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Who wants to get married in Granny’s dress?

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who wants to get married in grannys dress

When it came to finding ‘something old’ for her wedding last week, Princess Beatrice had a very special item indeed: a dress borrowed from her grandmother the Queen. 

The original diamante-encrusted dress was designed by Norman Hartnell for Her Majesty to wear to a movie premiere in 1962. 

Though her dress was old, it seems Beatrice was bang on trend. Vintage dresses are soaring in popularity, with many brides tweaking their grandmother’s dresses. 

Here, five women tell JILL FOSTER why they ‘did a Beatrice’ on their big day… 

When it came to finding 'something old' for her wedding last week, Princess Beatrice had a very special item indeed: a dress borrowed from her grandmother the Queen

When it came to finding 'something old' for her wedding last week, Princess Beatrice had a very special item indeed: a dress borrowed from her grandmother the Queen

When it came to finding ‘something old’ for her wedding last week, Princess Beatrice had a very special item indeed: a dress borrowed from her grandmother the Queen

GRAN ASKED, ‘WHERE’S THE RUFFLE?’ 

Bridhe McGroder, 37, works in marketing. She married her husband at Hackney Town Hall in September 2017. The couple live in London and have a four-month-old daughter. Bridhe says:

I’ve always loved vintage clothes but it wasn’t until I got engaged that I considered wearing my grandma Joan’s dress from her wedding in 1947. My mum, Therese, had also worn it in 1980, so I tried it on and luckily it fitted. I never even tried another dress.

It needed a few alterations, but nothing major — the ruffle that had worked in the 1940s and 1980s had to go — so I took it to Splendid Stitches who took up the hem slightly. 

They took some of the detail out but kept the beautiful vintage lace, originally from Ireland. It felt very special to have something with so much family heritage — plus it saved me a lot of money!

Pictured: Bridhe McGroder

Pictured: Bridhe McGroder

Pictured: Bridhe McGroder's grandmother Joan

Pictured: Bridhe McGroder's grandmother Joan

Bridhe McGroder (left), 37, works in marketing. She married her husband at Hackney Town Hall in September 2017. Pictured right: Ms McGroder’s grandmother Joan

On the day itself, I felt fabulous and very privileged to be wearing something both Mum and Grandma had worn. Mum loved the changes I’d made. My grandma is still alive — she’s 100 now — but didn’t get to see the dress on the big day because she lives in New Zealand and was too frail to travel. 

We had a second celebration there not long afterwards and I wore it again. She thought it was wonderful that I’d worn her dress, although her first words were ‘Where’s that ruffle?’

I was so proud to wear something so beautiful that two such inspiring women had worn before me.   

I FELT LIKE SHE WAS BY MY SIDE 

Charlotte Smith, 33, a personal assistant, married husband Alex, 33, a civil servant in 2016 in their home county of Devon. Charlotte is expecting their first baby in October. Charlotte says:

I’d seen photographs of both my mum and granny wearing the same dress for their weddings, in 1983 and 1958 respectively, but I always felt I’d probably want my own dress.

Charlotte Smith, 33, a personal assistant, married husband Alex, 33, a civil servant in 2016 in their home county of Devon

Charlotte Smith, 33, a personal assistant, married husband Alex, 33, a civil servant in 2016 in their home county of Devon

Charlotte Smith, 33, a personal assistant, married husband Alex, 33, a civil servant in 2016 in their home county of Devon

I'd seen photographs of both my mum and granny (pictured) wearing the same dress for their weddings, in 1983 and 1958 respectively, writes Charlotte Smith

I'd seen photographs of both my mum and granny (pictured) wearing the same dress for their weddings, in 1983 and 1958 respectively, writes Charlotte Smith

I’d seen photographs of both my mum and granny (pictured) wearing the same dress for their weddings, in 1983 and 1958 respectively, writes Charlotte Smith

But when I got engaged, I tried on ‘the family dress’ and it was a done deal — the champagne colour suited my skin tone.

We took the sleeves off to make it strapless and used the material to expand the dress. I think Granny — who died in 2011, aged 81 — would have loved it. Wearing her dress was a way of having her there with me.

I discovered a little blue ribbon tied into the fabric — her ‘something blue’ — and it made me feel close to her. 

NAN KEPT THE WEDDING DRESS IN THE SHED

Amie Chelsea Roberts, 30, works in public relations. She married Luke, 32, in 2013, in Florida. The couple live in Lincolnshire. Amie says:

I hate being the centre of attention, and wedding-dress shopping was my idea of a nightmare. But I needed a dress so I took my nan, mum and sister with me for moral support.

Every time I put on a dress, it didn’t feel right. I kept saying: ‘I want something with less of this or more of that’, and my nan kept saying: ‘Ooh, my dress was like that’.

I thought she was exaggerating. But after three days of fruitless shopping, I went back to her house and she persuaded me to try hers on. It wasn’t in the best condition — she’d kept it in the loft and shed for 48 years. 

Amie Chelsea Roberts, 30, works in public relations. She married Luke, 32, in 2013, in Florida. The couple live in Lincolnshire

Amie Chelsea Roberts, 30, works in public relations. She married Luke, 32, in 2013, in Florida. The couple live in Lincolnshire

Amie Chelsea Roberts, 30, works in public relations. She married Luke, 32, in 2013, in Florida. The couple live in Lincolnshire

Pictured: Ms Roberts' grandmother Ann Lovegrove on her wedding day in 1965

Pictured: Ms Roberts' grandmother Ann Lovegrove on her wedding day in 1965

Pictured: Ms Roberts’ grandmother Ann Lovegrove on her wedding day in 1965

But when I tried it on, it simply felt right. When I walked into the room both Mum and Nan burst into tears. It was beautiful, fitted perfectly and, what’s more, it was free.

I wanted to make it a little more modern as it had a very puffy underskirt, which isn’t my style. With Nan’s blessing, I asked a seamstress to make it more column-like and alter the neckline into a sweetheart style.

Nan got married in October 1965 in church, whereas I was getting married on a beach, so it needed to look less formal and be cooler due to the hot sunshine.

What was really strange was that I didn’t need any alteration in the fit. Nan had exactly the same size 10 figure as me when she married at 18. She was thrilled to see me wearing it on the day and it made it extra special for me, too.

Amie’s grandmother, Ann Lovegrove, 73, is a retired school administrator. She married her husband Brian, 76, in 1965. Ann says:

When Amie tried on my dress for the first time, I couldn’t believe I’d ever been that slim! We dry-cleaned it and even soaked it in the bath for two days to remove all the marks.

I shed a tear or two when I saw her on her wedding day, wearing the dress I’d worn 48 years previously. It was meant to be.

I ADDED CRYSTALS AND USED THE FIVE-METRE TRAIN TO ENLARGE IT 

Stephanie Langley-Poole, 33, an insurance director, married husband Tom, 32, who also works in insurance in 2018. The couple live in Haywards Heath, West Sussex. Stephanie says:

My Aunt Jill wore my grandmother Pamela’s wedding dress for her own wedding in 1979, and after Tom and I got engaged she mentioned that I should wear it, too.

When I tried it on, it was too small for my size 10 frame. It had a 5m train which I didn’t like, and an awful pink lining. It definitely wasn’t ‘The One’.

Stephanie Langley-Poole, 33, an insurance director, married husband Tom, 32, who also works in insurance in 2018

Stephanie Langley-Poole, 33, an insurance director, married husband Tom, 32, who also works in insurance in 2018

Stephanie Langley-Poole, 33, an insurance director, married husband Tom, 32, who also works in insurance in 2018

My Aunt Jill wore my grandmother Pamela’s wedding dress (pictured) for her own wedding in 1979, and after Tom and I got engaged she mentioned that I should wear it, too, writes Stephanie

My Aunt Jill wore my grandmother Pamela’s wedding dress (pictured) for her own wedding in 1979, and after Tom and I got engaged she mentioned that I should wear it, too, writes Stephanie

My Aunt Jill wore my grandmother Pamela’s wedding dress (pictured) for her own wedding in 1979, and after Tom and I got engaged she mentioned that I should wear it, too, writes Stephanie

But I took it to a bridal alterations company which said it could use the fabric from the train to make the dress bigger; modernise it with Swarovski crystals down the back; and straighten the upturned collar.

By the third fitting I was considering alternatives. And then at the fourth fitting, just eight weeks before the wedding, all the alterations came together and I fell in love with it.

I was always very close to my grandmother, who died in 2008 at 79. My dad was very moved that I was the third woman in his family wearing her wedding dress.

WEARING IT MOVED GRANDAD TO TEARS

Kara Allsopp, 28, a nursery nurse, married Steven, 29, who works in retail in June 2019 in Sheffield, where the couple live. Kara says:

When I was little, I used to love dressing up in my nan June’s wedding dress. It was a gorgeous lacy tea-dress that she’d worn in 1960.

After I got engaged, the more I looked at designs, the more I was drawn to her gown.

Kara Allsopp, 28, a nursery nurse, married Steven, 29, who works in retail in June 2019 in Sheffield, where the couple live

Kara Allsopp, 28, a nursery nurse, married Steven, 29, who works in retail in June 2019 in Sheffield, where the couple live

Kara Allsopp, 28, a nursery nurse, married Steven, 29, who works in retail in June 2019 in Sheffield, where the couple live

When I was little, I used to love dressing up in my nan June’s wedding dress, writes Kara

When I was little, I used to love dressing up in my nan June’s wedding dress, writes Kara

When I was little, I used to love dressing up in my nan June’s wedding dress, writes Kara

When I asked Nan if I could wear it, she broke down in tears. But she was 5ft 5in and I’m 5ft 10in, so it needed rather a lot of altering. I had the sleeves taken off, and the material was used to make the dress bigger.

Sadly, my nan never got to see me in it. After a few months of ill health she died three months before the wedding. My grandad Colin said he’d understand if I didn’t want to wear the dress any more, but I wanted to carry her up the aisle with me.

Both he and my dad were very emotional about seeing me in Nan’s dress.

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Over 3.8m EU citizens apply to stay in UK after Brexit transition

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over 3 8m eu citizens apply to stay in uk after brexit transition

More than 3.8million EU citizens have applied to stay in the UK permanently after freedom of movement ends – with two million granted approval so far.

Nationals from the bloc and their families must go through the Home Office’s settlement scheme by June next year to carry on living and working in the country after the Brexit transition period.

According to the latest figures, 2,041,200 people had been granted settled status up to the end of last month. 

A further 1,475,500 were granted pre-settled status, where they will need to reapply again after living in the country for five years to gain permanent residence.

More than 3.8million EU citizens have applied to stay in the UK permanently after freedom of movement ends - with over two million granted approval so far

More than 3.8million EU citizens have applied to stay in the UK permanently after freedom of movement ends - with over two million granted approval so far

More than 3.8million EU citizens have applied to stay in the UK permanently after freedom of movement ends – with over two million granted approval so far

Some 4,600 applications were refused, 36,500 were withdrawn or void and 34,900 were invalid – where the Home Office decides someone is not eligible to apply or has failed to provide sufficient proof of residence.

In total, 3,805,200 applications have been received so far, with 3,516,700 processed.

The number of applications being submitted and processed dipped during the peak of the coronavirus pandemic.

But the Home Office said it received 92,000 in July and dealt with 133,100 during the month.

Immigration minister Kevin Foster said EU citizens were an ‘integral part of UK society’ and 3.5 million had already secured their rights in UK law.

‘There’s plenty of time left to apply before the June 30 2021 deadline and a wide range of support is available online, over the telephone and in person if you need it,’ he said. 

But the Liberal Democrats repeated calls for EU citizens to be given an automatic right to stay in the UK and special documentation to avoid ‘a new Windrush-style scandal’.

The party’s home affairs spokeswoman Christine Jardine said: ‘With so many people being refused settled status, granted only temporary ‘pre-settled status’ or still waiting for a decision, it’s clear that this Conservative Government’s scheme is anything but automatic.

‘And without physical proof of their rights, EU citizens will be at the mercy of the Conservatives’ hostile environment. They must not become the victims of a new Windrush-style scandal.’ 

The next official quarterly figures on how the scheme is progressing are due to be published towards the end of the month.

After Boris Johnson (pictured in Northern Ireland today) secured a Brexit deal, EU nationals and their families must go through the Home Office's settlement scheme by June next year to carry on living and working in the UK

After Boris Johnson (pictured in Northern Ireland today) secured a Brexit deal, EU nationals and their families must go through the Home Office's settlement scheme by June next year to carry on living and working in the UK

After Boris Johnson (pictured in Northern Ireland today) secured a Brexit deal, EU nationals and their families must go through the Home Office’s settlement scheme by June next year to carry on living and working in the UK

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Coronavirus: UK deaths and cases on Thursday

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coronavirus uk deaths and cases on thursday

Another 13 people have died of Covid-19 in England’s hospitals but no-one else has died of the illness in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland, officials revealed today.

Scotland today marked four full weeks without a single death from coronavirus north of the border, according to its official government statistics.

A full round-up of the total number of fatalities — which will include all settings in England and not just hospitals — will be published later by the Department of Health.  

Today’s preliminary update comes amid confusion over how many people have actually died of the coronavirus, with ministers now counting deaths in six different ways.

Officials yesterday revised the overall count following an urgent review, knocking off around 5,000 victims who died at least 28 days after testing positive for the virus. It took the official death toll to 41,329.

But the Department of Health still publishes the original count that includes anyone who has ever tested positive and died, with the overall number of victims under this method standing at around 46,000. 

A third count will be kept by Public Health England, along with records by statistical bodies in each country and also measures of ‘excess’ deaths. Totals now range from 41,000 to almost 66,000.

In other developments to the coronavirus crisis in Britain today:

  • A-level students were left in limbo as their teachers scrambled to appeal against tens of thousands of ‘unfair’ downgraded results released just three weeks before the university deadline;
  • British holidaymakers in France could be spared quarantine for now despite a surge in coronavirus cases — but the Netherlands and Malta are facing tougher UK curbs; 
  • Coronavirus kills around 1.23 per cent of all infected patients, according to a major study that estimated around 3.4million people in England may have been infected with Covid-19;
  • Russia’s leading respiratory doctor has quit over ‘gross violations’ of medical ethics that rushed through Vladimir Putin’s coronavirus Sputnik V vaccine;
  • The NHS Test and Trace smartphone app is being re-launched using technology made by Apple and Google, with a second round of trials on the Isle of Wight and in the London borough of Newham;
  • More than 1.85million people were waiting longer than 18 weeks for routine hospital treatment in England in June in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic — the highest number since records began in 2007.
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Officials yesterday revised the overall count following an urgent review, knocking off around 5,000 victims who died at least 28 days after testing positive for the virus. It took the official death toll to 41,329. But the Department of Health still publishes the original count that includes anyone who has ever tested positive and died, with the overall number of victims under this method standing at around 46,000. A third count will be kept by Public Health England, along with records by statistical bodies in each country and also measures of 'excess' deaths. Totals now range from 41,000 to almost 66,000

Officials yesterday revised the overall count following an urgent review, knocking off around 5,000 victims who died at least 28 days after testing positive for the virus. It took the official death toll to 41,329. But the Department of Health still publishes the original count that includes anyone who has ever tested positive and died, with the overall number of victims under this method standing at around 46,000. A third count will be kept by Public Health England, along with records by statistical bodies in each country and also measures of 'excess' deaths. Totals now range from 41,000 to almost 66,000

Officials yesterday revised the overall count following an urgent review, knocking off around 5,000 victims who died at least 28 days after testing positive for the virus. It took the official death toll to 41,329. But the Department of Health still publishes the original count that includes anyone who has ever tested positive and died, with the overall number of victims under this method standing at around 46,000. A third count will be kept by Public Health England, along with records by statistical bodies in each country and also measures of ‘excess’ deaths. Totals now range from 41,000 to almost 66,000

HOW MANY PEOPLE HAVE REALLY DIED FROM COVID-19 IN THE UK? 

Department of Health (no cut-off): 46,706 

Department of Health’s latest death count for all settings stands at 46,706.

The daily data does not represent how many Covid-19 patients died within the last 24 hours — it is only how many fatalities have been reported and registered with the authorities.

It also only takes into account patients who have ever tested positive for the virus, as opposed to deaths suspected to be down to the coronavirus.

The method came under scrutiny because it meant someone who once had Covid-19 and then recovered would be counted, even if they were hit by a bus or were in a car crash months later. 

Department of Health (28-day cut off): 41,329

If someone died 28 days after testing positive for Covid-19, they wouldn’t be classed as a coronavirus death under this measure.  

This means that many victims who recovered and died of unrelated causes are not included.

Public Health England (60-day cut off): 45,038 

This method will count a Covid-19 death as anyone who died with in 60 days of a positive result. It will be published once a week.

It leaves room for those who may have died several weeks after getting infected, considering some patients may be in hospital for a long time before they eventually die of the disease.

However, it also means some people who tested positive for the virus, recovered, and then died a while later of different causes will be picked up.

Public Health England said the 60-day cut off is better than 28 days because some patients suffer long term Covid-19 symptoms after appearing to recover, and cannot be missed out from the tally if they do not die in the immediate month after their diagnosis. 

NHS England: 29,444

NHS England is the only statistical body to keep a rolling tally of how many patients have died of coronavirus in hospitals.

Statistics show 29,444 patients have died after testing positive for Covid-19 in hospitals across England. 

National statistical bodies: 56,846

Data compiled by the statistical bodies of each of the home nations show 56,846 people died of either confirmed or suspected Covid-19 across the UK by the end of May.

The Office for National Statistics yesterday confirmed that 51,779 people in England and Wales died with confirmed or suspected Covid-19 by July 31.

The number of coronavirus deaths was 854 by the same day in Northern Ireland, according to the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA).

National Records Scotland — which collects statistics north of the border — said 4,213 people had died across the country by June 22.

Their tallies are always 10 days behind the Department of Health (DH) because they wait until as many fatalities as possible for each date have been counted, to avoid having to revise their statistics.

Excess deaths: 65,278

The total number of excess deaths is at least 65,000.

Excess deaths are considered to be a more accurate measure of the number of people killed by the pandemic because they include a broader spectrum of victims.

As well as including people who may have died with Covid-19 without ever being tested, the data also shows how many more people died because their medical treatment was postponed, for example, or who didn’t or couldn’t get to hospital when they were seriously ill.

Data from England and Wales shows there has been an extra 59,324 deaths between March 15 and June 12, as well as 4,953 in Scotland between March 2 and June 22 and 1,001 in Northern Ireland between March 28 and June 26.

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Today’s NHS data — which is a separate measure by its own accord because it only takes into account deaths in hospitals in England — shows 13 more people between the ages of 49 and 90 died between July 18 and August 12.

Five of the victims died in the North East of England, five in the North West, two in the Midlands and one in London.    

Ministers now count coronavirus deaths in six different ways — including the NHS England tally — following an urgent review into how fatalities were calculated.

Health chiefs last night unveiled two new measures of recording Covid-19 victims.

One of the measures only counts a death as being down to coronavirus if they die within four weeks of testing positive for the disease and stands at 41,329. The other has a cut-off of 60 days (45,038).

The methods are in addition to the original government calculation (46,706), which sparked fury after top academics found it meant no-one in England could ever technically recover. Coronavirus patients would be counted as a victim, even if they were hit by a bus months after beating the disease.

National statistical bodies collect the other two tallies, including one that adds up to 56,842 because it tots up all confirmed and suspected deaths in each of the home nations.

The other calculates excess deaths, or how many more people died than expected over a certain time-frame (60,000). They are considered the most accurate way of analysing how many people have really died in an outbreak.

Each tally gives a different perspective as health officials said there is no correct way of counting Covid-19 deaths.

Some experts welcomed the ‘sensible’ switch to the ‘headline’ 28-day count, which brought England in line with the rest of the UK and shaved 5,400 off the government count.

Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter, a statistician at Cambridge University, said he felt ‘sorry for everyone’ amid the confusion of the true tally.

The UK Government had recorded 46,706 deaths in during the pandemic up to yesterday, when the results of a inquiry finally came to light.

The initial method, from Public Health England (PHE) counted people as victims if they die of any cause any time after testing positive for Covid-19.

Survivors would never be considered truly recovered from the disease and it would have meant every single person that has ever tested positive (313,798) would have shown up in the death tally eventually.

The flaw, discovered by Dr Yoon Loke, a pharmacologist at the University of East Anglia, and Oxford University’s Professor Carl Heneghan, prompted Health Secretary Matt Hancock to order a review last month.

The academics said the method is likely why the daily fatality tolls have not dropped as quickly in England as elsewhere, because Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland — which have been seen zero daily deaths for weeks — use a 28-day cut off.

Officials said it slashed almost 5,400 deaths off the total for England, therefore lowering the UK total to 41,329.

Most of the deaths come off the tallies for June, July and August.

For example, under the old PHE system, 2,086 deaths were reported in England in July by date of death, with the 28 days cut off this number is 574 – nearly a quarter of what was previously reported, Professor Heneghan pointed out.

Although scientists welcomed the new way of counting deaths, the damage caused by the original counting method, used for more than five months, has left a sour taste.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4 today, Sir David said: ‘People have been watching this daily figure and haven’t realised how ridiculous it is.

‘This will make a difference but it doesn’t make a difference to the fact we have done very badly and there has been a very large number of deaths.

‘I also would say thought that people are on the whole rather too cautious rather too fearful and the communication hasn’t helped in that, particularly that’s why the current communication of the risks of deaths at the moment is so vital.’

Professor Spiegelhalter noted there were around five ways of counting Covid-19 deaths now, but did not list them himself.

He said: ‘I do feel sorry for everyone… it is very confusing.’

Professor Karol Sikora, a cancer specialist and dean at the University of Buckingham medical school, said the old system had inflated numbers ‘for weeks’.

He wrote on Twitter: ‘These figures have been so influential, I’m angry at the way they’ve been handled.’

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Joss Stone angers viewers by saying ‘happiness is a choice’

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joss stone angers viewers by saying happiness is a choice

Joss Stone has been branded ‘deluded’ and ‘tone deaf’ by angry Good Morning Britain viewers after she declared ‘happiness is a choice’ from the comfort of her luxury home in the Bahamas.  

The multi-millionaire singer, 33, was slammed for being ‘out of touch’, ‘patronising’ and ‘entitled’ as show fans vented their fury on Twitter after her Thursday morning video-link live from the Caribbean.

In 2012, Joss was said to be the fifth richest British singer under 30 with an estimated net worth of £10 million. 

'Deluded': Joss Stone has angered Good Morning Britain viewers by telling them to be happy from her Bahamas home

'Deluded': Joss Stone has angered Good Morning Britain viewers by telling them to be happy from her Bahamas home

‘Deluded’: Joss Stone has angered Good Morning Britain viewers by telling them to be happy from her Bahamas home

As well as her music career, Joss is also close friends to Prince Harry and attended his royal wedding to Meghan Markle in 2018. 

The singer has been friends with both the Duke of Sussex, 35, and Prince William for years due to her humanitarian work. She was also a guest at the Duke of Cambridge’s wedding to Kate Middleton in 2011.

During her interview, Joss also raved about the government’s rescue package for the arts, despite many within the industry criticising the funding for being insufficient.

Promoting her A Cuppa Happy podcast with GMB’s Charlotte Hawkins and Shaun Fletcher, she said: ‘We have a lot of opportunity to be happy and we don’t always take it.

'Tone deaf': The singer, 33, said 'everyone has a choice to be happy' as she spoke from the Caribbean on Thursday, with fans slamming her as 'tone-deaf'

'Tone deaf': The singer, 33, said 'everyone has a choice to be happy' as she spoke from the Caribbean on Thursday, with fans slamming her as 'tone-deaf'

‘Tone deaf’: The singer, 33, said ‘everyone has a choice to be happy’ as she spoke from the Caribbean on Thursday, with fans slamming her as ‘tone-deaf’

‘Every person I’ve spoken to so far [on the podcast] has flagged that we have choice, and I don’t think everybody truly feels that way – I think some people genuinely feel that they don’t have it. And that is a total myth’

She added: ‘We do have choice in mostly every direction, unless we’re enslaved and someone’s taken that choice away from you, or you’re in prison and you don’t have a choice to walk outside. 

‘But, mentally, we have little choices that we make as we walk along in this life, and that is for every single person. That’s comforting, really. It’s very freeing.’ 

Ka-ching! In 2012, Joss was said to be the fifth richest British singer under 30 with an estimated net worth of £10 million (pictured in 2016)

Ka-ching! In 2012, Joss was said to be the fifth richest British singer under 30 with an estimated net worth of £10 million (pictured in 2016)

Ka-ching! In 2012, Joss was said to be the fifth richest British singer under 30 with an estimated net worth of £10 million (pictured in 2016)  

The singer then spoke about the Government’s funding for the arts, saying we should all be very grateful for their help.

She said: ‘I heard recently that Boris did something, he gave loads of money to the arts in the UK, something huge for the arts! 

‘I heard that and I was like ‘Oh my God, another little gem that’s happened to our little nation. We’re so bloody lucky!”  

Viewers did not take kindly to her comments, venting their frustrations on social media. 

Many branded her ‘out of touch’, ‘deluded’ and ‘entitled’ as they criticised her for making light of the situation that many Britons are finding themselves in due to coronavirus and the ensuing economic hardship. 

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Angry: Many branded her 'out of touch', 'deluded' and 'entitled' as they criticised her for making light of the current situation

Angry: Many branded her 'out of touch', 'deluded' and 'entitled' as they criticised her for making light of the current situation

Angry: Many branded her ‘out of touch’, ‘deluded’ and ‘entitled’ as they criticised her for making light of the current situation

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'Out of touch with reality': Many said that happiness is not always a choice for families struggling in the UK

'Out of touch with reality': Many said that happiness is not always a choice for families struggling in the UK

‘Out of touch with reality’: Many said that happiness is not always a choice for families struggling in the UK

One said: ‘How unbelievably patronising, entitled & blinkered. Its not a choice to be in lockdown, unemployed, having no money 4 bills/food, relative dead from covid. Well at least I’m not rich stuck out in the Bahamas in my luxury house.’ 

Another wrote: I’m sure a single mother with 2 young kids, struggling to pay the bills and put food on the table will take this advice on board. So out of touch with reality these people.’

Referencing her comments about the arts industry, one person said: ‘ I could have smashed my tv when she was cooing over the 1.8bn to the arts! 

‘The events industry and the supply chain to it is collapsing right now and she is oblivious! Me and 1000s of others are being made redundant and shes banging on about choice and being happy!’

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Venting their anger: Many on social media called out the singer for her comments on Thursday

Venting their anger: Many on social media called out the singer for her comments on Thursday

Venting their anger: Many on social media called out the singer for her comments on Thursday

As well as her music career, Joss is also close friends to Prince Harry and attended his royal wedding to Meghan Markle in 2018. 

The singer has been friends with both the Duke of Sussex, 35, and Prince William for years. She was also a guest at the Duke of Cambridge’s wedding to Kate Middleton in 2011.

Joss and Prince Harry have bonded over their humanitarian work, with the singer an ambassador for his Sentebale charity.

He founded Sentebale with Prince Seeiso in 2006 to improve prospects for the thousands of children and young people affected by HIV/AIDS in Africa’s Lesotho and Botswana.

Joss even told HELLO! magazine at a charity concert in 2016: ‘He’s quite shy in that way, but it depends. Last time I was singing in Lesotho he started a conga line, so I wouldn’t put it past him. He’s a fun human being.’

The singer grew up in a sprawling rural converted farmhouse in Devon and she is reported to have bought the property at just 18 after her parents split.

Joss’ father, Richard Stoker, is said to run a ‘successful fruit and nut importexport business’ claims the Telegraph.

While her mother, Wendy Joseph, rented out guest houses on the family’s former sprawling rural estate. 

Joss now lives in the US and had been spending lockdown in her lavish home on the east coast of America.  

At the BRIT Awards in 2007, the singer was ridiculed for adopting a fake American dialect. She has previously claimed that her transatlantic accent is due to spending her early 20s in America.  

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