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Woman mugged, dragged down street and run over in Argentina

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woman mugged dragged down street and run over in argentina

A chilling surveillance video captured the moment a woman was run over by a car while she was being dragged down a street by two armed muggers aboard a motorcycle in Argentina.

The near-fatal incident took place in the Buenos Aires city of Moreno on Tuesday morning when Brenda Gutiérrez stopped by her neighborhood bakery before attending a job interview.

A security camera video shows the moment the 24-year-old was standing outside the shop before two men drove up to the sidewalk and grabbed her cellphone and handbag. 

Brenda Gutiérrez is recovering at a Buenos Aires, Argentina, hospital after she was run over by a car. The 24-year-old was mugged by two men aboard a motorcycle and she managed to hold on to her belongings as the motorist speed down a street. Gutiérrez fell off the bike and was nearly crushed by a car, suffering several fractures

Brenda Gutiérrez is recovering at a Buenos Aires, Argentina, hospital after she was run over by a car. The 24-year-old was mugged by two men aboard a motorcycle and she managed to hold on to her belongings as the motorist speed down a street. Gutiérrez fell off the bike and was nearly crushed by a car, suffering several fractures

Brenda Gutiérrez is recovering at a Buenos Aires, Argentina, hospital after she was run over by a car. The 24-year-old was mugged by two men aboard a motorcycle and she managed to hold on to her belongings as the motorist speed down a street. Gutiérrez fell off the bike and was nearly crushed by a car, suffering several fractures

The wife of Tomás Villalba, the driver of the vehicle (pictured) that ran over Brenda Gutiérrez, said he was just trying to avoid a collision with the motorcycle. The suspects fired at his car after he crashed into a pole before fleeing

The wife of Tomás Villalba, the driver of the vehicle (pictured) that ran over Brenda Gutiérrez, said he was just trying to avoid a collision with the motorcycle. The suspects fired at his car after he crashed into a pole before fleeing

The wife of Tomás Villalba, the driver of the vehicle (pictured) that ran over Brenda Gutiérrez, said he was just trying to avoid a collision with the motorcycle. The suspects fired at his car after he crashed into a pole before fleeing

Additional surveillance footage shows the suspects driving on to the street and speeding away as Gutiérrez was being dragged while she held on to one of the assailants. Footage shows a car avoiding the motorcycle and running over her after she fell to the pavement. 

The car was operated by Tomás Villalba, a 20-year-old employee of the bakery who happened to be driving by. A woman who identified herself as Luz, Villalba’s wife, told Argentine news station Telefé Noticias that her husband only was trying to maneuver around the motorbike before he hit Gutiérrez and crashed into a pole.

‘Brenda could not be seen because she was behind the motor. My husband wanted to avoid them. Instead of breaking, he accelerated, the car hit a pole,’ she said. ‘He gets down and yells when he sees Brenda lying down.’

The woman said Villalba ‘never wanted to drive over on Brenda, he never wanted this. What he wanted was to avoid them, for the muggers to go away and save Brenda, but he could not because when accelerating he hit a pole.’

Pictured are the two suspects involved in the near-fatal mugging of Brenda Gutiérrez on Tuesday in the Buenos Aires town of Moreno. Both men remain at-large

Pictured are the two suspects involved in the near-fatal mugging of Brenda Gutiérrez on Tuesday in the Buenos Aires town of Moreno. Both men remain at-large

Pictured are the two suspects involved in the near-fatal mugging of Brenda Gutiérrez on Tuesday in the Buenos Aires town of Moreno. Both men remain at-large

Surveillance camera captures the moment a motorist slammed into a motorcycle which dragged a mugging victim Tuesday in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Surveillance camera captures the moment a motorist slammed into a motorcycle which dragged a mugging victim Tuesday in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Surveillance camera captures the moment a motorist slammed into a motorcycle which dragged a mugging victim Tuesday in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Brenda Gutiérrez suffered fractures to her arm, forehead and ribs. She was also diagnosed with  a contusion in the pelvis and internal bleeding,

Brenda Gutiérrez suffered fractures to her arm, forehead and ribs. She was also diagnosed with  a contusion in the pelvis and internal bleeding,

Brenda Gutiérrez suffered fractures to her arm, forehead and ribs. She was also diagnosed with  a contusion in the pelvis and internal bleeding,

Witnesses told authorities that the suspects fired several shots at Villalba’s vehicle before they fled. 

It took an ambulance approximately 30 minutes to reach the accident site as Villalba, his wife and mother tended to Gutiérrez before paramedics rushed her to a hospital. 

Gutiérrez suffered suffered fractures to her arm, forehead and ribs, and was also diagnosed with contusion in the pelvis and internal bleeding, and was listed in stable condition.

Rubén Gutiérrez said Villalba was not at fault for nearly crushing his daughter and thanked him for saving her life.

‘It was a miracle, the truth is that my daughter was born again today,’ he said.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Police to go to woodland spot where witness said he saw Russell Causley ‘burning something’

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police to go to woodland spot where witness said he saw russell causley burning something

Police are to visit woods where a witness said he saw wife killer Russell Causley ‘burning something in a rug’ in 1985 after the murderer was freed despite not revealing where his victim’s body is.  

Russell Causley, 78, killed his wife Carole Packman, 40, in Bournemouth in 1985, and evaded justice for almost a decade after she went missing, before becoming the first person in British legal history to be convicted of murder without a body. 

Witness Jay Fellows, 49, said he was cycling through the New Forest at the time as a teenager when he saw a rug wrapped around an item being burned at a firepit by a man he was ‘100 per cent sure’ was Causley. 

He led officers to the scene, but police said the evidence was insufficient for them to excavate despite Mrs Packman’s daughter Sam Gillingham, 51, urging them to do so.

But now police have agreed to go back to the scene with Packman’s family, according to the Daily Mirror.    

Russell Causley (centre) with his wife Carole Packman (left) and daughter Sam Gillingham (right). The 78-year-old murderer killed his wife when she was 40 in Bournemouth in 1985

Russell Causley (centre) with his wife Carole Packman (left) and daughter Sam Gillingham (right). The 78-year-old murderer killed his wife when she was 40 in Bournemouth in 1985

Russell Causley (centre) with his wife Carole Packman (left) and daughter Sam Gillingham (right). The 78-year-old murderer killed his wife when she was 40 in Bournemouth in 1985

Former aircraft engineer Causley was only caught by police when he made a botched attempt to fake his own death as part of an elaborate insurance fraud.

Causley was twice jailed for Mrs Packman’s murder – in 1996 and, after a quashed conviction, again in 2004.

What happened to Carole Packman? 

Carole Packman disappeared from her family home in Bournemouth in 1985. 

Her daughter Sam Gillingham, then 16, came home from school to find a note, supposedly from her mother, along with her wedding ring.  The letter said that she was leaving their family. 

The year before, Causley moved his lover Patricia Causley into the house and later changed his surname to hers.  

It was not until 10 years later, when Causley was jailed for two years for trying to fake his death in a boating accident that he was found guilty of her murder.   He allegedly made a jail cell confession, telling of the ‘perfect’ murder of his ‘b**** wife’. 

Police reopened their investigation into his wife’s disappearance. 

Causley was convicted of murder in 1996, but it was quashed in 2003.  

In 2004, he was found guilty at a retrial after his sister said she had heard him admit the killing.    

Now aged 78, he was the first killer in British legal history to be found guilty without his victim’s body ever being found.

The judgment was quashed by the Court of Appeal before a retrial was ordered in 2004, which saw Causley found guilty and jailed for the murder for a second time.

But in recent weeks an appeal to keep him behind bars was rejected and he has been freed.  

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The killer, who has been released after having been held at HMP Littlehey in Cambridgeshire, was the first person in British legal history to be convicted of murder without a body.

Mr Fellows told the Mirror: ‘I recognised his ginger hair and his sideburns – it was definitely him. I am as certain as I can be of anything in my life that Causley was at that spot.

‘I used to think what that guy was doing wasn’t normal. I even remember the sunlight flickering through the trees.’

He said the man added: ‘My dog died, I’m burning my dog.’ 

Mrs Gillingham said the sighting by Mr Fellows near Ringwood in Hampshire in July or August ‘fits with the timings and locations’.

She added: ‘I remember coming to Ringwood as a family to walk the dogs and climb trees. Police should at least rule it out and set my mind at rest.’

But detectives said the dates given by Mr Fellows, who is a now campsite manager on Jersey, were inconsistent with Mrs Packman’s disappearance on June 15.

Dorset Police told MailOnline its officers from the major crime investigation team met with Mr Fellows on June 21, 2017 and they travelled together to an area of land adjacent to Hightown Lake near Ringwood, at the end of Watership Drive.

A spokesman said: ‘Further enquiries were carried out with previous and current land owners, historical aerial imagery was sourced and advice was sought from search advisors at the National Crime Agency. 

‘Taking all this information into account it was established that the area described in his interview and identified to officers did not resemble the area that existed at the time. 

‘While a general area could be identified, a specific location to enable a realistic search could not. The time scales for the disappearance and when the witness was in the area was also not consistent.’

Police wrote to Mrs Gillingham in May 2018 to update her about the probe. 

A spokesman added: ‘We cannot begin to imagine the pain and heartache that Mrs Gillingham and her family have endured over the last 30 years following the murder of Carole Packman.

‘This case has been thoroughly reviewed on a number of occasions by Dorset Police. Carole’s family is desperate to find out what happened to her and where her body is. Dorset Police will continue to work with the family to achieve this goal.’  

Carole Packman's daughter Sam Gillingham (right) and her son Neil (left) hold a picture of Mrs Packman in London (file photograph)

Carole Packman's daughter Sam Gillingham (right) and her son Neil (left) hold a picture of Mrs Packman in London (file photograph)

Carole Packman’s daughter Sam Gillingham (right) and her son Neil (left) hold a picture of Mrs Packman in London (file photograph)

Sam Gillingham (left) was 16 when her mother Carole Packman (right) was murdered in 1985

Sam Gillingham (left) was 16 when her mother Carole Packman (right) was murdered in 1985

Sam Gillingham (left) was 16 when her mother Carole Packman (right) was murdered in 1985

Full Dorset Police response to claims by new witness

‘On June 27, 2017 detectives from the major crime investigation team met with this witness and they travelled together to an area of land adjacent to Hightown Lake on the outskirts of Ringwood in Hampshire. The area he took us to was at the end of Watership Drive.

‘Further enquiries were carried out with previous and current land owners, historical aerial imagery was sourced and advice was sought from search advisors at the National Crime Agency.

‘Taking all this information into account it was established that the area described in his interview and identified to officers did not resemble the area that existed at the time. 

‘While a general area could be identified, a specific location to enable a realistic search could not. The time scales for the disappearance and when the witness was in the area was also not consistent.

‘Officers wrote to Mrs Gillingham in May 2018 to update her with regard to our investigations into this information.

‘We cannot begin to imagine the pain and heartache that Mrs Gillingham and her family have endured over the last 30 years following the murder of Carole Packman.

‘This case has been thoroughly reviewed on a number of occasions by Dorset Police. 

‘Carole’s family is desperate to find out what happened to her and where her body is. Dorset Police will continue to work with the family to achieve this goal.’

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Justice Secretary Robert Buckland had asked the Parole Board to reconsider its decision last month to release Causley.

Mrs Packman’s family also opposed the move, saying the killer posed an ongoing risk to their safety.

But earlier this month the Parole Board said a senior judge had reviewed the case and had concluded the original panel had been right to recommend Causley’s release.

They said he was in poor health and unlikely to be able to cause harm.

Neil Gillingham, 30, the grandson of Mrs Packman, who was also known as Veronica, labelled the Parole Board’s decision to release him ‘moronic and nonsensical’.

He said: ‘The Parole Board seem to be intent on turning my family’s lives upside down. It is absolutely nonsensical and I am so angry it has come to this.

‘The original decision to grant Causley parole was irrational – their reasons are completely laughable, including the fact that he is now in his 70s and has had three heart attacks.

‘My mum is in tears and feels like she’s failed her own mother. She hasn’t – our family have been failed by the shambles of a system.

‘In all honesty I never expected the appeal to be successful because the police and the Parole Board have completely let us down so often.’

Two months ago the Parole Board found that, while Causley’s refusal to reveal the whereabouts of Mrs Packman’s remains was ‘heartless’, it did not increase his risk to the public.

Mr Buckland appealed the decision, but yesterday the Board confirmed it was standing by the ruling after reviewing the evidence, insisting that Ministry of Justice officials supported the release.

Mrs Packman mysteriously disappeared from her marital home the day after she had been to see a solicitor about divorcing her husband in the summer of 1985.

By then Causley had moved his mistress into the house to live with the family. 

The mistress even posed as Mrs Packman in an attempt to convince the police she was still alive.

A family handout photograph of Russell Causley who is now set to be released from prison

A family handout photograph of Russell Causley who is now set to be released from prison

A family handout photograph of Russell Causley who is now set to be released from prison

Russell Causley (centre) with wife Carole Packman (left) and daughter Sam Gillingham (right)

Russell Causley (centre) with wife Carole Packman (left) and daughter Sam Gillingham (right)

Russell Causley (centre) with wife Carole Packman (left) and daughter Sam Gillingham (right)

Over the years Causley, who has been eligible for parole since 2012, has repeatedly changed his account of what happened to his wife.

He has claimed that he burnt her body and scattered her ashes at various locations in Bournemouth but later retracted that statement.

A spokesman for the Parole Board said they had ‘immense sympathy’ for families of victims who have never been found, but added: ‘A senior judge of the Parole Board has rejected the application for reconsideration and found that the decision of the original panel was a rational one, with ample evidence on which the panel could base its decision.

‘In rejecting reconsideration the judicial member of the Board commented that the panel were entitled to consider that the prisoner’s age and poor health were likely to reduce the risk of causing serious harm.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Boy, 16, is shot dead by cops after knife attack on police officer in Russia

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boy 16 is shot dead by cops after knife attack on police officer in russia

A knifeman shouting ‘Allahu Akbar’ was shot dead by police after stabbing an officer and trying to set fire to a police station in a Muslim-majority region of Russia today.

The 16-year-old was armed with a knife and a Molotov cocktail and inflicted multiple wounds on a police officer before being shot dead in Kukmor.  

Russia’s Investigative Committee said it was treating the incident as an attempted act of terrorism and had opened a criminal case. 

Russian news agency Interfax said the man had shouted ‘Allahu Akbar’ and called police ‘infidels’ during his assault in the region of Tatarstan.

Police in Russia shot dead a 16-year-old teenager in the Muslim-majority Tatarstan region (file photo) after he stabbed an officer and tried to set fire to a local police station

Police in Russia shot dead a 16-year-old teenager in the Muslim-majority Tatarstan region (file photo) after he stabbed an officer and tried to set fire to a local police station

Police in Russia shot dead a 16-year-old teenager in the Muslim-majority Tatarstan region (file photo) after he stabbed an officer and tried to set fire to a local police station

Investigators said the teenager had tried to set fire to a district police building and stabbed the police officer while being arrested.  

Another police officer had fired warning shots into the air before being forced to open fire, they said, saying the teenager had died of his wounds before medics could arrive on the scene.  

The injured officer was stabbed at least three times and taken to hospital but his life was not thought to be in danger. 

Investigators have opened a case into an ‘attempted terrorist act’ and ‘encroachment on the life of a law enforcement officer’, the committee said.   

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Courts backlog could QUADRUPLE unless more sites opened and sessions sit for longer, study warns 

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courts backlog could quadruple unless more sites opened and sessions sit for longer study warns

The courts backlog which has worsened during the pandemic could quadruple by 2024 without action, a study has found.

The research by crime and justice consultancy Crest Advisory says that there could be a backlog of 195,000 cases in courts where the most serious trials are heard in 2024.

Crest says there is ‘catastrophic risk to public confidence, and effective enforcement of the law’ and that longer sittings and new courts are needed to tackle the problem, according to the BBC.

While the authors of the study say this is worst-case scenario, the Ministry of Justice says the study is based on ‘extreme assumptions’.

In March 2020, almost half of all courts were closed and jury trials were paused to minimise social interaction between court users.  

After jury trials were halted and around half of courts closed, up to nine in 10 hearings used remote technology to continue making progress throughout the pandemic.

Researchers have warned that the courts backlog of the most serious cases could rise to 195,000 by 2024 if the Government does not increase court capacity. Pictured: The Old Bailey

Researchers have warned that the courts backlog of the most serious cases could rise to 195,000 by 2024 if the Government does not increase court capacity. Pictured: The Old Bailey

Researchers have warned that the courts backlog of the most serious cases could rise to 195,000 by 2024 if the Government does not increase court capacity. Pictured: The Old Bailey

Some jury trials resumed in May, after almost two months on hold, but this summer Justice Secretary Robert Buckland QC warned that clearing the lockdown-induced backlog could continue into next year.

According to the Criminal Bar Association, the latest statistics show there is a current backlog of more than 47,000 crown court cases in the system.

Crest carried out research into how the pandemic will affect this backlog over the next four years, taking into account factors including the long-term impact of Covid on unemployment which could cause a rise in some crime and the current time frame for cases at court. 

According to the BBC, the consultancy firm says court capacity needs to be doubled to prevent the backlog growing to unstable levels.

 The study suggests longer sitting hours, new buildings, a greater use of existing courts and technology and more part-time judges.

In July, the Government opened ten Nightingale courts across the country but these were to deal with non-custodial crime cases as well as civil matters and tribunals.

In his weekly update, chair of the Criminal Bar Association, James Mullholland QC said:  ‘We are now a week away from the promised 250 courtrooms actually conducting Crown Court trials.

‘An analysis of the trial rooms in use today, including available Nightingale Courts, amounts to less than 200, estimated at 195.

‘We are still not at the stage where the number matches the limited courtrooms available for jury trials last year and which managed to deal during that period with only about one third of the effective trials that are currently outstanding.

‘Meanwhile the number of vacated trials continues to increase.

‘The ongoing lack of capacity and the increase in the Custody Time Limits period hits hardest those in custody waiting to be tried.’

A Nightingale court based in the Swansea Council Chambers in Wales (pictured). In March 2020, almost half of all courts were closed and jury trials were paused to minimise social interaction between court users. Nightingale courts opened across UK to help with backlog

A Nightingale court based in the Swansea Council Chambers in Wales (pictured). In March 2020, almost half of all courts were closed and jury trials were paused to minimise social interaction between court users. Nightingale courts opened across UK to help with backlog

A Nightingale court based in the Swansea Council Chambers in Wales (pictured). In March 2020, almost half of all courts were closed and jury trials were paused to minimise social interaction between court users. Nightingale courts opened across UK to help with backlog

Mr Mullholland says that at the end of June 2020, the prison population was just over 79,453 of which 11,388 pre-trial detainees.

He added: ‘Consequently, in summer, 1 in 7 of all those in prison was awaiting trial.

‘This is the highest annual figure in five years and an increase of 25% over the last year.

‘The way forward has been clear for many months. The government needed actively to seek out a large number of additional buildings so that capacity could be significantly increased and the backlog reduced without increasing the risk to others.

‘The fact that this is still not happening is disturbing bearing in mind the consequences.’

A Ministry of Justice spokesperson told the BBC the Crest study’s assumptions ‘do not stand up to reasonable scrutiny – such as vast rises in crime and charging which have no clear rationale’.

They added: ‘They also fail to take account of our extensive efforts to limit the impact of the pandemic on the justice system.

‘As a result of these, magistrates’ court backlogs are already falling, Crown Courts are listing more jury trials every week, and we’re spending £80m on a range of measures to further drive this recovery, including the recruitment of 1,600 additional staff.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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