received a hugely mixed response from the public and press

2001, The Perfect Place to Grow: This work pays homage to the artist’s Turkish Cypriot father who, she says, is a fantastic gardener but a terrible carpenter. It consists of a wooden birdhouse-like structure on wooden stilts

2001, The Perfect Place to Grow: This work pays homage to the artist’s Turkish Cypriot father who, she says, is a fantastic gardener but a terrible carpenter. It consists of a wooden birdhouse-like structure on wooden stilts

2001, The Perfect Place to Grow: This work pays homage to the artist’s Turkish Cypriot father who, she says, is a fantastic gardener but a terrible carpenter. It consists of a wooden birdhouse-like structure on wooden stilts

2004, Hate and Power Can be a Terrible Thing: This appliquéd blanket work is a blistering attack Margaret Thatcher, and her participation in the Falklands War of 1982

2004, Hate and Power Can be a Terrible Thing: This appliquéd blanket work is a blistering attack Margaret Thatcher, and her participation in the Falklands War of 1982

2004, Hate and Power Can be a Terrible Thing: This appliquéd blanket work is a blistering attack Margaret Thatcher, and her participation in the Falklands War of 1982

2011, I Promise To Love You: In the 2000s, Emin began working extensively with neon lighting. These works feature words and phrases in her handwriting. Pictured, 2011's neon sculpture I Promise To Love You

2011, I Promise To Love You: In the 2000s, Emin began working extensively with neon lighting. These works feature words and phrases in her handwriting. Pictured, 2011's neon sculpture I Promise To Love You

2011, I Promise To Love You: In the 2000s, Emin began working extensively with neon lighting. These works feature words and phrases in her handwriting. Pictured, 2011’s neon sculpture I Promise To Love You

 

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Friend says Khashoggi ‘threatened’ by Saudi official before death

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friend says khashoggi threatened by saudi official before death

A close friend of Jamal Khashoggi has told a Turkish court on Tuesday that the slain Saudi journalist felt threatened by people close to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

The main court in Istanbul held a second hearing in the trial in absentia of 26 Saudi suspects in the Washington Post columnist’s high-profile murder — including two former aides to the powerful Saudi crown prince.

The 59-year-old was suffocated and dismembered inside the kingdom’s Istanbul consulate on October 2, 2018 after going inside to get documents for his marriage to Turkish fiancee Hatice Cengiz.

The murder sparked an international outcry and tarnished the reputation of the oil-rich kingdom and the crown prince.

Jamal Khashoggi

Jamal Khashoggi

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman

A close friend of Jamal Khashoggi (left) has told a Turkish court on Tuesday that the slain Saudi journalist felt threatened by people close to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (right)

Ayman Nour, an Egyptian political dissident and longtime friend of Khashoggi, told the court that the journalist had described to him being personally threatened by the Saudi media czar.

‘Jamal said he had been threatened by Qahtani and his family,’ Turkish media quoted Nour as telling the court.

‘Nour said Khashoggi had reported being threatened by Saud al-Qahtani since 2016,’ Rebecca Vincent of Reporters Without Borders (RSF) separately tweeted from the courtroom.

‘Khashoggi spoke of a phone call from Qahtani when he was living in Washington DC, saying he knew his kids and where they lived. Nour said Khashoggi was crying, which was unusual, and said he was afraid.’

The Turkish trial is being held separately from a Saudi one that overturned five death sentences issued after a closed-door hearing in September.

The Riyadh court instead jailed eight unidentified people for terms ranging from seven to 20 years in what Amnesty International and Reporters Without Borders (RSF) both called a ‘parody of justice’.

Turkish prosecutors have charged Saudi’s former deputy intelligence chief Ahmed al-Assiri and the royal court’s one-time media czar Saud al-Qahtani with orchestrating the murder and giving direct orders to a Saudi hit team.

Khashoggi’s fiancee Cengiz also attended Tuesday’s hearing, which was adjourned to March 4.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has said the order to murder Khashoggi came from ‘the highest levels’ of the Saudi government but has never directly blamed Prince Mohammed.

Relations between the two countries suffered in the wake of Khashoggi’s death.

Ayman Nour (pictured) told the court that the journalist had described to him being personally threatened by the Saudi media czar

Ayman Nour (pictured) told the court that the journalist had described to him being personally threatened by the Saudi media czar

Ayman Nour (pictured) told the court that the journalist had described to him being personally threatened by the Saudi media czar

But Erdogan discussed ways to enhance ties with the prince’s ageing father King Salman on the eve of last weekend’s virtual G20 summit hosted by Saudi Arabia.

The Turkish trial is monitored closely by human rights advocates.

Vincent said the Istanbul court rejected RSF’s application to become a civil party in the Khashoggi’s case.

This would have given the Paris-based group broader access to court documents.

‘We were disappointed,’ Vincent told AFP, calling it ‘a missed opportunity to ensure robust international scrutiny.’

‘But regardless we will continue to closely monitor this case and call for adherence to international standards,’ she said.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Ministers ‘plot foreign aid law change’ as Scots Tory Ruth Davidson brands it ‘poor economics’ 

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ministers plot foreign aid law change as scots tory ruth davidson brands it poor economics

Ministers could change the law to cut Britain’s foreign aid budget as part of sweeping economic reforms.

The current rate of 0.7 per cent of GDP was enshrined in law by the Coalition government in 2015, but the current administration wants to cut it to 0.5 per cent.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak is set to outline a raft of economic moves tomorrow when he presents a spending review to help the UK get through the pandemic. 

Boris Johnson is believed to have approved a temporary cut for just a year, but altering the law would allow the target to be lowered more permanently. 

The UK has previously said it would be cutting its global aid budget by £2.9 billion this year due to the economic hit of the coronavirus crisis, but that the 0.7 per cent commitment towards international development would still be met. 

The legal change, first reported by the BBC, comes as politicians and church leaders voice their concern at the plans.

Former Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson became the latest to do so today, branding the proposal ‘bad economics’.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak is set to outline a raft of economic moves tomorrow when he presents a spending review to help the UK get through the pandemic

Chancellor Rishi Sunak is set to outline a raft of economic moves tomorrow when he presents a spending review to help the UK get through the pandemic

Chancellor Rishi Sunak is set to outline a raft of economic moves tomorrow when he presents a spending review to help the UK get through the pandemic

Politicians and church leaders have voiced their concern at the plans, with former Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson branding the proposal 'bad economics'

Politicians and church leaders have voiced their concern at the plans, with former Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson branding the proposal 'bad economics'

Politicians and church leaders have voiced their concern at the plans, with former Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson branding the proposal ‘bad economics’

Writing in the Times, Ms Davidson, a former critic of Boris Johnson, said: ‘The UK has always believed in shouldering its burden in the world. When famine or natural disaster strike, Britain pitches in. 

‘We’re one of the biggest educators of girls on the planet, support the largest vaccine programmes and do more to return war-ravaged land to civilian use through de-mining programmes than every other nation bar the US.

‘This isn’t simple charity, it benefits us too. Countries with healthy, educated, literate populations – and without huge swathes of unusable land – have higher employment, greater resilience and are more stable. 

‘They are less likely to descend into war or provide home to terrorists and are more likely to prove bigger and more reliable suppliers and consumers for trade.’

The MSP joins the former prime ministers David Cameron and Tony Blair in warning against the move, while Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has also made a significant intervention.

Mr Welby told The Observer: ‘A global recovery from the economic consequences of the pandemic requires a global response. Keeping our aid commitment is a strong signal that the UK is a reliable partner for long-term economic, social, environmental and educational advancement across the globe.’

Mr Cameron, who oversaw the country first meeting the 0.7% target in 2013, said abandoning it would be a ‘moral, strategic and political mistake’.

And Mr Blair said foreign aid – and the 0.7% target – had been a ‘great British soft power achievement’ and that it had saved millions of lives in Africa by reducing deaths from malaria and HIV.

Last week, the Prime Minister’s official spokesman drew attention to the fact the legislation enshrining the 0.7% target in UK law explicitly acknowledged it might not always be met.

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has also made a significant intervention, telling the Observer: 'Keeping our aid commitment is a strong signal that the UK is a reliable partner for long-term economic, social, environmental and educational advancement across the globe'

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has also made a significant intervention, telling the Observer: 'Keeping our aid commitment is a strong signal that the UK is a reliable partner for long-term economic, social, environmental and educational advancement across the globe'

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has also made a significant intervention, telling the Observer: ‘Keeping our aid commitment is a strong signal that the UK is a reliable partner for long-term economic, social, environmental and educational advancement across the globe’

Meanwhile, coronavirus has led to a strain on the public purse with the Government spending billions keeping the economy ticking over.

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab was grilled on the proposed change today int he Commons.

SNP MP Neil Gray asked if now was the right time to be considering cuts to the UK’s aid budget given US president-elect Joe Biden’s commitment to increase aid spending.

Mr Raab replied: ‘Actually, we consistently show that we are a leading, if not one of the leading, countries on aid. That will continue.

‘We’ve also, which will matter to the United States, indicated the increase in defence spending which shows what a dependable ally we are and all of the soundings that we’ve had, and I’ve had, with the incoming leadership show there are huge opportunities on climate change, on Covid, to strengthen the relationship even further.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Mark Meadows tells president’s staff they need permission to speak to members of next administration

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mark meadows tells presidents staff they need permission to speak to members of next administration

Mark Meadows has instructed White House staff not to speak with Joe Biden‘s team, in another sign President Donald Trump‘s team is still not completely complying with the transition despite authorizing it Monday.

‘Unless specifically authorized,’ the White House chief of staff said in a late Monday evening memo seen by Bloomberg that those on Trump’s team ‘are not permitted to speak directly with a member of the Biden transition team or the federal transition coordinator.’

Meadows, however, did say in the memo that the White House would ‘comply with all actions needed to ensure the smooth transfer of power.’

He said that the Trump administration’s work is not yet finished.

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows instructed Trump's team not to 'speak directly' with members of the new administration unless given 'specific authorization' to do so

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows instructed Trump's team not to 'speak directly' with members of the new administration unless given 'specific authorization' to do so

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows instructed Trump’s team not to ‘speak directly’ with members of the new administration unless given ‘specific authorization’ to do so

Although the transition process has been authorized, President Donald Trump says this is no where close to a concession that he lost to Joe Biden

Although the transition process has been authorized, President Donald Trump says this is no where close to a concession that he lost to Joe Biden

Although the transition process has been authorized, President Donald Trump says this is no where close to a concession that he lost to Joe Biden

Trump finally allowed the transition to Biden to commence, but the president made it clear he is still not conceding the election and will fight the results to the end.

The General Services Administration ascertained the election for Biden Monday, which Trump said he authorized, meaning the former vice president will now begin to get daily intelligence briefings and communicate with the COVID task force.

‘Remember, the GSA has been terrific, and Emily Murphy has done a great job, but the GSA does not determine who the next President of the United States will be,’ Trump tweeted Tuesday morning. 

The transition could only begin once the GSA recognized the ‘apparent successful candidate.’

Biden began announcing his Cabinet picks on Monday and will formally introduce them during a speech in Delaware on Tuesday afternoon.

Many Republicans were urging the president to allow the transition to begin after GSA Administrator Emily Murphy made it clear she would not sign off on the transition process even after Biden declared victory and most major media outlets called him the victor.

Trump has praised Murphy for holding her ground.

‘I want to thank Emily Murphy at GSA for her steadfast dedication and loyalty to our Country,’ Trump tweeted Monday. ‘She has been harassed, threatened, and abused – and I do not want to see this happen to her, her family, or employees of GSA.’

‘Our case STRONGLY continues, we will keep up the good fight, and I believe we will prevail!’ he continued. ‘Nevertheless, in the best interest of our Country, I am recommending that Emily and her team do what needs to be done with regard to initial protocols, and have told my team to do the same.’

Meadows and other senior Trump aides, including White House Counsel Pat Cipolline, have encouraged the president to allow the transition to begin – even without conceding.

They admitted they could not justify withholding support for the transition any longer.

Trump has launched several legal challenges in swing states that went blue this year, but many have already been thrown out and none have yet prevailed.

General Services Administration Administrator Emily Murphy would not sign off on ascertaining the election for Joe Biden until yesterday ¿ when Trump said he instructed her to give the OK for the transition to begin

General Services Administration Administrator Emily Murphy would not sign off on ascertaining the election for Joe Biden until yesterday ¿ when Trump said he instructed her to give the OK for the transition to begin

General Services Administration Administrator Emily Murphy would not sign off on ascertaining the election for Joe Biden until yesterday – when Trump said he instructed her to give the OK for the transition to begin

36049234 8982147 image a 10 1606229036819

36049234 8982147 image a 10 1606229036819

Trump took credit for the ascertainment, claiming he will allow the transition to begin

Trump took credit for the ascertainment, claiming he will allow the transition to begin

Trump took credit for the ascertainment, claiming he will allow the transition to begin

The president reiterated on Twitter that the transition did not mean his concession – still insisting it will be revealed he is the true winner.

‘What does GSA being allowed to preliminarily work with the Dems have to do with continuing to pursue our various cases on what will go down as the most corrupt election in American political history?’ he asked.

The post was flagged as disputed by Twitter.

Trump continued on Monday evening; ‘We are moving full speed ahead. Will never concede to fake ballots & ‘Dominion’.’

Dominion Voting Systems spoke out Sunday saying it is ‘not physically possible’ for its machines to change voter selections.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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