Connect with us

Main News

Controversial statue of British imperialist Cecil Rhodes may remain in place at Oxford

Published

on

controversial statue of british imperialist cecil rhodes may remain in place at

A statue of Cecil Rhodes may remain in place at Oxford University – as the team deciding its fate admit it is ‘not a foregone conclusion’ that ‘Rhodes would fall’. 

Carole Souter, chair of the Independent Commission of Inquiry into the statue, admitted she ‘can’t say absolutely’ that the sculpture will be removed, despite Oriel College ‘expressing their wish’ to take it down. 

The statue has been shrouded in controversy for several years, with a long-running campaign demanding its removal gaining renewed attention amid the Black Lives Matter movement.

Critics argue the British imperialist paved the way for the apartheid in southern Africa, and raise issue with his time as leader of the Cape Colony from 1890 to 1896.  

Carole Souter, chair of the Independent Commission of Inquiry into the statue, admitted she 'can't say absolutely' that the Cecil Rhodes sculpture (pictured) will be removed

Carole Souter, chair of the Independent Commission of Inquiry into the statue, admitted she 'can't say absolutely' that the Cecil Rhodes sculpture (pictured) will be removed

 Carole Souter, chair of the Independent Commission of Inquiry into the statue, admitted she ‘can’t say absolutely’ that the Cecil Rhodes sculpture (pictured) will be removed

Speaking to the Telegraph, Ms Souter explained ‘there wouldn’t be any point’ of setting up a Commission to investigate the future of the statue ‘if it was already a foregone conclusion.’

She said: ‘If the question had been, “How should we take down the statue?” that wouldn’t have been a question for a Commission, that’s a practical discussion to have within the college or with the relevant planning bodies.

‘But I can’t say absolutely this is what’s going to happen because there would be no point in us gathering and talking about it. It’s not a foregone conclusion in either direction.’ 

Oriel College voted to launch an inquiry into ‘the key issues surrounding the Rhodes statue’ in June, after BLM protesters pulled down a memorial to slave trader Edward Colston in Bristol and threw it in the harbour. 

A statue of Cecil Rhodes, top centre, stands mounted on the facade of Oriel College in Oxford

A statue of Cecil Rhodes, top centre, stands mounted on the facade of Oriel College in Oxford

A statue of Cecil Rhodes, top centre, stands mounted on the facade of Oriel College in Oxford

Demonstrators marched through the streets of Oxford last month as senior administrators met to discuss the future of the Rhodes sculpture

Demonstrators marched through the streets of Oxford last month as senior administrators met to discuss the future of the Rhodes sculpture

 Demonstrators marched through the streets of Oxford last month as senior administrators met to discuss the future of the Rhodes sculpture

But the Independent Commission of Inquiry said earlier this week it will take at least five months to finish its findings. It said that until then, no further action will be taken.

Ms Souter, Master of St Cross College, said: ‘I would like to express my personal gratitude, and that of the governing body of Oriel College, to all of the new commissioners for agreeing to undertake this timely and important work. 

Rhodes Must Fall: A timeline of events 

March 2015:  Students at University of Cape Town begin protest to remove statue.

April 2015: After a vote by the university’s council, the statue is removed

May 2015: A vote is held at Rhodes University, South Africa, to change the name of the university. The vote is defeated.

January 2016: Vote held by Oxford students in Oxford Union, not affiliate to Oxford University, vote to remove the statue.

January 2016: Leaked report reveals the university faces huge funding loss if it removes the statue. 

June 2020: The Rhodes Must Fall campaign is thrown into the spotlight among growing anti-racism protests by the Black Lives Matter movement following the death of American George Floyd.  It gains particular attention following the toppling of a statue to slave trader Edward Colston in Bristol.

Advertisement

‘Each of them has already made a significant contribution to the advancement of knowledge, access and diversity within their relevant sphere of expertise, and I look forward to chairing their discussions on how the Rhodes legacy can best inform the future of Oriel College.’ 

Broadcaster Zeinab Badawi, former Conservative shadow culture secretary Peter Ainsworth and Oriel College’s alumni advisory committee chairman Geoffrey Austin will sit on the inquiry group into the statue and associated issues.  

The Independent Commission, while noting the governing body’s wish to see the Rhodes statue removed, has licence to consider a full range of options.

A public notice will be posted near the statue with details of the Commission and how people can contribute their views.

Written and oral submissions will be requested, and it is intended that some oral evidence sessions will be held in public.

It comes after a long-running campaign demanding the removal of the Rhodes statue gained renewed attention amid the Black Lives Matter movement.

In 2016, Oriel College decided to keep the controversial statue in place following a consultation despite protests from campaigners. 

Critics argue Rhodes paved the way for the apartheid in southern Africa, and raise issue with his time as leader of the Cape Colony, from 1890 to 1896, when government restricted black Africans’ rights by increasing the financial criteria people required in order to vote.

Demonstrators marched through the streets of Oxford last month as senior administrators met to discuss the future of the Rhodes sculpture.

The board decided they want to remove the statue, along with the King Edward Street Plaque, but said the independent commission into the statue had to be set up before any action is taken.

The college said in a statement in June: ‘The Governing Body of Oriel College has today voted to launch an independent Commission of Inquiry into the key issues surrounding the Rhodes statue.’

Who was Cecil Rhodes and why is he so controversial?

Cecil Rhodes, pictured, who died in 1902, was the founder of the De Beers diamond company who was accused of exploiting his black miners. He was also a proponent of racial segregation which led to the Apartheid strategy in South Africa

Cecil Rhodes, pictured, who died in 1902, was the founder of the De Beers diamond company who was accused of exploiting his black miners. He was also a proponent of racial segregation which led to the Apartheid strategy in South Africa

Cecil Rhodes, pictured, who died in 1902, was the founder of the De Beers diamond company who was accused of exploiting his black miners. He was also a proponent of racial segregation which led to the Apartheid strategy in South Africa

Cecil Rhodes was born in Bishop Stortford, Hertfordshire in 1853. He was the son of a vicar. 

Rhodes left England in 1870 for South Africa to work on his brother’s cotton farm. Though he later moved into the diamond business – co-founding De Beers – which at one stage controlled more than 90 per cent of the world’s supply. 

The tycoon had wanted to build a railway from Cairo to Cape Town in order to colonise much of the continent of Africa.  

He had even plans to bring the United States back under Crown control. 

It wasn’t until the 1880s that he attended Oriel College, Oxford, which he left a substantial fund upon his death in 1902. 

He was supported by Queen Victoria in expanding British territory in southern Africa, colonising Northern Rhodesia and Southern Rhodesia – now Zambia and Zimbabwe. 

He once claimed: ‘Why should we not form a secret society with but one object, the furtherance of the British Empire and the bringing of the whole world under British rule, for the recovery of the United States, for making the Anglo-Saxon race but one Empire?’

 He was the Prime Minister of Cape Colony – now South Africa – between 1890 and 1896 and is credited with creating the conditions for the second Boer War. 

In 1895, Rhodes sent British troops into Transvaal, which was an independent Republic, in order to overthrow it’s prime minister Paul Kruger and seize the area’s gold mines. 

The Jameson Raid failed miserably.  

Though, the battle over gold rights in the region led to war in 1899, which lasted for more than three years. 

British troops operated a scorched earth policy, burning farms and placing women and children into concentration camps where thousands died. 

Some 500,000 troops – including soldiers from Australia, New Zealand and Canada were involved in the conflict. 

The conflict claimed the lives of 25,000 Afrikaners – many of them in concentration camps. 

Some 22,000 British troops as well as a further 12,000 Africans died in the conflict.     

Advertisement

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Main News

NHS contact tracing app re-launches TODAY in trials on the Isle of Wight and in east London

Published

on

By

nhs contact tracing app re launches today in trials on the isle of wight and in east london

The NHS Test and Trace smartphone app is being re-launched today with a second round of trials on the Isle of Wight and in the London borough of Newham.

England’s beleaguered app, of which the first version had to be scrapped in June, has now been recreated using technology made by Google and Apple.

Officials are rolling out tests to some staff in the NHS and residents of the two areas to test whether it is good enough to use nationwide.

If the app is found to work it will be used alongside the human contact-tracing system which is based on call centres and local councils visiting people’s homes.  

Bluetooth technology will keep a record of which phones spend 15 minutes within 2metres (6’7″) of one another and then alert people if they have been near someone who later tests positive for Covid-19.

Users will also have an ‘isolation companion’ which has countdown timer if someone has to self-isolate, and will be able to ‘check in’ to places they visit using QR codes.

They will also be shown what the risk level is in their local area based on the first half of their postcode, with places being categorised as low, medium or high risk. 

The app will rely totally on members of the public co-operating, volunteering to let it track their connections and following the instructions it gives them on getting tested and self-isolating.

Despite efforts to iron out flaws in the technology, the Department of Health has admitted that around half of people who are warned they have been near an infected person will actually not have been within the 2m for 15 minutes danger window.

And three out of 10 people who were put at risk – 31 per cent – won’t receive a notification at all. In trials it had a 69 per cent accuracy rate at detecting people who had been at risk, and it was 55 per cent accurate at detecting people who had not.

The announcement of developments in the app comes as data on the manual contact tracing today revealed that test results are getting slower again. 

Statistics showed this morning that around two-thirds of people who got swab tests (67.4 per cent) received their result within 24 hours, down from 76.9 per cent last week. Prime Minister Boris Johnson had promised to have this figure at 100 per cent last month.

The newest version of the app is being launched after the first attempt was abandoned in June because it did not work on Android smartphones.

The NHS’s app — which was originally promised for mid-May and the NHS spent months developing — was unable to spot 25 per cent of nearby Android users and a staggering 96 per cent of iPhones in the Isle of Wight trial.

This was because the Bluetooth system developed by the NHS effectively went into ‘sleep mode’ when the phone screens were locked and developers couldn’t fix the glitch.

HOW IS APPLE AND GOOGLE’S TECHNOLOGY DIFFERENT TO THE FAILED NHS PROJECT? 

It is not clear why the NHS app was so much worse at using Bluetooth to detect other phones than the Apple/Google technology is.

Officials have not explained exactly why or how the new system is better at measuring the distance between two phones, but Apple and Google’s own software appears to work significantly better when the phone’s screen is locked.

The companies make the phone operating systems themselves so are better able to fit the Bluetooth software around that, whereas the NHS was unable to make a program that could prevent the app going into sleep mode. 

The main difference between the two apps is the way they store data.

Both keep a log of who someone has come into close contact with – but the NHS’s app would have kept information in a centralised database, while the Google/Apple app is de-centralised. 

NHS app: Lists on NHS servers 

The NHSX app would create an alert every time two app users came within Bluetooth range of one another and log this in the user’s phone.

Each person would essentially build up a list of everyone they have been in ‘contact’ with. This would be anonymised so the lists were actually just be numbers or codes, not lists of names or addresses. 

If someone was diagnosed with the coronavirus all the app users they got close to during the time that they were considered infectious would receive an alert telling them they have been put at risk of COVID-19 – but it wouldn’t name the person who was diagnosed. 

NHSX insisted it would have deleted people’s data when they get rid of the app, but not data uploaded to the NHS server if they or a contact tested positive.

Apple/Google: Contained on phones

In Apple and Google’s de-centralised approach, meanwhile, the server and list element of this process is removed and the entire log is contained in someone’s phone.

That app works by exchanging a digital ‘token’ with every phone someone comes within Bluetooth range of over a fixed period.

If one person develops symptoms of the coronavirus or tests positive, they will be able to enter this information into the app.

The phone will then send out a notification to all the devices they have exchanged tokens with during the infection window, to make people aware they may have been exposed to COVID-19.

The server database will not be necessary because each phone will keep an individual log of the bluetooth profiles someone has come close to. These will then be linked anonymously to people’s NHS apps and alerts can be pushed through that even after the person is out of bluetooth range.

People can delete their data from this app at any time. 

Advertisement

Different Bluetooth technology made by the phone manufacturers Apple and Google themselves has turned out to be significantly better at detecting other phones.

Officials said the app software now reliably detects 99.3 per cent of nearby app users, regardless of what type of phone they have. 

Another major difference between the two is that Apple and Google’s technology stores the anonymously log of someone’s contacts entirely in the phone – it is never shared with anyone else and can be deleted at any time – whereas the NHS’s worked on a system which meant it had to be sent to a centralised database.

Officials have changed this to squash concerns about privacy, now insisting the app ‘tracks the virus, not people’.

In another improvement to the privacy afforded by the app, it will have a toggle switch for people to turn the contact tracing on or off without uninstalling the app.

People can choose at any time to make the app stop recording connections to other phones.   

And the app will now not send any information to the NHS or the Government – people will only be given advice to self-isolate if they are at risk, or advised to get a test if they have symptoms.

People will have to report a positive test themselves in order to alert people they may have put at risk. 

Once hailed as a vital part of the contact tracing system, the app is now an addition to the human system, officials say.

Dido Harding, the chair of NHS Test and Trace, said: ‘There is no silver bullet when it comes to tackling coronavirus. 

‘The app is a great step forward and will complement all of the work we are doing with local areas across the country to reach more people in their communities and work towards our vision of helping more people get back to the most normal life possible at the lowest risk.

‘I am hugely grateful to the Isle of Wight, Newham and the NHS responders for playing their part.’

Newham was chosen for the mainland trial because it is such a diverse and busy area, Baroness Harding said. 

The London borough has high levels of deprivation and is extremely diverse – white British people make up only 17 per cent of the population and there is no ethnic majority.

It is also very densely populated, home to around 352,000 people, and therefore a ideal for testing the app in a city environment where the risk of infection is higher.

People who use the app will be asked to put in the first half of their postcode so they can be given the risk level for their local area, which will be low, medium or high.

This section will then have links to more information about specific rules if that area has a stricter lockdown than other parts of the country. 

Other features include an isolation timer which will count down day-by-day how long people must stay at home for if they have – or might have – coronavirus.

And people will be able to check in to places they visit using a QR code scanner which will keep of log of where they have been in case they are approached by contact tracers.

It is hoped this will help eliminate problems of people not remembering where they have been or where they may have put strangers at risk and have no way of contacting them. 

The system will be based on venue owners and event organisers ordering and printing their own QR codes online for people to scan when they arrive. 

The announcement that the app will re-enter trials comes as data shows the NHS Test & Trace system is still struggling. 

People who use the app will be asked to put in the first half of their postcode so they can be given the risk level for their local area, which will be low, medium or high

A QR code scanner will be built in so people can scan codes at places they visit to keep a log of where they've been (right)

People who use the app will be asked to put in the first half of their postcode so they can be given the risk level for their local area, which will be low, medium or high (left) and a QR code scanner will be built in so people can scan codes at places they visit to keep a log of where they’ve been (right)

People can report symptoms through the app and it will help them to book a test

If someone has coronavirus symptoms or a positive test they will be able to use a self-isolation countdown timer which tells them how much longer they have to stay at home for

People can report symptoms through the app and it will help them to book a test (left) and if  someone has coronavirus symptoms or a positive test they will be able to use a self-isolation countdown timer which tells them how much longer they have to stay at home for (right) 

A total of 52,735 people who tested positive for Covid-19 in England have had their cases transferred to the NHS Test and Trace contact tracing system since its launch, according to figures from the Department of Health and Social Care.

Of this total, 41,254 people (78.2 per cent) were reached and asked to provide details of recent close contacts, while 9,938 (18.8 per cent) were not reached.

A further 1,543 people (2.9 per cent) could not be reached because their communication details had not been provided.

The figures cover the period from May 28 to August 5. 

The NHS Test and Trace figures also show that, for cases handled by local health protection teams, 97.9 per cent of close contacts of people who tested positive for Covid-19 have been reached and asked to self-isolate.

By contrast, for those cases handled either online or by call centres, 56.7 per cent of close contacts have been reached and asked to self-isolate.

Those figures cover the whole 10-week period of Test and Trace. 

HOW WILL THE NHS TEST & TRACE APP WORK? 

How does the contact logging work?

While the app is running Bluetooth technology will keep a record of which phones spend 15 minutes within 2metres (6’7″) of one another and then alert people if they have been near someone who later tests positive for Covid-19. 

People’s phones are only recognised by the system if they are running the app themselves – it cannot detect others.

The contacts it keeps track of are all anonymous and phones exchange digital ‘tokens’ with every app-using phone within Bluetooth range.

If one person develops symptoms of the coronavirus or tests positive, they will be able to enter this information into the app.

The phone will then send out a notification to all the devices they have exchanged tokens with during the infection window, to make people aware they may have been exposed to COVID-19.

Each phone keeps an individual log of the Bluetooth profiles someone has come close to. These will then be linked anonymously to people’s NHS apps and alerts can be pushed through that even after the person is out of bluetooth range.

People can delete their data from this app at any time.

Will the app tell me what to do?

The app can only react to data that people put into it, and it will only ever offer guidance. If a user reports that they have symptoms of coronavirus – a new continuous cough, a fever, or a changed sense of smell or taste, they will be urged to self-isolate for 10 days from the start of the symptoms and to get tested.

If they test positive for Covid-19 at any time, they should report this to the app. The app then sends out an anonymous alert to everyone with whom that person has been within 2m (6’7″) of for 15 minutes or more since they started feeling ill. 

That person may then be asked to self-isolate or to get tested if they feel unwell.

28003926 8623381 image a 44 1597327271366

 

Why does it want my postcode? 

People who use the app will be asked to put in the first half of their postcode so they can be given the risk level for their local area, which will be low, medium or high.

This section will then have links to more information about specific rules if that area has a stricter lockdown than other parts of the country.

The first half of someone’s postcode is too vague to pinpoint their personal location. They usually are the same for thousands of houses in the same area or for entire towns and villages. No location data is shared with the NHS or Government.

What is the QR code scanner for? 

People will be able to check in to places they visit using a QR code scanner which will keep of log of where they have been in case they are approached by contact tracers.

It is hoped this will help eliminate problems of people not remembering where they have been or where they may have put strangers at risk and have no way of contacting them. 

The system will be based on venue owners and event organisers ordering and printing their own QR codes online for people to scan when they arrive.

It is understood that this will create a log only for people’s personal reference and that information will not be shared with venues or officials.

Advertisement

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Main News

East London street gets brightly-coloured mural makeover

Published

on

By

east london street gets brightly coloured mural makeover

A street in east London has been transformed after being hand-painted over the past six weeks to give it a colourful boost. 

The London Mural Company used more than 600 litres of paint and 200 spray cans to transform Aberfeldy Street, Poplar, in a bid to kickstart the retail businesses forced to close due to coronavirus.  

There are still a few more things to do before the street is finished, with new lighting, pavement maintenance and shop signage due to be completed by the end of this month. 

A view of the Aberfeldy Street in Poplar, east London, before the transformation
A view of Aberfeldy Street in Poplar, east London, after the transformation using 600 litres of paint and 200 spray cans to give it a colourful boost
Slide me

The London Mural Company transformed Aberfeldy Street in Poplar, east London, by using more than 600 litres of paint and 200 spray cans to give it a colourful boost

Creative director of the London Mural Company Stewart Chromik said it was inspired by the Bangladeshi kantha tradition of recycling old textiles to create something new

Creative director of the London Mural Company Stewart Chromik said it was inspired by the Bangladeshi kantha tradition of recycling old textiles to create something new

Creative director of the London Mural Company Stewart Chromik said it was inspired by the Bangladeshi kantha tradition of recycling old textiles to create something new

A view of the street before the transformation
A view of the entire street after the transformation
Slide me

Each building in the street is painted a different colour and with a different pattern, which were donated by the community

The walls and shutters have all been painted with colourful designs and patterns

There are a few more things, such as new lighting and shop signage, to do before its finished

The walls and shutters have all been painted with colourful designs and patterns with a few more things, such as new lighting and shop signage, to do before it is finished

There are still a few more things to do before the street is finished, with new lighting, pavement maintenance and shop signage due to be completed by the end of this month. 

Creative director of The London Mural Company Stewart Chromik said: ‘We had spent a previous six weeks hand painting and stencilling a huge range of designs across the buildings, flats, shops, shutters and stall risers.

‘We were contacted by Jan Kattein Architects just under a year ago.

‘They had been approached to transform the building frontages of Aberfeldy Street with a patchwork of colours and patterns. 

The team have spent the previous six weeks hand painting and stencilling on the shop fronts, shutters and flats in the street

The team have spent the previous six weeks hand painting and stencilling on the shop fronts, shutters and flats in the street

Two members of The London Mural Company hold the stencil up on one of the shop shutters and hand paint the design onto it

Two members of The London Mural Company hold the stencil up on one of the shop shutters and hand paint the design onto it

‘Inspired by Bangladeshi Kantha tradition of recycling old textiles to create something new and with patterns donated by the local community the aim was to celebrate the cultural identity of the local people – making this one of the most colourful streets in East London.

‘Working with meanwhilespace.com the unused stores on the street have been re-fitted providing new business owners and start-up companies the opportunity to apply to rent the spaces with a host of incentives.

‘We worked closely alongside Cuttle Construction, so on site around 15 people involved with painting. 

31904468 8623153 image a 82 1597318926718
31901374 8623153 image a 83 1597318926756
Slide me

Mr Chromik said the unused stores on the street have been taken over by new owners and start-up companies

All of the buildings are painted with a different colour and pattern

15 people were involved with the painting of the project

All of the buildings are painted with a different colour and pattern in the project where 15 people were painting

The project was completed in a bid to kickstart buisnesses

Businesses had been closed during the coronavirus pandemic

The project was completed in a bid to kickstart businesses which had been closed during the coronavirus pandemic

Each building on is decorated with a different colour and a different pattern, with some in yellow, purple and pink

Each building on is decorated with a different colour and a different pattern, with some in yellow, purple and pink

Mr Chromik said there are still some things to be done before the project is completed but it should be finished by the end of August

Mr Chromik said there are still some things to be done before the project is completed but it should be finished by the end of August

‘I couldn’t give an approximate amount but it’s definitely been well over 600 litres and over 200 spray cans.

‘The site is still undergoing work, with new lighting, pavement maintenance, and shop signage aiming to be completed by the end of August.

‘I think it looks fantastic, Jan Kattein have really transformed the street with their designs and direction.

‘The feedback from the local residents and community was extremely encouraging and positive throughout. It was definitely an inspiring project to be involved with.’

One of the flats has been painted with yellow, pink and navy blue paint with the railings outside yellow with blue, pink and red shapes

One of the flats has been painted with yellow, pink and navy blue paint with the railings outside yellow with blue, pink and red shapes

The London Mural Company said the paintings were completed by hand by a team of 15 who worked closely with Cuttle Construction

The London Mural Company said the paintings were completed by hand by a team of 15 who worked closely with Cuttle Construction

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Main News

Empty plot of land overlooking Poole Harbour on sale for £3.5m

Published

on

By

empty plot of land overlooking poole harbour on sale for 3 5m

A wealthy buyer has purchased a 30ft strip of grass with a view of the exclusive resort of Sandbanks for an astonishing £3.5million. 

The empty plot of land with overgrown grass and uneven concrete runs down to the edge of Poole Harbour in Dorset.

It has one of the finest views of the Millionaire’s Row – where mansion homes sell for up to £10million. It also has a slipway for launching boats straight onto the water.

The new owner who paid the full asking price for the plot will have to obtain planning permission before they can build their own luxury pad. It is thought the build cost would be in excess of £1million.

The empty plot of land with overgrown grass and uneven concrete, pictured, sits behind two houses and has one of the finest views of the Millionaire's Row in Sandbanks, Dorset

The empty plot of land with overgrown grass and uneven concrete, pictured, sits behind two houses and has one of the finest views of the Millionaire’s Row in Sandbanks, Dorset

An aerial view of the empty plot of land, highlighted, which sold for £3.5m after the new owner paid the full asking price for the area which has a slipway for launching boats into the water

An aerial view of the empty plot of land, highlighted, which sold for £3.5m after the new owner paid the full asking price for the area which has a slipway for launching boats into the water

The mind-boggling figures are par for the course for the Sandbanks area, which is the fourth most expensive place in the world to buy property – behind London, Manhattan and Tokyo.

And although this half-an-acre plot is about a mile from the exclusive peninsula, seafront properties around the harbour remain in huge demand.

It is thought the ongoing uncertainty of Brexit and coronavirus is leading to people looking to buy holiday homes here than abroad.

London-based buyers are also now said to be casting their net further from the capital as the Covid-19 pandemic has shown they can work from home.

Tom Doyle, of Sandbanks estate agents Lloyds Property Group, which sold the plot, said: ‘To anybody outside the area it might seem madness to pay £3.5m for a vacant plot of land.

‘But people pay a premium for water frontage property and houses on that road sell for between £6-£7m. It does attract high net-worth individuals.

‘It is a very vibrant market at the moment. Why is that? A lot of people are thinking seriously about not having a second home abroad and focussing on securing something exciting in the UK.

‘Working and living away from London is also a factor. The mindset seems to be to go into the city one day a week and then work from home for the rest of it.’

An aerial view of Sandbanks with the plot of land towards the top left, in the distance. It comes as London-based buyers are now said to be casting their net further from the capital

An aerial view of Sandbanks with the plot of land towards the top left, in the distance. It comes as London-based buyers are now said to be casting their net further from the capital

He added: ‘The new owner is going to build a house there himself to live in.. He will not be putting it back up for sale when it is complete. He already lives locally but he wants a house on the water which is what this will be.’

The plot is on Dorset Lake Avenue and faces south west.

On its website, Lloyds Property Group states that it is ‘prime waterfront location’ on the ‘gateway to Sandbanks’.

Prices in the area have soared, with prospective buyers even able to get more for their money in the exclusive London neighbourhood of Mayfair. 

Sandbanks’ popularity is attributed to its seclusion, and every home in the community is within just a few minutes’ walk of the beach, with most of them enjoying stunning views over the harbour or out to the English Channel.

An aerial view of Poole Harbour and the plot of land, pictured far right. The area is the fourth most expensive place in the world to buy property - behind London, Manhattan and Tokyo

An aerial view of Poole Harbour and the plot of land, pictured far right. The area is the fourth most expensive place in the world to buy property – behind London, Manhattan and Tokyo

Houses were first built on Sandbanks in the late 19th century, but it was not until the 1960s when a property boom saw the peninsula – measuring less than half a square mile – become more and more built-up, turning into a Millionaires’ Row filled with luxury beachfront mansions.

The property market on the peninsula has shot through the roof in recent years, with many houses being demolished and replaced with cutting-edge new properties to meet demand.

In July 2009 a 14,990 sq ft (1,393-square-metre) empty plot of land on the peninsula was put up for sale for £13.5million – the equivalent of nearly £10,000 per square metre.

In May 2014, a bungalow bought for just £1,000 almost a century ago (around £40,000 in today’s money) and now a luxury holiday home was reported to be now worth £5million – a 500,000 percent increase in value.

Earlier in 2014 a tatty 1950s three-bedroom Sandbanks bungalow which would be worth just £200,000 in most other parts of the country went on sale for an eye-watering £2.25million.

In 2013, 15 homes were sold for a combined total of £80million as Sandbanks’ reputation has continued to grow. 

Millionaire’s Row: An exclusive stretch of real estate home to Harry Redknapp and Russian millionaire Maxim Demin that was once named the most expensive in the world

The Sandbanks peninsula in Dorset has become a millionaire’s playground in recent years, and continues to keep even the likes of Miami and Monte Carlo off the top of a list of ultimate waterfront destinations.

An 850ft stretch of road in one the UK’s most exclusive enclaves contains just 13 harbourside mansions that total a staggering £93million in value. 

The narrow plots measuring between 40ft and 60ft wide on Panorama Road previously made it the most expensive piece of coastline in the world in terms of price per square foot. 

Maxim Demin, the Russian millionaire owner of Premier League club AFC Bournemouth, lives in the luxurious area.

Former Tottenham manager and 2019 I’m a Celebrity winner Harry Redknapp also lives around the corner.

The 13 properties in Sandbanks which together are worth some £93m

The 13 properties in Sandbanks which together are worth some £93m

The mansions on the peninsula in Poole Harbour, Dorset, offer unrivalled views over the world’s second biggest natural harbour. 

There is almost total privacy at the front of the properties while back gardens run down to the water’s edge.

Such is the ‘super-prime level’ of the Sandbanks market, two ultra-modern properties with indoor swimming pools were once snapped up in quick succession for a combined £15.6m.

One, a sprawling state-of-the-art mansion, sold for more than £8m, while the other sold for £7.5m before the sales brochure had come out.

Adrian Dunford, of Sandbanks estate agents Tailor Made, said in 2018: ‘We now believe this part of Sandbanks is the most expensive stretch of coastline on the planet in terms of price-per-square foot. 

‘The multi-million pound mansions in Miami and Monte Carlo will be on much bigger plots of land than you get on Sandbanks.

‘The thing about Sandbanks is that it is a peninsula and so we are hemmed in. You can’t increase the number of properties and so supply and demand dictate the prices.

‘That row of properties is located in the most enviable part of Sandbanks. The houses have direct water access and also overlook the busiest part of the harbour.

‘The south westerly aspect allows for sensational views to Old Harry Rocks, Poole Harbour, Brownsea Island and the Purbeck Hills.

‘Sometimes with the bigger, headline-priced properties you need two summers to sell them.

‘So to have two at the very top end of the market go as quickly as they have says an awful lot about the state of the local market.

‘The properties were bought by London-based buyers and that maybe a reflection of what is happening with the Brexit.’

Advertisement

The changing face of Sandbanks: How windswept wasteland cut off from the rest of the country became one of the world’s most sought-after addresses

Before the rich and famous moved in: Parkstone-on-Sea as it was then known, went from a deserted landscape to Britain's answer to Monte Carlo

Before the rich and famous moved in: Parkstone-on-Sea as it was then known, went from a deserted landscape to Britain’s answer to Monte Carlo

Just 100 years ago, before it became one of the world’s most exclusive and expensive addresses, the Sandbanks peninsula in Dorset was little more than a windswept wasteland, cut off from the rest of the country and unrecognisable from the glossy coastal resort that exists today.

And while the mega-rich now compete to build bigger and better harbour-front homes, snapping up plots whenever they become available, in 1880 the tiny enclave in Poole was only home to a solitary hotel on the southern tip of the peninsula, where guests could get away from the rest of civilisation.

Sandbanks, or Parkstone-on-Sea as it was known, has gone from a deserted landscape to Britain’s answer to Monte Carlo.

A proper roadway linking the peninsula to the mainland was only laid after the First World War at a time when many former servicemen returned from battle only to find themselves out of work.

The highway made Sandbanks more accessible and it naturally started to become popular among holidaymakers and daytrippers.

Larger houses started to be built on the previously unspoiled land, with a wealthy banker and father-of-eight, Dr Edward Andreae, becoming Sandbanks’ first property magnate by building eight homes on the peninsula – one for each of his children.

Descendents of the family still own one of the properties built by Dr Andreae, who was of German descent.

Another wealthy type who built and owned a principal residence was Lord Leonard Lyle MP, the chairman of sugar giant Tate and Lyle.

The sand dunes in the middle of the peninsula once stood at up to 100ft high but they were gradually flattened as bigger, permanent houses were built in the years between the two world wars.

However, the area’s progress was halted by the Second World War when it became a fortified military base and it took until the 1960s for development on the peninsula to really take off.

The remaining empty plots along the waterside were snapped up by buyers, and some of the older properties were demolished and built on.

Although Sandbanks was a very prosperous place, it remained relatively affordable to locals with flats selling for less than £100,000 in the 1980s.

But some canny marketing in the 1990s by local estate agents put Sandbanks on the world map and transformed it overnight from a picturesque coastal suburb to Poole to something of a millionaire’s row.

Advertisement

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.