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BEL MOONEY: I’m isolated and feel so jealous of my friend’s perfect life

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bel mooney im isolated and feel so jealous of my friends perfect life

Dear Bel,

I’m having a very hard time dealing with the isolation of Covid. I’m single and live alone, with no partner or children. My depression has become worse over the past few months.

The problem concerns a friend who lives in New Zealand, where the virus is more contained and life is basically back to normal.

My friend calls all the time via Skype, and I’m beginning to feel that it’s always all about her.

She’s having a nice life, going out and meeting friends, dating — she met someone recently and it seems serious.

By contrast, I live in fear of the virus and mostly stay home alone. I feel she uses me as a sounding board for everything. I feel I spend so much time listening to her that I’m ignoring my own life.

She sucks a lot of energy from me, and more and more I feel like a fraud, acting like I’m happy for her and giving support, when I’m feeling bitter.

It’s not that I’m not happy for her, but honestly I’m jealous and just can’t deal with her lovely social life when I’m so sad. I’m not sure what to do. I’d like to put some distance between our friendship.

Lately, whenever we speak — almost daily — I end up feeling quite depressed. What do you advise?

LOUISE

This week Bel answers a question from a woman who is jealous of her friend's life in New Zealand, where the coronavirus is more contained

This week Bel answers a question from a woman who is jealous of her friend’s life in New Zealand, where the coronavirus is more contained

There is a perfect storm of feelings within this apparently simple email. Let’s pull out the words one by one: ‘alone…depression… fear… bitter… jealous… sad’.

The loneliness you describe (‘no partner or children’) has been made so much worse because you ‘live in fear of the virus’ — and your helpless pain at the situation is now projected upon the friend you now resent because she has what you cannot have.

So painful have your feelings become that you’d rather withdraw from her than be forced to hear about her good life, in stark contrast to your misery.

You give no indication of your age, which is a pity. For unless you are old and with health issues (which I doubt) I will suggest gently that it is probably your fear of Covid that is poisoning your life, and not your friend’s sharing of her activities in New Zealand.

Your letter is a reminder of the fact that the real pandemic in our country at the moment is that of psychological problems caused by the virus. Waiting times for people with disabling, unstable, chronic conditions have soared — and anxiety has spread.

Mental health services are overwhelmed, with little face-to-face contact — and so on. The situation is dire and everything the Government threatens makes the nation’s depression worse.

Your very first sentence isolates this issue. I’d be curious to know whether you felt ‘bitter’ and ‘jealous’ of your friend last year, or whether the fact that you’re voluntarily withdrawing from the world because you are terrified of the virus has turned you against her.

If so, it’s your fear that’s the danger, not your friend. I suggest you need to see terror as toxic and tackle that, rather than ditch her company via Skype.

Of course, she may be prattling on in a self-absorbed way — in which case, why do you have to be a ‘fraud’?

Why not tell her the truth? Ask for her understanding? We’ve all had selfish friends and sometimes they can become so demanding you have to turn away for your own good.

But is that really the case here? If you drop this friend, won’t you feel lonelier than ever? You say all the listening you do has the effect of making you ‘ignore my own life’. But I could argue that anything that briefly makes you forget your isolation is good.

If you feel you want to limit the Skype contact because her self-absorption is getting you down, then fine. The question is, what are you going to do with that time?

Do you have local friends you see regularly? I’d work hard to keep in touch by technology and see people face to face as much as possible (OK, two metres apart). Go out, masked-up — since even interaction in a shop matters.

Have you signed up to interesting online magazines and forums (like Spiked and Unherd) as well as uplifting sites such as Welldoing and The Daily Om? Also, don’t forget the charity Mind (mind.org.uk/coronavirus-we-are-here-for-you). These days, without going out much we can spend time online feeding mind and spirit.

We’re more fortunate than previous generations because the world can come to our door. Do you listen to music? Keep up with issues? When your friend calls you need to have things to discuss, rather than being the tense face which smiles, then resents in private.

Should I move in with mum-in-law?

Dear Bel

I really enjoy reading your advice, so I hope you can also give me your opinion on what I should do in this situation.

I’m getting married and I don’t know which option to choose. Should my partner and I create our own marital home together.

Or should I move into my partner’s family home where his mother is now a widow — but healthy mentally and physically.

Her children have all flown the coop. I feel depressed thinking about this ethical dilemma of leaving a parent behind.

Is it terribly immoral to not be with your elders every day?

CATALINA

THOUGHT OF THE DAY 

As you float now, where I held you and let go, remember when fear cramps your heart, what I told you:

Lie gently and wide to the light-year stars, lie back, and the sea will hold you.

From First Lesson by Philip Booth (American poet, 1925-2007) 

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This is a good question I respect. It is relevant to point out to readers that your real surname is from a world culture which has always attached great importance to respect for the older generation.

In the words of the Chinese philosopher Confucius, ‘there are three degrees of filial piety. The highest is being a credit to our parents, the second is not disgracing them; the lowest is being able simply to support them.’ What’s more, I have a friend married to an Eastern European who told me he was naturally fine about her elderly, widower father moving in with them, because that’s how it’s done in his country.

In this society, we are far from embracing that (admittedly often difficult) duty. Yet at the same time I have nothing but sympathy for your wish to have an independent married life with the man you love. (I’m guessing he’s still living with his mother, the last one in the ‘coop’).

Far from it being ‘immoral’ I see it as perfectly natural — especially when your partner’s mother is perfectly healthy. That last point is surely key.

What does she think? Might she feel happy to be alone at last? Your guilt may be misplaced, so I hope you and your partner can have this honest conversation with her and include his siblings, too.

I would seek a compromise that allows independence and support — like living nearby. As she becomes older, you could consider buying a place where she has her own quarters. I live next door to my son, 12 minutes from my parents and 20 from my daughter, so I know that careful proximity can work, with both love and duty satisfied.

Only a lockdown will fix my fears

Dear Bel,

I have a 91-year-old mother, an 81-year-old husband, an 18-month granddaughter from my daughter and a two-and-a-half- year-old granddaughter from my son.

My daughter’s little girl goes to nursery where there has just been a case of Covid confirmed with one of the older children.

The nursery is still open for the younger children so my daughter intends to keep sending her daughter. I usually have each granddaughter separately once a week and also see my mother.

But as my daughter is not working, I feel she should take my granddaughter out of nursery for the time being, especially as she is expecting another baby soon. In addition, my daughter-in-law is also expecting and worries about the girls mixing.

   

More from Bel Mooney for the Daily Mail…

I’m piggy-in-the-middle and quite frankly would welcome another lockdown.

CAROLINE

Obviously people have very strong feelings about Covid, lockdown, and the whole damn thing. When (a few weeks ago) I questioned the ‘rule of six’ re Christmas, I got into trouble with certain readers, who objected to my independence of mind.

What I’d do and what you choose to do may be very different, yet each of us is entitled (I firmly believe) to that choice.

Recently I received a sad letter from a grandmother who hasn’t seen her grandchildren since the beginning of lockdown — ‘to protect me’. So post lockdown she still chose (solely because of age) to shield herself — even though that meant choosing to be unhappy.

For me (just turned 74) that would be inconceivable. My mother (96) feels the same. We both choose being with family over ‘protection’ — and frankly, nobody tells either of us what to do within our homes.

Having said that, I believe you have every right to tell your daughters what you think, without waiting for any politician to issue instructions on new lockdowns.

If you think your granddaughter should leave nursery, and that if she doesn’t you can no longer take care of her, then your daughter should take that on board and respect your considered choice.

If your chief concern right now is to shield your husband and mother, then both your daughters should listen to your wishes. They may think you are being unduly worried and over-careful, but I believe they should honour and help — not add to the worry.

And finally… How hope can come out of grief

Having just had a birthday, I was pondering the passage of time (as you do) and reflecting on my 50 years in journalism (quite a milestone) and all I’ve experienced and learned …when, as if on cue, a book arrived from a publisher.

It was more than just another review copy, to add to the thousands of volumes in our house. This title pierced straight through to my heart and took me back 45 years.

Contact Bel 

Bel answers readers’ questions on emotional and relationship problems each week.

Write to Bel Mooney, Daily Mail, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5TT, or email bel.mooney@dailymail.co.uk.

Names are changed to protect identities. 

Bel reads all letters but regrets she cannot enter into personal correspondence.

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The title is Loving You From Here: Stories of Grief, Hope and Growth When A Baby Dies —compiled by Susan Clark for Sands (Stillbirth and Neonatal Death charity).

We are just at the end of Baby Loss Awareness Week (baby loss-awareness.org) and I heartily recommend this deeply moving book if you know anybody who has suffered this particular grief, before or after birth.

Believe me, it’s vital for those who are bereaved to know they’re not alone. That’s why the sharing of stories is vital.

My own jolt of emotion comes at the beginning of the book, because it reprints in full the article I wrote for The Guardian newspaper about the stillbirth (at nearly full term) of my second son.

I couldn’t possibly have known that one article (dated January 8, 1976) would become crucial in changing attitudes towards stillbirth in this country, giving for the first time a voice to parents weeping for their baby.

It actually resulted in setting up Sands — and I am very proud to be Founder-Patron today.

As a journalist and author, I have written millions of words in my long career, but that one article remains the single most powerful thing I’ve achieved.

I mention it with humility —since I’d rather not have had the loss, and seeing my name and long-ago words reprinted in Susan Clark’s book could only open the wound.

Still, this book I hold in my hand is a testimony to the awe-inspiring truth that goodness can indeed come out of grief. It takes me through the tunnel into the light.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Farmer shoots mother before killing himself ‘because of fear about caring for animals in lockdown’ 

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farmer shoots mother before killing himself because of fear about caring for animals in lockdown

A son shot his own mother dead before turning the gun on himself – because he was worried about caring for his animals during lockdown.

Farmer John Bound, 59, and mother Gwendoline Christine Bound, 80, were found dead at their home in the village of Abergwili, Carmarthenshire, Wales, in March.

An inquest heard Mrs Bound – known as Christine – had been shot in the chest and Mr Bound was killed by head injuries.

The pair were found dead just eight days after lockdown started in March.

Farmer John Bound, 59, shot his own mother dead before turning the gun on himself - because he was worried about caring for his animals during lockdown

Farmer John Bound, 59, shot his own mother dead before turning the gun on himself – because he was worried about caring for his animals during lockdown

Bound and mother Gwendoline Christine Bound, 80, were found dead at their home in the village of Abergwili, Carmarthenshire, in Wales

Bound and mother Gwendoline Christine Bound, 80, were found dead at their home in the village of Abergwili, Carmarthenshire, in Wales

Their inquest heard sheep farmer Mr Bound had told relatives he was worried about lockdown restrictions.

He had said he was concerned restrictions on leaving home would affect his ability to check on the welfare of his animals and he had said ‘he didn’t know how he would cope’.

Mr Bound had told relatives he was worried about lockdown restriction

Mr Bound had told relatives he was worried about lockdown restrictions

Mr Bound – known as Johnny – was described as ‘devoted to his mother’, who he lived with. 

The hearing was told that she often said ‘she would not have been able to cope without his help.’

Mrs Bound was well-known after working in the local post office and the sweet shop before retiring.

Mr Bound owned three shotguns and two rifles which he used to control the rabbit population on his smallholding.

Acting senior coroner Paul Bennett said: ‘There must have been something that triggered John to get his shotgun.’

But Mr Bennett said there was no suggestion it was ‘premeditated or planned’.

He recorded a conclusion that Mrs Bound had been unlawfully killed and Mr Bound’s death was suicide.

Mr Bennett said: ‘Their deaths had undoubtedly left their family utterly devastated. I hope they are reminded of how they lived their lives and not how they tragically died.’

The Bound family released a statement in the days following the deaths, conveying their ‘great sadness’ at what had happened.

For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123 or visit a local Samaritans branch, see www.samaritans.org for details. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Coronavirus UK: SAGE TOLD government to enforce circuit breakers

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coronavirus uk sage told government to enforce circuit breakers
Ministers were told more than one circuit breaker would be needed in Britain to control the coronavirus, according to SAGE papers published today.

Scientific advisers claimed a single two-week lockdown, which they first pleaded with ministers to implement in September, would not be enough to stem infections for the whole of winter. 

It would probably need to be imposed twice over the space of a few months to keep the country ticking over until a vaccine is ready, researchers at University of Warwick told the Government.

This is because the effects of the intervention would start to fade after a month or two and infections would start to creep up again.   

The revelation emerged in SAGE papers presented to the Government this autumn to help steer ministers through the crisis. 

Other documents handed to Number 10 and released today revealed 90 per cent of Brits are now catching the coronavirus from strangers.

During the first wave of the epidemic, the vast majority of people were catching it from loved ones and household transmission was rife.

Among the other documents made public today: 

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We won’t need just one circuit breaker, but SEVERAL, SAGE said 

SAGE has been pleading with the Government to consider a two-week lockdown since mid-September, after cases began creeping up when lockdon was eased in August.

The experts first highlighted that an immediate ‘circuit breaker’ was the best way to control cases at a meeting on September 21. 

SAGE WARNED MORE MEASURES WERE NEEDED A MONTH BEFORE THEY CAME IN

The Government’s expert advisers said that coronavirus infections and hospital admissions were exceeding the worse case scenario planning levels at least a month before Boris Johnson announced the three-tier system of restrictions.

A document from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) summarising the SAGE meeting on September 17, SAGE said: ‘The current situation continues to reflect the Reasonable Worst-Case Scenario (RWCS).

‘Medium-term projections indicate a rapid increase in hospital admissions in the coming weeks, and in a scenario where there were no interventions, this would have the potential to overwhelm the NHS.’ 

Later in the SAGE meeting on October 8, scientists said incidence and prevalence across the UK continue to increase with data showing ‘clear increases’ in hospital and ICU admissions, particularly in the North of England.

The paper said projections indicate the number of deaths is ‘highly likely’ to exceed Reasonable Worst Case Scenario (RWCS) planning levels within the next two weeks.

‘Well over 100 new deaths per day are projected to occur within 2 weeks, even if strict new interventions are put in place immediately,’ the document said, adding: ‘In all scenarios the epidemic is still growing.’ 

Four days after the SAGE meeting, on October 12, the Prime Minister announced England would be placed into ‘medium’, ‘high’ and ‘very high’ alert levels – or Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3 – under a new tier system of restrictions aimed at tackling the virus.

Since the three-tier system has been implemented, the number of deaths announced on the Government’s coronavirus dashboard has exceeded 100 on every day except two – and on a couple of days more than 300 deaths were announced.

At a Downing Street press conference that day alongside Mr Johnson, England’s chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty – a member of Sage – said he was ‘not confident’ that the ‘base case’ for Tier 3 proposals ‘would be enough to get on top of it’.

The newly published Sage document comes as the effectiveness of the three-tier system is more widely being called into doubt. 

The Government’s scientific advisers have called for the UK to follow in the footsteps of Germany and France and retreat back into a full national shutdown because they say the current three-tiered lockdown system is failing. But top experts say interventions take at least three weeks to take effect.

The tiered system only came into force on October 14, little over two weeks ago. 

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But today it emerged that SAGE subsequently warned that one circuit breaker would not be enough.

In the 59th meeting of the group, on September 24, SAGE said: ‘While a single circuit breaker has the potential to keep prevalence much lower than no intervention, it is not a long-term solution. 

‘Long-term control of the virus will likely require repeated circuit breaks, or for one to be followed by a longer-term period with measures in place to keep R at or below 1.’  

But the Prime Minister has been keen to avoid a blanket ban on social mixing, the closure of pubs, restaurants and gyms across England. 

Mr Johnson dismissed calls for the measure which he branded ‘miserable’ in the Commons on October 14, insisting his job was to balance the economic and wider interests of the country with the science.

But the PM admitted he will ‘rule out nothing’ in the bid to stop coronavirus but stood by his tiered local lockdown approach in which areas with the highest infection rates face the toughest rules. 

He said the three-level local system, which could soon become four, ‘can drive down and will drive down the virus if it is properly implemented’.

But with Wales, Ireland, and other European countries like Germany and France going into lockdowns in the past two weeks, Mr Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown.  

Senior figures are warning that the UK’s three-tier system is not enough to ‘get on top of the numbers’ before Christmas.  

A University of Warwick study, which was officially published by the Government today but widely reported two weeks ago, said a two-week circuit break would have no impact if restrictions were lifted again.  

The study, conducted in September, outlined how a short, planned lockdown could stop the UK’s spiralling outbreak in its tracks. 

It said that if the growth rate of the virus was five per cent (currently it is about 4 per cent)  the action of a two-week circuit breaker ‘is cancelled the following fortnight by two weeks of ‘normal’ behaviour’.

They suggested a ‘two-week on – two-week off strategy to maintain control’ but that this would need to be looked at in more detail.

The team’s findings, which came before October half term, said it was important to do it during a school holiday to minimise disruption to life.  

In the paper the experts suggested more than 100,000 British lives could be spared by January in the worst-case scenario if the country shut down over half-term. 

Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick indicated this week the Government has not chosen to use a circuit breaker because it would lead to stop-start lockdowns.

On a round on media interviews on Thursday morning, Mr Jenrick said the Government’s ‘very firm view’ is that a short national ‘circuit-breaker’ lockdown would be the wrong approach, saying ‘you can’t have a stop-start country’.   

Only 10 per cent of people know how they caught the coronavirus, suggesting most catch it off strangers

Around nine in ten people who get the coronavirus don’t know who they caught it from, according to a SAGE meeting on September 17.

The group noted data from the REACT study, led by Imperial College London, which tracks the outbreak using two waves of swabs from random people in England. 

The findings ‘indicate that currently only about 10 per cent of confirmed cases have a known history of exposure to another case, which suggests that much transmission may be through unrecognised contacts’, SAGE discussed in its 57th meeting.

It suggests the majority of transmission occurs in hospitality settings, such as pubs, bars and restaurants, the scientific experts speculated.

'Long-term control of the virus will likely require repeated circuit breaks, or for one to be followed by a longer-term period with measures in place to keep R at or below 1', SAGE said in September. However SAGE said today it currently sits at between 1.1 and 1.3 in the UK – representing the situation over the last few weeks

‘Long-term control of the virus will likely require repeated circuit breaks, or for one to be followed by a longer-term period with measures in place to keep R at or below 1’, SAGE said in September. However SAGE said today it currently sits at between 1.1 and 1.3 in the UK – representing the situation over the last few weeks

However, they also pointed to PHE data which shows ‘household transmission is currently the most commonly identified route’.

SAGE also said its likely most people don’t know how they got Covid-19 because they were infected by someone who was not showing symptoms, known as asymptomatic. 

Taken together, the Government advisors said interventions that limit indoor social mixing will have the greatest effect at stopping the outbreak from growing.

‘No evidence to date’ that BAME are more at risk of Covid-19 due to Vitamin D deficiency

SAGE dismissed rumours that BAME people may be more at risk from Covid-19 due to a deficiency of vitamin D.

At the 59th meeting on September 24, the advisory panel warned: ‘There was no evidence of an effect from vitamin D (on risk of infection) to date.’

There have been fears that a lack of the vitamin – which the body makes through exposure to sunlight – could be a risk factor for Covid-19.

Scientists have theorised this could be why BAME groups have higher odds of getting Covid-19 and have been investigating further. 

Officials estimate two in five Britons are deficient between October and April when sunlight levels outside are lower.

But the rate is up to 90 per cent in people with darker skin, such as BAME populations, because it is harder to obtain the vitamin from the sun.

A mountain of studies have suggested the vitamin could help protect people against the worst impacts of the virus.

One study, published last month by Boston University, found Covid-19 patients were 52 per cent less likely to die than when they got enough of the vitamin.

The scientists took blood samples from 235 patients admitted to hospitals in Tehran for Covid-19. Overall, 67 per cent had vitamin D levels below 30 ng/mL.

There isn’t a clear marker for the ideal level of vitamin D, but 30 ng/mL is considered as sufficient.

SAGE instead suggested that other factors could be contributing to higher death rates among minority groups, other than vitamin D. 

The group said in the most recently released minutes: ‘Ethnic groups may be at greater risk of infection after having come in contact with the virus, for example due to differences in immune response and nutritional status, which in itself could be related to stress or environmental conditions such as air pollution (differential susceptibility to infection).’ 

Evidence highlights some minority ethnic groups are overrepresented in health and social care and other key public sector jobs, where they may come into more contact with infected coronavirus people. 

Care home residents may be more at risk of catching the virus from staff than patients discharged from hospital 

Transmission from care home staff to residents could be a more significant route of coronavirus infection than when residents are discharged from hospital, documents suggests. 

SAGE said that for every resident who tests positive for the virus, there were approximately four positive cases among care home staff.

Transmission from care home staff to residents could be a more significant route of coronavirus infection than when residents are discharged from hospital

Transmission from care home staff to residents could be a more significant route of coronavirus infection than when residents are discharged from hospital

Minutes from a meeting, dated September 24, also acknowledged the ‘growing evidence’ of the negative mental health and wellbeing impacts of isolation on care home residents and their families.

Experts also warned that cases and outbreaks in care homes were beginning to increase again across the UK.

‘The concurrent ratio of positive tests in care staff to residents was approximately 4:1 (high confidence) suggesting potential staff to resident transmission,’ the document said.

‘Current evidence suggests discharge from hospitals may be less significant, and transmission from staff may be more significant, but quantification is difficult without better data linkage.’

The document said there was evidence of multiple routes of infection into care homes, including direct admission of residents, through staff and through visitors.

‘Understanding the different routes of transmission and their relative impact is critical,’ it added.

The document urged policymakers to balance the negative mental health and wellbeing impacts of isolation on care home residents and their families against the transmission risk.

Testing technology in the future may enable visitors to be rapidly tested for Covid-19 prior to visits, it adds.

In April, it was announced that coronavirus tests will be extended to all residents and staff in care homes – regardless of whether they have symptoms.

Staffing is one of several factors thought to have played a part in the spread of Covid-19 within care homes during the first wave of the pandemic, with employees often working between different sites.

Other factors were said to include the rapid discharge of thousands of hospital patients and struggles to access personal protective equipment (PPE) and regular tests. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Songbird branded ‘distasteful’ as first look trailer for pandemic drama is released

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songbird branded distasteful as first look trailer for pandemic drama is released

The first trailer for Songbird, a new drama inspired by COVID-19, was released on Thursday.

The Michael Bay-produced thriller saw Demi Moore and KJ Apa grapple to keep their loved ones safe after an outbreak of the virus COVID-23 in the US.

But despite the action-packed scenes, the film has been met with a barrage of criticism, with many branding it ‘distasteful’ in light of the current coronavirus pandemic. 

Outrage: The first trailer for Songbird, a new drama inspired by COVID-19, was released on Thursday, but the film has been slammed by many as 'distasteful' in light of current events

Outrage: The first trailer for Songbird, a new drama inspired by COVID-19, was released on Thursday, but the film has been slammed by many as ‘distasteful’ in light of current events 

Following the release of the first look trailer, people took to social media in their droves to slam the film’s release, with one remarking that those involved should be ‘f**king ashamed of themselves’ as millions of people continue to die and suffer because of the virus. 

‘In regards to this #songbird movie…..Michael Bay should’ve read the f**king room because why would we want to watch that?’ tweeted one outraged person.

While another fumed: ‘ Whoever created that new movie #Songbird is sick. Please don’t speak this stuff into existence please nobody wants a a covid-23 bruh.’

‘Everyone involved in this movie, from producers, to actors, to gaffers, and everyone in between, should be f**king ashamed of themselves. You know better. Or at least we thought you did’ ranted a third person.

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Backlash: Following the release of the first look trailer, people took to social media in their droves to slam the film's release

Backlash: Following the release of the first look trailer, people took to social media in their droves to slam the film’s release

‘Could they not of waited to release this until #COVID was just a distant memory? A bit distasteful & bizarre considering the whole world are still currently living through this’ came the response from a fourth.

‘I knew a shameless “let’s make a fear-mongering quarantine/covid movie” was inevitable but shout out to #Songbird and Michael Bay for not even waiting for the bodies to be cold from the real pandemic before releasing this trash’ a fift tweeted.

Another angry person shared their views, writing: ‘Uuuuuh…the movie we DIDN’t need right now?’

With another seething: ‘Releasing a film about this pandemic while we’re all still living in it is probably one of the most distasteful things I’ve seen in a while. It’s too close to home, too close to our present fears. Some are so incredibly detached from reality.’

Distanced: Bearing stark similarities to the current pandemic, KJ's Nico interacts with his girlfriend Sara (Sofia Carson) over the phone as she remains indoors to keep from getting the virus

Distanced: Bearing stark similarities to the current pandemic, KJ’s Nico interacts with his girlfriend Sara (Sofia Carson) over the phone as she remains indoors to keep from getting the virus

Bearing stark similarities to the current coronavirus pandemic, KJ’s character Nico interacts with his girlfriend Sara (Sofia Carson) over the phone in the trailer, as she remains indoors to keep from getting the virus while he can hang out outdoors as he’s immune.

The couple communicate via FaceTime on their phone, as Sara tells Nico ‘ I miss you. I could kiss you right now’ as he responds: ‘yea well, someday.’

In dramatic scenes, army vehicles and soldiers are seen taking over the city as an ominous voiceover tells those in LA: ‘Curfew is now in effect, all unauthorised citizens must stay indoors.’

The news is not any more cheerful, as a reporter says: ‘Tensions rise as we reach week 233 of lockdown’, while another says ‘a grim new reality emerges… COVID-23 has mutated.’

Apart: Bearing similarities to the current coronavirus pandemic, the couple communicate via FaceTime on their phone, as Sara tells Nico ' I miss you. I could kiss you right now'

Apart: Bearing similarities to the current coronavirus pandemic, the couple communicate via FaceTime on their phone, as Sara tells Nico ‘ I miss you. I could kiss you right now’

Drama: In dramatic scenes, army vehicles and soldiers are seen taking over the city as an ominous voiceover tells those in LA: 'Curfew is now in effect'

Drama: In dramatic scenes, army vehicles and soldiers are seen taking over the city as an ominous voiceover tells those in LA: ‘Curfew is now in effect’

Bradley Whitford’s unnamed character is seen exercising at home on a bike before he checks his temperature to make sure he’s ‘normal’ as the ‘virus attacks the brain tissue’ causing numerous issues.

The dangers of the virus are clearly being taken seriously, as armed soldiers are seen stopping KJ’s character in the streets, but before being taken into custody he informs them he’s immune from the virus.

Rather than being brought to hospital to be taken care of if they get the virus, the government are heard warning citizens: ‘All infected Americans are being forced into quarantine tanks.’

Scary: The news is not any more cheerful, as a reporter says: 'Tensions rise as we reach week 233 of lockdown', while another says 'COVID-23 has mutated'

Scary: The news is not any more cheerful, as a reporter says: ‘Tensions rise as we reach week 233 of lockdown’, while another says ‘COVID-23 has mutated’

Shock: Rather than being taken to hospital if they get the virus, the government are heard warning citizens: 'All infected Americans are being forced into quarantine tanks'

Shock: Rather than being taken to hospital if they get the virus, the government are heard warning citizens: ‘All infected Americans are being forced into quarantine tanks’

Tense: The dangers of the virus are clearly being taken seriously, as armed soldiers are seen stopping KJ's character in the streets before he tells them he's immune

Tense: The dangers of the virus are clearly being taken seriously, as armed soldiers are seen stopping KJ’s character in the streets before he tells them he’s immune

In an intense scene, Sara is seen watching from her door as men in hazmat suits try and storm down her neighbour’s door after she’s confirmed to have the virus, before the woman is dragged kicking and screaming to be quarantined.

The danger appears to come close to home, as her mother begins to have a temperature and she tells Nico that he can’t see her and should ‘say goodbye.’

But he refuses to do so, telling her: ‘I’m not letting you give up!’

Frightening: In an intense scene, Sara is seen watching from her door as men in hazmat suits try and storm down her neighbour's door

Frightening: In an intense scene, Sara is seen watching from her door as men in hazmat suits try and storm down her neighbour’s door

Bit much: The woman is dragged kicking and screaming by the people in hazmat suits to be forcefully quarantined

Bit much: The woman is dragged kicking and screaming by the people in hazmat suits to be forcefully quarantined

Virus: The danger appears to come close to home, as her mother begins to have a temperature and she tells Nico that he can't see her and should 'say goodbye'

Virus: The danger appears to come close to home, as her mother begins to have a temperature and she tells Nico that he can’t see her and should ‘say goodbye’

Demi is then seen confronting Bradley’s character with a gun in hand, as she says: ‘Sometimes we have to do things we don’t like in life.’

Seemingly in response, KJ’s Nico desperately claims: ‘I want to help the one person in my life that matters to me.’

The film’s trailer then ends on a grim note with a message that reflects recent calls to stay healthy amid the COVID-19 outbreak, as one character says: ‘Remember stay sane, safe, and sanitised.’

Earlier this week, director Adam Mason discussed the show’s inspiration with Entertainment Weekly, as he said: ‘It’s a dystopian, scary world, but it’s a romantic movie about two people who want to be together, but they can’t. 

Supportive: KJ refuses to do so, telling her: 'I'm not letting you give up!'

Supportive: KJ refuses to do so, telling her: ‘I’m not letting you give up!’

Doing what he can: KJ's Nico desperately claims: 'I want to help the one person in my life that matters to me'

Doing what he can: KJ’s Nico desperately claims: ‘I want to help the one person in my life that matters to me’

Tough decisions: Demi is then seen confronting Bradley's character with a gun in hand, as she says: 'Sometimes we have to do things we don't like in life'

Tough decisions: Demi is then seen confronting Bradley’s character with a gun in hand, as she says: ‘Sometimes we have to do things we don’t like in life’

‘It’s Romeo and Juliet, but they’re separated by her front door and by the virus. 

Having created the film with his script-writing partner Simon Boyes, with filming taking place over just 17 days, Adam went on: ‘We were kind of trepidatious, but still very much amped and excited to get to work.

‘It was really eerie, but the way we shot was every actor’s dream.’ 

A release date has yet to be revealed for Songbird, and it’s also not been confirmed whether the film will be released in cinemas or on-demand. 

Similarities: The film's trailer ends on a grim note with a message that reflects recent calls to stay healthy in the pandemic, as one character says: 'Remember stay sane, safe, and sanitised'

Similarities: The film’s trailer ends on a grim note with a message that reflects recent calls to stay healthy in the pandemic, as one character says: ‘Remember stay sane, safe, and sanitised’

Storyline: Earlier this week, director Adam Mason discussed the show's inspiration and said it was 'Romeo and Juliet, but they're separated by her front door and by the virus'

Storyline: Earlier this week, director Adam Mason discussed the show’s inspiration and said it was ‘Romeo and Juliet, but they’re separated by her front door and by the virus’

Coming soon: A release date has yet to be revealed for Songbird, and it's also not been confirmed whether the film will be released in cinemas or on-demand

Coming soon: A release date has yet to be revealed for Songbird, and it’s also not been confirmed whether the film will be released in cinemas or on-demand

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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