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Cara Delevingne and Naomi Campbell join Kim Kardashian and Hollywood stars in 24-hour ‘freeze’

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cara delevingne and naomi campbell join kim kardashian and hollywood stars in 24 hour freeze

Cara Delevingne and Naomi Campbell have joined Kim Kardashian and a plethora of Hollywood stars in a 24-hour ‘freeze’ of their Instagram and Facebook accounts to protest over hate, propaganda and misinformation spreading claims.  

The pair have joined Orlando Bloom, 43, Sacha Baron Cohen, 48, to ditch Mark Zuckerberg’s brands today as part of the Stop Hate For Profit initiative that has previously seen advertisers stop spending. 

Delevingne, 28, announced her plan to stop posting yesterday, writing: ‘I’ll join some of the nation’s leading civil rights organizations in pausing posting for 24 hours. 

‘This will give these platforms a chance to make social media a safer and happier place for all of us. I hope you’ll join me.’

Cohen and Bloom had both commented on her pledge, with the former writing: ‘Thank you Cara for joining this coalition of Civil Rights groups fighting against racism and disinformation on Facebook/Insta.’

Pictured: Cara Delevingne

Pictured: Naomi Campbell

Cara Delevingne (left) and Naomi Campbell (right) have joined Kim Kardashian and a plethora of Hollywood stars in a 24-hour ‘freeze’ of their Instagram and Facebook accounts

Delevingne, 28, announced her plan to stop posting yesterday, writing: 'I'll join some of the nation's leading civil rights organizations in pausing posting for 24 hours'

Delevingne, 28, announced her plan to stop posting yesterday, writing: ‘I’ll join some of the nation’s leading civil rights organizations in pausing posting for 24 hours’

Three hours later, ahead of the ‘freeze’, the British model shared an image of a Zoom call with her Paper Towns co-stars, in which she appeared to tease a second film instalment of the John Green story. 

British model Campbell, 50, also made her pledge on Instagram yesterday.

She said: ‘Facebook claims they address hate, yet they continue to look the other way as racist, violent groups posts, sow division and split the world apart. They only take steps after people are killed or something horrible has happened.

‘They share empty talk about voting, they continue to allow blatant lies and misinformation on every election to spread – undermining democracy globally.

‘That’s why this Wednesday, I am “freezing” my Instagram account to tell Facebook to Stop Hate for Profit.’

British model Naomi Campbell, 50, also made her pledge on Instagram yesterday

British model Naomi Campbell, 50, also made her pledge on Instagram yesterday

Orlando Bloom

Sacha Baron Cohen

Orlando Bloom and Sacha Baron Cohen were among the first British celebrities to back the cause

Orlando Bloom posted on Instagram he was 'freezing' his account for the next 24 hours

Orlando Bloom posted on Instagram he was ‘freezing’ his account for the next 24 hours

Ashton Kutcher, Olivia Wilde, Leonardo DiCaprio, Jamie Foxx, Michael B. Jordan and Jennifer Lawrence have also joined the movement. 

Actor Bloom wrote: ‘Social media platforms should be a place for positive encouragement and clear communication. 

‘When platforms I use and enjoy such as Instagram and Facebook look the other way at hate speech, disinformation, and confusion, it can lead us into trouble…So I’m standing with some of America’s leading civil rights organizations to ask you to join me and refrain from posting for 24hrs this Wednesday September 16.’

The campaign accuses the platforms of ‘undermining democracy’ and profiting off allowing hate groups and pages to use their sites. The protest demands Facebook, which owns Instagram, ban pages that promote hate, forbid any event page with a call to arms, and remove election misinformation. 

Mark Ruffalo and Kerry Washington, plus model Naomi Campbell and singer Katy Perry also hopped on board the social media boycott to raise awareness among fans who are used to seeing many of them interact online on a daily basis. 

However some celebrity followers have told the stars to delete their account altogether. Amid the call for fans to join them, they were criticized for putting money first.

Comedian Sarah Silverman was told: ‘Delete your Facebook account. Life is so much nicer without it. The only way to pressure Zuckerberg is his wallet.’

Kim Kardashian announced Tuesday that she will 'freeze' her Instagram and Facebook accounts because the platforms allow for hate and misinformation as a part of the #StopHateForProfit campaign

Kim Kardashian announced Tuesday that she will ‘freeze’ her Instagram and Facebook accounts because the platforms allow for hate and misinformation as a part of the #StopHateForProfit campaign

Leonardo DiCaprio

Olivia Wilde

Leonardo DiCaprio wrote: ‘I do use Instagram and Facebook, but I want it to be a force for good – not hate, violence, and disinformation.’ Olivia Wilde wrote, ‘These platforms are profiting off becoming a dangerous tool of discrimination’ 

Another sarcastically wrote in response to the #StopHateForProfit graphic: ‘Wait…listen. Can you hear that? It’s gone. I think you just stopped it. Thank god for this post.’ 

Kardashian is the seventh most followed person on Instagram with 188 million followers and she has more than 30 million fans on Facebook. 

CELEBRITY BOYCOTT

Amy Schumer, Ashton Kutcher, Ed Helmes, Isla Fisher, Jamie Foxx, Jason Alexander, Jennifer Lawrence, Judd Apatow, Kate Hudson, Katy Perry, Kerry Washington, Kim Kardashian, Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo, Michael B. Jordan, Naomi Campbell, Olivia Wilde, Rosario Dawson, Sacha Baron Cohen, Sarah Silverman, Scooter Braun.

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The reality star, 39, who has been paid as much as $1 million for social media endorsements, said the platforms are allowing groups to ‘sow division’ and they ‘split America apart.’

‘I love that I can connect directly with you through Instagram and Facebook, but I can’t sit by and stay silent while these platforms continue to allow the spreading of hate, propaganda and misinformation – created by groups to sow division and split America apart – only to take steps after people are killed,’ she said in a lengthy message Tuesday.   

‘Misinformation shared on social media has a serious impact on our elections and undermines our democracy. Please join me tomorrow when I will be ‘freezing’ my Instagram and FB account to tell Facebook to #StopHateForProfit. Link in bio for more info on how to preserve truth,’ Kardashian West added in her post.

Katy Perry wrote: ‘I love sharing my music and my life with you on Instagram and Facebook, but TBH I can’t sit idly by while these platforms turn a blind eye to groups and posts spreading hateful disinformation and intentional confusion.’ 

Comedy actress Amy Schumer told her followers: ‘Facebook not only looks the other way when it comes to organizing hate and violence. 

‘Their algorithms recommend otherwise non-violent users to organize and join other hateful groups without a request being made.’

The campaign is accompanied by a ‘Week of Action’ that will end on September 18, with a call for people to use their right to vote in the November election.  

More than 1,200 companies joined the boycott as well, including big brands like Unilever, Verizon, Adidas and Ford.  

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Naomi Campbell

Katy Perry

Model Naomi Campbell and singer Katy Perry posted messages on Instagram to announce their boycotts

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The protest is led by the same coalition of civil rights groups that led a month-long advertising boycott against Facebook in July following the death of George Floyd. Those include the NAACP, Color of Change and Anti-Defamation League.

The #StopHateForProfit campaign says: ‘In the wake of a global health pandemic, Facebook’s failure to update the policies and processes that have allowed for hate, conspiracy theories and racist and anti-Semitic content to proliferate on its platform continues to be a source of pain for entire communities.’

‘In a historic election year, Facebook’s slow response to voter suppression, vitriolic and divisive content, and misinformation can have grave consequences for BIPOC voters and key democratic structures.’

Leonardo DiCaprio wrote: ‘I do use Instagram and Facebook, but I want it to be a force for good – not hate, violence, and disinformation. 

‘This should be an opportunity for Facebook to work with these organizations and the community at large to make it a better, safer platform for all.’

DailyMail.com has reached out to Facebook for comment on the protest. 

Facebook has come under fire for questionable ads during the 2016 election and for allowing hate groups to gather on its platforms.

DEMANDS: Racism, Violence and Hate 

  • Remove Facebook Groups and other specific content promoting white supremacy, militia, hate, and violent conspiracies
  • Increase resources focused on monitoring groups for hate speech and violence 
  • Change platform policy to forbid any event page with a call to arms, as recommended by the Change the Terms coalition
  • Commit 5% of their annual revenue to an independently administered fund to support initiatives, research and organizations doing the work to fight against racism, hate and division enabled in part by Facebook’s inaction 
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DEMANDS: Election Misinformation 

  • Ensure accuracy in political and voting matters by eliminating the politician exemption
  • Remove misinformation related to voting that has been debunked by credible fact checkers
  • Prohibit calls to violence by politicians in any format 
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Facebook owns Instagram 

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Comedian Sarah Silverman was told: 'Delete your Facebook account. Life is so much nicer without it. The only way to pressure Zuckerberg is his wallet'

Comedian Sarah Silverman was told: ‘Delete your Facebook account. Life is so much nicer without it. The only way to pressure Zuckerberg is his wallet’

Facebook has come under fire for failing to squash coronavirus conspiracy theories, for allowing political misinformation to spread, and letting hate groups use and create call to arms events on the platform. Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg above

Facebook has come under fire for failing to squash coronavirus conspiracy theories, for allowing political misinformation to spread, and letting hate groups use and create call to arms events on the platform. Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg above 

However, it’s unclear if the boycott will have any sway over the tech giant’s practices. 

Facebook was also heavily criticized for failing to take down a self-proclaimed militia group’s online call to arms event in Kenosha, Wisconsin following protests in the wake of the police shooting of Jacob Blake, according to The Verge.

On August 25, two people were killed by 17-year-old police admirer Kyle Rittenhouse who was armed with a rifle during a protest in the city.

Afterwards it was revealed that the Kenosha Guard, a group that calls themselves a militia organization, issued a ‘call to arms’ on the platform. 

At least two separate Facebook users reported the account for inciting violence prior to the shooting, but the Kenosha Guard’s Facebook page was only taken down the morning after the deadly shooting.

Facebook said in a statement at the time that the company’s investigation had produced no direct links between the shooting and the Kenosha Guard accounts. 

On Monday BuzzFeed News reported that an internal whistleblower said the company was slow to act on misinformation efforts that undermined elections around the globe. 

The issue is particularly worrisome ahead of the upcoming presidential election. 

‘In the three years I’ve spent at Facebook, I’ve found multiple blatant attempts by foreign national governments to abuse our platform on vast scales to mislead their own citizenry, and caused international news on multiple occasions,’ former Facebook data scientist Sophie Zhang said in a 6,600-word memo. 

Facebook has also come under fire for failing to squash conspiracy theories regarding the pandemic.

In August the platform deleted one of President Donald Trump’s posts for violating its policy on coronavirus information after he shared a link to a Fox News video in which Trump says children are ‘virtually immune’ to the virus. 

Medical experts say that’s not true because children do get the virus, but milder symptoms. 

In August Facebook took down a 'Kenosha Guard' page with 3,000 members that rallied 'patriots to take up arms and defend our city tonight from the evil thugs' as protests decrying the police shooting of Jacob Blake took place. Pictured the event that encouraged armed civilians to assemble

In August Facebook took down a ‘Kenosha Guard’ page with 3,000 members that rallied ‘patriots to take up arms and defend our city tonight from the evil thugs’ as protests decrying the police shooting of Jacob Blake took place. Pictured the event that encouraged armed civilians to assemble

Facebook initially failed to take action against the militia group on August 25 saying it was not breaking its rules, despite Facebook users reporting the group to the company. The apparent backtracking in the decision comes after 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse was arrested for the murder of two Black Lives Matter protesters. Rittenhouse pictured August 25

Facebook initially failed to take action against the militia group on August 25 saying it was not breaking its rules, despite Facebook users reporting the group to the company. The apparent backtracking in the decision comes after 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse was arrested for the murder of two Black Lives Matter protesters. Rittenhouse pictured August 25

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Kate Middleton reveals meaning behind images for her exhibition of life in lockdown

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kate middleton reveals meaning behind images for her exhibition of life in lockdown

Kate Middleton has unveiled the meaning behind some of the images selected for her community photography project at the National Portrait Gallery. 

The Duchess of Cambridge, 38, who is a keen amateur photographer, launched the Hold Still initiative during lockdown and asked the public to submit their images which captured the period for a digital exhibition. 

Earlier this month, she was joined by a panel of five judges to select the best photos from more than 31,000 submitted for the nation-wide contest and said she was ‘overwhelmed’ by the response and that it was ‘so hard’ to whittle the images down to a top 100. 

Posting on the Kensington Royal Instagram page today, the Duchess shared a further glimpse into some of the chosen images, including a picture of an elderly couple clapping for the NHS together, and a five-year-old boy undergoing cancer treatment at home. 

‘Clapping together for the NHS’ showed Gladys and Jack, a couple in their 90s who would come out every Thursday to applaud the health service. 

Posting on the Kensington Royal Instagram page today, the Duchess of Cambridge shared a further glimpse into some of the chosen images for her Hold Still initiative during lockdown. Pictured, Gladys and Jack

Posting on the Kensington Royal Instagram page today, the Duchess of Cambridge shared a further glimpse into some of the chosen images for her Hold Still initiative during lockdown. Pictured, Gladys and Jack

'Clapping together for the NHS' showed Gladys and Jack, a couple in their 90s who would come out every Thursday to applaud the health service

‘Clapping together for the NHS’ showed Gladys and Jack, a couple in their 90s who would come out every Thursday to applaud the health service

The Duchess of Cambridge, 38, who is a keen amateur photographer, launched the initiative during lockdown and asked the public to submit their images which captured the unprecedented period for the digital exhibition (pictured Kate during the judging last month)

The Duchess of Cambridge, 38, who is a keen amateur photographer, launched the initiative during lockdown and asked the public to submit their images which captured the unprecedented period for the digital exhibition (pictured Kate during the judging last month) 

The caption on the image read: ‘I took this photo of my next door neighbours, Gladys and Jack. Jack is in his 90s and they both came out every Thursday to clap for the NHS. They are an inspirational couple and still very much in love. 

‘They encouraged others to come out and clap and waved to everyone in the street. They are lovely neighbours and I am lucky to live next door.’  

Another was titled ‘Franck’s fight’, and showed a five-year-old boy having his hospital chemotherapy treatment at home during lockdown.

The caption read: ‘This shows our five year old son Franck, who is being treated for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia, having his hospital chemo at home during lockdown. 

Another was titled 'Franck’s fight', and showed a five-year-old boy having his hospital chemotherapy treatment at home during lockdown

Another was titled ‘Franck’s fight’, and showed a five-year-old boy having his hospital chemotherapy treatment at home during lockdown

The caption read: 'This shows our five year old son Franck, who is being treated for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia, having his hospital chemo at home during lockdown'

The caption read: ‘This shows our five year old son Franck, who is being treated for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia, having his hospital chemo at home during lockdown’ 

The third was called 'Waving to the outside world' and told the story of a teen who learned to use a camera while homeschooling during lockdown

Pictured, a teen who learned photography during lockdown

The third was called ‘Waving to the outside world’ and told the story of a teen who learned to use a camera while homeschooling during lockdown

‘The treatment is being administered by his CLIC Sargent nurses from the Children’s Oncology ward at Bristol Hospital. 

‘Franck was the first patient to receive this new way of receiving treatment. The care they give him and us as a family is incredible and we can’t thank them enough.’ 

The third was called ‘Waving to the outside world’ and told the story of a teen who learned to use a camera while homeschooling during lockdown. 

Last week, Kate revealed she had chosen an image featuring a Black Lives Matter protester and showed a woman holding a sign reading: ‘Be on the right side of history.’    

Kate unveiled more images selected for her community photography project at the National Portrait Gallery - including a photograph of a Black Lives Matter protester (pictured)

Kate unveiled more images selected for her community photography project at the National Portrait Gallery – including a photograph of a Black Lives Matter protester (pictured)

Another image shared by the Duchess shows a girl with hands covering her mouth (pictured)

Another image shared by the Duchess shows a girl with hands covering her mouth (pictured)

One of the snaps is a black and white image showing a man embracing his daughter during lockdown (pictured)

One of the snaps is a black and white image showing a man embracing his daughter during lockdown (pictured)

One of the snaps was a black and white image showing a man embracing his daughter, while another shows a child kissing their godmother through a window. 

Meanwhile others featured a student holding her exam qualifications, and another black and white photograph showed a woman with a hand covering her mouth. 

It comes after the National Portrait Gallery teased three further photos set to be in the exhibition earlier this month. 

The gallery tweeted: ‘We are excited to reveal three more images from #HoldStill2020 community photography project. 

Another shows a child kissing their godmother through a window during the global pandemic and the UK's lockdown (pictured)

Another shows a child kissing their godmother through a window during the global pandemic and the UK’s lockdown (pictured)

Meanwhile others featured a student holding her exam qualifications (pictured). Sharing the news online, Kensington Palace posted : 'Tomorrow, on Monday 14th September, the final 100 portraits from Hold Still will be unveiled'

Meanwhile others featured a student holding her exam qualifications (pictured). Sharing the news online, Kensington Palace posted : ‘Tomorrow, on Monday 14th September, the final 100 portraits from Hold Still will be unveiled’

‘Spearheaded by the Duchess of Cambridge, the final 100 will feature in a digital exhibition, launching on Monday 14 September.’

It went on to reveal the images were Rainbow By Helen Pugh, ‘Keep smiling through. Just like you always do. ‘Til the blue skies drive the dark clouds far away’ By Jessica Sommerville, Empty by Julie Thiberg.

In one photograph, a young girl could be seen drawing a huge rainbow onto a window pane, while in another a boy was pushed around an empty supermarket.

Among the images selected by Kate and the judging panel was one shot of an elderly woman beaming through a window (pictured)

Among the images selected by Kate and the judging panel was one shot of an elderly woman beaming through a window (pictured)

Another of the images chosen by the Duchess for her community photography project was a photograph of a young boy staring  out at empty supermarket shelves (pictured)

Another of the images chosen by the Duchess for her community photography project was a photograph of a young boy staring  out at empty supermarket shelves (pictured)

Another image shows an elderly woman smiling through a window to the photographer on the other side.

The unveiling of the photographs comes after Kate appeared in a video alongside the judging panel and said ‘it’s been great’ to work on the project.

As the Duchess, who spearheaded the campaign and is a keen amateur photographer, discussed choosing the top 100 images, she joked: ‘It’s going to be so difficult to edit this down.’  

Joining her was Nicholas Cullinan, Director of the National Portrait Gallery, Lemn Sissay MBE, writer and poet, Ruth May, Chief Nursing Officer for England and Maryam Wahid, photographer, to chose the top 100 entries. 

The final of the three images to be unveiled was a snap of a little girl painting a rainbow on a window pane

The final of the three images to be unveiled was a snap of a little girl painting a rainbow on a window pane 

This is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge ahead of showcasing the final 100 images in a digital exhibition from September 14

This is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge ahead of showcasing the final 100 images in a digital exhibition from September 14

The royal appeared in high spirits in the clip, asking the group of judges: ‘What’s going to happen next?’ as she laughed and joked with the panel.   

Announcing that the top 100 images had been selected, the Duchess said: ‘I’ve been so overwhelmed by the public’s response to Hold Still, the quality of the images has been extraordinary, and the poignancy and the stories behind the images have been equally as moving as well.’

She continued: ‘So I wanted to say a huge thank you to everyone who has entered and taken part.  And a big thank you to my fellow judges. I hugely appreciate the time and dedication that they have shown towards the project.’ 

A snapshot of the Duchess on a video call with the other judges was also shared. 

A mother sitting in her garden is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge

A mother sitting in her garden is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge

This is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge ahead of showcasing the final 100 images

This is one of the photos selected by the Duchess of Cambridge ahead of showcasing the final 100 images

Meanwhile Lemn said the experience had been surprisingly emotional, revealing: ‘I didn’t expect the judging process to be so emotional. 

‘As I studied the portraits in this most public crisis I was drawn into the most private moments. A nation through portraiture. Intimacy and inspiration, bravery and hope, determination and love and loss and laughter… 

‘We have been in this together and in these portraits of private struggles and victories, the quiet moments, the tears and laughter are caught on camera for ever in Hold Still.’

She added that the collection of portraits ‘made her proud to be British’, saying: ‘It made me proud of my fellow citizen. It made me remember who we are and what we have been through. I didn’t really know until now.’ 

Kate (pictured in June 2019), who is a keen amateur photographer, launched the community contest during lockdown to capture the mood of the nation

Kate (pictured in June 2019), who is a keen amateur photographer, launched the community contest during lockdown to capture the mood of the nation

The news comes after the Duchess teased the final 100 portraits had been chosen with an email screengrab, which was posted on Twitter

The news comes after the Duchess teased the final 100 portraits had been chosen with an email screengrab, which was posted on Twitter  

Last month, Kate used the initial of her first name Catherine to sign off an email to judges of her Hold Still portrait contest.

Taking to Kensington Royal Twitter account, Kate shared an email teasing the final 100 photographs picked to feature in the Hold Still exhibition – a campaign she spearheaded which aims to capture a snapshot of the UK amid the coronavirus pandemic. 

Alongside the caption: ‘An email was sent yesterday… Eyes#HoldStill2020,’ the contents of the email read: ‘Dear judges, I am thrilled we have chosen the final 100 portraits. I thought you might like to see the images all together so please find them attached. 

‘I couldn’t have done it without you so thank you so much for your help. C.’ 

This moving image submitted to the project shows a hospital worker on the floor in despair. It's titled Heartbroken Hero

This moving image submitted to the project shows a hospital worker on the floor in despair. It’s titled Heartbroken Hero

Throughout lockdown the Duchess shared regular updates via Instagram, offering up some of her favourite shots and explanations on why they make such an impact.

Images included photos of exhausted healthcare workers and socially distant neighbours.   

Other images submitted to the Hold Still project include one of a family dinner table where a little girl is trying to sing Let It Go from Disney’s Frozen and another snap of children living next-door to each other playing musical instruments in front of their houses. 

Kate previously told how she had been ‘struck’ by the many ‘incredible’ images seen already, ‘which have given us an insight into the experiences and stories of people – some desperately sad images showing the human tragedy of this pandemic’. 

The relationship between a toddler and an elderly woman is captured in this image, 'Social distancing

The relationship between a toddler and an elderly woman is captured in this image, ‘Social distancing

People from across the UK were invited to submit a photographic portrait which they have taken during these extraordinary times for the community project.

Participants were also encouraged to provide a short written submission to outline the experiences and emotions of those depicted in their photograph. 

Hold Still was completely free, open to all ages and abilities, with the exhibition set to focus on three core themes – ‘Helpers and Heroes’, ‘Your New Normal’ and ‘Acts of Kindness’. 

Emergency services workers are celebrated in this image called Customised PPE, taken in the back of an ambulance

Emergency services workers are celebrated in this image called Customised PPE, taken in the back of an ambulance

The idea was to create a unique photographic portrait of the people of our nation in lockdown as we ‘hold still’ for the good of others, and celebrate those who have continued so we can stay safe.

The exhibition will reflect resilience and bravery, humour and sadness, creativity and kindness, and human tragedy and hope.

Hold Still will also act as a reminder of the significance of human connection in times of adversity, and that although we were physically apart, as a community and nation, we all faced and rose to the challenge together.

The top 100 photographs have been exhibited online from 14 September, with selected images shown in towns and cities across the country later in the year.  

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May defies Boris Johnson over Brexit legislation allowing ministers to break international law

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may defies boris johnson over brexit legislation allowing ministers to break international law

Former prime minister Theresa May slammed successor Boris Johnson today over Brexit, refusing to support new legislation being drawn up that would break international law.

Mrs May, now a backbench MP, took aim at her successor over his plan to undermine part of the Withdrawal Agreement agreed with Brussels last year.

In the Commons today she said she would not back the United Kingdom Internal Market Bill, which contains the provision, warning it would ‘lead to untold damage to the United Kingdom’s reputation’ and threaten the Union.

In a savage intervention in the House of Commons she said: ‘If the potential consequences of the Withdrawal Agreement were so bad, why did the Government sign it?’

Mrs May was ousted and replaced by Mr Johnson last summer after her repeated attempts to get a Withdrawal Agreement past MPs. Mr Johnson eventually achieved it in January before the UK left the EU. 

Mrs May, now a backbench MP, took aim at her successor over his plan to undermine part of the Withdrawal Agreement agreed with Brussels last year

Mrs May, now a backbench MP, took aim at her successor over his plan to undermine part of the Withdrawal Agreement agreed with Brussels last year

In a savage intervention in the House of Commons she said: 'If the potential consequences of the Withdrawal Agreement were so bad, why did the Government (of Mr Johnson, pictured today in Downing Street)  sign it?'

In a savage intervention in the House of Commons she said: ‘If the potential consequences of the Withdrawal Agreement were so bad, why did the Government (of Mr Johnson, pictured today in Downing Street)  sign it?’

But clauses of the IMB would allow ministers to circumvent part of the agreement relating to Northern Ireland, prompting fury from British and foreign critics from as far away as the United States.

Mrs May, the Maidenhead MP, told the Commons today: ‘I consider that by introducing clauses 41 to 45 the Government is acting recklessly and irresponsibly with no thought for the long-term impact on the standing of the United Kingdom in the world.

‘This will lead to untold damage to the United Kingdom’s reputation, it puts the future of the United Kingdom at risk and, as a result, with regret, I have to tell the minister I cannot support this Bill.’

She added: ‘I believe that the Government’s willingness unilaterally to abandon an international agreement or parts of an international agreement it has signed, its willingness to renege on an agreement it has signed will lead to some questioning, as has already been made clear in an intervention, some questioning the willingness of the Government to fully uphold the measures in the Belfast Good Friday Agreement.

‘That in turn will lead to some communities having less willingness to trust the UK Government and that could have a consequence on the willingness of people in the Northern Ireland to remain part of the UK.

‘So, far from acting to reinforce the integrity of the UK, in pursuit of trying to appear to be tough to the EU, I think the Government is putting the integrity of the UK at risk.’

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg to lie in state at Supreme Court and US Capitol building

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ruth bader ginsburg to lie in state at supreme court and us capitol building

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state at the Supreme Court building and at the US Capitol this week in ceremonies that follow coronavirus guidelines.

The late Supreme Court justice’s casket will be on public view Wednesday and Thursday under the portico at the top of the steps in front of the Supreme Court building.

On Friday, she will lie in state in National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol. 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state at the Supreme Court building and at the US Capitol this week

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state at the Supreme Court building and at the US Capitol this week

Ginsburg coffin will lie in repose on the front steps of the Supreme Court building on Wednesday and Thursday for the public to pay their respects

Ginsburg coffin will lie in repose on the front steps of the Supreme Court building on Wednesday and Thursday for the public to pay their respects

Admirers have left tributes to Ginsburg on the steps of the Supreme Court building

Admirers have left tributes to Ginsburg on the steps of the Supreme Court building

Ginsburg’s coffin will arrive at the Supreme Court building just before 9:30 a.m. Wednesday for a private ceremony for her family, close friends and fellow justices, the court said in a statement. 

There also will be a formal ceremony at the Capitol on Friday morning that is invitation-only due to the COVID pandemic, Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced.

Her coffin, for both viewing locations, will be placed on the Lincoln Catafalque, which has been loaned to the court by Congress for the ceremony. 

It’s unclear if President Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden will pay their respects and, if so, when. 

Ginsburg will be buried next week at Arlington National Cemetery in a private service, the court said in a statement.

Her husband, Martin Ginsburg, was buried at Arlington in 2010. 

It’s an unusually long public celebration for a Supreme Court justice – the third branch of government that flies under the radar compared to the president and members of Congress, likely because the justices do not allow cameras in their court room.

Justices Antonin Scalia, William Brennan Jr., John Paul Stevens and Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist all lay in repose for one day at the court.

But none achieved the level of national fame that Ginsburg received.  

A large crowd is expected to walk past her casket at the court when she lies in repose, given the outpouring of emotion already being particularly by those who view her as a feminist icon and hero to the left. 

Admirers left flowers and notes for Ginsburg on the Supreme Court’s steps in the wake of her passing. 

Ginsburg found fame late in life and became known affectionately as ‘Notorious R.B.G.’ There have been documentaries and movies on her life along with a children’s book about her.  

President Trump has ordered flags at all federal buildings to be at half-staff until after she is laid to rest. Flags at the White House, the Supreme Court and the US Capitol are among those being lowered in her honor.

Ginsburg, the justice beloved of the left who became famous for her fiery dissents, died on Friday at the age of 87 due to complications from her ongoing battle with pancreatic cancer. 

Trump said he would nominate Ginsburg’s replacement on Friday or Saturday – after funeral services have concluded for the late justice.

‘I think it’ll be on Friday or Saturday,’ he said. ‘And we want to pay respect. We, it looks like, it looks like we will have probably services on Thursday or Friday, as I understand it.’ 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be buried next week in Arlington National Cemetery; her husband Martin, seen above with her at her 1993 Supreme Court swearing in ceremony with then-President Bill Clinton and then Chief Justice William Rehnquist, was buried in Arlington in 2010

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be buried next week in Arlington National Cemetery; her husband Martin, seen above with her at her 1993 Supreme Court swearing in ceremony with then-President Bill Clinton and then Chief Justice William Rehnquist, was buried in Arlington in 2010

Ginsburg will also lie in state in National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol, where flags fly at half-staff

Ginsburg will also lie in state in National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol, where flags fly at half-staff

President Donald Trump told 'Fox & Friends' he would name Justice Ginsburg's replacement on Friday or Saturday

President Donald Trump told ‘Fox & Friends’ he would name Justice Ginsburg’s replacement on Friday or Saturday

Trump, who now has a chance to nominate a third justice to a lifetime appointment on the court, named Amy Coney Barrett, 48, of the Chicago-based 7th Circuit and Barbara Lagoa, 52, of the Atlanta-based 11th Circuit as possible nominees.    

But he told ‘Fox & Friends’ on Monday morning he was seriously looking at four or five possible nominees.

‘I’m looking at five, probably four, but I’m looking at five very seriously,’ Trump said. 

He said his nominee, which he has said will be a woman, should be confirmed before Election Day.

‘I think the final vote should be taken, frankly, before the election. We have plenty of time for that,’ he said.

‘When you have the Senate, when you have the votes, you can do what you want as long as you have it,’ he told ‘Fox & Friends’ on Monday morning. 

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