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US should shut down totally for another four to six weeks to save economy, senior Fed official says

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us should shut down totally for another four to six weeks to save economy senior fed official says

A top official at the Federal Reserve has recommended that the U.S. were to ‘lock down really hard’ for four to six weeks, in order to save the ailing economy.

Neel Kashkari, president of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank, said on Sunday that Congress can well afford large sums for coronavirus relief efforts.

The economy, which in the second quarter suffered its biggest blow since the Great Depression, would be able to mount a robust recovery, but only if the virus were brought under control, he told CBS’ Face the Nation.

Neel Kashkari appeared on Face the Nation on Sunday to call for a second 4-6 week lockdown

Neel Kashkari appeared on Face the Nation on Sunday to call for a second 4-6 week lockdown

Neel Kashkari appeared on Face the Nation on Sunday to call for a second 4-6 week lockdown

Kashkari said that without a second lockdown the recovery will be 'much slower for all'

Kashkari said that without a second lockdown the recovery will be 'much slower for all'

Kashkari said that without a second lockdown the recovery will be ‘much slower for all’

‘If we don’t do that and we just have this raging virus spreading throughout the country with flare-ups and local lockdowns for the next year or two, which is entirely possible, we’re going to see many, many more business bankruptcies,’ he said.

‘That’s going to be a much slower recovery for all of us.’

He said Congress is positioned to spend big on coronavirus relief efforts because the nation’s budget gap can be financed without relying on foreign borrowing, given how much Americans are saving.

‘Those of us who are fortunate enough to still have our jobs, we’re saving a lot more money because we’re not going to restaurants or movie theaters or vacations,’ Kashkari said.

‘That actually means that we have a lot more resources as a country to support those who have been laid off.’

The Democratic-led U.S. House of Representatives approved a $3 trillion relief bill in May, while Senate Republicans, many of whom have expressed concerns about mounting debt, countered by proposing a $1 trillion aid package last week.

Efforts to craft a compromise appear stalled.

Democrats and Republicans are arguing over another bail out to boost the U.S. economy

Democrats and Republicans are arguing over another bail out to boost the U.S. economy

Democrats and Republicans are arguing over another bail out to boost the U.S. economy

The stock market plummeted when COVID-19 first hit the US back in the spring

The stock market plummeted when COVID-19 first hit the US back in the spring

The stock market plummeted when COVID-19 first hit the US back in the spring

In an interview with ABC’s This Week on Sunday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said President Donald Trump would spend what was needed, but that the deficit was a factor.

‘There’s obviously a need to support workers and support the economy,’ he said. 

‘On the other hand, we have to be careful about not piling on enormous amount of debts for future generations.’

Kashkari took a different view, stressing both the high level of domestic saving and historically low interest rates.

‘I’m not worried about it,’ he said. 

‘Congress should use this opportunity to support the American people and the American economy.’

‘If we get the economy growing, we will be able to pay off the debt.’

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Dyson engineer wins unfair dismissal claim after manager told her ‘I don’t like Muslims’ 

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dyson engineer wins unfair dismissal claim after manager told her i dont like muslims

An engineer who helped develop Sir Richard Dyson’s electric car has won a religious discrimination and unfair dismissal claim against the company after her manager told her ‘I don’t like Muslims’.

Zeinab Alipourbabaie, 39, told an employment tribunal that senior technical project manager Kamaljit Chana also said: ‘Muslims are violent’ and ‘Pakistani men are grooming our girls.’

Ms Alipourbabaie worked at Dydon in Wiltshire for four years but resigned in 2018 after months of harassment and discrimination by Mr Chana, according to the Times

Zeinab Alipourbabaie

Zeinab Alipourbabaie

Kamaljit Chana

Kamaljit Chana

Zeinab Alipourbabaie (left) told a tribunal that senior technical project manager Kamaljit Chana (right) also said: ‘Muslims are violent’ and ‘Pakistani men are grooming our girls.’

Mr Chana, who is Sikh and also a Conservative councillor in Harrow, northwest London, denied making the comments but a tribunal found Ms Aliporbabaie’s account of the one-to-one meeting ‘compelling and persuasive’.

 In the tribunal’s judgement, it said: ‘He asked if she was a Muslim and she replied that she came from a Muslim family […] he said ‘that he did not like Muslims’.’

The judgement went on to describe how Mr Chana also talked about 9/11 and that Pakistani men ‘are grooming our girls’.

The court also heard Mr Chana excluded Ms Alipourbabaei from meetings and emails and advised against promoting her. 

The court found that Iranian national Ms Alipourbabaie’s resignation amounted to constructive unfair dismissal.

Mr Chana was handed a final written warning but kept his job at Dyson after an internal investigation also found he had bullied and harassed Ms Alipourbabaie.

Dyson told the Times: ‘It said: ‘These allegations were investigated fully and disciplinary action was taken against Kamaljit Chana who was found to have acted inappropriately.

British billionaire Sir James Dyson said his electric car was cancelled for being ‘too risky’

British billionaire Sir James Dyson said his electric car was cancelled for being ‘too risky’

British billionaire Sir James Dyson said his electric car was cancelled for being ‘too risky’

‘We have since launched mandatory ‘respect’ training for all our people.’ 

Earlier this year, British billionaire Sir James Dyson said his company’s electric car was cancelled for being ‘too risky’.

The aborted ‘N526’ Dyson electric car, which Dyson piled £500 million of his own money into before pulling the plug, was a 16-foot-long seven-seater, electric SUV.

The 2.6 tonne-vehicle featured an aluminium body, quiet-running tyres and quick-charging battery cells that would have provided enough power to drive 600 miles on a single charge.

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First black woman to win Booker prize reveals she struggled with racial identity as a child

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first black woman to win booker prize reveals she struggled with racial identity as a child

The first black woman to win a Booker prize, Bernadine Evaristo, has revealed that she struggled with racial identity as a child. 

Evaristo recalled how as a child growing up in the 60s and 70s she would deliberately cross the road to avoid being seen with her ‘very dark-skinned’ father because she ‘didn’t want to be associated with him’. 

The acclaimed author, 61, grew up in Woolwich, southeast London and was the daughter of a white English teacher and a Nigerian welder. 

The first black woman to win a Booker prize, Bernadine Evaristo, has revealed that she struggled with racial identity as a child

The first black woman to win a Booker prize, Bernadine Evaristo, has revealed that she struggled with racial identity as a child

The first black woman to win a Booker prize, Bernadine Evaristo, has revealed that she struggled with racial identity as a child

Speaking on today’s Desert Island Discs on Radio 4, Evaristo recalled: ‘I remember when I was about 11, seeing him walking down the street towards me and I crossed the road because I didn’t want to say hello to him because I didn’t want to be associated with him.

‘I mean, that feels terrible now, but that’s what it was like, because growing up in the 1960s and 70s, in a very white area, there was nothing around us to tell us that being a person of colour was a good thing.’ 

Evaristo was the fourth of eight children and said she and her siblings were not taught about their Nigerian heritage growing up. Her father, born Julius Taiwo Obayomi Evaristo, adopted the English name Danny. 

‘He [my father] had four boys, four girls at a time when there was a lot of racism on the streets before the Race Relations Act,’ she said. 

Bernadine Evaristo

Bernadine Evaristo

Her father, Julius Taiwo Obayomi Evaristo, who adopted the name Danny

Her father, Julius Taiwo Obayomi Evaristo, who adopted the name Danny

Evaristo, left, was the fourth of eight children and said she and her siblings were not taught about their Nigerian heritage growing up, and her father, born Julius Taiwo Obayomi Evaristo, right, adopted the English name Danny

‘So he had children in a society where it was kind of OK to be racist, and he had to protect us.’ 

The Race Relations Act 1965 was the first piece of legislation in the UK to address the prohibition of racial discrimination. 

The act banned racial discrimination in public places and made the promotion of hatred on the grounds of ‘colour, race, or ethnic or national origins’ an offence.

Evaristo believes her father’s reluctance to tell his children about Nigerian culture was because he was concerned for them. ‘He didn’t tell us anything. He said later on that he wanted us to grow up as English children and so it wouldn’t be wise for him to tell us about his past or to pass on his language, which was Yoruba.’ 

Evaristo pictured as a child, second right, with the rest of her family. Evaristo was the fourth of eight children and said she and her siblings were not taught about their Nigerian heritage growing up

Evaristo pictured as a child, second right, with the rest of her family. Evaristo was the fourth of eight children and said she and her siblings were not taught about their Nigerian heritage growing up

Evaristo pictured as a child, second right, with the rest of her family. Evaristo was the fourth of eight children and said she and her siblings were not taught about their Nigerian heritage growing up

She also explained how she would be referred to as ‘half caste’ by other black people in the UK due to her mixed heritage. ‘Growing up we were called … half caste and that didn’t feel like an insult. That was what mixed-race people were called,’ she said.  

The author’s Booker-winning novel ‘Girl, Woman, Other’ topped the best-selling charts for five weeks over summer in the wake of the widespread Black Lives Matter protests. 

She became the first BAME woman and the first black British writer to assume the top spot in the UK paperback fiction charts. 

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SAS Mountain Troop members are barely visible as they patrol in winter camouflage 

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sas mountain troop members are barely visible as they patrol in winter camouflage

This photo shows SAS soldiers patrolling in the snow as they wear their winter camouflage and are barely visible. 

The soldiers are SAS Mountain Troops, who are experts in mountain climbing and arctic warfare and are trained to survive and fight in extreme conditions. 

They can be called on anywhere from the frozen hills in Norway to the mountains in Afghanistan

Their winter camouflage includes face masks and white speckled clothing and equipment, the Daily Star reported

Can you spot the SAS soldiers in this photo? Their winter camouflage includes face masks and white speckled clothing and equipment

Can you spot the SAS soldiers in this photo? Their winter camouflage includes face masks and white speckled clothing and equipment

Can you spot the SAS soldiers in this photo? Their winter camouflage includes face masks and white speckled clothing and equipment 

The outfit makes it possible for them to move almost invisibly through mountains and forests in snowy conditions. 

Members of the Mountain Troops  are among the best climbers in the world and have trained in various climbing schools across Europe and many go on climbing expeditions up some of the world’s highest mountains, including Everest. 

Mountain Troops use a range of equipment in their role, including climbing shoes with sticky rubber soles, climbing harnesses, carabiners for hooking onto climbing rope lines and nuts – metal wedges that fit into cracks, used to secure climbing lines.  

They can be called on anywhere from the frozen hills in Norway (pictured, file photo) to the mountains in Afghanistan

They can be called on anywhere from the frozen hills in Norway (pictured, file photo) to the mountains in Afghanistan

They can be called on anywhere from the frozen hills in Norway (pictured, file photo) to the mountains in Afghanistan

Their skills have been required throughout history until recently where their training in high-altitude warfare was used in the mountain ranges of Afghanistan. 

They were used during the 1982 Falklands conflict and during the cold war, they were used in Norway to guard Nato’s northern flanks against an expected Soviet push. 

Mountain Troopers are highly skilled in long distance skiing, scaling sheer cliffs and rock faces as well as arctic survival techniques.  

Their skills allow them to reach areas considered inaccessible by others and to attack from unexpected directions.  

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