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Beyoncé’s mom Tina Knowles calls on Vogue to hire more Black photographers

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beyonces mom tina knowles calls on vogue to hire more black photographers

Beyoncé’s mom Tina Knowles has called out Vogue magazine for not hiring enough Black photographers for cover shoots. 

The 66-year-old businesswoman took to Instagram on Monday to applaud Edward Enninful, the editor-in-chief of British Vogue, for his latest issue, which stars Black activists on the cover, in an image shot by Black photographer Misan Harriman.

But she also took the opportunity to call out American Vogue, accusing the magazine of not doing enough to spotlight Black talent. 

Speaking out: Beyoncé's mom Tina Knowles has called out Vogue magazine for not hiring enough Black photographers for cover shoots

Speaking out: Beyoncé’s mom Tina Knowles has called out Vogue magazine for not hiring enough Black photographers for cover shoots

New: British Vogue's latest issue stars Black activists on the cover, in an image shot by Black photographer Misan Harriman

New: British Vogue’s latest issue stars Black activists on the cover, in an image shot by Black photographer Misan Harriman

The 66-year-old took to Instagram on Monday to applaud editor-in-chief Edward Enninful

But she seemed to criticize American Vogue boss Anna  Wintour

The 66-year-old took to Instagram on Monday to applaud editor-in-chief Edward Enninful (left), but she seemed to criticize American Vogue boss Anna Wintour

‘Kudos to this wonderful Man Mr. Edward Enningful!! [sic] Editor of “British Vogue“ for boldly putting our beautiful Activists on the cover!!!’ she wrote, captioning a photo of Enninful.

‘When will American Vogue step up and hire more Black Photographers for cover shoots? We’re waiting…….’  

Tina shared two other Instagram posts about the new issue, including the cover with soccer player Marcus Rashard and model Adwoa Aboah and another version with American activist Tamika Mallory. 

‘Yesssss!!!!! Congratulations Tamika and congratulations British Vogue!!!!! … for Putting this beautiful bold modern day freedom fighter on the cover of your magazine,’ she wrote. 

‘And all of the other beautiful sisters !!!!  out here fighting for our rights and our justice!!! Tamika is a gift to us, as she fights fearlessly every day in the trenches Getting arrested, Giving those who don’t have a voice a big voice! Let’s support her in anyway we can.’

The images were shot by Misan Harriman, the first Black male photographer to shoot a cover of British Vogue since the magazine launched 104 years ago. The rest of the team involved in the shoot was also mostly Black. 

'When will American Vogue step up and hire more Black Photographers for cover shoots? We're waiting.......' she wrote

‘When will American Vogue step up and hire more Black Photographers for cover shoots? We’re waiting…….’ she wrote

Talented family: Tina is mom to Beyoncé and Solange

Talented family: Tina is mom to Beyoncé and Solange

Photog: The images were shot by Misan Harriman, the first Black male photographer to shoot a cover of British Vogue since the magazine launched 104 years ago

Photog: The images were shot by Misan Harriman, the first Black male photographer to shoot a cover of British Vogue since the magazine launched 104 years ago

American Vogue’s most recent cover star, for its August issue, is Olympic gymnast Simone Biles.

But Simone, 23, was shot by famed photographer Annie Leibovitz — a decision that has been slammed on social media.

Most of the criticism has come from people who take issue with Leibovitz’ lighting technique, accusing the photographer of not knowing how to light dark skin tones. 

‘Simone Biles deserved better than Annie Leibovitz bad lighting,’ writier Britni Danielle complained.

“This @Simone_Biles shoot was great but again, I’m disappointed at how many professional photographers don’t know how to treat dark skin,’ Twitter user Nowlen Webb added. ‘These edits took less than 10 mins to color correct.’

‘I think what’s important to keep in mind is that although currently we’re talking about Vogue, this is historical. Photographers over time have neglected accurately capturing dark skin tones; this even goes even back to the creation of color film itself,’ he added.

Many other Twitter users chimed in to call on Vogue to hire more Black photographers — both on principle and to eliminate problems like this one.  

Star: American Vogue's most recent cover star, for its August issue, is Olympic gymnast Simone Biles

Star: American Vogue’s most recent cover star, for its August issue, is Olympic gymnast Simone Biles

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Called out: She was shot by famed photographer Annie Leibovitz, a decision that has been slammed on social media with those who take issue with Leibovitz' lighting technique, accusing the photographer of not knowing how to light dark skin tones

Called out: She was shot by famed photographer Annie Leibovitz, a decision that has been slammed on social media with those who take issue with Leibovitz’ lighting technique, accusing the photographer of not knowing how to light dark skin tones

It took until 2018 for Vogue to hire a Black photographer to shoot its cover, after Beyoncé hand-picked him to shoot her for the September issue.

Tyler Mitchell was the first Black photographer to shoot a cover in 125 years of the magazine.  

‘You know, we should be shooting covers of Vogue month to month, not just as a first,’ he told NPR at the time. 

‘[Photography] was known as a rich man’s art, so it was mostly for white men who were able to afford all of the chemicals, the films, the cameras that went into it in the very early stages,’ he went on. 

‘It’s a historical thing that goes into why there just haven’t comparatively been as many black fashion photographers as white fashion photographers. But the part that I can’t answer is why they haven’t been recognized … the amazing Black photographers and black fashion photographers that have been shooting.

‘The iPhone is the thing that opened up everything. The beautiful thing about now is that it’s no longer somebody that can afford the best camera, but it’s about what your eye says.’  

Flashback: It took until 2018 for Vogue to hire a Black photographer to shoot its cover, after Beyonce hand-picked him to shoot her for the September issue

Flashback: It took until 2018 for Vogue to hire a Black photographer to shoot its cover, after Beyonce hand-picked him to shoot her for the September issue

Honor: Tyler Mitchell was the first Black photographer to shoot a cover in 125 years of the magazine

Honor: Tyler Mitchell was the first Black photographer to shoot a cover in 125 years of the magazine

Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour typically control all the content of the magazine, but in this case, the reigns were handed over to Beyoncé herself.

‘The reason a 23-year-old black photographer photographed Beyoncé for the cover of Vogue is because Beyoncé used her power and influence to get him that assignment,’ a source at Vogue said. 

Mitchell — who grew up in Atlanta, Georgia and now lives in New York City — graduated from Tisch School of the Arts at New York University in 2017, and by the time he was hired by Vogue, his work had appeared in Office Magazine and The Fader.

Earlier in 2018, he was also chosen by Teen Vogue to photograph gun violence survivors for its March for Our Lives feature back in March. 

Mitchell has also filmed advertisements for several prominent clients, including American Eagle, Givenchy, and Marc Jacobs. He’s also done advertisement work for companies such as Nike, Converse, Mercedes-Benz, and Ray-Ban.  

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Drinkers head out in force before 10pm curfew as a QUARTER of Britain is locked down

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drinkers head out in force before 10pm curfew as a quarter of britain is locked down

Drinkers have headed out in force before the 10pm curfew as a quarter of Britain is locked down – with residents banned from leaving Cardiff and Swansea unless they have a ‘reasonable excuse’.

Punters were spotted descending on trendy Soho in the West End of London as well as in Leeds on a bitter evening across the UK.

One woman was pictured swigging prosecco from the bottle as a male companion smoked a cigarette and others shared a laugh as they strolled into town.

But households in the Welsh town of Llanelli were banned from entering each other’s homes and gardens from 6pm, with the nation’s two biggest cities of Cardiff and Swansea following suit. Residents are also banned from entering or leaving the areas without a ‘reasonable excuse’.

It comes after lockdowns were already imposed in large swathes of the North East and North West of England. More than a quarter of the UK is under tighter restrictions, including half of the Welsh population. 

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Britain's coronavirus R rate could now be as high as 1.5, government scientific advisers warned on Friday after rises in all regions of the country

Britain’s coronavirus R rate could now be as high as 1.5, government scientific advisers warned on Friday after rises in all regions of the country

One woman was pictured swigging prosecco from the bottle as a male companion smoked a cigarette and others shared a laugh as they strolled into town

A woman runs down a street in Leeds

One woman was pictured swigging prosecco from the bottle as a male companion smoked a cigarette and another ran down the street without her shoes on

Meanwhile in Soho, in the West End of London, three women were pictured with their face coverings on the ground outside a bar

Meanwhile in Soho, in the West End of London, three women were pictured with their face coverings on the ground outside a bar

Crowds were out on Saturday night in trendy Soho in the West End of London ahead of the new curfew at 10pm

Crowds were out on Saturday night in trendy Soho in the West End of London ahead of the new curfew at 10pm

Three women smile as they take a selfie in Leeds as they head into town ahead of the new 10pm curfew introduced to slow the spread of the coronavirus

Three women smile as they take a selfie in Leeds as they head into town ahead of the new 10pm curfew introduced to slow the spread of the coronavirus

Public Health England data shows only a handful of London's 32 boroughs are now seeing a sustained rise in infections - including Redbridge, Hounslow, Barking and Dagenham and Enfield. The data is set to be updated on Friday, but gives an indication of which boroughs are struggling the most

Public Health England data shows only a handful of London’s 32 boroughs are now seeing a sustained rise in infections – including Redbridge, Hounslow, Barking and Dagenham and Enfield. The data is set to be updated on Friday, but gives an indication of which boroughs are struggling the most 

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said there had been an ‘acceleration of Covid-19 cases across the country, especially in the North West and the North East’.

Rolling seven-day rate of new cases of Covid-19 in hotspot areas in England

In Burnley, 228 new cases were recorded in the seven days to September 23 – the equivalent of 256.4 per 100,000 people.

Burnley has the highest rate in England, up from 145.1 in the seven days to September 16.

Liverpool has the second highest rate, up from 131.1 to 243.8 with 1,214 new cases.

Knowsley is in third place, where the rate has risen from 132.6 to 241.9, with 365 new cases.

Other areas recording sharp increases in their seven-day rates include:

  • Newcastle upon Tyne (up from 87.2 to 228.8, with 693 new cases)
  • Pendle (up from 97.7 to 203.0 with 187 new cases)
  • Sunderland (up from 78.9 to 180.0, with 500 new cases)
  • Halton (up from 125.2 to 214.0 with 277 new cases)
  • Sefton (up from 74.2 to 162.8, with 450 new cases)
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‘Working alongside our scientific and public health experts and local leaders, we are prepared to take swift and decisive action to reduce transmission of the virus and protect communities,’ he said. ‘I recognise the burden and impact these additional measures have on our daily lives but we must act collectively and quickly to bring down infections.’

Meanwhile London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the capital was at a ‘very worrying topping point’ with rising Covid-19 cases, NHS 111 calls, hospital admissions and patients in intensive care units.

Health chiefs are reportedly mulling over plans to make face masks compulsory in most places of work, in an attempt to curb the spread of the virus. Office workers are expected to be exempt from the measures when sitting, but will be required to wear a mask when in corridors, lifts or communal areas.

As cases continue to mount London has been placed on the national lockdown watchlist because of a spike in cases and hospital admissions, as the capital’s R rate ticks up to between 1.2 and 1.5 – the same level seen in the North West, North East and the Midlands, which have all been stung by additional Covid-19 measures.

London mayor Mr Khan has already called for a ban on people mixing in each other’s households, claiming in a conversation with the Prime Minister that ‘if you go too late, we will be in a North East, North West, Birmingham-type situation’.

Meanwhile hundreds of students in Manchester have been ordered into isolation after 127 tested positive for the virus at the Birley campus and Cambridge Halls at Manchester Metropolitan University, as the rate of spread in the city climbs to 185.6 per 100,000 from 93.2 a week ago.

Number 10‘s expert panel SAGE also warned the reproductive rate of the virus may be as high as that for the UK overall. It is the advisory body’s highest projection since it began tracking how quickly the disease was growing back in June and is slightly up on last week’s estimate of 1.1 – 1.4.

If the R rate – the number of people each infected patient passes the disease on to – remains above one, then the outbreak will continue to grow and cases will keep surging, running the risk that local Covid-19 outbreaks spiral out of control into regional and even national problems.

As coronavirus infections mount in the UK: 

  • Boris Johnson’s 10pm curfew was based on ‘back of fag packet calculations’ and not advocated by SAGE;
  • The restrictions imposed in March could kill 75,000 in five years, including 31,000 deaths not related to Covid, according to documents submitted to SAGE; 
  • Unions call for in-person university classes to be suspended as 3,000 students are placed in lockdown; 
  • MailOnline analysis reveals Britain’s outbreak began to surge after ‘Super Saturday’ reopening;
  • Lighthouse lab in Wales meant to open in August and process thousands of tests still lies empty;
  • Sadiq Khan calls for Londoners to be stopped from visiting friends and family.

Matt Hancock said the strict lockdown measures are in line with those seen in Leicester, where they have successfully quelled a surge in cases, and the West Midlands.

‘This will be difficult news for the people living in these areas, profoundly affecting their daily lives,’ he said. ‘These decisions are not taken lightly, and such measures will be kept under review and in place no longer than they are necessary.’

Office workers ‘to wear masks in corridors, lifts and communal areas’

Health chiefs are mulling over plans to impose face masks in offices, it has been reported.

The stricter measures would see white-collar workers not required to wear a mask when sitting, but needing to have one on when in corridors, lifts or communal spaces.

The rules will be part of a wider crackdown for indoor workspaces, where Public Health England data reveals 18 per cent of 729 respiratory disease outbreaks were recorded in the week to September 13. It also shows only five per cent occurred in food outlets, 45 per cent in care homes and 21 per cent in schools.

A Minister told the Daily Express: ‘The rules are going to be widened. We have to accept that this is going to be a new way of living that will be around for some-time and get used to it.

‘The fines do send a strong, clear message about how to behave.’

Further restrictions are also expected to be imposed nationwide in the coming weeks if the rule of six and 10pm curfew fails to stymie the number of new cases reported.

Local authorities have already started pursuing a ban on mixing in other households, with mounting calls for this measure to be rolled out to the whole of the UK over fears lessons are yet to be learnt from March.

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The tightened restrictions come after a surge in cases in the areas. The latest seven-day Covid-19 rate in Leeds was found to be 113.3 per 100,000 people, according to Government figures, while Leeds director of public health Victoria Eaton said there was an 8.4 per cent positive test rate.

The seven-day rolling average in Blackpool has risen from 48.8 per 100,000 a week ago to 69.6 per 100,000 on Friday, the Government’s coronavirus dashboard shows. The rate in Wigan has risen to 122.6 per 100,000 people, while in Stockport it is up to 77.4 per 100,000 people.

On Thursday, Cardiff Council leader Huw Thomas said the capital had seen 38.2 cases of Covid-19 per 100,000 people over the past five days. Swansea’s rate is 49.8.

Over the past seven days Cardiff’s positivity rate has hit 3.8 per cent, exceeding the Welsh Government’s ‘amber’ threshold of 2.5 per cent – part of its ‘traffic light road map’ strategy for managing the pandemic.

Infectious disease modelling expert Professor Graham Medley, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) warned there would be 100 coronavirus deaths a day in a few weeks’ time. 

Professor Medley told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme the new restrictions would not stop the deaths but would prevent the toll getting even higher.

‘A level of 10,000 (cases) we are seeing now means that in three or four weeks we are going to see 100 deaths a day,’ he said. ‘In order to stop that process increasing again, then we need to make sure that that transmission comes down now because that doubling time will carry on. The things that we do now will not stop 100 people dying a day but they will stop that progressing much higher.’

The leader of Leeds city council, Judith Blake, said there was ‘a lot of confusion’ and ‘a lack of clarity’ this morning as the draconian rules came into force in the city.

She told BBC Breakfast: ‘We know that the restrictions themselves won’t just work on their own, it has to come as part of a whole raft of measures in the city.

‘The important message that we know from other areas is there is a lot of confusion, a lack of clarity, particularly in areas where there are different rules in one borough and the next-door borough has another one. This has to be a wake-up call to people.

‘If things carry on the way they are, then I can’t see how the Government won’t be forced to take more measures that have more of an impact on our lives, on our ability to go out and do the things we need to do to keep the economy going.’

Leeds’ director of public health Ms Eaton told reporters last night that the spread of the virus is ‘very dynamic’ across the city and that it was ‘clear we have very widespread community transmission’.

‘We have high rates in some of our student areas which we have increased more recently. It’s clearly not just an issue for student areas,’ she said, before warning cases wererising in all age groups and that compliance with self-isolation rules was low.’

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Daughter stuck in Wales after flying 9,500 miles from Australia to be by dying father’s bedside 

Pearl Findlay-James pictured with her father Patrick James

Pearl Findlay-James pictured with her father Patrick James

A daughter has been stranded in Wales due to coronavirus restrictions after she flew 9,500 miles from Australia to say goodbye to her father.

Pearl Findlay-James was allowed to leave the state of Victoria on compassionate grounds, and be at her father’s bedside in Pembroke Dock, west Wales, but is now unable to get home.

She had already paid for a ticket to Melbourne at AUS$8,900 (£5,000) but, after the flight was cancelled, was forced to pay an additional AUS$4,000 (£2,200) for a new ticket to Sydney. She will have to spend a further AUS$3,000 (£1,600) on quarantine measures when she eventually returns home.

Her father, Patrick James,  died four days after she arrived in the UK. 

‘My whole family are in Australia. My husband, my children and my 10 grandchildren. It’s time to go home,’ she said.

‘The UK is heading into its second wave and I’m worried this will make it even harder to get home.

‘I’ve joked to my daughters – you better get ready to cook the Christmas turkey, because I don’t know if I’m going to be there.

‘I can take to my grave that I sat and held my dad while he went to God.

‘Nobody can ever take that away from me, no matter what my journey is now.’ 

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Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford has urged people in Cardiff to start behaving as though the new restrictions are in place, even though they do not come into force until Sunday evening.

He told LBC that police enforcement was the last resort, adding: ‘If there are people who clearly deliberately flout the law you have to enforce.

‘Yes, with fines if necessary. But for us that’s the last resort, not the first resort. In Caerphilly (the first area in Wales to be locked down) we have had very, very good levels of co-operation. My experience is people are wanting to do the right thing.

The nation’s health minister, Vaughan Gething warned the spiralling infections are comparable to the end of February where ‘we ended large parts of NHS activity about two weeks later’. 

He added: ‘We have seen a sharp rise in cases in all of the areas where we are taking local restrictions and it is being driven by indoor household contact, so more people than should be in that household bubble going in and mixing.

‘That has extended out into licensed premises as well, where again people are not following the rules.’ 

The latest data for Cardiff on the Government’s dashboard shows the seven-day rolling average of cases surged to 21.9 per 100,000 on September 18, up from 11.6 a week ago. And in Swansea they have more than tripled from 6.4 per 100,000 on September 11 to 19.4 a week later. 

Blackpool has been exempt from restrictions imposed in the rest of Lancashire until today, with the seaside resort now brought in line with its neighbours.

Scott Benton, Conservative MP for Blackpool South, said the area initially avoided restrictions as its infection rate was 23 cases per 100,000 but that by Wednesday this had surged to 63 cases per 100,000, still below the average for the whole of Lancashire but a significant rise. 

Mr Benton said on Facebook: ‘The rise in cases is particularly high in areas of north Blackpool and the evidence is that this is due to transmission within the community rather than as a result of tourism (this explains why our local infection rate has remained low in comparison to other areas in the North West despite visitors coming here all summer).

‘It is vital that we take sensible steps now to reduce the rate of transmission which is why these new restrictions are being applied.

‘Nobody wants a second full lockdown and that idea behind these new rules is to slow the spread of Covid-19 so that we do not end up in a position where a full lockdown has to be considered.’

Wigan is to have restrictions reimposed after they were first eased on August 26 as case numbers surge again. Stockport is also seeing restrictions reimposed after a ban on mixing in each other’s households was lifted on September 2.

Health chiefs on Friday announced 6,874 more Covid-19 infections and 34 more deaths. The daily case toll is a record-high and takes the total number of cases to 423,237, although millions of Brits went undiagnosed during the first wave of the pandemic due the Government’s lacklustre testing regime.

Government figures show the number of victims succumbing to the life-threatening infection now stands at 29 – 73 per cent higher than the average of 17 last Friday. But they are still a far-cry from the 1,000 being recorded each day during the darkest weeks of the crisis in March and April. But SAGE warned that the low numbers of deaths do not reflect how quickly the outbreak is growing. 

Hospital admissions – another measure of how severe an outbreak is – have also risen again, with 314 newly-infected patients requiring NHS care in England on Wednesday – up from 183 the week before. 

Meanwhile in Liverpool crowds took to the city centre to enjoy a night out with friends as the city so far avoids a local lockdown

Meanwhile in Liverpool crowds took to the city centre to enjoy a night out with friends as the city so far avoids a local lockdown

And people also descended on the city centre in Birmingham (pictured) as they headed to a bar on a cold night in the country's second city

And people also descended on the city centre in Birmingham (pictured) as they headed to a bar on a cold night in the country’s second city

A man gives a woman a piggy-back in Birmingham city centre

Another woman crouches on the ground after going out for the night

A man gives a woman a piggy-back (left) in Birmingham city centre as another crouches on the ground after going out for the night (right)

London is thought to be on the brink of a localised lockdown. Official government data shows the capital recorded 620 more cases of Covid-19 yesterday - twice as high as the rate last week

London is thought to be on the brink of a localised lockdown. Official government data shows the capital recorded 620 more cases of Covid-19 yesterday – twice as high as the rate last week

Covid-19 hospital admissions in the capital have tripled in a fortnight, with the seven-day average rising from 11 on September 2 to 33.4 by September 18. But the number of hospitalisations in the city is still a far cry from the 700-plus at the height of the pandemic in spring and only slightly higher than they were the start of July (around 25), when the country was deemed safe to reopen again

Covid-19 hospital admissions in the capital have tripled in a fortnight, with the seven-day average rising from 11 on September 2 to 33.4 by September 18. But the number of hospitalisations in the city is still a far cry from the 700-plus at the height of the pandemic in spring and only slightly higher than they were the start of July (around 25), when the country was deemed safe to reopen again

King's College London (KCL) scientists behind the COVID Symptom Tracker mobile app estimate there were at least 16,310 daily cases of the disease in the last week, more than double the 7,536 estimated last week

King’s College London (KCL) scientists behind the COVID Symptom Tracker mobile app estimate there were at least 16,310 daily cases of the disease in the last week, more than double the 7,536 estimated last week 

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) believes it has risen 60 per cent over the same time frame and that there are now 9,600 infections a day

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) believes it has risen 60 per cent over the same time frame and that there are now 9,600 infections a day

Friday saw another 6,874 Covid-19 cases recorded, meaning the seven-day rolling average is 54 per cent higher than it was a week ago. MailOnline analysis shows this is the sixth consecutive day the average compared to the week before has risen

Friday saw another 6,874 Covid-19 cases recorded, meaning the seven-day rolling average is 54 per cent higher than it was a week ago. MailOnline analysis shows this is the sixth consecutive day the average compared to the week before has risen

London Mayor Sadiq Khan pressed for more measures to be imposed to stop cases rising any more before Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a nation-wide 10pm curfew on pubs and restaurants and encouraged working from home again. Pictured: Soho

London Mayor Sadiq Khan pressed for more measures to be imposed to stop cases rising any more before Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a nation-wide 10pm curfew on pubs and restaurants and encouraged working from home again. Pictured: Soho

Leeds is also expected to be hit with new restrictions from midnight, including 'more household restrictions' along the lines of those already in force across three of the West Yorkshire districts, because of a rise in cases

Leeds is also expected to be hit with new restrictions from midnight, including ‘more household restrictions’ along the lines of those already in force across three of the West Yorkshire districts, because of a rise in cases

WHAT AREAS ARE ON THE MOST RECENT WATCHLIST? 

The most recent watchlist, published last Friday, included:

INTERVENTION (number of infections recorded up to September 15 for every 100,000 people living there)

BOLTON – 212.7

BLACKBURN WITH DARWEN – 122.9

OADBY AND WIGSTON – 119.2

HYNDBURN – 117.6

PRESTON – 105.1

WARRINGTON – 105.0

TAMESIDE – 103.5

SUNDERLAND – 103.1

OLDHAM – 98.9

BIRMINGHAM – 98.0

BRADFORD – 97.5

LIVERPOOL – 95.8

WIRRAL – 95.6

BURNLEY – 93.8

KNOWSLEY – 92.9

ST HELENS – 91.6

BURY – 90.5

SALFORD – 88.8

LEICESTER – 86.7

SOUTH TYNESIDE – 86.5

ROCHDALE – 84.1

MANCHESTER – 83.6

GATESHEAD – 77.5

SOLIHULL – 77.2

SANDWELL – 72.1

NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE – 69.6

PENDLE – 61.3

HALTON – 60.7

KIRKLEES – 60.4

WOLVERHAMPTON – 60.3

CALDERDALE – 59.5

ROSSENDALE – 57.8

SOUTH RIBBLE – 52.5

SEFTON – 49.0

NORTH TYNESIDE – 48.5

WEST LANCASHIRE – 47.4

COUNTY DURHAM – 46.7

TRAFFORD – 45.7

CHORLEY – 35.1

WYRE – 34.2

FYLDE – 28.8

NORTHUMBERLAND – 24.7

LANCASTER – 22.9

RIBBLE VALLEY – 18.3

ENHANCED SUPPORT 

LEEDS – 75.5

BLABY – 65.7

STOCKPORT – 48.7

CONCERN 

SELBY – 65.1

HARTLEPOOL – 55.8

SHEFFIELD – 53.7

SPELTHORNE – 53.4

CORBY – 50.8

MIDDLESBROUGH – 47.0

NORTHAMPTON – 42.6

SCARBOROUGH – 42.3

HERTSMERE – 37.4

PETERBOROUGH – 30.3

STOKE-ON-TRENT – 27.4

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A weekly report by SAGE on Friday said that the R rate for the UK appears to be between 1.2 and 1.5, and is the same in England. These are the highest estimates the chief scientists have given since their regular updates began.

The R appears to be highest in London, the Midlands, North West and the North East, where it is thought to be at the same rate as the UK. This means each infected case passes it on to 1.2 to 1.5 others, or every 10 infect 12 or 15 more. 

SAGE cautions, however, that its estimates of R are around three weeks out of date each time they are published, because they are calculated by watching how the numbers of positive tests and hospital cases change over time. 

The advisory panel also says the growth rate has increased, and the outbreak may now be increasing in size by between four and eight per cent each day. Last week it said it was slightly lower at between three and seven per cent.

But it admitted outbreaks could be growing by as much as nine per cent each day in the South West.

The decision to put London on the national watchlist comes as a striking MailOnline map on Friday suggested that London’s Covid-19 hotspots may be linked by the city’s bustling underground network. Bexley, Bromley, Croydon, Kingston upon Thames, and Sutton — none of which have a Tube station — have the lowest infection rates across the entire city.

Council bosses in London met on Friday to confirm that the response to the capital’s crisis would be escalated. No tougher measures will be imposed yet but health chiefs have pledged to boost testing capacity to control any flare-ups. Formal confirmation is expected to be announced later by Public Health England.

Official government figures show London recorded 620 more cases of Covid-19 yesterday – twice as high as the rate last week. But the capital’s outbreak appears to have plateaued since spiking at the start of September, when taking into account separate data that analyses when positive samples were actually taken, not recorded. It can take suspected patients several days to get their test results back. 

Hospital admissions in the capital have tripled in a fortnight, with the rolling average rising from 11 on September 2 to 34.7 by September 19. But the number is still a far cry from the 700-plus at the height of the pandemic in spring and only slightly higher than they were the start of July (around 25). For comparison, 13 times as many admissions were being recorded in March (425 on March 22) — before the national lockdown was imposed. 

London Councils, a cross-party organisation which represents all 32 boroughs and the City of London, said the English capital was being placed on the national Covid-19 watchlist.

The list is divided between ‘areas of intervention’ which usually have local lockdown restrictions, areas of ‘enhanced support’, given more testing for example, and’ areas of concern’ that are closely monitored.

London Councils said no additional measures were being taken in the city but that ‘the city’s testing capacity is boosted so that Londoners have timely access to Covid-19 tests and the government must ensure that this is sustained from now on’.

The organisation said London’s Its entry on the list should serve as a ‘stark reminder that now is time for all Londoners to pull together and take action’.

The watchlist is determined by Health Secretary Matt Hancock after studying epidemiological advice from the chief medical officer, NHS Test and Trace, the Joint Biosecurity Centre and Public Health England. 

Sian Berry, Green Party co-leader and London Mayor candidate, said: ‘We have lacked test information in London for weeks, which has caused huge worry for all of us in local and regional government,’ according to The Evening Standard.

‘The news that Public Health England has added London to its list of areas of concern, using estimates from other data, shows what a crucial time this is, and how all our actions can make a difference.

‘The 10pm closing time for bars and restaurants has already led to crowded scenes on public transport that worry me greatly. My strong advice to Londoners is to avoid going out in the next few days unless you have to, and find other ways to see friends and family.

‘Like you, I am sad, tired and weary after six months of a gruelling national crisis, but we’re in a dangerous moment, lacking data and tests, and we must work together as a city amid rising signs of infection.’

London Mayor Sadiq Khan pressed for more measures to be imposed to stop cases rising any more before Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a nation-wide 10pm curfew on pubs and restaurants and encouraged working from home again.

Infections across the city has more than doubled since August, with the seven-day weekly average number of cases rising from 86 per 100,000 to 262 per 100,000.  

Ministers are said to be mulling a decision to place more than 9million people in the city under even tighter restrictions, if the new suite of national social distancing measures announced by the Government this week fail to curb climbing numbers.  

The most up-to-date statistics released by Public Health England (PHE), which cover the week ending September 18, reveal that just a single borough in the capital — Redbridge — ranks among the top 40 worst-hit regions of the country. 

But infection rates in 20 London boroughs are higher than areas of England already hit by restrictions. PHE published its latest batch of figures on infections on Friday afternoon which also confirmed London’s spot on the watchlist. 

During a behind-closed-doors briefing this week, Kevin Fenton, director of Public Health England in London, told Mayor Mr Khan and the leaders of all 32 boroughs that all signs indicated the disease was making a rapid resurgence in the city. 

Professor Fenton argued testing infrastructure had been stripped out of the capital and reallocated to hotspots in the north, meaning many Londoners may have gone undiagnosed. 

He warned cases could be being massively under-reported due to Londoners struggling to get access to tests, and that increased hospital admissions and a rising number of calls to 111 were better indicators that London was in the midst of an outbreak as serious as in the northeast.

Professor Fenton told The Times: ‘We are seeing a rising tide of coronavirus cases in London across a broad range of ages. This is no longer limited to young people in their twenties.’ 

He said that ‘whilst the number of cases by borough varies, the general trend across the city is one of steadily increasing transmission and if that continues then the situation may escalate’.   

Professor Fenton revealed that about that about a fifth of testing capacity had been stripped from the capital and reallocated to hotspots in the north this month.

The ONS has spotted a rise in infections among all age groups in England - although the steepest increase was observed in 17 to 24-year-olds

The ONS has spotted a rise in infections among all age groups in England – although the steepest increase was observed in 17 to 24-year-olds

Data from the King College London's app, which has seen millions of Brits sign up and report their symptoms, suggests there are nearly 150,000 people currently suffering symptomatic Covid-19, although many more will have no symptoms

Data from the King College London’s app, which has seen millions of Brits sign up and report their symptoms, suggests there are nearly 150,000 people currently suffering symptomatic Covid-19, although many more will have no symptoms

HOW HAS THE R RATE CHANGED FROM LAST WEEK?

AREA

UK

England

East

London

Midlands

NE and Yorks

North West

South East

South West

THIS WEEK 

1.2 – 1.5

1.2 – 1.5

 

1.1 – 1.3

1.2 – 1.5

1.2 – 1.5

1.2 – 1.5

1.2 – 1.5

1.0 – 1.3

1.1 – 1.4

LAST WEEK 

1.1 – 1.4

1.2 – 1.4

 

1.0 – 1.3

1.1 – 1.4

1.2 – 1.5

1.2 – 1.4

1.2 – 1.5

1.1 – 1.4

0.9 – 1.6

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HOW HAS THE GROWTH RATE CHANGED FROM LAST WEEK?

AREA

UK

England

East

London

Midlands

NE and Yorks

North West

South East

South West

THIS WEEK 

4% to 8%

4% to 8%

 

1% to 4%

4% to 9%

3% to 7%

4% to 8%

3% to 9%

1% to 5%

1% to 6%

LAST WEEK 

3% to 7%

2% to 7%

 

0% to 5%

3% to 7%

4% to 8%

3% to 8%

3% to 8%

3% to 7%

0% to 9%

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Leeds director of public health Victoria Eaton said the city’s virus rate was 98.5 per 100,000 people with a positive testing rate of 8.4 per cent. Pictured: Students and young people out drinking in the city this week

Leeds director of public health Victoria Eaton said the city’s virus rate was 98.5 per 100,000 people with a positive testing rate of 8.4 per cent. Pictured: Students and young people out drinking in the city this week

In the middle of August there were about 90,000 tests being done every week in London, but there were just 65,000 carried out last week, according to Professor Fenton. 

But the latest Department of Health figures show testing in London has actually increased week-on-week. 

There were 85,000 tests done across the capital in the week up to September 16, up from 75,000 the previous seven days. Even the capital’s hotspots are enjoying more access to swabs – Barking carried out 2,669 tests in the week ending September 16, 25 per cent more than the week before, when 2,036 swabs were done. In Redbridge, 3,370 residents were checked for the virus in the latest reporting period, compared to 3,046 the week prior, a rise of nearly 10 per cent. 

BETWEEN 9,000 AND 16,000 PEOPLE GETTING INFECTED EACH DAY, DATA SHOWS

The North West is still bearing most of the brunt of the second wave, but Yorkshire, London and the North East are seeing significant outbreaks

The North West is still bearing most of the brunt of the second wave, but Yorkshire, London and the North East are seeing significant outbreaks

Between 9,000 and 16,000 Britons are getting infected with coronavirus every day, according to researchers monitoring the UK’s outbreak.

King’s College London (KCL) scientists behind the COVID Symptom Tracker mobile app estimate there were at least 16,310 daily cases of the disease in the last week, more than double the 7,536 estimated last week.

The Office for National Statistics, a Government-run agency, has made a more modest estimate on Friday, saying it thinks around 9,600 people are contracting the virus every day, a 60 per cent rise from the 6,000 a week prior. 

Both surveillance projects are picking up far more than the Government’s official testing programme, which recorded 6,000-plus cases on Thursday and Wednesday.

KCL collects its data by sending tests to people who report tell-tale symptoms of Covid-19 into the mobile app, while the ONS study sends tests to random households regardless of their health status.  

Data from the symptom-tracking app, which has seen millions of Brits sign up, suggests there are nearly 150,000 people currently suffering symptomatic Covid-19, although many more will have no symptoms. This figure has more than doubled since last week, when there were about 70,000 symptomatic patients. The chief scientist behind the app said it was fresh evidence the crisis was ‘rising at an alarming rate’.  

The ONS, on the other hand, estimates that about 113,000 people are currently carrying the virus – equating to around one in 500 people – although the number-crunching body only looks at England and Wales.

It comes as Matt Hancock yesterday suggested the true number of cases occurring each day was in the region of 10,000. And the Health Secretary pointed out that the spike now is nowhere near levels seen during the darkest days of the crisis in March and April, when 100,000 people were getting infected every 24 hours.

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Official figures show the outbreak may finally be slowing down, despite hospital admissions for coronavirus having tripled in a fortnight and public health chiefs warning of a ‘rising tide’ of the virus in the capital.  

Only a handful of boroughs now seeing a sustained rise in infections — including Redbridge and Barking and Dagenham, two of the three worst-hit parts of the capital.  

Redbridge, in east London, is suffering the highest number of infections of anywhere in the capital, with a weekly case rate of 34.2 per 100,000 people, according to PHE data up to September 18. 

The borough of 300,000 people currently has just the 40th highest infection rate in the UK but it has suffered a sustained increase in diagnoses of Covid-19 over the past month and a half.

Figures show infections have tripled in Redbridge since September 4, when the rate was 11.2 per 100,000 per week, and have risen by tenfold since the start of August (3.3).

And Redbridge’s actual number of new infections being diagnosed each day — figures which are provided by the Department of Health — is one of the only borough’s to still be on the up. It went from a rolling seven-day average of three cases at the end of August to almost 23 at the end of last week. 

The Department of Health data, published on the government’s coronavirus dashboard, takes into account daily cases by specimen date, meaning they lag behind by a few days because it can take upwards of 72 hours to get a result back.

The west London borough of Hounslow has been the second worst-hit region in the capital, with a weekly case rate of 32.5 per 100,000 in the week ending September 18. Like Redbridge, Hounslow has seen cases triple in the past three weeks after rising from 5.9 new infections per 100,000 people at the start of August.

But Department of Health data shows cases in Hounslow, home to 290,000 people, have started to fall. Around 16 actual cases were being diagnosed each day on September 7, up from four at the end of August. But this dropped to below nine on the most recent full-day of data, September 16.

Hounslow has one of the largest South Asian populations in the country – about 20 per cent, compared to the 2 per cent national average – who have been disproportionately affected the virus throughout the crisis.

The weekly infection rates in both boroughs are still significantly lower than the UK average, which is about 47 per 100,000. Although this figure is being skewed upwards due to outbreaks in the likes of Bolton, Blackburn and Oldham.

The east London borough of Barking and Dagenham is suffering 29.3 infections per 100,000, having more than doubled since the start of the month, when the case rate was 12.3 per 100,000, and quadrupling since August 1 (5.9 per 100,000).

Department of Health figures suggest its rolling seven-day average number of daily infections is also still on the up. The borough, home to around 210,000 people, recorded an average of four cases a day at the end of August. This jumped to around nine during the start of September before levelling off. 

But figures for the past week, which are not yet deemed to be accurate because of the three-day lag it takes for coronavirus test samples to be analysed, suggest it may yet be hit by another spike.

Rounding out the top 10 worst-hit boroughs in London for infection rates are Enfield (27.3), Newham (27), Ealing (26.9), Hackney (25.7), Tower Hamlets (25.5), Hammersmith and Fulham (24.8), Harrow (24.4) and Havering (24.4), all of which were up on the week before except Newham. 

Figures show infections have tripled in Redbridge since September 4, when the rate was 11.2 per 100,000 per week, and have risen by tenfold since the start of August (3.3)

Figures show infections have tripled in Redbridge since September 4, when the rate was 11.2 per 100,000 per week, and have risen by tenfold since the start of August (3.3)

The east London borough of Barking and Dagenham is suffering 29.3 infections per 100,000, having more than doubled since the start of the month, when the case rate was 12.3 per 100,000, and quadrupling since August 1 (5.9 per 100,000)

The east London borough of Barking and Dagenham is suffering 29.3 infections per 100,000, having more than doubled since the start of the month, when the case rate was 12.3 per 100,000, and quadrupling since August 1 (5.9 per 100,000)

The west London borough of Hounslow has been the second worst-hit region in the capital, with a weekly case rate of 32.5 per 100,000 in the week ending September 18

The west London borough of Hounslow has been the second worst-hit region in the capital, with a weekly case rate of 32.5 per 100,000 in the week ending September 18

IS BRITAIN’S COVID-19 OUTBREAK TAKING OFF AGAIN?

Some top scientists had insisted there was not a true rise in cases because the test positivity rate - how many cases are found for every swab completed - had not changed wildly. However, this appears to no longer be the case. NHS Test and Trace data shows almost 3.3 per cent of people tested get a positive result compared to lows of 1.1 in July

Some top scientists had insisted there was not a true rise in cases because the test positivity rate – how many cases are found for every swab completed – had not changed wildly. However, this appears to no longer be the case. NHS Test and Trace data shows almost 3.3 per cent of people tested get a positive result compared to lows of 1.1 in July

Britain’s coronavirus outbreak appears to be speeding up again, according to official data.

Friday saw another 6,874 Covid-19 cases recorded, meaning the seven-day rolling average is 54 per cent higher than it was a week ago. MailOnline analysis shows this is the sixth consecutive day the average compared to the week before has risen.

Before last Saturday, the weekly coronavirus growth rate had dropped every day for an entire week. It had plummeted from the high of 84 per cent on September 12 to 20 per cent on September 19.   

It comes as chief scientific advisors to the Government, Professor Chris Whitty and Sir Patrick Vallance, terrified the nation by their gloomy prediction that cases may reach 50,000 per day by mid-October, if nothing is done. They claimed infections were doubling every week, in line with growing outbreaks in Spain and France

But scientists shot down the claims, warning it was based on old data that relied on just a few hundred positive cases. Even Boris Johnson distanced himself from the claims, saying the outbreak could be doubling up to every 20 days. 

Other figures from NHS Test and Trace also suggest cases had dwindled last week. But the newest statistics – released yesterday – only go up until September 16, meaning any spike in the past week has yet to be confirmed in another government dataset. 

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MailOnline revealed on Friday London’s Covid-19 hotspots could be linked by the city’s bustling underground network, according to a striking map based on government data. 

The cluster of cases appear to be centered along the 11 Tube-lines — used by some 2million people every day before the pandemic struck. 

It means areas in the north west and north east of London may be suffering from bigger outbreaks than the south, simply because they have more public transport links. Bexley, Bromley, Croydon, Kingston upon Thames, and Sutton — none of which have a Tube station —  have the lowest infection rates across the entire city.

The connection has previously been discovered by experts looking at other contagious respiratory diseases that spread via droplets, such as the coronavirus. British scientists have previously linked busy Tube stations to worse flu outbreaks.

The more changes passengers needed to make on their journey, the more contact they were likely to have with other people. This would potentially be the case with London’s three top hotspots — Redbridge, Hounslow, and Barking and Dagenham — all of which are only served by one Tube line.

Nine of 32 boroughs which were found to have higher cases of the flu, based solely on their London underground connections, now also have higher Covid-19 infection rates. Scientists say the Tube is the ‘perfect environment’ for a virus to spread because of crowding, poor ventilation and dirty surfaces touched by millions.

But experts say the pattern may be more complicated than that — it may be more key workers, who are vulnerable to picking up the virus because they come into close contact with lots of people, choose to live near a Tube line in order to get around easier, while those able to work from home live further out in the suburban commuter belt. 

Infection rates may also be heavily influenced by the borough’s deprivation, as Government studies have shown poorer areas have been shown to have more Covid-19 deaths, and ethnic diversity, as Black, Asian and ethnic minorities have been harder hit by the pandemic for a multitude of reasons.

Millions of travellers were put off the tube during the peak of the first wave of the coronavirus because the Government ruled against any travel other than essential. 

But since restrictions have been lifted in response to the outbreak dwindling, hundreds of thousands more journeys are now being made. Tube capacity has risen to around 35 per cent, up from four per cent in April and May. Cases also appear to keep rising in London alongside the uptick in journeys. 

MailOnline analysis last week revealed that 20 boroughs in total across London have infection rates higher than areas of England already hit by restrictions, including Kensington and Chelsea (23.7), Wandsworth (23), Brent 22.7.

Public Health England’s most recent watchlist shows the authority in England with the lowest case rate considered an ‘area of intervention’ — the highest degree of concern — is Ribble Valley, with 18.3 cases per 100,000.  

Meanwhile, several boroughs in the capital have managed to keep virus cases suppressed since August, despite the upwards trend seen across the nation. 

The south London borough of Sutton ranks among the 25 least affected areas in England, with a current weekly case rate of 9.3 per 100,000, according to PHE data up to September 18.

This actually fell from the previous week (10.3) and has just by just 45 per cent from the start of August (6.4).  Bromley (11.8), Bexley (12.1), Merton (13.6), Croydon (14) and Kingston upon Thames (14.3) have the five lowest weekly infection rates after Sutton.

All of those boroughs, excluding Merton, do not have an underground station, which may partly explain the low number of cases. British scientists have previously linked busy tube stations to worse flu outbreaks. 

Testing bosses say they’ve had to prioritise resources at a time when the country is struggling to ramp up capacity fast enough to deal with the looming second wave. 

Boris Johnson has pledged for the UK to be able to process 500,000 coronavirus tests a day by the end of next month, more than double the current 242,000 capacity. But industry insiders say this target could be missed because of delays in machines and chemicals. 

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Meanwhile, between 9,000 and 16,000 Britons are getting infected with coronavirus every day, according to researchers monitoring the UK’s outbreak.

King’s College London (KCL) scientists behind the COVID Symptom Tracker mobile app estimate there were at least 16,310 daily cases of the disease in the last week, more than double the 7,536 estimated last week.

The Office for National Statistics, a Government-run agency, has made a more modest estimate on Friday, saying it thinks around 9,600 people are contracting the virus every day, a 60 per cent rise from the 6,000 a week prior. 

Both surveillance projects are picking up far more than the Government’s official testing programme, which recorded 6,000-plus cases on Thursday and Wednesday.

KCL collects its data by sending tests to people who report tell-tale symptoms of Covid-19 into the mobile app, while the ONS study sends tests to random households regardless of their health status.  

Data from the symptom-tracking app, which has seen millions of Brits sign up, suggests there are nearly 150,000 people currently suffering symptomatic Covid-19, although many more will have no symptoms. This figure has more than doubled since last week, when there were about 70,000 symptomatic patients. The chief scientist behind the app said it was fresh evidence the crisis was ‘rising at an alarming rate’.  

The ONS, on the other hand, estimates that about 113,000 people are currently carrying the virus – equating to around one in 500 people – although the number-crunching body only looks at England and Wales.

It comes as Matt Hancock yesterday suggested the true number of cases occurring each day was in the region of 10,000. And the Health Secretary pointed out that the spike now is nowhere near levels seen during the darkest days of the crisis in March and April, when 100,000 people were getting infected every 24 hours.

KCL has based its latest estimates on nearly 7,000 tests this week, of which 151 were positive – about three times more than the ONS.  

More positive tests improves the accuracy of the data but the study may have a slight bias because it only swabs people who are already ill.

The ONS study sends tests to random groups of people, which may give a better indication of the true scale of the virus. But the real number of infections is likely to lie somewhere in the middle, and both data-sets are being fed into Government to help steer it through the crisis. 

KCL’s fresh batch of data was based on 6,847 swab tests done between September 7 and September 20 from people right across the UK, during which 151 people tested positive for the virus.

Researchers then extrapolate this data to the general population to make estimates about the virus’s trajectory. 

The app estimates 147,498 people have symptomatic Covid-19 in the UK right now, with 55,201 patients in England, 14,319 in Scotland and 9,075 in Wales. They did not make estimates for Northern Ireland.

Almost half of the new daily infections are occurring in the North of England (7,778) but London, Glasgow and Belfast are also seeing ‘worrying’ rises, according to the KCL team. 

Broken down, the North West of England is being battered hardest by the latest surge in infections, with estimated cases tripling in the last seven days from 12,544 to 36,316. 

In the North East and Yorkshire and London, infections have more than doubled from 12,916 to 27,731 and 9,291 to 18,200, respectively.

The researchers now predict the reproduction ‘R’ rate – the average number of people each Covid-19 patient infects – is dangerously high across the UK – 1.4 in England and Wales and 1.3 in Scotland.

Experts say keeping the R squashed below 1.0 is essential to prevent the outbreak from growing exponentially and spiralling out of control. 

Tim Spector, professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London and the brains behind the app, said: ‘The number of cases in the UK continues to rise at an alarming rate as we are seeing figures doubling weekly across the country, in particular we are worried about places like London and other major cities like Manchester, Belfast and Glasgow where cases are surging and the R value is around 1.4.’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Tell your MP to back the Mail on Sunday’s Save Our Family Farms campaign

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tell your mp to back the mail on sundays save our family farms campaign

Some of Britain’s most recognisable faces have joined the Mail on Sunday’s war on toxic US food and we’re now calling on our readers to do the same.

Celebrities including chef Jamie Oliver, fitness guru Joe Wicks and BBC Countryside presenter Anita Rani have urged Boris Johnson to block sub-standard foods from flooding into the UK under post-Brexit trade deals. 

The move comes as International Trade Secretary Liz Truss faces growing Parliamentary pressure to bolster protections against poor quality foreign food – and save British farms from being put out of business by cheap imports.

This newspaper is today urging readers who back the campaign to send a version of the letter to their local Tory MP, as Opposition MPs are already expected to support moves to protect standards

This newspaper is today urging readers who back the campaign to send a version of the letter to their local Tory MP, as Opposition MPs are already expected to support moves to protect standards

In a crunch Commons debate expected within the next fortnight, MPs will vote on new plans to give watchdogs on the Trade and Agriculture Commission the power to enforce high food standards.

In a heartfelt open letter, the group argues that ‘the British public cares deeply’ about these issues – a point emphasised by a Mail on Sunday poll today which shows an overwhelming majority of voters want our high food standards protected in future trade agreements.  

This newspaper is today urging readers who back the campaign to send a version of the letter to their local Tory MP, as Opposition MPs are already expected to support moves to protect standards. 

MPs will vote in the coming weeks on two amendments to the Agriculture Bill – one to keep out food imports that do not meet the UK’s world-class standards, and the other to give Parliament a final say over future trade deals and create a permanent independent food trade watchdog. 

As things stand the Government is telling Tory MPs not to back the amendments to the Agriculture Bill. Below is a list of Conservative MPs you can lobby with our letter. 

To urge your MP to vote for the amendments and back the Mail on Sunday’s Save Our Family Farms campaign, click this blue box and paste in their email address from the list below. If you are using the app, click here.

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TORY MPs: CONSTITUENCY, MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT AND EMAIL ADDRESSES
Constituency Member of Parliament Email address
Aberconwy Robin Millar robin.millar.mp@parliament.uk
Aldershot Leo Docherty leo.docherty.mp@parliament.uk
Aldridge-Brownhills Wendy Morton wendy.morton.mp@parliament.uk
Altrincham and Sale West Sir Graham Brady altsale@parliament.uk
Amber Valley Nigel Mills nigel.mills.mp@parliament.uk
Arundel and South Downs Andrew Griffith Andrew@GriffithMP.com
Ashfield Lee Anderson lee.anderson.mp@parliament.uk
Ashford Damian Green damian.green.mp@parliament.uk
Aylesbury Rob Butler rob.butler.mp@parliament.uk
Banbury Victoria Prentis victoria.prentis.mp@parliament.uk
Banff and Buchan David Duguid david.duguid.mp@parliament.uk
Barrow and Furness Simon Fell simon.fell.mp@parliament.uk
Basildon and Billericay John Baron baronj@parliament.uk
Basingstoke Maria Miller maria.miller.mp@parliament.uk
Bassetlaw Brendan Clarke-Smith brendan.clarkesmith.mp@parliament.uk
Beaconsfield Joy Morrissey joy.morrissey.mp@parliament.uk
Beckenham Bob Stewart bob.stewart.mp@parliament.uk
Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk John Lamont john.lamont.mp@parliament.uk
Berwick-upon-Tweed Anne-Marie Trevelyan annemarie.trevelyan.mp@parliament.uk
Beverley and Holderness Graham Stuart grahamstuartmp@parliament.uk
Bexhill and Battle Huw Merriman huw.merriman.mp@parliament.uk
Bexleyheath and Crayford Sir David Evennett david.evennett.mp@parliament.uk
Birmingham, Northfield Gary Sambrook gary.sambrook.mp@parliament.uk
Bishop Auckland Dehenna Davison dehenna.davison.mp@parliament.uk
Blackpool North and Cleveleys Paul Maynard paul.maynard.mp@parliament.uk
Blackpool South Scott Benton scott.benton.mp@parliament.uk
Blyth Valley Ian Levy ian.levy.mp@parliament.uk
Bognor Regis and Littlehampton Nick Gibb gibbn@parliament.uk
Bolsover Mark Fletcher mark.fletcher.mp@parliament.uk
Bolton North East Mark Logan mark.logan.mp@parliament.uk
Bolton West Chris Green chris.green.mp@parliament.uk
Boston and Skegness Matt Warman matt.warman.mp@parliament.uk
Bosworth Dr Luke Evans luke.evans.mp@parliament.uk
Bournemouth East Tobias Ellwood tobias.ellwood.mp@parliament.uk
Bournemouth West Conor Burns conor.burns.mp@parliament.uk
Bracknell James Sunderland james.sunderland.mp@parliament.uk
Braintree James Cleverly james.cleverly.mp@parliament.uk
Brecon and Radnorshire Fay Jones fay.jones.mp@parliament.uk
Brentwood and Ongar Alex Burghart alex.burghart.mp@parliament.uk
Bridgend Dr Jamie Wallis jamie.wallis.mp@parliament.uk
Bridgwater and West Somerset Ian Liddell-Grainger ianlg@parliament.uk
Brigg and Goole Andrew Percy andrew.percy.mp@parliament.uk
Broadland Jerome Mayhew jerome.mayhew.mp@parliament.uk
Bromley and Chislehurst Sir Robert Neill bob.neill.mp@parliament.uk
Bromsgrove Sajid Javid sajid.javid.mp@parliament.uk
Broxbourne Sir Charles Walker charles.walker.mp@parliament.uk
Broxtowe Darren Henry darren.henry.mp@parliament.uk
Buckingham Greg Smith greg.smith.mp@parliament.uk
Burnley Antony Higginbotham antony.higginbotham.mp@parliament.uk
Burton Kate Griffiths kate.griffiths.mp@parliament.uk
Bury North James Daly james.daly.mp@parliament.uk
Bury South Christian Wakeford christian.wakeford.mp@parliament.uk
Bury St Edmunds Jo Churchill jo.churchill.mp@parliament.uk
Calder Valley Craig Whittaker craig.whittaker.mp@parliament.uk
Camborne and Redruth George Eustice george.eustice.mp@parliament.uk
Cannock Chase Amanda Milling amanda.milling.mp@parliament.uk
Carlisle John Stevenson john.stevenson.mp@parliament.uk
Carmarthen West and South Pembrokeshire Simon Hart simon.hart.mp@parliament.uk
Carshalton and Wallington Elliot Colburn elliot.colburn.mp@parliament.uk
Castle Point Rebecca Harris rebecca.harris.mp@parliament.uk
Central Devon Mel Stride mel.stride.mp@parliament.uk
Central Suffolk and North Ipswich Dr Dan Poulter daniel.poulter.mp@parliament.uk
Charnwood Edward Argar edward.argar.mp@parliament.uk
Chatham and Aylesford Tracey Crouch tracey.crouch.mp@parliament.uk
Cheadle Mary Robinson mary.robinson.mp@parliament.uk
Chelmsford Vicky Ford vicky.ford.mp@parliament.uk
Chelsea and Fulham Greg Hands handsg@parliament.uk
Cheltenham Alex Chalk alex.chalk.mp@parliament.uk
Chesham and Amersham Dame Cheryl Gillan cheryl.gillan.mp@parliament.uk
Chichester Gillian Keegan gillian.keegan.mp@parliament.uk
Chingford and Woodford Green Sir Iain Duncan Smith Iain.duncansmith.mp@parliament.uk
Chippenham Michelle Donelan michelle.donelan.mp@parliament.uk
Chipping Barnet Theresa Villiers theresa@theresavilliers.co.uk
Christchurch Sir Christopher Chope chopec@parliament.uk
Cities of London and Westminster Nickie Aiken nickie.aiken.mp@parliament.uk
Clacton Giles Watling giles.watling.mp@parliament.uk
Cleethorpes Martin Vickers martin.vickers.mp@parliament.uk
Clwyd South Simon Baynes simon.baynes.mp@parliament.uk
Clwyd West David Jones katharine.huggins@parliament.uk
Colchester William Quince will.quince.mp@parliament.uk
Colne Valley Jason McCartney jason.mccartney.mp@parliament.uk
Congleton Fiona Bruce fiona.bruce.mp@parliament.uk
Copeland Trudy Harrison trudy.harrison.mp@parliament.uk
Corby Tom Pursglove tom.pursglove.mp@parliament.uk
Crawley Henry Smith henry.smith.mp@parliament.uk
Crewe and Nantwich Dr Kieran Mullan kieran.mullan.mp@parliament.uk
Croydon South Chris Philp chris.philp.mp@parliament.uk
Darlington Peter Gibson peter.gibson.mp@parliament.uk
Dartford Gareth Johnson gareth.johnson.mp@parliament.uk
Daventry Chris Heaton-Harris chris.heatonharris.mp@parliament.uk
Delyn Rob Roberts rob.roberts.mp@parliament.uk
Derby North Amanda Solloway amanda.solloway.mp@parliament.uk
Derbyshire Dales Sarah Dines sarah.dines.mp@parliament.uk
Devizes Danny Kruger danny.kruger.mp@parliament.uk
Dewsbury Mark Eastwood mark.eastwood.mp@parliament.uk
Don Valley Nick Fletcher nick.fletcher.mp@parliament.uk
Dover Natalie Elphicke natalie.elphicke.mp@parliament.uk
Dudley North Marco Longhi marco.longhi.mp@parliament.uk
Dudley South Mike Wood mike.wood.mp@parliament.uk
Dumfries and Galloway Alister Jack alister.jack.mp@parliament.uk
Dumfriesshire, Clydesdale and Tweeddale David Mundell david.mundell.mp@parliament.uk
East Devon Simon Jupp simon.jupp.mp@parliament.uk
East Hampshire Damian Hinds damian.hinds.mp@parliament.uk
East Surrey Claire Coutinho claire.coutinho.mp@parliament.uk
East Worthing and Shoreham Tim Loughton loughtont@parliament.uk
East Yorkshire Sir Greg Knight sothcottt@parliament.uk
Eastbourne Caroline Ansell caroline.ansell.mp@parliament.uk
Eastleigh Paul Holmes paul.holmes.mp@parliament.uk
Eddisbury Edward Timpson edward.timpson.mp@parliament.uk
Elmet and Rothwell Alec Shelbrooke alec.shelbrooke.mp@parliament.uk
Epsom and Ewell Chris Grayling chris.grayling.mp@parliament.uk
Erewash Maggie Throup maggie.throup.mp@parliament.uk
Esher and Walton Dominic Raab dominic.raab.mp@parliament.uk
Fareham Suella Braverman suella.braverman.mp@parliament.uk
Faversham and Mid Kent Helen Whately helen.whately.mp@parliament.uk
Filton and Bradley Stoke Jack Lopresti jack.lopresti.mp@parliament.uk
Finchley and Golders Green Mike Freer mike.freer.mp@parliament.uk
Folkestone and Hythe Damian Collins damian.collins.mp@parliament.uk
Forest of Dean Mark Harper mark.harper.mp@parliament.uk
Fylde Mark Menzies mark.menzies.mp@parliament.uk
Gainsborough Sir Edward Leigh edward.leigh.mp@parliament.uk
Gedling Tom Randall tom.randall.mp@parliament.uk
Gillingham and Rainham Rehman Chishti rehman.chishti.mp@parliament.uk
Gloucester Richard Graham richard.graham.mp@parliament.uk
Gosport Caroline Dinenage caroline.dinenage.mp@parliament.uk
Granntham and Stamford Gareth Davies gareth.davies.mp@parliament.uk
Gravesham Adam Holloway hollowaya@parliament.uk
Great Grimsby Lia Nici lia.nici.mp@parliament.uk
Great Yarmouth Brandon Lewis brandon.lewis.mp@parliament.uk
Guildford Angela Richardson angela.richardson.mp@parliament.uk
Halesowen and Rowley Regis James Morris james.morris.mp@parliament.uk
Haltemprice and Howden David Davis david.davis.mp@parliament.uk
Harborough Neil O’Brien neil.obrien.mp@parliament.uk
Harlow Robert Halfon halfon4harlow@roberthalfon.com
Harrogate and Knaresborough Andrew Jones andrew.jones.mp@parliament.uk
Harrow East Bob Blackman bob.blackman.mp@parliament.uk
Harwich and North Essex Sir Bernard Jenkin bernard.jenkin.mp@parliament.uk
Hastings and Rye Sally-Ann Hart sallyann.hart.mp@parliament.uk
Havant Alan Mak alan.mak.mp@parliament.uk
Hazel Grove William Wragg william@williamwragg.org.uk
Hemel Hempstead Sir Mike Penning mike.penning.mp@parliament.uk
Hendon Dr Matthew Offord matthew.offord.mp@parliament.uk
Henley John Howell howelljm@parliament.uk
Hereford and South Herefordshire Jesse Norman jesse.norman.mp@parliament.uk
Hertford and Stortford Julie Marson julie.marson.mp@parliament.uk
Hertsmere Oliver Dowden oliver.dowden.mp@parliament.uk
Hexham Guy Opperman guy.opperman.mp@parliament.uk
Heywood and Middleton Chris Clarkson chris.clarkson.mp@parliament.uk
High Peak Robert Largan mail@robertlargan.co.uk
Hitchin and Harpenden Bim Afolami bim.afolami.mp@parliament.uk
Hornchurch and Upminster Julia Lopez julia.lopez.mp@parliament.uk
Horsham Jeremy Quin jeremy.quin.mp@parliament.uk
Huntingdon Jonathan Djanogly jonathan.djanogly.mp@parliament.uk
Hyndburn Sara Britcliffe sara.britcliffe.mp@parliament.uk
Ipswich Tom Hunt tom.hunt.mp@parliament.uk
Isle of Wight Bob Seely bob.seely.mp@parliament.uk
Keighley Robbie Moore robbie.moore.mp@parliament.uk
Kenilworth and Southam Jeremy Wright Jeremy.wright.mp@parliament.uk
Kensington Felicity Buchan felicity.buchan.mp@parliament.uk
Kettering Philip Hollobone philip.hollobone.mp@parliament.uk
Kingswood Chris Skidmore chris.skidmore.mp@parliament.uk
Leigh James Grundy james.grundy.mp@parliament.uk
Lewes Maria Caulfield maria.caulfield.mp@parliament.uk
Lichfield Michael Fabricant fabricantm@parliament.uk
Lincoln Karl McCartney karl.mccartney.mp@parliament.uk
Loughborough Jane Hunt jane.hunt.mp@parliament.uk
Louth and Horncastle Victoria Atkins Victoria@victoriaatkins.org.uk
Ludlow Philip Dunne philip.dunne.mp@parliament.uk
Macclesfield David Rutley david.rutley.mp@parliament.uk
Maidenhead Theresa May mayt@parliament.uk
Maidstone and The Weald Helen Grant helen.grant.mp@parliament.uk
Maldon John Whittingdale john.whittingdale.mp@parliament.uk
Mansfield Ben Bradley ben.bradley.mp@parliament.uk
Meon Valley Flick Drummond flick.drummond.mp@parliament.uk
Meriden Saqib Bhatti saqib.bhatti@parliament.uk
Mid Bedfordshire Nadine Dorries dorriesn@parliament.uk
Mid Derbyshire Pauline Latham pauline.latham.mp@parliament.uk
Mid Dorset and North Poole Michael Tomlinson michael.tomlinson.mp@parliament.uk
Mid Norfolk George Freeman george.freeman.mp@parliament.uk
Mid Sussex Mims Davies mims.davies.mp@parliament.uk
Mid Worcestershire Nigel Huddleston nigel.huddleston.mp@parliament.uk
Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland Simon Clarke simon.clarke.mp@parliament.uk
Milton Keynes North Ben Everitt ben.everitt.mp@parliament.uk
Milton Keynes South Iain Stewart iain.stewart.mp@parliament.uk
Mole Valley Sir Paul Beresford annie.winsbury@parliament.uk
Monmouth David TC Davies david.davies.mp@parliament.uk
Montgomeryshire Craig Williams craig.williams.mp@parliament.uk
Moray Douglas Ross douglas.ross.mp@parliament.uk
Morecambe and Lunesdale David Morris david.morris.mp@parliament.uk
Morley and Outwood Andrea Jenkyns andrea.jenkyns.mp@parliament.uk
New Forest West Sir Desmond Swayne swayned@parliament.uk
Newark Robert Jenrick robert.jenrick.mp@parliament.uk
Newbury Laura Farris laura.farris.mp@parliament.uk
Newcastle-under-Lyme Aaron Bell aaron.bell.mp@parliament.uk
Newton Abbot Anne Marie Morris annemarie.morris.mp@parliament.uk
North Cornwall Scott Mann scott.mann.mp@parliament.uk
North Devon Selaine Saxby selaine.saxby.mp@parliament.uk
North Dorset Simon Hoare simon.hoare.mp@parliament.uk
North East Bedfordshire Richard Fuller richard.fuller.mp@parliament.uk
North East Cambridgeshire Steve Barclay stephen.barclay.mp@parliament.uk
North East Derbyshire Lee Rowley lee.rowley.mp@parliament.uk
North East Hampshire Ranil Jayawardena email@ranil.uk
North East Hertfordshire Sir Oliver Heald Oliver.heald.mp@parliament.uk
North East Somerset Jacob Rees-Mogg jacob.reesmogg.mp@parliament.uk
North Herefordshire Bill Wiggin bill.wiggin.mp@parliament.uk
North Norfolk Duncan Baker duncan@duncanbaker.org.uk
North Shropshire Owen Paterson Patersono@parliament.uk
North Somerset Dr Liam Fox ione.douglas@parliament.uk
North Swindon Justin Tomlinson justin.tomlinson.mp@parliament.uk
North Thanet Sir Roger Gale galerj@parliament.uk
North Warwickshire Craig Tracey craig.tracey.mp@parliament.uk
North West Cambridgeshire Shailesh Vara shailesh.vara.mp@parliament.uk
North West Durham Richard Holden richard.holden.mp@parliament.uk
North West Hampshire Kit Malthouse kit.malthouse.mp@parliament.uk
North West Leicestershire Andrew Bridgen andrew.bridgen.mp@parliament.uk
North West Norfolk James Wild james.wild.mp@parliament.uk
North Wiltshire James Gray jamesgraymp@parliament.uk
Northampton North Michael Ellis michael.ellis.mp@parliament.uk
Northampton South Andrew Lewer andrew.lewer.mp@parliament.uk
Norwich North Chloe Smith chloe@chloesmith.org.uk
Nuneaton Marcus Jones marcus.jones.mp@parliament.uk
Old Bexley and Sidcup James Brokenshire james.brokenshire.mp@parliament.uk
Orpington Gareth Bacon gareth.bacon.mp@parliament.uk
Pendle Andrew Stephenson andrew.stephenson.mp@parliament.uk
Penistone and Stocksbridge Miriam Cates miriam.cates.mp@parliament.uk
Penrith and The Border Dr Neil Hudson neil.hudson.mp@parliament.uk
Peterborough Paul Bristow paul.bristow.mp@parliament.uk
Plymouth, Moor View Johnny Mercer diary@johnnyforplymouth.co.uk
Poole Sir Robert Syms symsmp.office@parliament.uk
Portsmouth North Penny Mordaunt penny.mordaunt.mp@parliament.uk
Preseli Pembrokeshire Stephen Crabb stephen.crabb.mp@parliament.uk
Pudsey Stuart Andrew stuart.andrew.mp@parliament.uk
Rayleigh and Wickford Mark Francois mark.francois.mp@parliament.uk
Reading West Alok Sharma alok.sharma.mp@parliament.uk
Redcar Jacob Young jacob.young.mp@parliament.uk
Redditch Rachel Maclean rachel.maclean.mp@parliament.uk
Reigate Crispin Blunt crispinbluntmp@parliament.uk
Richmond (Yorks) Rishi Sunak rishi.sunak.mp@parliament.uk
Rochester and Strood Kelly Tolhurst kelly.tolhurst.mp@parliament.uk
Rochford and Southend East James Duddridge james@jamesduddridge.com
Romford Andrew Rosindell andrew.rosindell.mp@parliament.uk
Romsey and Southampton North Caroline Nokes caroline.nokes.mp@parliament.uk
Rossendale and Darwen Jake Berry jake.berry.mp@parliament.uk
Rother Valley Alexander Stafford alexander.stafford.mp@parliament.uk
Rugby Mark Pawsey mark.pawsey.mp@parliament.uk
Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner David Simmonds david.simmonds.mp@parliament.uk
Runnymede and Weybridge Dr Ben Spencer ben.spencer.mp@parliament.uk
Rushcliffe Ruth Edwards ruth.edwards.mp@parliament.uk
Rutland and Melton Alicia Kearns alicia.kearns.mp@parliament.uk
Saffron Walden Kemi Badenoch kemi.badenoch.mp@parliament.uk
Salisbury John Glen john.glen.mp@parliament.uk
Scarborough and Whitby Robert Goodwill robert.goodwill.mp@parliament.uk
Scunthorpe Holly Mumby-Croft holly.mumbycroft.mp@parliament.uk
Sedgefield Paul Howell paul.howell.mp@parliament.uk
Selby and Ainsty Nigel Adams nigel.adams.mp@parliament.uk
Sevenoaks Laura Trott laura.trott.mp@parliament.uk
Sherwood Mark Spencer mark.spencer.mp@parliament.uk
Shipley Philip Davies daviesp@parliament.uk
Shrewsbury and Atcham Daniel Kawczynski daniel.kawczynski.mp@parliament.uk
Sittingbourne and Sheppey Gordon Henderson gordon.henderson.mp@parliament.uk
Skipton and Ripon Julian Smith julian.smith.mp@parliament.uk
Sleaford and North Hykeham Dr Caroline Johnson caroline.johnson.mp@parliament.uk
Solihull Julian Knight julian.knight.mp@parliament.uk
Somerton and Frome David Warburton david.warburton.mp@parliament.uk
South Basildon and East Thurrock Stephen Metcalfe stephen.metcalfe.mp@parliament.uk
South Cambridgeshire Anthony Browne anthony.browne.mp@parliament.uk
South Derbyshire Heather Wheeler heather.wheeler.mp@parliament.uk
South Dorset Richard Drax richard.drax.mp@parliament.uk
South East Cambridgeshire Lucy Frazer lucy.frazer.mp@parliament.uk
South East Cornwall Sheryll Murray sheryll.murray.mp@parliament.uk
South Holland and The Deepings Sir John Hayes hayesj@parliament.uk
South Leicestershire Alberto Costa alberto.costa.mp@parliament.uk
South Norfolk Richard Bacon richardbaconmp@parliament.uk
South Northamptonshire Andrea Leadsom andrea.leadsom.mp@parliament.uk
South Ribble Katherine Fletcher katherine.fletcher.mp@parliament.uk
South Staffordshire Gavin Williamson gavin.williamson.mp@parliament.uk
South Suffolk James Cartlidge james.cartlidge.mp@parliament.uk
South Swindon Robert Buckland robert.buckland.mp@parliament.uk
South Thanet Craig Mackinlay craig.mackinlay.mp@parliament.uk
South West Bedfordshire Andrew Selous andrew.selous.mp@parliament.uk
South West Devon Sir Gary Streeter deans@parliament.uk
South West Hertfordshire Gagan Mohindra gagan.mohindra.mp@parliament.uk
South West Norfolk Elizabeth Truss elizabeth.truss.mp@parliament.uk
South West Surrey Jeremy Hunt huntj@parliament.uk
South West Wiltshire Dr Andrew Murrison murrisona@parliament.uk
Southampton, Itchen Royston Smith royston.smith.mp@parliament.uk
Southend West Sir David Amess amessd@parliament.uk
Southport Damien Moore damien.moore.mp@parliament.uk
Spelthorne Kwasi Kwarteng kwasi.kwarteng.mp@parliament.uk
St Austell and Newquay Steve Double steve.double.mp@parliament.uk
St Ives Derek Thomas derek.thomas.mp@parliament.uk
Stafford Theo Clarke theo.clarke.mp@parliament.uk
Staffordshire Moorlands Karen Bradley karen.bradley.mp@parliament.uk
Stevenage Stephen McPartland stephen@stephenmcpartland.co.uk
Stockton South Matt Vickers matt.vickers.mp@parliament.uk
Stoke-on-Trent Central Jo Gideon jo.gideon.mp@parliament.uk
Stoke-on-Trent North Jonathan Gullis jonathan.gullis.mp@parliament.uk
Stoke-on-Trent South Jack Brereton jack.brereton.mp@parliament.uk
Stone Sir William Cash cashw@parliament.uk
Stourbridge Suzanne Webb suzanne.webb.mp@parliament.uk
Stratford-on-Avon Nadhim Zahawi nadhim.zahawi.mp@parliament.uk
Stroud Siobhan Bailie siobhan.baillie.mp@parliament.uk
Suffolk Coastal Dr Therese Coffey therese.coffey.mp@parliament.uk
Surrey Heath Michael Gove michael.gove.mp@parliament.uk
Sutton and Cheam Paul Scully paul.scully.mp@parliament.uk
Sutton Coldfield Andrew Mitchell andrew.mitchell.mp@parliament.uk
Tamworth Christopher Pincher christopher.pincher.mp@parliament.uk
Tatton Esther McVey esther.mcvey.mp@parliament.uk
Taunton Deane Rebecca Pow rebecca.pow.mp@parliament.uk
Telford Lucy Allan lucy.allan.mp@parliament.uk
Tewkesbury Laurence Robertson robertsonl@parliament.uk
The Cotswolds Sir Geoffrey Clifton-Brown cliftonbrowng@parliament.uk
The Wrekin Mark Pritchard pritchardm@parliament.uk
Thirsk and Malton Kevin Hollinrake kevin.hollinrake.mp@parliament.uk
Thornbury and Yate Luke Hall luke.hall.mp@parliament.uk
Thurrock Jackie Doyle-Price jackie.doyleprice.mp@parliament.uk
Tiverton and Honiton Neil Parish neil.parish.mp@parliament.uk
Tonbridge and Malling Tom Tugendhat tom.tugendhat.mp@parliament.uk
Torbay Kevin Foster kevin.foster.mp@parliament.uk
Torridge and West Devon Geoffrey Cox coxg@parliament.uk
Totnes Anthony Mangnall anthony.mangnall.mp@parliament.uk
Truro and Falmouth Cherilyn Mackrory cherilyn.mackrory.mp@parliament.uk
Tunbridge Wells Greg Clark gregclarkmp@parliament.uk
Uxbridge and South Ruislip Boris Johnson boris.johnson.mp@parliament.uk
Vale of Clwyd Dr James Davies james.davies.mp@parliament.uk
Vale of Glamorgan Alun Cairns alun.cairns.mp@parliament.uk
Wakefield Imran Ahmad Khan imran.mp@parliament.uk
Walsall North Eddie Hughes eddie.hughes.mp@parliament.uk
Wantage David Johnston david.johnston.mp@parliament.uk
Warrington South Andy Carter andy.carter.mp@parliament.uk
Watford Dean Russell dean.russell.mp@parliament.uk
Waveney Peter Aldous peter.aldous.mp@parliament.uk
Wealden Nusrat Ghani nusrat.ghani.mp@parliament.uk
Wellingborough Peter Bone bonep@parliament.uk
Wells James Heappey james.heappey.mp@parliament.uk
Welwyn Hatfield Grant Shapps shappsg@parliament.uk
West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine Andrew Bowie andrew.bowie.mp@parliament.uk
West Bromwich East Nicola Richards nicola.richards.mp@parliament.uk
West Bromwich West Shaun Bailey shaun.bailey.mp@parliament.uk
West Dorset Chris Loder chris.loder.mp@parliament.uk
West Suffolk Matt Hancock matt.hancock.mp@parliament.uk
West Worcestershire Harriet Baldwin harriett.baldwin.mp@parliament.uk
Weston-super-Mare John Penrose beauperec@parliament.uk
Wimbledon Stephen Hammond stephen.hammond.mp@parliament.uk
Winchester Steve Brine steve.brine.mp@parliament.uk
Windsor Adam Afriyie adam.afriyie.mp@parliament.uk
Witham Priti Patel withammp@parliament.uk
Witney Robert Courts robert.courts.mp@parliament.uk
Woking Jonathan Lord jonathan.lord.mp@parliament.uk
Wokingham John Redwood john.redwood.mp@parliament.uk
Wolverhampton North East Jane Stevenson jane.stevenson.mp@parliament.uk
Wolverhampton South West Stuart Anderson stuart.anderson.mp@parliament.uk
Worcester Robin Walker robin.walker.mp@parliament.uk
Workington Mark Jenkinson mark.jenkinson.mp@parliament.uk
Worthing West Peter Bottomley bottomleyp@parliament.uk
Wrexham Sarah Atherton sarah.atherton.mp@parliament.uk
Wycombe Steve Baker steve.baker.mp@parliament.uk
Wyre and Preston North Ben Wallace wallaceb@parliament.uk
Wyre Forest Mark Garnier mark.garnier.mp@parliament.uk
Yeovil Marcus Fysh marcus.fysh.mp@parliament.uk
Ynys Môn Virginia Crosbie virginia.crosbie.mp@parliament.uk
York Outer Julian Sturdy julian.sturdy.mp@parliament.uk

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Liz Jones’s Diary: In which P gets even more needy 

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liz joness diary in which p gets even more needy
I don’t need winding up. I am already a coiled spring

I don’t need winding up. I am already a coiled spring

Hmm. Yeah. Am not sure… P didn’t react to my mistakenly sending him a text meant for Nic, saying, ‘Oh well, at least I got three columns out of him.’ Perhaps because he knows he is column fodder. But he has become rather more frisky, viz:

‘I neeeeeed to see you! I need you in my life and in my bed!’

And: ‘I hope when we have dinner in London I can stay with you.’ (I’d told him I have to be in a hotel in town for work and said we could meet up.)

And, in response to my saying that we need to meet up before the statute of limitations on my extreme Hollywood bikini wax runs out, he replied, ‘I am not worried about the odd hair in my mouth.’ And that, ‘You’d be shocked if you knew how indifferent I usually am with women, but with you I feel like I’m grieving that I can’t see you, but there’s no solution…’

Crikey! He’s worse than David! We have had precisely two meals together. I only had one course each time. I didn’t even have any bread! And then he got more needy, mainly as I was ignoring him because Benji, my rescue pony, went down with colic, which meant he was on a round-the-clock watch. ‘I am trying to find my feet, learning, and trying to understand you. I am quietly optimistic this might actually be doable! But in a rare moment of insecurity, I do worry if I am enough…’

I replied, ‘What brought this on? I hope you haven’t been reading my column, listening to the podcast, googling me, reading my tweets.’ (My tweets are, admittedly, very full-on. I am currently trying to get the Navy and Army to help me rescue a walrus forced to do sit-ups in a circus.)

He went on and on about my birthday present. Just send something! A dog bed! A candle!* And then he said, apropos of nothing, ‘I don’t feel anywhere near my age at all. So I’m not dreading getting to yours.’

Excuse me! a) I have been rebuilt. b) According to Companies House, he is three years older than me! And c) Just don’t bring it up! What is this obsession with age? There are other qualities aside from youth! During dinner, he had felt my upper arm, presumably to check my BMI, and asked me my dress size, to which I replied, ‘It depends on the designer. Jil Sander comes up huge, Victoria Beckham comes up kidney-constricting small…’

At this point, I took a break, and sent what I’d written to Nic via Messenger for her feedback. No response.

So, I call her. She hasn’t got it. Oh dear. Oh no. Not again. I’ve sent it to P instead. I quickly text to tell him that I have sent it to him so he can OK it before it’s published. You have to think fast in this job. ‘Happy?’ I ask. I wait. And I wait. I’m sweating.

And do you know what? He is remarkably sanguine. ‘Don’t send the column to me every week; I have no right to influence your writing. Must you mention the hair in the mouth? You’re the one that goes on about how much hair you have or haven’t got! I was winding you up about the age thing. I accept I am column fodder, but I do hope you like me a little as well.’

Well, that is nice. Apart from the winding me up part. I don’t need winding up. I am already a coiled spring!

Oh God, I am looking at his texts. There are three dot, dot, dots, shimmering. What is he going to say now?

*Got to be Diptyque though.

                   ★Everyone’s talking about Liz Jones’s Diary: The Podcast! ★

Join Liz and her trusty (long-suffering) assistant Nicola as they dissect her weekly YOU magazine diary and delve into the archives to relive the bust-ups, betrayals, bullets… and so much more in this brilliant podcast. They’re outspoken, outrageous and utterly hilarious. Find it now at mailplus.co.uk/lizjones, iTunes and Spotify.

Contact Liz at lizjonesgoddess.com and stalk her @LizJonesGoddess 

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