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BT warns it will take a DECADE to remove Huawei from UK telecoms network

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bt warns it will take a decade to remove huawei from uk telecoms network

BT has warned it will take at least a decade to strip Huawei technology out of the UK’s telecoms network amid a mounting row.

Boris Johnson is expected to confirm a U-turn tomorrow on allowing the Chinese firm to be part of the new 5G project. 

But BT chief executive Philip Jansen said there would be ‘outages’ and possible security risks if the sector was told to bar Huawei from the upgrade.

And he suggested it would be ‘impossible’ to remove the firm’s equipment from the wider network before 2030. 

The US has been heaping pressure on ministers to reconsider links with Huawei amid fears over spying and reliance on China, while Beijing has threatened ‘consequences’ if the firm is shut out. 

A final decision is expected tomorrow after a meeting of the National Security Council.   

BT has warned it will take at least a decade to strip Huawei technology out of the UK's telecoms network amid a mounting row

BT has warned it will take at least a decade to strip Huawei technology out of the UK's telecoms network amid a mounting row

BT has warned it will take at least a decade to strip Huawei technology out of the UK’s telecoms network amid a mounting row

Boris Johnson is expected to confirm a U-turn tomorrow on allowing the Chinese firm to be part of the new 5G project

Boris Johnson is expected to confirm a U-turn tomorrow on allowing the Chinese firm to be part of the new 5G project

Boris Johnson is expected to confirm a U-turn tomorrow on allowing the Chinese firm to be part of the new 5G project

A recent intelligence report said the security implications were ‘severe’ and that American sanctions on the firm may make its equipment less reliable and safe.

There are also calls from dozens of Tory MPs to strip Huawei’s technology from the wider telecoms network by 2024, and cut involvement in building nuclear power plants. 

There have been reports that Huawei wants the government to delay the removal of its technology from telecoms infrastructure until at least 2025, in the hope that a future government might reverse the decision. 

As part of the compromise, Huawei would reportedly pledge to maintain its equipment, which is also used in the UK’s other non-5G networks.

Mr Jansen told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘Huawei has been in the telecoms infrastructure for about 20 years and a big supplier to BT and many others in the UK telecoms industry.

‘It is all about timing and balance. So if you want to have no Huawei in the whole of the telecoms infrastructure across the whole of the UK, I think that’s impossible to do in under 10 years.’

To remove it from the 5G network could take as long as five years, he added: ‘To not have Huawei at all, ideally we’d want seven years and we could probably do it in five.’

Former MI6 chief Sir Richard Dearlove insisted yesterday that the government should be more ‘assertive’ in its interaction with the Asian superpower.

Sir Richard said Huawei is an ‘intimate part of the Chinese state’. 

‘I’ve always believed that there is a strategic security reason for not allowing the Chinese that degree of involvement in the construction of our critical infrastructure.’

He added: ‘I think the relationship between the Chinese state and Huawei is absolutely clear-cut.

‘Huawei is not a sort of ordinary international telecommunications company, it’s an intimate part of the Chinese state.

‘And if you know anything about Chinese military strategy, they talk about the fusion of civil and military capabilities.

‘There is a close linkage undoubtedly between the Chinese military capability and Huawei.’ 

Sir Richard Dearlove told Sky News yesterday that the government should be more 'assertive' in its interaction with the Asian superpower

Sir Richard Dearlove told Sky News yesterday that the government should be more 'assertive' in its interaction with the Asian superpower

Sir Richard Dearlove told Sky News yesterday that the government should be more ‘assertive’ in its interaction with the Asian superpower

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White House takes fire for Donald Trump saying virus ‘affects virtually nobody’ 

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white house takes fire for donald trump saying virus affects virtually nobody

Joe Biden on Tuesday made repeated references to the nation crossing the 200,000 line of coronavirus deaths amid the ongoing pandemic – while the White House defended President Trump’s comment at a rally that young people fare better and it ‘affects virtually nobody.’ 

Biden tweeted out a large image of the number 200,000 with white on black, writing: ‘t didn’t have to be this bad.’

The image contained the number of dead listed state-by-state. 

'200,000 Americans have died from this virus. It’s a staggering number that’s hard to wrap your head around,' wrote former Vice President Joe Biden on Twitter as the nation crossed the threshold

‘200,000 Americans have died from this virus. It’s a staggering number that’s hard to wrap your head around,’ wrote former Vice President Joe Biden on Twitter as the nation crossed the threshold

In another missive, Biden wrote: ‘200,000 Americans have died from this virus. It’s a staggering number that’s hard to wrap your head around. But behind every COVID-19 death is a family and community that will never again be the same. There’s a devastating human toll to this pandemic — and we can’t forget that.’

His comments came as media organizations around the country began marking the 200,000 milestone.

At the White House, press secretary Kayleigh McEnany blasted reporters who asked about Trump’s comments at a rally Monday night that ‘“It affects virtually nobody,” adding: ‘It’s an amazing thing.”  

‘It affects elderly people. Elderly people with heart problems and other problems. If they have other problems, that’s what it really affects. That’s it,’ Trump said, noting the disease primarily hits the elderly and those with preexisting conditions – a huge number of Americans.

Former Vice President Joe Biden tweeted about the 200,000 milestone Tuesday

Former Vice President Joe Biden tweeted about the 200,000 milestone Tuesday

'Today is dark, but we will overcome this,' Biden wrote

‘Today is dark, but we will overcome this,’ Biden wrote

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany  reread some of Trump's comments and said they was 'factually true' and pointed to several states with zero pediatric deaths

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany  reread some of Trump’s comments and said they was ‘factually true’ and pointed to several states with zero pediatric deaths

‘You know, in some states, thousands of people, nobody young [dies of the disease]. Below the age of 18, like, nobody. They have a strong immune system, who knows?’ he continued. ‘You look — take your hat off to the young, because they have a hell of an immune system. But it affects virtually nobody. It’s an amazing thing.’

Then Trump added a political rejoinder: ‘By the way, open your schools, everybody. Open your schools,’ he said. 

Pressed on the comments, McEnany said: ‘The president is telling people the truth.’

She accused CNN’s Jim Acosta of taking the comments ‘out of context’ – although he noted that he had referenced that Trump was talking about young people when he made the comment.    

‘The president is telling people the truth,’ she said. She told Acosta: ‘ You’re right that he was referring to young people. You are taking it out of context.’ He countered that children can still get sick form the disease and spread it in the community. 

McEnany reread some of Trump’s comments and said they were ‘factually true’ and pointed to several states with zero pediatric deaths.

‘COVID has a .01 per cent mortality for people under the age of 18. So it is not a disease that affects young people in the same way as older people, which is the exact point the president was making last night,’ she said. 

Speaking to the 200,000 death toll, she pointed to an early model that showed ‘the prospect of 2 million people potentially perishing.’

‘The fact that we have come nowhere near that number is a testament to this president taking immediate action,’ she said.

‘We grieve when even one life is lost,’ she said. 

More than 200,000 Americans have now died from COVID-19 – a bleak milestone reached on Tuesday that comes even as the national death rate continues to decline. 

The number of Americans dying from coronavirus per day, based on a weekly average, is now at just over 760. 

It is down from the peak 2,000 deaths being reported per day back in April. 

While deaths continue to decline across the country, fatalities related to COVID-19 are a lagging indicator and can potentially rise several weeks after new cases. 

The national infection rate started increasing just over a week ago, which is a rise health experts have attributed to some schools reopening and parties over the Labor Day holiday. 

The average number of COVID-19 cases being reported per day is now at just under 40,000 with total infection in the US topping 6.8 million. 

The number of Americans dying from coronavirus per day, based on a weekly average, is now at just over 760. It is down from the peak 2,000 deaths being reported per day back in April

The number of Americans dying from coronavirus per day, based on a weekly average, is now at just over 760. It is down from the peak 2,000 deaths being reported per day back in April

Before this uptick, cases, on average, had been trending downwards nationally since July when about 70,000 infections were being reported daily. 

California, Texas and Florida – the three most populous US states – have recorded the most coronavirus infections and have long surpassed the state of New York, which was the epicenter of the outbreak earlier this year.

The southern states of Texas and Florida contributed the most deaths in the US in the past two weeks and were closely followed by California.  

Deaths in those three states are currently declining. 

The states that saw the largest increases in deaths in the last week were Arkansas, Kansas and Virginia. 

The University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation is predicting that deaths will rise to more 378,000 by the end of the year. 

The model forecasts that more than 114,000 lives could be saved if the majority of Americans wear masks but epidemiologists have already warned that mask-wearing is already declining across the country. 

The national infection rate started increasing just over a week ago. The average number of COVID-19 cases being reported per day is now at just under 40,000 with total infection in the US topping 6.8 million

The national infection rate started increasing just over a week ago. The average number of COVID-19 cases being reported per day is now at just under 40,000 with total infection in the US topping 6.8 million

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The death rate projected by the IHME model, which has been cited by the White House Coronavirus Task Force, would more than triple the current daily death rate to to 3,000 per day in December.

During the early months of the pandemic, 200,000 deaths was regarded by many as the maximum number of lives likely to be lost in the United States to the virus. 

‘The idea of 200,000 deaths is really very sobering, in some respects stunning,’ Dr Anthony Fauci, the government’s top infectious-disease expert, told CNN. 

President Donald Trump on Monday said he had done a phenomenal job on the pandemic.

‘It affects virtually nobody. It’s an amazing thing,’ Trump told supporters at a Swanton, Ohio, campaign rally Monday night. 

‘It affects… elderly people with heart problems and other problems – if they have other problems that’s what it really affects, that’s it.’ 

Trump has admitted to playing down the danger of the coronavirus early on because he did not want to ‘create a panic.’ 

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For 24 hours these celebs came off Instagram to protest against ‘hate’

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for 24 hours these celebs came off instagram to protest against hate

Crammed full of pouting selfies, snapshots of envy-inducing holidays and general self-promotion, Instagram is usually screaming under the weight of the posts churned out each day.

But for 24 hours last week, this noisy corner of the world wide web was rather quieter than usual.

A host of celebrities and assembled worthies — including Gwyneth Paltrow, Kim Kardashian and Leonardo DiCaprio to name a few — temporarily hit pause on their profiles.

Why? As part of the #StopHate ForProfit, a boycott against Facebook (and, by extension, its sister company Instagram) organised by civil rights activists in order to hold social media companies accountable for allowing ‘hate on their platforms’.

A host of celebrities and assembled worthies ¿ including Gwyneth Paltrow

Cara Delevigne

A host of celebrities and assembled worthies — including Gwyneth Paltrow (left), Kim Kardashian and Leonardo DiCaprio to name a few — temporarily hit pause on their profiles. Also pictured: Cara Delevigne (right)

But surely if a celebrity really wants to protest against social media, the most powerful statement would be to quit it all together? The trouble is that Instagram is a powerful tool in a celebrity’s profile — not to mention bank balance. Not only can they use it to plug their various projects to millions of fans, they can also hope to rake in thousands of pounds advertising other brands. A well-placed plug can net them more than £300,000 per post; reality star Kylie Jenner is rumoured to be paid almost $1million (£780,000) per sponsored post.

Michael Heller, founder of global agency Talent Resources, says that what determines a star’s value for marketing on Instagram is not so much how many followers they have, but ‘how engaged’ the audience is. Because the more followers ‘like’ or comment on a post, the more likely they are to then click on a link to buy a celebrity-endorsed product.

Here, we look at those involved in #StopHateForProfit, and consult with Instagram marketing experts to demonstrate why celebrities will never really boycott ‘Plug-stagram’.

KIM KARDASHIAN

Followers: 189million

Estimated amount per paid post: £390,000

Business plugs in the past year: 167

Net worth: £700million

No family has mastered the art of self-promotion quite like the Kardashians. Reality star Kim, 39, has translated her TV success into a multi-armed, multi-million dollar business empire —and all of it is liberally flogged on Instagram.

Her assets include her KKW beauty line (valued at more than £785 million last year), KKW fragrances and her shapewear line Skims, which sold around £1.5million worth of smalls within minutes of its launch last year.

But Kim is happy to promote other business, too — for a fee, of course. During a court wrangle with fashion firm Missguided last year, she revealed she can receive from £280,000 to £390,000 per sponsored post. However, she’s reported to reap £660,000 for some.

While you can promote your own business on Instagram without declaring it, advertising rules state that paid-for promotions must be marked with #ad, #sponsored or similar. In the last year, Kim has had paid partnerships with UberEats Australia and Facebook’s smart camera sidearm Portal, and posted about teeth whitening using the hashtag ‘HiSmilePartner’.

No family has mastered the art of self-promotion quite like the Kardashians

No family has mastered the art of self-promotion quite like the Kardashians

CARA DELEVINGNE

Followers: 44.1 million

Estimated amount per paid post: £230,000

Business plugs in past year: 32

Net worth: £27million

So valuable is the power of Instagram that model agents negotiate specific clauses in their clients’ contracts, with a fee for an Instagram post of the campaign pictures in which the model stars.

Cara Delevingne is the UK’s highest-paid model and her posts include several marked as a paid partnership with sports brand Puma, for whom she endorses her own range. Marketing experts say she is thought to be paid more than £2 million a year.

The 28-year-old also has a contract thought to be worth £1 million with Dior, name-checking the brand several times, along with two paid-for posts for watch brand Tag Heuer.

Cara Delevingne is the UK¿s highest-paid model and her posts include several marked as a paid partnership with sports brand Puma, for whom she endorses her own range

Cara Delevingne is the UK’s highest-paid model and her posts include several marked as a paid partnership with sports brand Puma, for whom she endorses her own range

PENELOPE CRUZ

Followers: 5.4 million

Estimated amount per paid post: £195,000

Business plugs in past year: 51

Net worth: £43 million

The Spanish-born actress has a slightly more highbrow profile than others, but when it comes to Instagram she means business.

She’s got a lucrative deal as a spokesmodel for Lancome, is an ambassador for Chanel and has her own collection with jeweller Swarovski, all of which get plugged liberally on her account, as of course do her screen and magazine projects.

The 46-year-old doesn’t always make clear that she’s paid by the trio of stellar names above, but occasionally drops in #ad.

‘So grateful for my long relationship with my @lancomeofficial family,’ she chirps in one post. No wonder — she was reportedly earning £2.4 million a year representing parent company L’Oreal back in 2006, and could easily expect to be earning six figures for her deals with both Chanel and Swarovski.

Her global audience and luxury market means she can command a substantial fee for making Instagram posts, says Michael Heller, probably negotiated as part of her multi-million-pound deals with the brands she has worked closely with for years.

The Spanish-born actress has a slightly more highbrow profile than others, but when it comes to Instagram she means business

The Spanish-born actress has a slightly more highbrow profile than others, but when it comes to Instagram she means business

GWYNETH PALTROW

Followers: 7.2 million

Estimated amount per paid post: £390,000

Business plugs in past year: 41

Net worth: £100 million

These days, actress-turned-lifestyle guru Gwyneth is more likely to be found plugging vagina-scented candles than striving for an Academy Award.

Since she started her lifestyle company, Goop, as a website in 2008, it has grown into a £200 million business — so Gwynnie, 47, peppers her Instagram with mentions of it.

Before joining the boycott, she wrote ‘I am not a very frequent poster…’ but in fact she uses Instagram multiple times a month.

Her paid posts included a recent plug for the Miami Cocktail Company’s organic drinks and plugs for a short film, in which she stars, advertising Dubai. Two days after the Instagram boycott she was back with a paid partnership post about an anti-wrinkle product.‘A post from someone like Gwyneth Paltrow hits the universe,’ says Michael Heller.

These days, actress-turned-lifestyle guru Gwyneth is more likely to be found plugging vagina-scented candles than striving for an Academy Award

These days, actress-turned-lifestyle guru Gwyneth is more likely to be found plugging vagina-scented candles than striving for an Academy Award

KATE HUDSON

Followers: 12.3 million

Estimated amount per paid post: £150,000

Business plugs in past year: 120

Net worth: £62 million

Actress and mother-of-three Kate has numerous businesses she regularly promotes on Instagram.

The most prominent is Fabletics, a subscription-based activewear firm, of which the 41-year-old is a co-founder. It has annual revenues of more than £230 million.

Her Instagram gallery is full of pictures of Ms Hudson in Lycra yoga gear. Fabletics chalked up 32 plugs in the past year, along with 12 posts about her own vodka brand, ten for her sustainable fashion line and 37 for a podcast she presents with her brother Oliver.

There were also six plugs for her ‘nutritional powders’ and some sponsored plugs for Dubai.  

Actress and mother-of-three Kate has numerous businesses she regularly promotes on Instagram

Actress and mother-of-three Kate has numerous businesses she regularly promotes on Instagram

MIRANDA KERR

Followers: 12.3 million

Estimated amount per paid post: £39,000

Business plugs in past year: 120

Net worth: £45 million

The former Victoria’s Secret model has a successful Australian skincare line, Kora Organics, and a furniture brand, Miranda Kerr Home.

Backed largely by her own finances (Miranda owns 95 per cent of Kora), the 37-year-old has turned it into an international empire — and boy, does she know how to plug her stuff. The mother-of-three has chalked up at least 46 references in the past year.

It’s hardly surprising she’s a social media whiz, as her husband Evan Spiegel is the multi-billionaire co-founder of messaging app Snapchat.

Her homewares also get liberally plugged, usually underneath a photograph of Miranda looking glamorous at home. And while nothing is marked ‘paid partnership’ or ‘ad’ — for which it’s thought she would get between £19,000 and £39,000 per post — it’s still an Insta-business success story.  

The former Victoria¿s Secret model has a successful Australian skincare line, Kora Organics, and a furniture brand, Miranda Kerr Home

The former Victoria’s Secret model has a successful Australian skincare line, Kora Organics, and a furniture brand, Miranda Kerr Home

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Nothing says ‘UK open for business’ like commandos on the streets

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nothing says uk open for business like commandos on the streets

 This was not Lockdown II: The Sequel. In some ways it was worse. The measures announced all felt so wretchedly authoritarian, like a call to arms for petty officialdom. So un-Boris.

Yet here he was, sounding as bossy as a bed and breakfast-owning old biddy in Birkenstocks.

No one took any cheer from Boris Johnson’s address to the nation last night.

The Prime Minister sat at a well-polished desk, a single Union Jack flag drooping reassuringly behind him.

Physically he looks in good nick. That jawline is sharper than it has been in decades. Still not quite capable of slicing ripe camembert, but give the guy a break.

Sombre: Boris Johnson addresses the British people

Sombre: Boris Johnson addresses the British people 

‘Covid,’ Boris began ominously, ‘is the single biggest crisis the world has faced in my lifetime…’

We heard how he was calling time on pubs. Chucking-out time would now be 10pm. Wedding numbers would be slashed, the use of face masks expanded.

We were warned of tougher fines, stricter controls, tighter policing.

There was even a mention of the army being mobilised to take some of the burden off the plod. Nice.

Nothing says ‘UK open for business’ better than platoons of camouflaged commandos on the streets brandishing automatic weapons.

It was good day for giant turkeys at least. With numbers limited to six, no need for mum to go ordering any gargantuan- sized gobblers this Christmas. Tiny tiddlers all round.

¿Covid,¿ Boris began ominously, ¿is the single biggest crisis the world has faced in my lifetime¿¿

‘Covid,’ Boris began ominously, ‘is the single biggest crisis the world has faced in my lifetime…’

For those thinking of flouting the rules, Johnson offered food for thought. ‘Your mild cough can be someone else’s death knell,’ he warned, his arms jabbing at the camera like a pair of jousting lances.

It is to the PM’s credit that he avoided coming over like an epaulette-laden Latin American dictator.

Absence of pomposity spares him of that. He spoke of being ‘deeply, spiritually reluctant to make any of these impositions’.

In the same situation, Tony Blair or even David Cameron might have come across a l i t t le too comfor table snatching away our basic freedoms. He ended with a Churchillian flourish which briefly soared.

‘Never in our history has our collective destiny and our collective health depended so completely on our individual behaviour,’ he said.

A throaty whisper promised us ‘great days ahead’. But language-wise, this was a speech free of frills. The seriousness of it all was striking.

The Prime Minister had already announced most of these measures earlier to Parliament.

That will have earned him a brief reprieve with Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle, who’s become increasingly ratty about these announcements being made on the telly.

Earlier in the day, Boris’s language was blood-and-thunder, his demeanour oddly chipper. ‘We have reached a perilous turning point,’ he informed the House. ‘This is the moment when we must act…’

To think it was less than two months ago that he stood on that same spot to announce that ‘our long period of hibernation’ was at an end. What a joyous day that was. Not so yesterday.

Sir Keir Starmer announced he was supporting the measures. I think he half-expected the chamber to erupt into applause. His main concern was that the furlough scheme was ending next month. 

To think it was less than two months ago that he stood on that same spot to announce that ¿our long period of hibernation¿ was at an end

To think it was less than two months ago that he stood on that same spot to announce that ‘our long period of hibernation’ was at an end

Scrapping it in one fell swoop ‘would be a disaster’, he said.

Other opposition parties jumped on the same issue. The SNP’s Ian Blackford urged the Government ‘not to throw workers on the scrapheap’.

Green queen Caroline Lucas issued a plea on behalf of freelance workers.

Lib Dem leader Sir Ed Davey made a spectacle of himself, as ever, by trying to get Boris to issue the public an apology.

Last night felt eerily like a teetering point in the Boris Johnson premiership. By imposing such draconian new measures on a freedom-loving public – not to mention adopting such larynx-tightening forceful language – suggests no one realises this more than Boris himself.

Should his leadership begin to crumble over these next months, this will likely be the location on the map his critics mark with an X to signify where it all went drastically wrong.

He has asked the country for another six months of sacrifice. After that, I fear

that famous well of good will toward him will have run awfully dry…

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