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Catholic archbishop tells Trump protests and virus are a ‘deep state’ plot

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catholic archbishop tells trump protests and virus are a deep state plot

President Trump tweeted a letter written to him from Carlo Maria Viganò, a Catholic archbishop, who suggests the coronavirus pandemic and the George Floyd protests are part of a ‘deep state’ plot to hurt the president’s re-election. 

In the long-winded letter, Viganò describes the current climate as a battle against good and evil and says Trump’s participation in the anti-abortion ‘March for Life’ ‘confirm[s] which side you wish to fight on.’    

‘In society, Mr. President, these two opposing realities co-exist as eternal enemies, just as God and Satan are eternal enemies. And it appears that the children of darkness – whom we may easily identify with the deep state, which you wisely oppose and which is fiercely waging war against you in these days – have decided to show their cards, so to speak, by now revealing their plans,’ Viganò wrote.  

President Trump tweeted a letter from Catholic Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò that detailed a 'deep state' and 'Masonic' plot against him, which included the coronavirus pandemic and the George Floyd protests

President Trump tweeted a letter from Catholic Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò that detailed a 'deep state' and 'Masonic' plot against him, which included the coronavirus pandemic and the George Floyd protests

President Trump tweeted a letter from Catholic Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò that detailed a ‘deep state’ and ‘Masonic’ plot against him, which included the coronavirus pandemic and the George Floyd protests 

President Trump shared Carlo Maria Viganò's letter to him in a Wednesday evening tweet, asking Americans to have a look

President Trump shared Carlo Maria Viganò's letter to him in a Wednesday evening tweet, asking Americans to have a look

President Trump shared Carlo Maria Viganò’s letter to him in a Wednesday evening tweet, asking Americans to have a look 

Carlo Maria Viganò (right) wrote President Trump a long-winded letter praising him for being on the right side of a broad 'deep state' conspiracy

Carlo Maria Viganò (right) wrote President Trump a long-winded letter praising him for being on the right side of a broad 'deep state' conspiracy

Carlo Maria Viganò (right) wrote President Trump a long-winded letter praising him for being on the right side of a broad ‘deep state’ conspiracy 

Viganò claimed that ‘investigations’ into the pandemic response will ‘reveal the true responsibility of those who managed the Covid emergency’ and expose a ‘colossal operation of social engineering.’ 

‘We will also discover that the riots in these days were provoked by those who, seeing that the virus is inevitably fading and that the social alarm of the pandemic is waning, necessarily have had to provoke civil disturbances, because they would be followed by repression which, although legitimate, could be condemned as an unjustified aggression against the population,’ Viganò continued. 

He then suggested this was for political ends. 

‘It is quite clear that the use of street protests is instrumental to the purposes of those who would like to see someone elected in the upcoming presidential elections who embodies the goals of the deep state and who expresses those goals faithfully and with conviction,’ he wrote. 

Viganò goes on to assure Trump that he’s not alone as there’s an evil, ‘deep church’ exists among clergy too. 

He pointed to the members of the Catholic church who criticized Trump’s decision to appear in front of a statue of Pope John Paul II last week, a day after protesters were cleared out of the way with teargas and pepper balls so the president could stand in front of St. John’s church in Washington, D.C. holding the Bible. 

‘They are subservient to the deep state, to globalism, to aligned thought, to the New World Order which they invoke ever more frequently in the name of a universal brotherhood, which has nothing Christian about it, but which evokes the Masonic ideals of those want to dominate the world by driving God out of the courts, out of schools, out of families, and perhaps even out of churches,’ Viganò said of those Trump critics. 

He also blasted the media for not wanting to ‘spread the truth.’ 

He then told Trump that he knew he was on the good side of the equation for his participation in the March for Life and National Child Abuse Prevention Month. 

‘However, it is important that the good – who are the majority – wake up from their sluggishness and do not accept being deceived by a minority of dishonest people with unavowable purposes,’ Viganò said. ‘It is necessary that the good, the children of light, come together and make their voices heard.’ 

‘What more effective way is there to do this, Mr. President, than by prayer, asking the Lord to protect you, the United States, and all of humanity from this enormous attack of the Enemy?’ he argued. 

Viganò concluded the letter by telling Trump that he was praying for him against the Invisible Enemy, the name the president has used for the coronavirus, though in the letter referred to a broader conspiracy.  

Viganò, who has put Pope Francis on blast in the past over the child sex abuse scandal, did not assign merit to the protests over racial equality in the same way as the pope. 

Last week Pope Francis said, ‘My friends, we cannot tolerate or turn a blind eye to racism and exclusion in any form and yet claim to defend the sacredness of every human life.’   

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Coronavirus UK: Entrepreneurs warn future of nation is under threat

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coronavirus uk entrepreneurs warn future of nation is under threat

The horrifying cost of Boris Johnson’s six-month Covid clampdown was dramatically laid bare last night.

Business chiefs and hospitality groups issued a string of dire warnings over the impact of the restrictions, saying millions of jobs were now on the line.

They said the Prime Minister’s U-turn on his ‘get back to work’ message could spell doom for struggling high streets, with footfall plummeting and shops boarded up.

In a passionate intervention, a prominent entrepreneur said the prosperity of the nation was at stake. 

In a passionate intervention to Boris Johnson¿s six-month Covid clampdown, Julian Metcalfe, who founded Pret A Manger and Itsu, says the prosperity of the nation is now at stake

In a passionate intervention to Boris Johnson’s six-month Covid clampdown, Julian Metcalfe, who founded Pret A Manger and Itsu, says the prosperity of the nation is now at stake

Julian Metcalfe, who founded Pret A Manger and Itsu, said: ‘The repercussions of this six months are going to be devastating to so many, to local councils, to industry, to people all over our country.

‘We have not begun to touch the seriousness of this. This talk of six months is criminal.’

Despite ballooning national debt, Rishi Sunak is preparing a multi-billion-pound ‘winter economy plan’ to try to protect jobs.

The Chancellor signalled the true extent of the crisis by cancelling plans for a full-scale Budget in November. Sources said he accepted the country could no longer make long-term financial decisions.

Despite ballooning national debt, Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak is preparing a multi-billion-pound ¿winter economy plan¿ to try to protect jobs

Despite ballooning national debt, Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak is preparing a multi-billion-pound ‘winter economy plan’ to try to protect jobs

As the Archbishops of Canterbury and York warned of the economic costs of Covid:

  • Hospitality groups said a quarter of pubs and restaurants could go bust this year;
  • HMRC and Goldman Sachs were among employers abandoning their drives to get people back to the office;
  • Pictures showed high streets boarded up as shops reacted to the clampdown;
  • The travel industry faced fresh despair when Downing Street warned of the risk of booking half-term holidays;
  • Upper Crust and Caffe Ritazza are keeping two thirds of outlets shut;
  • A major study warned countless patients were living with worsening heart disease, diabetes and mental health because of the lockdown;
  • MPs demanded extra help for theatre and music venues;
  • No 10 said a ban on household visits could be extended across large swathes of England;
  • A mobile tracing app is finally being rolled out today – four months late;
  • Matt Hancock’s target for half a million virus tests a day by the end of next month was under threat from equipment shortages;
  • Scientific advisers suggested that students could be told to remain on campus over Christmas.

In a dramatic television address to the nation on Tuesday, Mr Johnson announced he was abruptly dropping his call – made repeatedly since the end of lockdown – for workers to return to the office. He also told pubs and restaurants to shut their doors at 10pm, and doubled fines for not wearing a mask or failing to obey the rule of six.

He indicated the measures were likely to last for six months at least.

Mr Metcalfe led the backlash against the curbs on BBC Radio 4’s World at One, saying he did not know whether Itsu could survive the measures.

Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak (left) and Prime Minister Boris Johnson leave 10 Downing Street, for a Cabinet meeting to be held at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in London, ahead of MPs returning to Westminster after the summer recess on September 1

Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak (left) and Prime Minister Boris Johnson leave 10 Downing Street, for a Cabinet meeting to be held at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in London, ahead of MPs returning to Westminster after the summer recess on September 1

He added: ‘People who work in hotels, restaurants, takeaways and in coffee shops are devastated. A great many are closing down – we’re losing thousands upon thousands of jobs. 

‘How long can this continue, this vague “work from home”, “don’t go on public transport”? The ramifications of this are just enormous.’

Mr Metcalfe accused the Prime Minister of ‘sitting down with his Union Jack talking utter nonsense’.

He said: ‘To turn to an entire nation and say “stay at home for six months”, and to spout off Churchillian nonsense about we’ll make it through – it’s terribly unhelpful. It should be “we will review the situation each week, each hour”.’

Tory MP Desmond Swayne said the Government had made the wrong call, adding: ‘I am concerned the cure could be worse than the disease.’

Tom Stainer, chief executive of the Campaign for Real Ale, warned the clampdown could see the closure of many pubs. 

‘Pub-goers and publicans alike want to stop the spread of Covid, but this curfew is an arbitrary restriction that unfairly targets the hospitality sector and will have a devastating impact on pubs, jobs and communities,’ he added.

Rob Pitcher of Revolution Bars said: ‘It’s beyond belief that they have brought in the 10pm curfew with no evidence to back it up.’

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Fashion mogul Sir Paul Smith warned the pandemic was proving devastating to his and other industries.

A former head of the civil service will today say Mr Johnson’s government has proved incapable of combating Covid.

Lord O’Donnell, a crossbench peer, will say in a lecture that ministers did not use adequate data and deferred too much to medical science at the expense of behavioural and economic experts. 

He will also allege there has been a lack of strong leadership and clear strategy. 

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Coronavirus: SAGE experts tell students they should stay at university over Christmas

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coronavirus sage experts tell students they should stay at university over christmas

Students could be told to stay away from their families over the Christmas holidays, according to the latest scientific advice.

The warnings are expected to be published in the latest minutes from meetings of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE).

Larger outbreaks are expected at the end of the academic term as students move around the country to travel home during their two-week break, reported Inews.

‘This could pose a risk to both local communities and families, and will require national oversight, monitoring and decision making,’ SAGE warned.   

People walk past the entrance to Glasgow University on September 23, 2020. Students could be told to stay on campus during the Christmas holidays, according to scientific advice

People walk past the entrance to Glasgow University on September 23, 2020. Students could be told to stay on campus during the Christmas holidays, according to scientific advice

It comes as the University of Liverpool this week confirmed 87 cases, while the University of Dundee told 500 students to isolate after an outbreak in a halls of residence as students returned to the city for the new term.  

Nick Hillman, director of the Higher Education Policy Unit and former government special adviser to the universities minister, confirmed students could be asked to stay on campus over the holidays. 

‘Ministers will have to tell students that it’s best you stay away from home this year. It is no different from any other situation. If you are following the science then what else can the Government say?’ Mr Hillman said. 

Larger outbreaks are expected at the end of the academic term as students move around the country to travel home during their two-week break, reported Inews (file image)

Larger outbreaks are expected at the end of the academic term as students move around the country to travel home during their two-week break, reported Inews (file image)

Meanwhile, there were calls to halt lectures at Liverpool University after 80 students and seven staff caught coronavirus – while 500 undergraduates are isolating at halls in Dundee after a single confirmed case.

NHS Tayside in Scotland contacted other students who had come into contact with the infected cases at Abertay University – with all residents of halls being told to self-isolate until tracing was completed.  

Dr Daniel Chandler, associate director of public health, said: ‘We know from outbreaks in other university settings across Scotland that the virus can spread very quickly in student accommodation. 

‘Therefore, as a precautionary measure, we are contacting all residents of Parker House and advising them to self-isolate immediately.’

A general view of the tower of Glasgow University on September 23. Nick Hillman, director of the Higher Education Policy Unit and former government special adviser to the universities minister, confirmed students could be asked to stay on campus over the holidays

A general view of the tower of Glasgow University on September 23. Nick Hillman, director of the Higher Education Policy Unit and former government special adviser to the universities minister, confirmed students could be asked to stay on campus over the holidays

Meanwhile, there were calls to halt lectures at Liverpool University after 80 students and and seven staff caught coronavirus - while 500 undergraduates are isolating at halls in Dundee after a single confirmed case (file image)

Meanwhile, there were calls to halt lectures at Liverpool University after 80 students and and seven staff caught coronavirus – while 500 undergraduates are isolating at halls in Dundee after a single confirmed case (file image)

‘Further investigation and contact tracing are continuing and we will review this advice in the coming days.’

Union members in Liverpool are seeking assurances they will not vulnerable staff will have to arrive in campus.  

Martyn Moss, UCU regional official, said: ‘Liverpool’s universities have to immediately heed the call from staff and halt unnecessary in-person teaching. 

‘The safety of staff, students and the local community has to be the number one priority.

‘More widely, the university sector and the government must address this public health crisis immediately. It is not enough to plan to manage Covid outbreaks when we could be working to prevent them.’

University of Glasgow faces two ‘significant clusters’ as 124 students test positive for coronavirus

More than 600 students at the University of Glasgow were told to self-isolate after 124 tested positive following freshers’ week.

The ‘actual number is likely to be higher’, according to a spokesman, who said there were two ‘significant clusters’ at the university. 

The outbreaks have been identified in the Murano Street and Cairncross residences, GlasgowLive reports.

Students are seen at Glasgow University on September 23 after 600 people were told to self-isolate

Students are seen at Glasgow University on September 23 after 600 people were told to self-isolate

A spokesman for Glasgow University said: ‘We are aware of two significant clusters of positive cases of Covid-19 in our Murano Street and Cairncross residences, which we believe were largely due to social activity around September 12-14, the start of freshers’ week.

‘We are working closely with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde’s public health team to manage these.’

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The childhood diary of her friend revealed the Queen we’ve never known, writes RICHARD KAY

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the childhood diary of her friend revealed the queen weve never known writes richard kay

For eight decades she has been as intriguing as she has reassuring, from the schoolgirl Princess broadcasting out of Windsor in wartime Britain to steadfast monarch.

But what do we really know of the Queen and what makes her tick?

There is the public side, the unerring sense of duty and obligation, of course; and then there are the glimpses of the private Elizabeth, the countrywoman devoted to her horses and her dogs. Yet all we truly understand is what she chooses to let us see.

Then, occasionally, something unexpected about her emerges. Such a moment was reached with the serialisation in the Daily Mail this week of The Windsor Diaries, a compelling and revealing insight into the teenage life of the then Princess Elizabeth and her sister Princess Margaret.

The diaries — written by the sisters’ closest childhood friend Alathea Fitzalan Howard — provide a fascinating profile of the young woman destined to wear the crown, and the values which she formed and still follows.

For eight decades the Queen has been as intriguing as she has reassuring, from the schoolgirl Princess broadcasting out of Windsor in wartime Britain to steadfast monarch

For eight decades the Queen has been as intriguing as she has reassuring, from the schoolgirl Princess broadcasting out of Windsor in wartime Britain to steadfast monarch

These are not just standards of behaviour, but principles of integrity and decency which have governed her life. And underpinning it all, is the importance of family.

How perceptive a witness then was the young Alathea, a kinswoman of the Duke of Norfolk, who was three years older than the girl she knew as Lilibet.

After one ‘blissful’ summer’s day in 1942 spent with the two Princesses and their parents, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (later the Queen Mother), she writes enviously of ‘four people who mean everything to each other, whose lives form one spiritual whole, independently of the aid of all outsiders, or even relations’.

In another entry, she notes almost forlornly of the royal sisters, ‘they are happier alone with their parents than with anyone else on earth’.

This was the template for Elizabeth’s life as both a Sovereign and a mother.

The Windsor Diaries is a compelling and revealing insight into the teenage life of the then Princess Elizabeth and her sister Princess Margaret written by the sisters’ closest childhood friend Alathea Fitzalan Howard

The Windsor Diaries is a compelling and revealing insight into the teenage life of the then Princess Elizabeth and her sister Princess Margaret written by the sisters’ closest childhood friend Alathea Fitzalan Howard

For someone whose own life experiences were, in many ways, as narrow as the Princesses, Alathea’s judgments about the future Queen’s character are remarkable.

She is, she declares of the young Elizabeth, the ‘most ungossipy person I know’, adding: ‘Placid and unemotional, she never desires what doesn’t come her way; always happy in her own family, she never needs the companionship of outsiders; she never suffers, therefore she never strongly desires. If only she could be drawn out of her shell, she who has so much at her feet, who can be so gay and amusing.’

Later she writes that Lilibet ‘doesn’t seem to need friends and is careless with the ones she has, though quite unconsciously’.

This is Alathea almost uncannily describing the scrupulousness Elizabeth has employed as monarch. Surely this has been as much about self-protection, while also respecting that tradition of not allowing too much daylight on royal magic — something that subsequent generations senselessly ignored.

Yet, despairing of the terms of their friendship, Alathea complains to her diary: ‘I love her and miss her when I don’t see her — but she doesn’t miss me. Why should she? She has PM (Princess Margaret) — she doesn’t need me.’

At times Elizabeth had her sister’s very happiness in her hands, from the fallout over Margaret’s love for the divorced Group Captain Peter Townsend, to her divorce from the serially unfaithful Earl of Snowdon. But the affection and loyalty between the two never faltered.

More than once Alathea wonders about the competing qualities of the two sisters: ‘Margaret is far and away more the type I would like for the future Queen, she has the frivolity and irresponsibility that Lilibet lacks, though one couldn’t call either of them dull.’

She is at her most observant with those astute asides about Elizabeth’s reserve, shyness almost, which is still so recognisable today. Here, she is describing a function at Windsor Castle, where 14-year old Elizabeth had to receive a company of RAF officers, shaking hands with them all.

‘Lilibet finds making conversation very difficult, like me, but she did very well as she had to stand by herself for over an hour talking to each one in turn. She insisted on bringing the dogs in because she said they were the greatest save to the conversation when it dropped.’

That childhood reticence never departed. As royal portrait painter Michael Noakes told me at the time of the Queen’s 90th birthday: ‘Sometimes she has to gather herself together before she can face going into a room where she knows everyone will be looking at her. When Prince Philip has seen that happening, he has taken over and made sure everything is OK. He likes to say he can make people laugh within 15 seconds.’

For someone who has had to spend so much time on public display, she did, for many years, develop a way of hiding her true feelings and suppressing her emotions. In simple terms, this was often a way of avoiding an issue.

This is exactly what she did with the domestic crises of the 1990s involving Diana and Fergie — to Philip’s frustration, who was often urging her to come off the fence and do something.

There is the public side, the unerring sense of duty and obligation, of course; and then there are the glimpses of the private Elizabeth (pictured with her father King George VI, mother Queen Elizabeth, and sister Princess Margaret), the countrywoman devoted to her horses and her dogs

There is the public side, the unerring sense of duty and obligation, of course; and then there are the glimpses of the private Elizabeth (pictured with her father King George VI, mother Queen Elizabeth, and sister Princess Margaret), the countrywoman devoted to her horses and her dogs

Now, for the first time, we know that this trait was visible all those years ago. After a night at Windsor Castle, Alathea writes: ‘Lilibet is funny in some ways — v. matter of fact and uncurious and above all untemperamental. But one can’t have everything.’ Later she observes: ‘Lilibet is unusually set in her ideas for 15; none of her friends could ever influence her. For one thing she never lets herself come to know them enough.

‘If she were not so placid and unimpressionable, no doubt I would have at least interested her with my thoughts, so vastly different from her own.’

The diaries also reveal other qualities that have shaped the Queen’s life, notably thrift: ‘They [the Princesses] make a point now of having hardly any [new] clothes, which I think is ridiculous.’

Crawfie, the royal nanny Marion Crawford, regrets that Elizabeth has ‘no taste’, Alathea writes. Another friend says it is a shame that the Princess is not encouraged ‘to read more cultured books’, complaining that Royal Family conversation revolves ‘round the dogs and the latest radio joke’.

   

More from Richard Kay for the Daily Mail…

On the childhood crush the young Elizabeth had for Philip, one delightful entry describes her dancing round the room with a photo the young naval officer sent her for Christmas 1944.

But what emerges is that Lilibet was not the one-man woman she is so often painted as. At least two other men caught her eye: Guards officer Hugh Euston — later the Duke of Grafton — and (at least according to Alathea’s mother) the Marquess of Milford Haven, who was to be Philip’s best man.

After a castle dance with young commissioned officers, including Euston, the two friends vied for the attention of the handsome soldier. ‘PE [Princess Elizabeth] asked me how many times I danced with him and said she was rather hurt because he only had

the first one with her because he was asked to and then not again,’ Alathea wrote. The following day Lilibet discloses that she’d ‘stolen’ a letter of thanks the officer had written ‘and was going to keep it!’.

Only once did these two credulous young women talk frankly about affairs of the heart. In an entry from June 1942, Alathea writes: ‘She wondered if she’d ever marry, and I assured her she would, and she said if she really wanted to marry someone she’d run away, but I know she wouldn’t really — her sense of duty is too strong, though she’s suited to a simpler life.’

Alathea regrets that Elizabeth does not have her sister’s charm, ‘chattering and telling the latest jokes’, but writes of the thoughtful Princess: ‘I fell to wondering what fate awaited this girl, who was in character and tastes so much simpler than I. Will she stand out in history as another great Elizabeth, or will she merely be a commonplace puppet in a rapidly degenerating monarchy? She seems to have no desire to win fame for herself.’

How observant — and how lucky we got the right sister as Queen.

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