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China demanded French Genghis Khan exhibition not use his name

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china demanded french genghis khan exhibition not use his name

A French museum has accused China of trying to rewrite history after Beijing demanded that an exhibition about Genghis Khan not refer to the Mongol leader by name.

The exhibition at the Chateau des ducs de Bretagne in the city of Nantes was being planned in collaboration with the Inner Mongolia Muesum in Hohhot, China.

But when authorities in Beijing caught wind of the project they demanded the words ‘Genghis Khan,’ ‘Empire’ and ‘Mongol’ be omitted and later asked for control over exhibition texts, maps, brochures and communication.

The museum said the 13th century ruler’s exhibition has been put on hold for three years because it will not abide a ‘biased rewriting of Mongol culture in favour of a new national narrative.’  

Genghis Khan (c. 1155/1162 - August 18, 1227) founder and Great Khan of the Mongol Empire

Genghis Khan (c. 1155/1162 – August 18, 1227) founder and Great Khan of the Mongol Empire

In a statement on Monday, the museum’s director Bertrand Guillet said ‘we made the decision to stop this production in the name of the human, scientific and ethical values that we defend.’  

The dispute coincides with a tougher Chinese line against ethnic Mongols, who account for about 6.5 million of China’s 1.4 billion inhabitants and mostly live in the northern province of Inner Mongolia.

The province has seen weeks of protests and school boycotts over a policy requiring schools to teach politics, history, and literature in Mandarin rather than the local language. 

‘The Chinese regime bans historical narratives that don’t match its official narratives. And tries to do the same abroad,’ tweeted Valerie Niquet, an Asia specialist at France’s Foundation for Strategic Research.

Antoine Bondaz, a research fellow at the foundation, also backed the museum’s decision on Twitter, calling the reported Chinese demands ‘crazy’.

‘The Nantes museum and Hohhot museum had good working relations until Beijing changed its policies and tried to impose its narrative abroad,’ he added.

The ‘hardening this summer of the Chinese government’s position towards the Mongol minority’ prompted the halt of the exhibition, the museum said. 

The Chateau des ducs de Bretagne history museum in the city of Nantes, northwestern France

The Chateau des ducs de Bretagne history museum in the city of Nantes, northwestern France

The show, which was to open next week, had already been pushed back to the first half of 2021 because of the coronavirus crisis.

But the museum said it was now ‘forced to delay this exhibition until October 2024’.

This would give it time to build a new exhibition, featuring works from European and American collections.

The Great Khan: The blood of 40 million on his hands, 16 million of his descendants live on today

Genghis Khan was the founder and Great Khan of the Mongol Empire.

In the early 1200s he united the Mongol tribes, creating a military state that invaded its neighbours and expanded.

The Empire soon ruled most of what would become modern Korea, China, Russia, eastern Europe, southeast Asia, Persia and India.

Khan made himself master of half the known world, and inspired mankind with a fear that lasted for generations.

He was a prolific lover, fathering hundreds of children across his territories. Some scientists think he has 16 million male descendants alive today.

By the time he died in August 1227, the Mongol Empire covered a vast part of Central Asia and China.

Originally known as Temüjin of the Borjigin, legend has it Genghis was born holding a clot of blood in his hand.

His father was Khan, or emperor, of a small tribe but was murdered when Temüjin was still young.

The new tribal leader wanted nothing to do with Temujin’s family, so with his mother and five other children, Temüjin was cast out and left to die.

In all, Genghis conquered almost four times the lands of Alexander the Great. He is still revered in Mongolia and in parts of China.

Historians estimate he was responsible for the deaths of nearly 40 million people with his large-scale massacres of civilian populations. 

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Coronavirus UK: Pub landlords set up marquees so people can meet ‘outside’

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coronavirus uk pub landlords set up marquees so people can meet outside

With many parts of Britain now under local lockdowns preventing friends from different households meeting indoors, pubs across the country are having to come up with ingenious methods to get people to visit.

And these photographs show how venues are turning to marquees and teepees with heaters to follow Covid-19 rules and ensure those living in tier two areas such as London can still meet ‘outside’ in groups of up to six.

Pubs in tier two under ‘high’ alert are not allowed to seat anyone from different households indoors, so they are turning to marquees which can be classed as outdoor seating as long as the ends are opened up. 

The Government has urged pub landlords and restaurateurs to ensure social distancing is maintained within marquees, and that they are open on three or four sides to be considered as an ‘external environment’.

The move to outdoor seating has resulted in a boom in business for marquee manufacturers – with one in Surrey saying demand is up by 500 per cent and another in South Yorkshire posting monthly sales of more than £1million.

Emma McClarkin, chief executive of the British Beer and Pub Association, told MailOnline today: ‘Many pubs have invested in their outdoor spaces to make them comfortable and welcoming for winter so do check out your local.’ 

And UK Hospitality chief executive Kate Nicholls added: ‘The restrictions, particularly for those businesses in tier two areas, means that they will have to think laterally in order to accommodate guests. 

‘A marquee is a great idea, provided the pub has the space. Utilising outdoor areas will be vital if pubs and bars are going to trade at anything approaching a healthy level. Some local authorities have relaxed rules to let businesses utilise outdoor space and we hope more will follow that lead.’ 

Among the pubs in England which have turned to outdoor marques and teepees are The Weeping Willow in Barrow, Suffolk; The Three Tuns in Guilden Morden, Cambridgeshire; and The Perch in Binsey, Oxfordshire. 

The 17th century Weeping Willow in Barrow, Suffolk, is among the pubs in England which has a covered outdoor seating area

The 17th century Weeping Willow in Barrow, Suffolk, is among the pubs in England which has a covered outdoor seating area

Punters enjoy a drink under a marquee with outdoor heating at The Three Tuns in Guilden Morden, Cambridgeshire

Punters enjoy a drink under a marquee with outdoor heating at The Three Tuns in Guilden Morden, Cambridgeshire

Others with covered outdoor areas include The Red Lion in Hollington, Derbyshire; The Horse and Groom in Wivenhoe, Essex; The Rose Revived in Hadlow, Kent; and The Old Boot Inn in Stanford Dingley, Berkshire. 

Nik Antona, national chairman for the Campaign for Real Ale, told MailOnline today: ‘Beer gardens are an intrinsic part of British pub culture and the backbone of our summers.

‘This year, we’re in exceptional circumstances as more pubs have turned to putting up marquees and heating their outdoor areas to keep abreast of Covid-19 restrictions and social distancing measures.

‘While this will help some pubs in the lead up to winter, particularly on pleasant days, it’s not a long-term solution for our pubs to survive the winter, and many pubs have no outdoor space. Like it or not, the weather will turn, and our pub gardens will need to close at certain times.

‘That is why it is vital that the Government provides additional financial support for all hospitality businesses. Otherwise, we’re likely to see many pubs close their doors forever by Christmas.’ 

The Perch is a thatched 17th century country inn located in Binsey, Oxfordshire, which has put up a marquee in its garden

The Perch is a thatched 17th century country inn located in Binsey, Oxfordshire, which has put up a marquee in its garden

The Red Lion in the Derbyshire village of Hollington has put up a marquee so punters to meet up 'outside'

The Red Lion in the Derbyshire village of Hollington has put up a marquee which allows punters to meet up inside or out

The demand for marquees has also meant good business for manufacturers – with Spencer King, director of DIY Marquees in Dorking, Surrey, telling MailOnline that demand is up by 400 to 500 per cent from its usual levels.

Sales of patio heaters and fire pits soar by 400% as homeowners desperately prepare for winter outdoor entertaining under new Tier 2 rules 

The demand for patio heaters and fire pits has soared as people try to get themselves ready for outdoor entertaining under new coronavirus restrictions.

Residents living in areas hit by the government’s second-harshest lockdown level are banned from mixing indoors and can only meet with people from different households when outside in groups of six or less.

As such, outdoor furniture businesses have seen a rush for patio heaters and fire pits – with one company telling MailOnline it has experienced a 400 per cent increase in sales on previous years.

Social media users have also admitted to urgently purchasing the devices after Boris Johnson announced the high alert level measures, with one person joking: ‘Patio heaters and fire pits… Take all my money!’

Sheffield-based Briq Furniture sold their patio heaters within just three hours after re-stocking the product recently. Director Laura Hodgkinson said: ‘We have been sold out of patio heaters for the last two months. 

‘When we released stock of patio heaters it sold out within three hours. The rise is a 400 per cent increase on previous years and the majority of customers seem to be commercial establishments gearing up to welcome customers outdoors over the colder months.’

Mike Powell, director of Neo Direct, which is a specialist in appliances and home furniture, said it has seen a 300 per cent increase in sales of outdoor heating.

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He said: ‘We are having to quote long lead times for marquees for the first time in our 40-plus years in the industry – usually it is only a day or two – so a lot of pubs are either having a long wait or having to make do with lighter weight party tent type structures.

‘The lockdown limited our production whilst the stock we did have was sold to Covid testing stations, schools, factories and hospitals – we donated a marquee to our local hospital purely so the staff could have a rest area for example.

‘By the time pubs reopened needing outdoor space stocks of marquees were already very limited and quickly became depleted leading to the current long lead times. Hopefully by next spring – second lockdown allowing – production will have caught up and we will be back to normal.’

Another firm, Gala Tent, reported 50 per cent year-on-year growth and £1million-plus revenue for two months in a row the first time its 21-year history.  

The company, which makes tents for the NHS, police and the military, had a 60,000 sq ft warehouse packed with summer stock during lockdown but demand soon soared as the hospitality sector reopened in July. 

Gala Tent posted a 33 per cent growth year-on-year for July, then a 49 per cent increase for August, creating the most successful period in the history of the company based in the South Yorkshire town of Rotherham.

Chief executive Jason Mace said last month: ‘If you’re going to succeed as a company, you need to know that you can change direction at a minute’s notice and carry on regardless. The beauty of our products is their versatility. 

‘It’s a wedding marquee one year but now it’s a way of pubs expanding their premises to ensure their own revenues don’t drop, or for schools to protect their children in the social distancing era.’

A third firm, Barkers Marquees in Godstone, Surrey, said it had seen a ‘vast increase’ for marquees to help pubs, restaurants, schools and sports clubs work within Covid-19 restrictions during the winter.

A spokesman said demand was being driven firstly from ‘companies using cheaper gazebos in the summer – usually sourced from China – and realising they won’t withstand UK winters; our event tents are structurally analysed to ensure they comply with wind loading regulations’.

The other key driver was the Government ‘suggesting that organisations need to plan to comply with Covid-19 restrictions for another six months’, the firm said. 

The Horse and Groom in Wivenhoe, Essex, is among the pubs which has used the services of Rotherham-based Gala Tent

The Horse and Groom in Wivenhoe, Essex, is among the pubs which has used the services of Rotherham-based Gala Tent

The Rose Revived in Hadlow, Kent, has put up a marquee for dining within its extensive land and gardens in the countryside

The Rose Revived in Hadlow, Kent, has put up a marquee for dining within its extensive land and gardens in the countryside

The spokesman added: ‘Usually we are taking orders at this time of year for next summer season from the events industry, but confidence in this sector is at an all-time low.

‘With Government suggesting that we will have to live with Covid-19 restrictions for possibly another six months, some couples that had deferred their wedding until next spring are considering moving the date again.

‘The events industry could well see increased demand in 2021 season due to 2020 deferrals and new weddings, however many events companies may not survive that long to take advantage. This could mean increased frustration for events planners and event goers alike.’

It comes after industry estimates revealed this week that pubs, bars and restaurants spent £900million on screens, masks and hand sanitiser to make their venues safe for reopening.

Bosses have spoken of their fury at spending the cash only to be forced to shell out again to adapt to an ‘ever-changing raft of ill-thought-out regulations’. 

The Old Boot Inn in the historic Berkshire village of Stanford Dingley has put up a giant structure for people to sit outdoors

The Old Boot Inn in the historic Berkshire village of Stanford Dingley has put up a giant structure for people to sit outdoors

Each pub has spent more than £10,000 adapting the interiors of their venues, according to research, but many can now only entertain customers outside.

* Has your local come up with an interesting way of sitting people outside? Please email: tips@dailymail.com * 

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Tens of thousands of venues across the North of England have been plunged back into drastic restrictions, which industry leaders said are having a ‘devastating impact’ and will cost hundreds of thousands of jobs. 

Last Saturday, South Yorkshire joined Greater Manchester, Lancashire and Liverpool at the highest tier three level of restrictions, forcing many venues to shut.

Household mixing has already been banned in tier two areas such as London and the North East, and Wales has shut all its hospitality businesses as part of a two-week ‘fire-break’ lockdown.

Amid growing anger, Chancellor Rishi Sunak was forced to extend the winter jobs scheme on Thursday, but fears remain for the future of thousands of businesses.  

The teepee structure at the Old Boot Inn in Stanford Dingley, Berkshire, will allow people to eat or drink outdoors

The teepee structure at the Old Boot Inn in Stanford Dingley, Berkshire, will allow people to eat or drink outdoors

Official data suggests close to four in ten restaurants, pubs, hotels are at risk of going bust, and the majority are now loss-making. 

But, even as restrictions were introduced for hospitality, Public Health England data showed that just 3.3 per cent of new infections were linked to the sector.

Tier three measures will force up to 5,000 pubs to shut in the North unless they serve ‘substantial’ meals, according to property adviser Altus Group.   

Tier two measures have affected 11,798 pubs, nearly a third of all English pubs, and 12,400 of the 27,000 of the country’s restaurants. 

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Since the start of the pandemic, more than 41,000 jobs have been lost from large companies in the hospitality sector.

Last week the boss of Marston’s pub chain blamed lockdown measures for the loss of 2,100 jobs at its 1,700 venues, saying they were the ‘inevitable consequence of the limitations placed upon our business’.

It is spending £2million to add heated outdoor seating areas to its pubs. Wetherspoons has spent £13.1million on getting its 875 pubs ready. 

Its founder, Tim Martin, said the company is now being hit by ‘an ever-changing raft of ill-thought-out regulations’. It has announced up to 480 job cuts because of the pandemic.

* Has your local come up with an interesting way of sitting people outside? Please email: tips@dailymail.com * 

Tier-ing us apart: Guide to England’s Covid restrictions

A seventh of England’s population will be in the highest level of restrictions by the end of the week as Warrington and Nottingham enter Tier 3.

More than eight million people will be living under the toughest coronavirus measures as winter looms, but what does it mean and what can you do?

Here’s what you need to know about the tier system:

– Who is in Tier 3 at the moment?

The UK Government confirmed on Monday that Warrington will be relegated to Tier 3 on Tuesday, with Nottingham and the boroughs of Broxtowe, Gedling and Rushcliffe set to join it on Thursday.

They join Greater Manchester, which was forced into top tier restrictions at midnight on Saturday despite the best efforts of Mayor Andy Burnham for extra support for the city.

Large areas of South Yorkshire including Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield were also placed into Tier 3 at the same time, after the region secured a £41 million funding package.

Liverpool City Region has been languishing in Tier 3 since October 14, and was joined by Lancashire two days later.

– What does Tier 3 mean exactly?

Expect extreme curbs to your social life – social mixing is banned both indoors and in private gardens, while pubs and bars must close unless they can operate as a restaurant.

The rule of six applies in some outdoor settings such as parks, public gardens and sports courts.

Deliberately flouting the rules can net you a fine of up to £6,400, while those who organise gatherings of more than 30 people can be fined up to £10,000.

Local leaders help the Government to determine whether other venues should be closed, such as gyms or casinos.

Shops and places of worship can remain open, as can schools and colleges, while universities must reflect wider restrictions with the option to move to greater online provision.

Up to 15 guests are allowed at weddings and 30 people can attend funerals, with 15 allowed at wakes, but wedding receptions are not permitted.

People living in Tier 3 areas are advised against overnight stays in other parts of the UK and should avoid travel where possible in and out of the area, unless it is for work, education or caring responsibilities.

Number 10 confirmed that, under Tier 2 and 3 rules on household mixing, people can still meet up for work meetings indoors under certain circumstances.

– What happens in Tier 2?

London, Derbyshire, West Yorkshire, Durham, Northumberland, Tyne and Wear, Tees Valley, West Midlands, and Leicestershire are among the regions currently in Tier 2.

Areas categorised as high risk have restrictions on household mixing indoors, while the rule of six continues to apply outdoors.

People must not meet socially with friends and family indoors in any setting unless they live with them or have formed a support bubble with them.

Shops, gyms, all education settings, and places of worship can remain open, with overnight stays permitted.

Up to 15 guests are allowed at weddings and up to 30 people allowed at funerals, with 15 allowed at receptions and wakes.

Travel advice for those living in Tier 2 areas is to reduce the number of journeys they take where possible and avoid travel into very high Tier 3 areas.

– What restrictions are placed on areas in Tier 1?

Areas classed as medium risk, those in Tier 1, are subject to the same national measures which were commonplace across England earlier this year.

These include the 10pm curfew for pubs and restaurants and a ban on most gatherings of more than six people.

Like Tier 2, up to 15 guests will be allowed at weddings and up to 30 people allowed at funerals, with 15 allowed at receptions and wakes.

Shops, gyms, all education settings, and places of worship will remain open, with overnight stays permitted and no travel restrictions within the area, although people are advised to avoid travel into Tier 3 areas where possible.

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BBC accused of portraying Oscar Pistorius as a victim in new trailer

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bbc accused of portraying oscar pistorius as a victim in new trailer

The BBC was today accused of portraying convicted murderer Oscar Pistorius as a victim in a documentary trailer which did not mention the name of Reeva Steenkamp, the woman he shot dead in 2013. 

The trailer for The Trials Of Oscar Pistorius quoted admirers of the former Paralympian hailing him as a ‘nice guy’, suggesting that Steenkamp’s death was an ‘accident’ and saying Pistorius had been ‘thrown to the wolves’ during his trial. 

Critics berated the BBC for failing to mention Steenkamp’s name and said the trailer was ‘erasing’ her memory and suggesting that Pistorius’s fall from grace was the real tragedy of the story. 

Pistorius, 33, had his conviction for killing Steenkamp upheld by South Africa‘s highest court in 2018 and is serving a 13-year prison sentence for her murder. 

Reeva Steenkamp in 2012 with Oscar Pistorius who is serving a 13-year prison sentence for murdering her on Valentine's Day in 2013

Reeva Steenkamp in 2012 with Oscar Pistorius who is serving a 13-year prison sentence for murdering her on Valentine’s Day in 2013 

The trailer for the show, originally commissioned for ESPN, begins with a segment about Pistorius’s success as a Paralympian and Olympian, mentioning his ‘remarkable’ achievements and showing him being lauded by Nelson Mandela.

The preview clip then moves on to Pistorius’s murder case, quoting the South African as saying: ‘I didn’t mean to do it.’ 

Pistorius claimed in court that Steenkamp’s death was an accident, maintaining that he fired through a bathroom door because he mistook her for an intruder. 

But a court found him guilty of Steenkamp’s murder in 2016 after he had initially been convicted of manslaughter.  

One person quoted in the trailer said she had ‘always believed it was an accident’, while another said Pistorius ‘absolutely, positively knew [Steenkamp] was in the bathroom’.  

Steenkamp, a 29-year-old model and law graduate who was famous in her own right in South Africa, is pictured but not named in the trailer, 

One critic, Emma Champion, said: ‘Her name was Reeva and he killed her. That’s why he was on trial. 

‘I am appalled at the title and that you think he’s worthy of a documentary. Her name was Reeva Steenkamp.’

The trailer for the BBC series included a segment about Pistorius's athletic successes but did not mention Steenkamp by name

The trailer for the BBC series included a segment about Pistorius’s athletic successes but did not mention Steenkamp by name 

The trailer for the BBC programme showed Pistorius being lauded by Nelson Mandela

The trailer for the BBC programme showed Pistorius being lauded by Nelson Mandela 

Screenwriter Sarah Phelps said: ‘The framing of this is heinous and is justifiably going down like a cup of cold sick. Do better.’ 

Feminist campaigner Jean Hatchet said: ‘Seriously. This is an insult to murdered women and their families across the globe. This should not be aired at all. 

‘Show some respect. He had his murder trial for his lies. She doesn’t get a right to reply because he murdered her.’ 

Freelance creative director Nathalie Gordon asked: ‘When will we begin to reframe these narratives and stop erasing victims in favour of blindly celebrating murderers and rapists? 

‘Her name is Reeva Steenkamp. She’s not ‘the girlfriend’ and she’s not just a side note in this story.’  

Writer Kate Harding satirised the trailer’s portrayal of Pistorius by saying: ‘It is always so sad when an exceptional man is brought down by a woman who gets in the way of his bullets.’  

The director of the documentary, Daniel Gordon, said gender-based violence was part of a ‘breadth of issues’ on which the film would ‘provide a lens’. 

‘My hope is that the film gives audiences additional context and layers to a story they think they know,’ he said. 

Pistorius in court in 2015, during a lengthy legal process which eventually saw him convicted for Steenkamp's murder and jailed for more than 13 years

Pistorius in court in 2015, during a lengthy legal process which eventually saw him convicted for Steenkamp’s murder and jailed for more than 13 years 

Pistorius in action during the 2012 Olympic Games in London

Pistorius in action during the 2012 Olympic Games in London 

The documentary is due to appear on BBC iPlayer next month, more than seven-and-a-half years after Steenkamp’s death on Valentine’s Day 2013. 

After his conviction was upgraded to murder in 2016, Pistorius had his sentence more than doubled from six years to 13 years and five months in 2017.  

Rights groups had said that Pistorius received preferential treatment in a country with a dire record of violent crimes against women. 

The judge who increased his sentence said Pistorius’s apology to Steenkamp’s family during an earlier hearing did ‘not demonstrate any genuine remorse on his part’.  

In 2018, Pistorius finally ran out of legal options when South Africa’s Constitutional Court dismissed an application to appeal his sentence. 

‘Oscar Pistorius has exhausted his legal avenues in terms of the criminal process,’ prosecutors said at the time.

Pistorius must serve at least half of his 13-year sentence before he can be considered for parole. 

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Romanian female shoplifting gang stole £6,000 of perfume including Chanel in nationwide spree

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romanian female shoplifting gang stole 6000 of perfume including chanel in nationwide spree

A gang of female Romanian shoplifters have been spared jail after stealing more than £6,000 of perfume in a nationwide four-month crime spree. 

The Birmingham-based quartet targeted busy shopping centres across the country, discreetly swiping luxury products such as Chanel, before being foiled. 

All eventually pleaded guilty to charges of theft and were handed community orders after a judge concluded it was clear ‘there are others in control’.

Two of the women, Geanina Stan, 22, and Daniella Stoian, 20, initially tried to claim their £4,283 haul in John Lewis on February 14 were Valentine’s Day gifts for friends. 

Mothers-of-three Angelica Marin, 18, and Samirateanca Bucurestean, 24, also admitted involvement in the shoplifting spree.

The group were caught stealing £6,101 worth of perfume in Bristol, Northampton, Telford and Worcester over four months by simply ‘removing the items from the perfume cabinet and placing them in their bags’, the court was told.

Although they claimed the crimes were ‘spur of the moment’, sentencing Judge Sarah Buckingham, who had presided over the trial, concluded that the women were working under the orders of organised crime bosses. 

Prosecutor Alison Scott Jones told Birmingham Crown Court: ‘This case concerns a group of Birmingham-based Romanian women who travelled around the country. 

The young Birmingham-based quartet targeted busy shopping centres across the country discreetly swiping luxury products and stuffing them into bags. Pictured left to right: Samariteanca Bucurestean , Angelica Marin, Geanina Stan

The young Birmingham-based quartet targeted busy shopping centres across the country discreetly swiping luxury products and stuffing them into bags. Pictured left to right: Samariteanca Bucurestean , Angelica Marin, Geanina Stan

All eventually pleaded guilty charges of theft and were handed community orders after a judge concluded it was clear 'there are others in control' (pictured at Birmingham Crown Court)

All eventually pleaded guilty charges of theft and were handed community orders after a judge concluded it was clear ‘there are others in control’ (pictured at Birmingham Crown Court)

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Geanina Stan, 22, and Daniella Stoian, 20, initially tried to claim their £4,283 haul in John Lewis in Bristol (pictured) on February 14 were Valentine’s Day gifts for friends

The group targeted four stores in England between November 2019 and last Valentine's Day

The group targeted four stores in England between November 2019 and last Valentine’s Day

‘They visited busy shopping venues where they blatantly stole large quantities of expensive perfume from large stores.

‘They made immediate admissions and showed remorse for their actions. There is an overtone of organisation because their travel was financed.’ 

The court has heard that Marin’s first offence was committed on November 28 of last year where she targeted a branch of Debenhams on Worcester High Street.

She tried to steal £168 of perfume in her bag along with Stoian, but the pair were stopped as they tried to escape through a back exit. Stoian was subsequently fined £80 following sentencing at Worcester Magistrates Court.

Four-month spree of ‘Birmingham gang’ 

November 28, 2019: Angelica Marin and Daniella Stoian tried to steal £168 of perfume from Debenhams on Worcester High Street.

December 21, 2019: Angelica Marin breaks bail and steals £1,450 worth of fragrance from a Boots in Telford with Maria Radu. Radu was handed an eight-month suspended sentence.

January 12, 2020: Geanina Stan and Daniella Stoian tried to steal two Chanel fragrances worth £200 from a Boots in Northampton.

February 14, 2020:  Geanina Stan, Daniella Stoian,Angelica Marin and Samirateanca Bucurestean stole £4,283 worth of perfume from a John Lewis branch in Bristol.

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Marin, meanwhile, was on bail when she targeted a branch of Boots in Telford on December 21 – this time accompanied by Maria Radu. They stole £1,450 worth of fragrance and were stopped by security as they tried to escape. 

Marin reportedly punched the security guard, while Radu later was handed an eight-month suspended sentence.

On January 12, Stan and Stoian went to a Boots in Northampton ‘where their behaviour drew immediate attention because they both carrying large empty bags,’ the court heard.

Miss Scott-Jones said: ‘They were observed removing items from the perfume cabinet and placing them in their bags. Both women then left the store making no attempt to pay for the goods.’

When confronted the two women were found to have two Chanel fragrances worth £200.

Just over a month later all four defendants were captured on CCTV stealing multiple bottles of perfume from John Lewis in Bristol worth £4,283. 

When interviewed, Stan said: ‘I saw the perfume. I liked it. I took the items as gifts for my friends for Valentine’s Day.’  Stoian repeated the claim. 

Bucurestean had tried to justify her involvement in the crime saying she ‘did not know stealing was a crime’.

Sentencing, Judge Sarah Buckingham said: ‘This was a pre-planned operation and an example of organised offending.

‘You travelled the length and breadth of the country carrying out these offences.

‘I am prepared to accept there is little evidence that either of you are part of the planning committee deciding which shops should be targeted and what should be taken. It is perfectly clear there are others in control.’

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The court has heard that Marin’s first offence was committed on November 28 of last year where she targeted a branch of Debenhams on Worcester High Street (pictured)

Angelica Marin breaks bail and steals £1,450 worth of fragrance from a Boots in Telford (pictured) with Maria Radu. Radu was handed an eight-month suspended sentence

Angelica Marin breaks bail and steals £1,450 worth of fragrance from a Boots in Telford (pictured) with Maria Radu. Radu was handed an eight-month suspended sentence

She previously told a court: ‘There is no doubt in my mind that the mischief behind all of this offending has been a plan formulated by someone, or some people, who may or may not include you two, or others unknown to the courts.

‘But someone came up with the idea that a group of women, all known to each other would visit shopping venues across the southwest blatantly stealing large volumes of expensive perfume.

‘The hope behind each of these offences was that if successful these high-value perfumes would be extremely easy to sell on for profit either to be enjoyed by you individually or extended family and others.’

Stan was given a 12-month community order and ordered to do 50 hours of unpaid work after pleading guilty to two charges of theft

Stan was given a 12-month community order and ordered to do 50 hours of unpaid work after pleading guilty to two charges of theft

Lynette McClement, mitigating for Stoian, said she had one child and was 26 weeks pregnant and had spent five weeks on remand.

Haroon Khattak, mitigating for Stan, said she was not employed because of her child caring responsibilities and she was deeply remorseful.

Mr Khattak said: ‘She speaks very little English and her financial means are limited,’ her solicitor said. 

Stan, of Sparkbrook, was given a 12-month community order and ordered to do 50 hours of unpaid work after she pleaded guilty to two charges of theft.

Stoian, of Small Heath, had previously pleaded guilty to theft and was also handed a 12-month community order.

At a previous hearing earlier this month, Marin and Bucurestean also admitted their roles in the gang.

Marin, of Bordesley Green, pleaded guilty to three charges of theft from a shop, assault by beating, and failing to answer to bail.

Last year during a separate shoplift she became abusive and punched a security guard in the face. 

For this she was handed an eight-month suspended sentence earlier this year for theft offences as well as obstructing a police officer. 

And this month she was handed an 18-month community order involving 20 days of rehabilitation activity and 40 hours of unpaid work.

Bucurestean, of Sparkbrook, pleaded guilty to one charge of theft from a shop.

She was given a 12-month community order with 20 days of rehabilitation activity and 30 hours of unpaid work. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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