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Britain pours tens of millions of aid money into middle-class hotels and coffee shops

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britain pours tens of millions of aid money into middle class hotels and coffee shops

Britain is ploughing tens of millions of taxpayer money into middle-class ventures under the guise of foreign aid, it has been revealed. 

Five-star hotels, artisan pizza diners and an Indian celebrity chef’s cookware line have all benefited from investment by the CDC Group, a government-owned institution.

Under the umbrella of the International Development department, the CDC Group is supposed to fund projects which help raise standards in the ‘world’s poorest places’.

But an investigation has shone a spotlight on eye-watering amounts of investment made to companies selling high-end products. 

Information on the CDC Group website shows it has poured almost £43million into African hotel chain Onomo since 2017.

Onomo has a stable of 20 three to four-star hotels across the continent that cater for guests on international businesses. 

One of the most eye-raising CDC investments was made to Wonderchef, a 'premium cookware' company founded by Indian television chef Sanjeev Kapoor (pictured)

One of the most eye-raising CDC investments was made to Wonderchef, a 'premium cookware' company founded by Indian television chef Sanjeev Kapoor (pictured)

One of the most eye-raising CDC investments was made to Wonderchef, a ‘premium cookware’ company founded by Indian television chef Sanjeev Kapoor (pictured)

It also invested into hotel chain Azalai which the CDC's own website made clear owns five-star hotels (The Bamako in Mali pictured)

It also invested into hotel chain Azalai which the CDC's own website made clear owns five-star hotels (The Bamako in Mali pictured)

It also invested into hotel chain Azalai which the CDC’s own website made clear owns five-star hotels (The Bamako in Mali pictured)

It also invested into hotel chain Azalai which the CDC’s own website made clear owns five-star hotels.

CDC typically pumps money into investment companies, in this case, Tunisian financial services company AfricInvest, which it has given £25million since 2014, which then funds local projects.

It is unclear on the CDC website how much of the money given to AfricInvest filtered down to Azalai hotels.

One of the most eyebrow-raising CDC investments was made to Wonderchef, a ‘premium cookware’ company founded by Indian television chef Sanjeev Kapoor.

The company bills itself as the ‘finest Cookware & Appliances brand, especially crafted by Chef Sanjeev Kapoo’ and specialise in seemingly middle-class items such as nutri blends which retail at £39.99

Yet they are listed on the CDC website as recipients of UK government-funded investment through Amicus Capital Partners private equity firm, which received £20million in December 2016. 

CDC made the investment through Tunisian financial services company AfricInvest, which it has given £25million since 2014 - it is unclear how much of this money filtered down to Azalai hotels (Azalai hotel in Cote d'Ivoire pictured)

CDC made the investment through Tunisian financial services company AfricInvest, which it has given £25million since 2014 - it is unclear how much of this money filtered down to Azalai hotels (Azalai hotel in Cote d'Ivoire pictured)

CDC made the investment through Tunisian financial services company AfricInvest, which it has given £25million since 2014 – it is unclear how much of this money filtered down to Azalai hotels (Azalai hotel in Cote d’Ivoire pictured)

Java House, which ‘operates casual dining retail brands in Kenya’ and sells ‘frozen yoghurt and 360 Degrees Artisan Pizza’ is also named as a recipient. 

The coffee chain received investment from Cayman Islands-headquarted fund managers Actis LLP which received £40million from the CDC.

Development campaigners blasted the investments, which was first reported by The Times, as a colossal misuse of public funds.

Daniel Willis of Global Justice Now told the newspaper: ‘It’s a betrayal of the whole point of aid, which is to help end poverty, not support luxury businesses.

He added: ‘The evidence that these investments are effective at tackling poverty is absolutely minimal.’

Java House, which 'operates casual dining retail brands in Kenya' and sells 'frozen yoghurt and 360 Degrees Artisan Pizza' is also named as a recipient

Java House, which 'operates casual dining retail brands in Kenya' and sells 'frozen yoghurt and 360 Degrees Artisan Pizza' is also named as a recipient

Java House, which ‘operates casual dining retail brands in Kenya’ and sells ‘frozen yoghurt and 360 Degrees Artisan Pizza’ is also named as a recipient

The CDC, which commands assets of over £6billion claims it prioritises investment based on the possibility of job-creation in the poorest places in the world.

Its website states: ‘Our investment teams include product and sector specialists who look for businesses with the greatest potential for impact, whether through their ability to grow and create jobs, to address a lack of enabling infrastructure, to increase efficiency, or to increase opportunities for the poorer parts of society.’ 

Over half its 294 staff are paid more than £100,000 and its chief executive earned £342,200, according to the Times.   

A spokesman stressed that: ‘Every single investment we now make is subject to a comprehensive and systematic assessment of its expected impact.’

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Father of baby boy found crying beside his dead Ugandan mother hits back in custody battle

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father of baby boy found crying beside his dead ugandan mother hits back in custody battle

The father of a baby boy found crying beside his dead Ugandan asylum seeker mother has hit back at her family in a looming custody battle over where the child should be brought up.

Distraught Adriel Gaguma was found in a cot with an empty bottle of milk as his mother Mercy Baguma, 34 lay dead in the hallway of her Glasgow flat.

Now the boy’s father Eric Nnanna, who is seeking asylum in the UK, has revealed that he wants 18-month old Adriel to be raised by him in Scotland. 

Earlier this week, Ms Baguma’s sister Sarah Nakendo told MailOnline that they wanted Adriel to live in Uganda, where he would have a ‘better life’ than in Britain.

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Adriel, 18 months old was found crying beside his mother Baguma's body. Now his father Eric Nnanna (pictured with the boy) is fighting Mercy's family in Africa for custody of him

Adriel, 18 months old was found crying beside his mother Baguma’s body. Now his father Eric Nnanna (pictured with the boy) is fighting Mercy’s family in Africa for custody of him

Mercy, 34, was found dead by police in Govan, Glasgow, last month

Mercy, 34, was found dead by police in Govan, Glasgow, last month

Mercy's son, Adriel, was found hungry and crying in his cot next to her body

Mercy’s son, Adriel, was found hungry and crying in his cot next to her body

He added: ‘I want the future to be in Scotland. I also want him to play for the Scottish national team.’

Mr Nnanna described how he has been reduced to tears when the boy mentions his mother.

The child was alone for four days before being discovered by police.

Mr Nnanna told BBC Reporting Scotland: ‘I remember how she used to hold him, how they used to bond together. It is just so sad.

‘Adriel was the love of her life.’

Mr Nnanna last saw Ms Baguma on Tuesday 19 August in her flat in Govan.

But when he returned to the property on Saturday 22 August, he was forced to call the police after he heard Adriel inside.

The circumstances of her death are unclear. They have been described as ‘unexplained but not suspicious.’

Mr Nnanna said: ‘At that point I was so devastated. I was so weak. I knew that something had happened because there was no one answering the door. I could only hear Adriel.’

Officers soon arrived and broke down the door but told Mr Nnanna to stay behind.

Ms Baguma’s body was found in the hallway while her son was in his cot.

Mr Nnanna, 30, said: ‘When they brought him out, he was holding an empty bottle of milk.

‘He had marks on his skin as he had cried for so many days.’ 

Privately-educated Ms Baguma suffered from pre-existing kidney and liver conditions, as well as depression and alcoholism, according to her family and friends

Privately-educated Ms Baguma suffered from pre-existing kidney and liver conditions, as well as depression and alcoholism, according to her family and friends

Eric Nnanna raised the alarm after he hadn't heard from Mercy in four days

Eric Nnanna raised the alarm after he hadn’t heard from Mercy in four days

Ms Baguma as a teenager. She had been in Scotland for 14 years prior to her death

Ms Baguma standing in a hotel lobby. She had been in Scotland for 14 years prior to her death

Ms Baguma had been in Scotland for almost 14 years prior to her death

Mercy's father, Abdu Balingilira Nakendo, stands by her coffin at her funeral yesterday

Mercy’s father, Abdu Balingilira Nakendo, stands by her coffin at her funeral yesterday

Mercy's coffin rests under a tent just before her funeral service and burial yesterday

Mercy’s coffin rests under a tent just before her funeral service and burial yesterday

Mercy's father, brothers and other local dignitaries pray at her funeral service yesterday

Mercy’s father, brothers and other local dignitaries pray at her funeral service yesterday

Asked for his reaction to the fact his son was still alive, he said: ‘I couldn’t believe Adriel had survived for those few days.

‘I could feel his bones and he couldn’t even talk. He couldn’t even recognise me.

‘He surviving was a miracle.’

The cost of Ms Baguma’s body to Uganda was met by a crowdfunding appeal while the remaining funds of £75,000 are to be placed in a trust for her son.

Speaking at the funeral her sister Ms Nakendo said: ‘The money raised by donations for our nephew should be fixed in an account which he will access when he is of age. We shall use the little we have to take care of him unconditionally.

‘My father can’t understand why they sent back his daughter’s body, but his grandson remains in Britain. We want Adriel back very much. He is our blood. He is Ugandan, with family here. We want to do it for Mercy.’

Mercy, who was from a wealthy background, suffered from alcohol addiction, depression and a kidney condition for years before her death.

According to friends in Glasgow, her relationship with Mr Nnanna, whom she met in a phone repair shop in 2017, had been tempestuous for seven months but they were trying to get back together.

The tragic asylum seeker was laid to rest in her family village near Bugiri in eastern Uganda, in a ceremony attended by about three hundred mourners. 

Mercy's sister, Sarah Nakendo, said she wanted to bring Adriel to live with the family in Uganda

Mercy’s sister, Sarah Nakendo, said she wanted to bring Adriel to live with the family in Uganda

Mercy's family and friends gather around her grave as her body is lowered in

Mercy’s family and friends gather around her grave as her body is lowered in

New trees were planted to mark Mercy's grave at her ancestral village in eastern Uganda

New trees were planted to mark Mercy’s grave at her ancestral village in eastern Uganda

Well-wishers and mourners gather in a tent during the funeral service for Mercy Baguma

Well-wishers and mourners gather in a tent during the funeral service for Mercy Baguma

Ms Baguma, right, and her father, former MP Abdu Balingilira Nakendo, left, who collapsed when he heard news of her death

Ms Baguma, right, and her father, former MP Abdu Balingilira Nakendo, left, who collapsed when he heard news of her death

Mercy's family lives adjacent to an enclave known as 'Ministers' Village', due to its popularity with Ugandan politicians, army chiefs and business leaders

Mercy’s family lives adjacent to an enclave known as ‘Ministers’ Village’, due to its popularity with Ugandan politicians, army chiefs and business leaders

Mercy's body was found in her flat in Govan, Glasgow, in August, next to her hungry son

Mercy’s body was found in her flat in Govan, Glasgow, in August, next to her hungry son 

She belonged to a prominent local family who own an extensive network of properties in the capital, Kampala, as well as extensive farming assets in their home village.

Ms Nakendo also revealed that the grieving family’s pain had been made worse by getting caught up in the ‘politicisation’ of Mercy’s death by activists and politicians in Britain.

The charity Positive Action in Housing (PAIH), which had been helping Mercy, said she was living in ‘extreme poverty’ as her right to work in Britain had expired.

Scottish leader Sturgeon blamed Westminster, saying ‘the UK asylum system is not just broken, it is deeply inhumane’ and calling on the British Government to ‘look into their hearts as a result of this case’.

Boris Johnson agreed to step in to pave the way for Mr Nnanna and Adriel to stay permanently in Britain.

‘People are using the death of my sister for their political campaigns while the family is being left out,’ Ms Nakendo told MailOnline.  

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Father-of-five who is a full-time carer for his chronically ill wife slams rule of six

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father of five who is a full time carer for his chronically ill wife slams rule of

A father-of-five who works as a full-time carer for his wife has revealed how his family have been cut off from meeting others due to the rule of six and has slammed the government for not considering the effect of the the latest lockdown rules on bigger families.

Joe Campbell, 32, from Grimsby, Lincolnshire says his family-of-seven have effectively been stopped from seeing anyone from outside their household due to the new law which stops more than six people meeting up at once. 

The family had already limited their social lives, as Joe’s wife Kerry, 35, suffers from chronic pancreatitis and fibromyalgia, which means that she is at a high risk of having serious side effects of Covid-19.

Joe Campbell, 32, from Grimsby, Lincolnshire says his family-of-seven have effectively been stopped from seeing anyone from outside their household due to the new law which stops more than six people meeting up at once. Joe is pictured with his wife Kerry, 35, and daughters Faith, 16, Ellie, 15, Madison, 14, Izzobella, 9, and Imogen, 8

Joe Campbell, 32, from Grimsby, Lincolnshire says his family-of-seven have effectively been stopped from seeing anyone from outside their household due to the new law which stops more than six people meeting up at once. Joe is pictured with his wife Kerry, 35, and daughters Faith, 16, Ellie, 15, Madison, 14, Izzobella, 9, and Imogen, 8

But the new ruling means the family are unable to meet anyone as a group, causing Joe to question why people can meet in pubs but not each others houses.

While larger families can still live together, the restrictions mean that nobody else can visit the family at home, and stops them from meeting up with anyone else as a family. 

This means Kerry’s mum is unable to visit, and the couple’s five daughters , Faith, 16, Ellie, 15, Madison, 14, Izzobella, 9, and Imogen, 8, aren’t able to have friends over.  

Joe said: ‘I can understand it to some extent, but I think their priorities are wrong. I don’t know why they are heavily restricting how many people you can meet in your home while keeping pubs open.

The family had already limited their social lives, as Joe's wife Kerry, 35, suffers from chronic pancreatitis and fibromyalgia, which means that she is at a high risk of having serious side effects of Covid-19. Joe is pictured with his daughters

The family had already limited their social lives, as Joe’s wife Kerry, 35, suffers from chronic pancreatitis and fibromyalgia, which means that she is at a high risk of having serious side effects of Covid-19. Joe is pictured with his daughters

‘Surely you are more at risk by going to to the pub than having one member of your family visiting your home?

‘We don’t get that many people round at the moment because my wife is quite ill, but her mother often visits, as well as my daughters’ friends.

‘But with this new law, nobody can visit at all, which I think is unfair to bigger families.

‘I completely understand how scary the coronavirus is, we have been wearing masks and following social distancing throughout. But I just don’t think enough thought has been put into this.

The new ruling means the family are unable to meet anyone as a group, causing Joe to question why people can meet in pubs but not each others houses. He says his daughters (pictured) are unable to have friends round

The new ruling means the family are unable to meet anyone as a group, causing Joe to question why people can meet in pubs but not each others houses. He says his daughters (pictured) are unable to have friends round

‘We have looked into it and we are exempt if we are out as a group of seven because we are all from the same household, but I can imagine we will still get some looks and possibly even people reporting us when they see us.

‘It won’t matter too much, because we can prove we’re a family of seven, but it just adds an extra hassle onto our lives.

‘Since the rule has been in place, I have seen people outwardly not following it, with people from multiple households still meeting up, and it just makes the situation even more frustrating.’

The restrictions have also had a big impact on Joe’s daughters.

Joe also thinks that people need to do what they can to avoid a second wave as bad as the first one. He is pictured on his wedding day

Joe also thinks that people need to do what they can to avoid a second wave as bad as the first one. He is pictured on his wedding day 

He said: ‘The younger ones have been really confused by it all, they know the basics and have taken it in their stride, but when they keep changing the rules it doesn’t help things.

‘The teenagers have been struggled the most through it all. Faith is looking for work, which is hard coming out of the pandemic.

‘But Ellie and Madison have also struggled, they can’t see their friends as often with the restrictions, and it’s not always possible for them to see them elsewhere.

‘With my wife having chronic pancreatitis and fibromyalgia, we have had to be very careful anyway, but being able to occasionally see family and friends has made it bearable for us.

‘I am a full-time carer for my wife, but through the pandemic I have had to keep on top of things even more, ensuring the house is frequently sanitised and reducing the risk of Covid coming into the house.

Joe, pictured in the car with his five daughters, has slammed the government for their decision to cut off at six

Joe, pictured in the car with his five daughters, has slammed the government for their decision to cut off at six

‘If we could have even one person or household that we could choose as a social bubble that could come round, it would make a massive difference.

‘I understand why it has been done, but it has had a major impact on bigger families that I don’t think they have considered.’

Joe also thinks that people need to do what they can to avoid a second wave as bad as the first one.

‘I think we all know a second wave is coming, and it’s largely down to people that have not been following the rules at all.

‘But I think part of that is because of the lack of clarity set out by the guidance. People hear the word guidance and think it’s optional, and the government need to be as clear as they were during lockdown for people to follow it.

‘If everyone follows the rules and sticks to social distancing, we can reduce the impact of a second wave, but we all need to work together for that to happen.’

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Seafront home where Princes Harry and William holidayed with Diana goes on the market for £4million

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seafront home where princes harry and william holidayed with diana goes on the market for 4million

A luxury seafront home once owned by Prince Harry and William’s grandfather has gone on sale for £4million.

The stunning four-bedroom home sits on an exclusive private estate and has access directly onto the beach.

Princess Diana‘s father, Earl Spencer, previously lived in the imposing seaside property in the West Sussex resort of Bognor Regis and spent summers there with his wife.

It was sold by his widow Raine in 1994 two years after the death of the Earl in 1992.

Pictures discovered in the attic revealed Prince Harry and William once played in the swimming pool during a happy summer holiday. 

A luxury seafront home once owned by Prince Harry and William's grandfather Earl Spencer has gone on sale for £4million

A luxury seafront home once owned by Prince Harry and William’s grandfather Earl Spencer has gone on sale for £4million

The stunning four-bedroom home sits on an exclusive private estate in Bognor Regis and has access directly onto the beach

The stunning four-bedroom home sits on an exclusive private estate in Bognor Regis and has access directly onto the beach

The advert calls the Spencers' former holiday home 'a truly unique property, made famous through it's Royal connections that has been meticulously rebuilt and refurbished by the current owners to create a simply magnificent coastal retreat'

The advert calls the Spencers’ former holiday home ‘a truly unique property, made famous through it’s Royal connections that has been meticulously rebuilt and refurbished by the current owners to create a simply magnificent coastal retreat’

Princess Diana took William and Harry to her father's seafront house for summer holidays as young royals, neighbours say

Princess Diana took William and Harry to her father’s seafront house for summer holidays as young royals, neighbours say

The home called Trade Winds used to be connected to a subsidiary house – which is undergoing renovations – where staff such as a housekeeper and gardener once lived.

The main house was bought in 2017 by Geoffrey Harvey-Toms and his wife Lynne for £1.9million.

According to neighbours it underwent a face lift before being put back on the market.

Both homes were built in the Spanish-style with terracotta roofs and large outside verandas and sun-decks.

The old servants home – which was called ‘Hacienda’, which is Spanish for ‘house on an estate’, when the Earl owned it – used to be connected to the main house by a passageway.

It was bought in January 2019 for 1.1million by Lesley Dobbie. 

Christina Sheppard bought the smaller, servants cottage from Raine 26 years ago and sold it to Mrs Dobbie last year.

She said that while she had seen the pictures of the princes as boys that were discovered in the attic, she doesn’t  know where they are now. 

‘We don’t know for a fact if Diana ever stayed here but next door found some photos in their loft of the young princes playing in the swimming pool,’ she said. 

Her husband Roger added: ‘The houses are both built in a Spanish style – particularly the roof tiling.’

Set in 1.2 acres of walled gardens, the estate agents describe it as 'One of the South Coast's most iconic properties'

Set in 1.2 acres of walled gardens, the estate agents describe it as ‘One of the South Coast’s most iconic properties’

The property was bought by its current owners for £1.9m who hope to sell it for double that after three years of renovations

The property was bought by its current owners for £1.9m who hope to sell it for double that after three years of renovations

The property with sea views is one of two houses on the estate. The main one currently on the market is where the Earl and his wife stayed while there is a smaller cottage next door that was lived in by staff and servants before it was sold in 1994

The property with sea views is one of two houses on the estate. The main one currently on the market is where the Earl and his wife stayed while there is a smaller cottage next door that was lived in by staff and servants before it was sold in 1994

‘We didn’t buy it from Diana’s father, the Earl of Spencer, because he died before 1994. We bought it from his widow, Raine Spencer.’ 

Both properties sit on the exclusive Aldwick private estate near Bognor Regis which is home to wealthy residents whose homes regularly sell for more than £3m.

A neighbour said: ‘Earl Spencer was a regular visitor to the property in the 1980s. He would bring his wife, Raine, for the summer.

‘He used the smaller property for staff but would live in the house now on the market called Trade Winds.

‘People don’t to live in them very long and they have been sold a few times recently. Property has shot up in value here.’

The estate agents, Coastguards, describe it as ‘One of the South Coast’s most iconic properties.’

Earl Spencer's wife Raine (pictured together in front of their ancestral home Althorpe House) sold the houses in West Sussex in 1994 - two years after her husband passed away

Earl Spencer’s wife Raine (pictured together in front of their ancestral home Althorpe House) sold the houses in West Sussex in 1994 – two years after her husband passed away

Photos were found in the loft of the main house of Princes William and Harry playing in the swimming pool on a summer holiday on the south coast with their mother, Diana, says a neighbour

Photos were found in the loft of the main house of Princes William and Harry playing in the swimming pool on a summer holiday on the south coast with their mother, Diana, says a neighbour

They say: ‘This truly unique property, made famous through it’s Royal connections, has been meticulously rebuilt and refurbished by the current owners throughout recent years to create what can only be described as a simply magnificent coastal retreat, set within a walled plot of approximately 1.2 acres providing direct access to the privately owned beach.’

The home boasts a swimming pool and changing rooms and sauna, four bedrooms, a drawing room and spacious kitchen living area as well as a sun and plant room, a games room/study and an open plan sitting room.

Coastguards say: ‘On the whole this simply delightful home provides the most wonderful feeling of space with an incredibly light and airy feel whilst maintaining the perfect balance of a homely feel complemented with the most luxurious fitments and attention to detail.’

The second smaller cottage (pictured) adjacent to the main residence was sold to Christina and Roger Sheppard 26 years ago. The couple sold that property to a woman called Lesley Dobbie last year for £1.1million

The second smaller cottage (pictured) adjacent to the main residence was sold to Christina and Roger Sheppard 26 years ago. The couple sold that property to a woman called Lesley Dobbie last year for £1.1million

It has extensive lawned gardens and a boathouse right at the end of the property abutting the beach.

The agents say: ‘In all this really is a truly magnificent home whether it be for a second home on the coast or a full time residence.’

In 2018 Harry and Meghan visited the West Sussex town where the house is located during a whistle-stop tour of their dukedom.

It is understood they did not visit the house where Prince Harry once spent time playing with his brother in the pool.

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