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Coronavirus lockdown: R rates ARE reducing in some Tier 3 areas

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coronavirus lockdown r rates are reducing in some tier 3 areas

Infection rates in some Tier 3 areas are finally beginning to fall – but most are still facing rising figures, data shows.    

Liverpool, which entered the strictest Tier 3 lockdown on October 14, has seen a 21% drop in the rate of Covid infections in the most recent week, according to figures from Public Health England’s weekly surveillance report.

Recent data suggests the harsh restrictions — which ban socialising with anyone outside your own household and mean many businesses have to close — are beginning to work, but scientists say the true effect won’t be clear until a few weeks have passed. 

The city, along with Halton, Knowsley, Sefton, Sheffield and St Helens are among the Tier 3 areas that have seen a drop in the infection rate recently – but the majority of those hit by the harshest restrictions are still seeing rises in the rate of transmission. 

The rate in Liverpool from Week 43 (October 19-25) was still a worrying 462% – but this represents a drop of one-fifth from the 584% of the previous week, indicating that Liverpudlians may have finally passed the peak of this wave. 

St Helens in Merseyside, which went into Tier 3 on October 14, was another area to see a drop in the infection rate. The most recent week’s figure is 3.80% less than in the previous week – 421%, down from 437%, and still lower than the 443% in week 41 – the apparent peak.

The town suffered an explosion in the infection rate from 6% in week 35 (late August) to 50% in week 36.

Sefton, another October 14 lockdown, saw a drop of 12% in the weekly rate, and Sheffield, which entered Tier 3 on October 24, saw a small drop of 2% in the rate.  

Halton and Knowsley both entered Tier 3 on October 14, and each saw a drop of 7% and 18% respectively. 

Knowsley’s rate had exploded from 11% in week 35 to 51% in week 36 (early September), and kept increasing until an apparent peak in week 41 (early October) of 700%. The following week the rate was 663%, and the week after it was 542%.

While these areas spark hope for an end to the threat of Covid – and the draconian restrictions brought into to try and combat it – many areas now under the harshest lockdown are still facing explosive rises in infection rates. 

Almost 60 per cent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be under stricter rules by Monday

Almost 60 per cent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be under stricter rules by Monday

Percentage change in coronavirus cases across London in the week to October 25: The five local authorities where the infection rate grew the most are: Kingston upon Hull City, 92.81 per cent; Derby, 91.84 per cent; North Somerset, 82.99 per cent; Medway, 77.17 per cent; and Bath and North East Somerset 69.72 per cent

 Percentage change in coronavirus cases across London in the week to October 25: The five local authorities where the infection rate grew the most are: Kingston upon Hull City, 92.81 per cent; Derby, 91.84 per cent; North Somerset, 82.99 per cent; Medway, 77.17 per cent; and Bath and North East Somerset 69.72 per cent

Blackburn with Darwen, which entered Tier 3 on October 16, has seen a 34.30% growth in the infection rate over the most recent week. The latest rate is a staggering 774%, up from 576% the previous week and 446% the week before.  

Doncaster, which was locked into Tier 3 on October 24, saw a 46% growth in the rate in the most recent week. The latest figure is 513%, up from 350% the week before, and 220% the week before that. 

TIER 3 AREAS THAT ARE SEEING IMPROVEMENTS – AND THOSE STILL STRUGGLING 

Below is a list of areas the entered Tier 3 restrictions before October 30, followed by when they entered Tier 3 (T3), and the most recent change in the weekly coronavirus infection rate: 

DECREASES:

Halton; entered Tier 3 (T3) on October 14; down 7.95% 

Knowsley; T3 on October 14; down 18.18%

Liverpool; T3 on October 14; down 20.98% 

Sefton; T3 on October 14; down 12.54%  

Sheffield; T3 on October 24; down 2.46%  

St Helens; T3 on October 14; down 3.80%  

INCREASES:   

Barnsley; T3 on October 24; up 9.12% 

Blackburn; T3 on October 16; up 34.30% 

Bolton; T3 on October 23; up 23.60% 

Blackpool; T3 on October 16; up 0.34%   

Bury; T3 on October 23; up 22.26% 

Doncaster; T3 on October 24; up 46.44% 

Lancashire; October 16; up 10.01% 

Manchester; T3 on October 23; up 10.75% 

Nottinghamshire; T3 on October 14; up 19.38% 

Oldham; T3 on October 23; up 41.22% 

Rochdale; T3 on October 23; up 12.81%  

Rotherham; T3 October 24; up 27.71

Salford; T3 October 23; up 18.88% 

Stockport; T3 on October 23; up 32.05% 

Tameside; T3 on October 23; up 38.41% 

Trafford; T3 on October 23; up 31.27%   

Warrington; T3 on October 27; up 16.67% 

Wigan; T3 on October 23; up 42.40%  

Wirral; T3 on October 14; up 5.78% 

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The area had been under control for many weeks, with a rate below 10% for around two months – until an explosion in the rate around Week 36, with exponential growth ever since. 

Oldham, which only last week entered Tier 3 on October 23, still endured a brutal 41% growth in the infection rate in the most recent week – 662%, up from 469%.  

Experts have insisted that it is too early to tell if the tough measures have truly worked, but the figures will add to growing pressure for tougher lockdown rules to be used in the South, which has so far largely escaped anything harsher than the Tier One social distancing laws.    

Scientists warned infections are ‘speeding up’ in the South and a worrying Government-funded study by Imperial College London found that the outbreak appears to be growing fastest in London and the South West, where rules are comparatively lax. 

Although the situation is not as bad yet in the southern regions – there are fewer people testing positive or being admitted to hospital – ministers face growing pressure to act early and stop surging outbreaks before they become disastrous. 

Dr David Nabarro, of the World Health Organization (WHO), praised the UK Government’s decision to impose local measures, claiming they have been ‘very effective’ in some parts of the North.

But he warned in the South infections are ‘speeding up’ on BBC Radio 4, adding: ‘This will mean of course the Government in Britain, like other governments in Europe, will be thinking “do we need to have some sort of over-arching position in the country, with tougher restricions?”‘. 

Delays in processing Covid-19 tests mean it is only possible to see the impact of Tier Three up to October 21, the latest day for which local authorities infection rates are available. The infection rate has been released up to October 23 on the Government’s experimental website, but is yet to be finalised.

It comes after a Government-led study revealed the R rate – how many people an infected person spreads the virus to on average – has begun to decline in the North West, where millions are living under Tier Three curbs.

The rate may have dropped as low as 0.72 for the week ending October 25, the academics said, a significant decline from the previous week’s lowest value of 1.12 and the first sign the outbreak in the region may be falling. 

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) has called for a new national lockdown to curb the spread of the virus, but Housing Minister Robert Jenrick today insisted the Government would avoid the potentially ruinous measure saying you ‘can’t stop-start a country’.

Lockdown critics have warned another one would be ‘catastrophic’ for the country and the ‘final nail in the coffin’ for many businesses that are ‘on their last legs’. 

Most of the authorities where epidemics have grown the most remain in Tier One, where only the rule of six and 10pm curfew apply. Scientists have argued these rules are not stringent enough to shrink the outbreak, with top Government advisers warning the current growth is ‘very bleak’.  

For example, North Somerset and Bath and North East Somerset, where cases jumped up 83 per cent and 70 per cent in one week, have yet to be hit by any tougher virus-controlling restrictions.  

Public Health England’s weekly surveillance report revealed only 20 of all 150 authorities in England saw a drop in infections last week, including Nottingham where cases dropped by 30 per cent. Despite the city’s outbreak shrinking, it will be thrown under the toughest Tier Three restrictions from tomorrow, along with the rest of the county.

WHERE DID THE INFECTION RATE GROW THE MOST? 

Kingston upon Hull, City of 92.81%

Derby 91.84%

North Somerset 82.99%

Medway 77.17%

Bath and North East Somerset 69.72%

South Gloucestershire 62.13%

Herefordshire, County of 58.10%

Derbyshire 57.98%

Stoke-on-Trent 56.79%

Lincolnshire 55.26%

Staffordshire 55.21%

Leicestershire 54.29%

Southampton 54.02%

Brighton and Hove 52.57%

Milton Keynes 50.88%

Swindon 49.99%

East Riding of Yorkshire 49.32%

Dudley 49.07%

West Sussex 46.89%

Leicester 46.57%

 

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WHERE DID THE INFECTION RATE GROW THE LEAST? 

Nottingham -30.00%

Liverpool -20.98%

York -20.25%

Windsor and Maidenhead -20.09%

Knowsley -18.18%

County Durham -15.51%

Sefton -12.54%

Rutland -11.63%

Devon -11.12%

Camden -10.03%

Halton -7.95%

South Tyneside -5.35%

Hackney and City of London -4.60%

Richmond upon Thames -3.96%

St. Helens -3.80%

Hartlepool -3.68%

Slough -3.02%

Sheffield -2.46%

Leeds -1.22%

Newcastle upon Tyne -0.42%

 

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Ministers are understood to analyse a ‘basket’ of indicators to make decisions on Covid-19 restrictions, including the infection rate, hospital admissions and speed of growth. 

Dominic Raab says Government is ‘ready’ for TIER FOUR COVID restrictions 

Dominic Raab today hinted the Government could introduce a new Tier Four set of even stricter coronavirus restrictions as he refused to rule out a national lockdown. 

The Government’s current local lockdown system is based on three tiers but there are fears that even the most draconian rules in Tier Three are not enough to stop the spread of the disease. 

A new Tier Four could see non-essential shops told to close and travel limited to getting to work and school. 

Mr Raab said the Government is ‘always ready for further measures’ as he insisted ministers intend to stick to their localised approach of cracking down on infections. 

But the Foreign Secretary admitted that both Germany and France had also used a strategy of local crackdowns before ultimately being forced into new nation shutdowns. 

He would only go so far as saying the Government is ‘striving to avoid’ following the UK’s European neighbours as he resisted imposing a ‘blanket approach or a blunt approach’. 

Mr Raab told the BBC’s Radio 4 Today programme: ‘We are always ready for further measures that we can take but I think the most important thing about further measures is we continue on the track that we are on of targeting the virus.

‘The difference between now and the first lockdown is we are in a much better place to really focus on where the virus is the greatest and I think that is right, not only in scientific and virus management terms, I think in terms of the way people feel about tackling the virus it is fair, it fits the natural justice that we are focusing on the areas where the uptick is the greatest and we are not taking a one-size-fits-all approach or a blanket approach or a blunt approach.’

Mr Raab said the Government wanted to avoid the ‘arbitrariness of a blanket approach’ as he claimed the public favour targeted restrictions. 

However, he did not rule out eventually having to impose a national lockdown after France and Germany made the move earlier this week. 

He said: ‘You mention France. France of course tried a localised approach and then fell back on the national approach.

‘What I think that shows you, Germany is the same, is how important it is that we all rally together at local level through to national level, communities, local leaders, national leaders, and really lean in to the localised focused approach.

‘That is the most effective way to tackle the virus and avoid the blanket approach which I don’t think would be in the best interests of this country and which we are striving to avoid.’

Mr Raab said it is ‘crucially important’ to ‘carry the public with us’ and that he believed the Government’s tiered approach is the best way to do that. 

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South Gloucestershire, in the south west, and Herefordshire in the West Midlands, also saw their outbreaks rapidly grow in the space of one week, by around 60 per cent. However, their infection rates are also lower than the national average and currently stand at 192 and 86, respectively.

The figures indicate the ‘second wave’ is now affecting all corners of England, and not just the north.   

Scientists warned this week infections are ‘speeding up’ in the south.

A worrying Government-funded study by Imperial College London found that the outbreak appears to be growing fastest in London and the South West, where rules are comparatively lax, and slowest in the northern regions with the toughest restrictions. 

They predicted the R rate — the average number of people each carrier infects — is also higher than two in the South East, East and South West, which have mostly escaped any tough local lockdowns.  

But the R rate in the capital is higher than anywhere else in England, at three. For comparison, the experts claimed the national R rate is around 1.6. Cases are doubling every three days compared to every nine days in the rest of England, the study claimed.  

The PHE data shows just 20 out of 149 councils recorded a fall in their Covid-19 infection rates in the week ending October 25. For comparison, 23 saw a dip the week before. 

A  number of large cities saw their infection rates drop in the week to October 25. This includes Nottingham (down 30 per cent), Liverpool (down 21 per cent), Sheffield (down 2.46 per cent) and Leeds (down 1.22 per cent).

But despite this, Nottingham and Leeds will be plunged into Tier Three restrictions this weekend. And there are no clear path for Liverpool and Sheffield to move out of their local ‘lockdowns’.

Liverpool, and the rest of Merseyside including Halton, Knowsley, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral, went straight into Tier Three when the tiered system came into force on October 14. All those places saw infection rates drop in the most recent week, other than Wirral, where cases only rose by 6 per cent. 

A number of places under Tier Two also saw drops in infection rates, including York (20 per cent), South Tyneside (5 per cent) and Newcastle upon Tyne (down a slight 0.42 per cent).

Parts of London — Camden (down 10 per cent), Hackney and City of London (down 4.60 per cent) and Richmond upon Thames (down 3.96 per cent) — also saw improvements in infection rates. These areas have some of the highest infection rates in London, suggesting that residents have acted to control the coronavirus.

But it’s understood London could be thrown into Tier Three lockdown within two weeks unless infection rates drop significantly across the whole capital. 

Londoners are currently banned from meeting indoors with anyone they don’t live with. 

However London Mayor Sadiq Khan is piling on pressure on No10 to drag the city into Tier Three, despite infection rates varying across the 32 different boroughs – from 223 positive tests per 100,000 people in Ealing over the most recent week, to 103 per 100,000 in Lewisham. 

It comes after the Government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) reportedly said this week all of England could be in Tier Three lockdown by mid-December if a national lockdown is not adopted before.

They said virus rates all over the country will soar past the levels seen in areas already put into the ‘very high’ category by the festive season, The Sun reported, with ‘a government source’ saying: ‘The latest Sage numbers are utterly bleak.’

SAGE has piled fresh pressure on Boris Johnson to impose tougher restrictions as it warned up to 85,000 people could die in a second wave. A ‘reasonable worst case scenario’ put forward by SAGE suggested daily deaths could remain above 500 for three months or more until March next year.

London ‘will go into Tier 3 lockdown in two weeks’ as Britain faces a super-spreader Christmas

London could be plunged into Tier 3 lockdown within two weeks as England creeped closer towards full national lockdown by the back door last night, with millions told they will face extra curbs.    

Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays, and sources close so Sadiq Khan expect the capital to be locked down imminently.

Senior figures are warning that the UK’s three-tier system is not enough to ‘get on top of the numbers’, with deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam reportedly beginning to change his mind over whether regional lockdowns will suppress the virus . He backed the move at a No 10 press conference last week

Presenting what one source called ‘very, very bleak’ data to a meeting of Covid-O, the the Cabinet subcommittee on coronavirus, he said that daily hospital admissions had reached the highest level since April at 1,404.  

There are fears that the whole country will be at Tier 3 by Christmas, and unable to meet extended family members unless the Government takes harsh, draconian action before the season.

Allowing people to visit family at Christmas will be a ‘spreader event’ that could cause a spike in infections many times worse than that caused by the return of university students, experts believe. 

But introducing national restrictions before and after Christmas, while lifting them for the big day could help minimise the impact. 

One senior health official told the Telegraph that anti-Covid measures were most likely to be successful if they were taken on a national basis rather than toughening up the rules for Tier 3. 

They added that a post-Christmas ‘circuit-breaker’ lockdown could also help reverse numbers and curb rising numbers of hospitalisations as fears spread that Britain’s ICUs could be overrun.

‘Releasing measures for two days is unlikely to cause a big upswing,’ a source said.’ But it won’t do nothing. Christmas brings people from all over the country to sit inside together, so its quite likely to be a spreading event.

‘But people want to see their loved ones and they want to make physical contact, and we have to recognise that.’ 

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Independent experts told MailOnline it’s likely most of the places in England that are in Tier One will move into Tier Two by Christmas because the Rule of Six and 10pm curfew are not enough to stamp out rising infections. 

Martin McKee, a professor of European public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and member of Independent Sage, said: ‘We unfortunately have allowed the infection to get out of control and as a consequence we are going to need to turn this around, otherwise it will just keep going up, more will get seriously ill and more people will die.

‘The sooner we impose tighter restrictions, the better. I see MPs saying “the rates are low in my area so we shouldn’t do anything”. It’s not about if case are low, it’s about if they are increasing rapidly. 

‘We saw very clearly in March that it’s better sooner than later. So we really should be doing this now, we really have no time to lose.’

But Professor McKee stressed that with tighter restrictions, three essential things are needed — a clampdown on indoor social mixing where the virus can spread easily, mental health support, and a working test and trace system. Currently the UK’s NHS Test and Trace is not performing to the ‘world beating’ status that was promised.

Professor McKee added: ‘As long as infections are going up, we have a major problem. Simply because of the nature of exponential growth. It’s a simple nature of mathematics. Even if the infections are going up even slightly, the rate of growth will go upwards faster. 

‘On the other hand, if we can put in really stringent measure to stop people mixing with each other, you can get a large drop in quite a short period of time.

Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease expert at the University of East Anglia, said: ‘The Tier One restrictions are clearly not working in terms of suppressing the epidemic. I suspect the government would decide to increase, in most areas of the country, will at least move into Tier Two in the next month. And some of the current Tier Two will move into Tier Three. 

‘The interesting thing is it’s not going up quite as quickly in the northern cities as it was. And in some of those cities, such as Liverpool, it does seem to be declining a bit already.

‘I think it’s a little too early to say whether these Tier Two/Tier Three levels are not working. The bottom line is the higher restrictions may be working but it’s too early to be sure.

‘In the southern small town rural areas, that’s where a lot of the current increases are at the moment. It’s very obvious cases are increasing in the south now. Pretty much everywhere in between is on the up.

‘The issue is what time will they decide that is no longer acceptable or tolerable and then increase restrictions in those areas.’

Simon Clarke, an associate professor in cellular microbiology at University of Reading, said: ‘Are local restriction enough? They should be, but the problem is not so much going from Tier Two to Three, but going from One to Two. We know in certain parts of the country that is not happening quickly enough.

‘My gut feeling is we are heading for tightening restrictions between now and into the new year. I think that it will be something like Tier Three or perhaps tighter. I think we will get a tier 4 added on top. But it’s just a guess.’ 

Britain is slowly creeping one step closer to a de facto lockdown every day, with the UK confirming another 23,065 positive test results and 280 deaths yesterday.

Cases are up 8.6 per cent on the 21,242 announced last Thursday, while deaths have increased by 48 per cent in the same time. 

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Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays

Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays

Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays, and sources close so Sadiq Khan expect the capital to be locked down imminently.

Senior figures are warning that the UK’s three-tier system is not enough to ‘get on top of the numbers’, with deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam reportedly beginning to change his mind over whether regional lockdowns will suppress the virus . He backed the move at a No 10 press conference last week

Presenting what one source called ‘very, very bleak’ data to a meeting of Covid-O, the the Cabinet subcommittee on coronavirus, he said that daily hospital admissions had reached the highest level since April at 1,404. 

Allowing people to visit family at Christmas will be a spreader event that could cause a spike in infections many times worse than that caused by the return of university students, experts believe.

But introducing national restrictions before and after Christmas, while lifting them for the big day could help minimise the impact. 

Almost 60 per cent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be under stricter rules by Monday, and it is understood London could be moved into the top tier in two weeks unless infection rates drop significantly.

Sixteen areas will move into the ‘high risk’ Tier Two at midnight including Oxford, Luton, East Riding of Yorkshire, Kingston Upon Hull, Derbyshire Dales, Derby and Staffordshire.

That means that more than 21.6 million face the restrictions that include a ban on socialising indoors with anyone from another household, whether at home or in bars, restaurants and cafes. 

A further 11 million will be in the ‘very high risk’ Tier Three from midnight on Sunday when Leeds and the rest of West Yorkshire are added to the places where pubs are closed unless serving food.

This will leave only 23.7million without enhanced restrictions.

With tougher restrictions in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, it means just over three-fifths of the UK population are living under extra lockdown restrictions.

HOW HAVE INFECTION RATES CHANGED IN YOUR AREA? 
Local authority name Sept 21 to 27 Sept 28 to Oct 4 Change Oct 5 to 11 Change Oct 12 to 18 Change Oct 19 to 25 Change
Barking and Dagenham 62 63.41 39.18% 98.17 54.82% 119.3 21.52% 131.51 10.23%
Barnet 43.2 86.39 267.77% 110.64 28.07% 114.68 3.65% 140.7 22.69%
Barnsley 76.56 148.66 336.85% 279.91 88.29% 457.33 63.38% 499.06 9.12%
Bath and North East Somerset 37.25 67.78 367.77% 120.03 77.09% 112.79 -6.03% 191.43 69.72%
Bedford 47.9 74.44 138.90% 81.37 9.31% 87.14 7.09% 88.29 1.32%
Bexley 28.19 56.39 141.40% 66.05 17.13% 82.97 25.62% 113.58 36.89%
Birmingham 147.92 159.31 28.64% 190.92 19.84% 227.36 19.09% 257.75 13.37%
Blackburn with Darwen 182.37 257.86 30.41% 446.24 73.06% 576.5 29.19% 774.24 34.30%
Blackpool 91.79 197.21 169.60% 288.28 46.18% 424.54 47.27% 425.97 0.34%
Bolton 244.13 265 9.80% 335.25 26.51% 442.01 31.84% 546.34 23.60%
Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole 25.55 74.12 252.95% 134.57 81.56% 144.44 7.33% 184.91 28.02%
Bracknell Forest 25.3 40.8 212.40% 53.04 30.00% 81.6 53.85% 84.86 4.00%
Bradford 184.34 293.27 98.37% 335.14 14.28% 395.72 18.08% 481.13 21.58%
Brent 50.64 79.45 181.74% 99.16 24.81% 98.55 -0.62% 113.41 15.08%
Brighton and Hove 21.66 62.22 448.68% 82.51 32.61% 93.51 13.33% 142.67 52.57%
Bristol, City of 28.27 66.47 275.54% 156.46 135.38% 245.37 56.83% 333.64 35.97%
Bromley 27.68 55.67 242.58% 70.11 25.94% 89.97 28.33% 108.93 21.07%
Buckinghamshire 24.82 48.35 182.75% 88.98 84.03% 86.77 -2.48% 104.6 20.55%
Bury 216.24 290.59 52.89% 389.55 34.05% 430.39 10.48% 526.21 22.26%
Calderdale 97.42 173.56 135.27% 242.6 39.78% 311.65 28.46% 410.49 31.72%
Cambridgeshire 18.06 45.29 355.18% 65.34 44.27% 67.48 3.28% 82.17 21.77%
Camden 27.4 55.55 138.11% 111.84 101.33% 121.84 8.94% 109.62 -10.03%
Central Bedfordshire 23.56 37.76 67.67% 51.27 35.78% 61.67 20.28% 71.37 15.73%
Cheshire East 61.17 141.35 287.90% 168.68 19.33% 173.11 2.63% 215.8 24.66%
Cheshire West and Chester 78.12 143.7 220.12% 191.21 33.06% 199.08 4.12% 214.53 7.76%
Cornwall and Isles of Scilly 40.4 26.58 32.17% 32 20.39% 30.78 -3.81% 44.95 46.04%
County Durham 110.55 201.29 209.30% 338.05 67.94% 329.56 -2.51% 278.44 -15.51%
Coventry 74.56 108.2 95.13% 166.34 53.73% 184.11 10.68% 199.99 8.63%
Croydon 32.58 66.46 307.98% 75.25 13.23% 79.39 5.50% 105.76 33.22%
Cumbria 51.2 86.6 252.03% 121.6 40.42% 152.4 25.33% 170.2 11.68%
Darlington 103.93 176.03 358.53% 206.92 17.55% 286.51 38.46% 296.81 3.59%
Derby 43.14 82.78 124.21% 134.08 61.97% 171.39 27.83% 328.8 91.84%
Derbyshire 44.35 93.44 201.23% 144.51 54.66% 186.5 29.06% 294.63 57.98%
Devon 18.82 84.37 957.27% 105.69 25.27% 78.52 -25.71% 69.79 -11.12%
Doncaster 62.84 147.81 177.73% 220.27 49.02% 350.76 59.24% 513.64 46.44%
Dorset 11.36 25.1 352.25% 60.76 142.07% 72.39 19.14% 103.3 42.70%
Dudley 56.28 79.29 90.28% 102.3 29.02% 150.81 47.42% 224.82 49.07%
Ealing 55.29 98.01 248.91% 139.85 42.69% 162.08 15.90% 212.4 31.05%
East Riding of Yorkshire 49.83 109.33 372.06% 133.36 21.98% 172.35 29.24% 257.35 49.32%
East Sussex 14.72 30.51 359.49% 44.86 47.03% 50.43 12.42% 58.32 15.65%
Enfield 42.54 72.8 158.52% 93.77 28.80% 137.21 46.33% 138.41 0.87%
Essex 26.66 48.35 176.92% 69.97 44.72% 90.25 28.98% 99.05 9.75%
Gateshead 162.33 241.02 83.08% 255.38 5.96% 259.34 1.55% 355.84 37.21%
Gloucestershire 19.62 40.5 200.00% 62 53.09% 62.63 1.02% 68.6 9.53%
Greenwich 36.47 50.7 217.27% 75.36 48.64% 85.43 13.36% 92.73 8.55%
Hackney and City of London 55.36 101.77 311.03% 132.37 30.07% 164.35 24.16% 156.79 -4.60%
Halton 265.82 343.1 80.49% 387.91 13.06% 340 -12.35% 312.96 -7.95%
Hammersmith and Fulham 45.91 75.08 238.96% 115.59 53.96% 163.12 41.12% 190.12 16.55%
Hampshire 16.78 35.08 219.20% 55.48 58.15% 68.35 23.20% 94.32 38.00%
Haringey 40.95 89.34 192.73% 116.88 30.83% 126.93 8.60% 142.57 12.32%
Harrow 42.2 95.95 244.28% 116.26 21.17% 127.81 9.93% 133.78 4.67%
Hartlepool 153.74 250.9 213.35% 274.39 9.36% 348.06 26.85% 335.24 -3.68%
Havering 58.18 60.49 80.46% 100.56 66.24% 126.76 26.05% 148.72 17.32%
Herefordshire, County of 12.97 22.3 152.83% 37.86 69.78% 54.46 43.85% 86.1 58.10%
Hertfordshire 30.94 66.83 166.79% 87.35 30.70% 90.79 3.94% 106.68 17.50%
Hillingdon 57.35 75.28 117.95% 102.32 35.92% 135.24 32.17% 160 18.31%
Hounslow 57.82 81.39 166.24% 105.7 29.87% 139.21 31.70% 177.15 27.25%
Isle of Wight 11.29 12.7 259.77% 17.63 38.82% 24.69 40.05% 31.04 25.72%
Islington 42.89 76.3 198.40% 90.32 18.37% 121.25 34.24% 126.62 4.43%
Kensington and Chelsea 24.34 81.34 262.80% 94.15 15.75% 135.14 43.54% 138.99 2.85%
Kent 16.44 34.46 240.51% 50.46 46.43% 54.25 7.51% 75.24 38.69%
Kingston upon Hull, City of 35.41 95.85 555.16% 107.01 11.64% 144.74 35.26% 279.08 92.81%
Kingston upon Thames 33.24 72.11 255.57% 101.97 41.41% 144.78 41.98% 184.22 27.24%
Kirklees 118.92 192.37 106.85% 254.44 32.27% 300.37 18.05% 388.82 29.45%
Knowsley 335.41 602.54 182.30% 700.64 16.28% 663.52 -5.30% 542.88 -18.18%
Lambeth 41.71 77.6 272.00% 92.94 19.77% 122.38 31.68% 137.1 12.03%
Lancashire 160.6 246.02 139.88% 347.6 41.29% 387.44 11.46% 426.22 10.01%
Leeds 170.46 379.13 239.39% 394.63 4.09% 393.5 -0.29% 388.71 -1.22%
Leicester 111.51 140.31 23.94% 184.06 31.18% 222.46 20.86% 326.06 46.57%
Leicestershire 51.12 92.19 124.47% 161.58 75.27% 176.87 9.46% 272.89 54.29%
Lewisham 34 64.09 206.21% 77.16 20.39% 79.13 2.55% 90.57 14.46%
Lincolnshire 27.85 63.19 238.82% 92.61 46.56% 103.65 11.92% 160.93 55.26%
Liverpool 342.94 580.27 186.43% 681.47 17.44% 584.69 -14.20% 462.01 -20.98%
Luton 61.96 72.28 41.28% 89.65 24.03% 141.28 57.59% 150.2 6.31%
Manchester 307.67 558.19 215.22% 474.62 -14.97% 438.99 -7.51% 486.2 10.75%
Medway 17.59 30.87 177.36% 38.77 25.59% 45.59 17.59% 80.77 77.17%
Merton 26.63 47.93 266.72% 77.95 62.63% 95.38 22.36% 134.11 40.61%
Middlesbrough 136.19 259.61 375.30% 280.89 8.20% 351.82 25.25% 353.95 0.61%
Milton Keynes 24.86 45.28 139.20% 65.69 45.08% 63.46 -3.39% 95.75 50.88%
Newcastle upon Tyne 299.19 492.37 204.91% 466.94 -5.16% 313.39 -32.88% 312.07 -0.42%
Newham 66.26 75.04 100.75% 103.36 37.74% 129.41 25.20% 142.16 9.85%
Norfolk 17.3 38.01 228.52% 50.89 33.89% 63.89 25.55% 84.71 32.59%
North East Lincolnshire 35.1 76.46 481.00% 162.32 112.29% 237.52 46.33% 339.68 43.01%
North Lincolnshire 47.59 94.03 224.02% 151.49 61.11% 170.06 12.26% 191.54 12.63%
North Somerset 27.9 39.99 56.33% 54.87 37.21% 71.15 29.67% 130.2 82.99%
North Tyneside 156.32 232.31 137.93% 251.55 8.28% 210.67 -16.25% 279.44 32.64%
North Yorkshire 67.47 113.1 188.82% 134.29 18.74% 141.09 5.06% 164.39 16.51%
Northamptonshire 24.43 60.14 198.02% 96.25 60.04% 107.53 11.72% 127.31 18.39%
Northumberland 171.2 180.19 114.38% 175.54 -2.58% 176.47 0.53% 179.88 1.93%
Nottingham 94.32 609.79 1523.94% 927.91 52.17% 610.69 -34.19% 427.46 -30.00%
Nottinghamshire 49.74 137.04 387.17% 220.47 60.88% 272.27 23.50% 325.03 19.38%
Oldham 193.58 295.64 62.27% 382.52 29.39% 468.56 22.49% 661.72 41.22%
Oxfordshire 25.59 64.48 309.14% 86.31 33.86% 89.35 3.52% 111.9 25.24%
Peterborough 35.1 62.3 223.13% 81.58 30.95% 95.92 17.58% 125.09 30.41%
Plymouth 23.27 37.77 80.03% 68.68 81.84% 103.01 49.99% 141.55 37.41%
Portsmouth 32.11 50.72 194.54% 104.7 106.43% 144.25 37.77% 163.79 13.55%
Reading 29.67 43.89 343.78% 74.79 70.40% 95.81 28.11% 109.41 14.19%
Redbridge 73.06 110.74 78.84% 125.15 13.01% 136.95 9.43% 168.4 22.96%
Redcar and Cleveland 70.73 173.53 395.80% 210.72 21.43% 280.71 33.21% 323 15.07%
Richmond upon Thames 39.39 108.58 593.36% 144.94 33.49% 153.02 5.57% 146.96 -3.96%
Rochdale 202.78 335.41 126.06% 429.83 28.15% 508.97 18.41% 574.16 12.81%
Rotherham 100.98 203.08 228.66% 279.57 37.66% 386.19 38.14% 493.2 27.71%
Rutland 42.58 85.16 580.19% 132.74 55.87% 107.7 -18.86% 95.17 -11.63%
Salford 195.49 317.19 114.36% 390.21 23.02% 495.3 26.93% 588.79 18.88%
Sandwell 113.26 114.78 19.67% 146.45 27.59% 216.17 47.61% 275.23 27.32%
Sefton 226.84 371.19 194.83% 477.19 28.56% 438.48 -8.11% 383.49 -12.54%
Sheffield 121.74 385.74 519.76% 455.16 18.00% 431.05 -5.30% 420.45 -2.46%
Shropshire 42.4 59.11 193.79% 86.34 46.07% 84.48 -2.15% 119.45 41.39%
Slough 82.92 86.93 217.03% 92.28 6.15% 155.14 68.12% 150.46 -3.02%
Solihull 90.12 119.7 61.87% 174.7 45.95% 209.36 19.84% 223.69 6.84%
Somerset 13.87 32.9 362.73% 39.13 18.94% 45.89 17.28% 61.36 33.71%
South Gloucestershire 24.2 58.58 255.25% 88.04 50.29% 118.56 34.67% 192.22 62.13%
South Tyneside 221.89 274.88 37.42% 245.07 -10.84% 235.14 -4.05% 222.55 -5.35%
Southampton 19.01 42.77 199.93% 60.19 40.73% 74.05 23.03% 114.05 54.02%
Southend-on-Sea 31.13 42.59 143.79% 48.05 12.82% 68.81 43.20% 82.46 19.84%
Southwark 47.99 60.53 114.42% 79.35 31.09% 95.66 20.55% 121.69 27.21%
St. Helens 254.17 347.76 167.24% 443.56 27.55% 437.47 -1.37% 420.85 -3.80%
Staffordshire 38.66 82.2 173.82% 121.2 47.45% 169.06 39.49% 262.4 55.21%
Stockport 110.42 227.32 162.62% 297.18 30.73% 299.91 0.92% 396.02 32.05%
Stockton-on-Tees 100.84 233.6 339.02% 342.54 46.64% 357.24 4.29% 447.43 25.25%
Stoke-on-Trent 49.54 60.46 54.99% 118.19 95.48% 192.3 62.70% 301.51 56.79%
Suffolk 8.41 33.49 298.22% 46.37 38.46% 55.03 18.68% 72.63 31.98%
Sunderland 215.7 296.72 108.61% 299.24 0.85% 321.92 7.58% 323.72 0.56%
Surrey 27.08 66.29 350.65% 83.01 25.22% 94.8 14.20% 106.58 12.43%
Sutton 23.75 36.83 162.14% 81.9 122.37% 90.14 10.06% 114.85 27.41%
Swindon 19.35 27.9 181.82% 45.46 62.94% 69.31 52.46% 103.96 49.99%
Tameside 174.4 245.48 74.84% 322.75 31.48% 371.31 15.05% 513.92 38.41%
Telford and Wrekin 43.92 56.16 173.02% 81.73 45.53% 154.01 88.44% 211.28 37.19%
Thurrock 24.09 43.02 226.16% 75.14 74.66% 122.17 62.59% 157.74 29.12%
Torbay 14.68 49.9 466.40% 82.19 64.71% 100.54 22.33% 126.23 25.55%
Tower Hamlets 62.51 85.61 164.80% 97.92 14.38% 133.64 36.48% 148.73 11.29%
Trafford 139.88 279.75 277.28% 336.63 20.33% 327.36 -2.75% 429.74 31.27%
Wakefield 86.13 163.93 243.96% 238.87 45.71% 310.64 30.05% 401.08 29.11%
Walsall 83.37 122.25 81.76% 168.84 38.11% 211.57 25.31% 305.8 44.54%
Waltham Forest 47.3 79.43 147.21% 94.95 19.54% 102.53 7.98% 135.75 32.40%
Wandsworth 37.92 71.89 243.48% 101.31 40.92% 114.35 12.87% 143.78 25.74%
Warrington 197.61 268.55 102.15% 337.6 25.71% 348.55 3.24% 406.64 16.67%
Warwickshire 40.49 70.94 98.05% 101.05 42.44% 126.14 24.83% 166.63 32.10%
West Berkshire 22.72 39.13 181.92% 49.23 25.81% 57.43 16.66% 83.94 46.16%
West Sussex 21.64 33.1 148.69% 43.06 30.09% 50.35 16.93% 73.96 46.89%
Westminster 29.08 71.18 220.63% 88.02 23.66% 108.3 23.04% 135.08 24.73%
Wigan 160.04 274.45 124.39% 407.71 48.56% 460.66 12.99% 655.99 42.40%
Wiltshire 15.2 32.8 221.57% 53.8 64.02% 68 26.39% 84.2 23.82%
Windsor and Maidenhead 31.7 80.57 335.75% 113.59 40.98% 141.33 24.42% 112.93 -20.09%
Wirral 193.82 252.77 61.86% 315.42 24.79% 267.27 -15.27% 282.71 5.78%
Wokingham 28.64 45 327.76% 61.36 36.36% 76.55 24.76% 95.26 24.44%
Wolverhampton 83.16 75.94 21.21% 133.66 76.01% 191 42.90% 246.43 29.02%
Worcestershire 43.47 70.83 232.22% 93.15 31.51% 105.24 12.98% 128.4 22.01%
York 72.64 195.14 341.89% 266.36 36.50% 307.19 15.33% 244.99 -20.25%

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Man, 31, is arrested after hospital worker mother, 62, was beaten to death 

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man 31 is arrested after hospital worker mother 62 was beaten to death

A 31-year-old man has been arrested after a hospital worker mother was beaten to death at her west London home. 

Police were called to the home of Harsha Patel, 62, in Greenford at 5pm yesterday where she was found with head injuries. 

She died 20 minutes later.   

Residents say Mrs Patel lived with her husband and their son, who had a mental illness, while their older son lived in nearby Ruislip. 

The son would often be heard talking to himself around the house and was described as a clever child before ‘something flipped.’

A 31-year-old man has been arrested after a hospital worker mother was beaten to death at their west London home. Pictured: Police at the scene

A 31-year-old man has been arrested after a hospital worker mother was beaten to death at their west London home. Pictured: Police at the scene

A 31-year-old man has been arrested after a hospital worker mother was beaten to death at their west London home. Pictured: Police at the scene

Police (pictured at the scene today) were called to the home of Harsha Patel, 62, in Greenford at 5pm yesterday where she was found with head injuries

Police (pictured at the scene today) were called to the home of Harsha Patel, 62, in Greenford at 5pm yesterday where she was found with head injuries

Police (pictured at the scene today) were called to the home of Harsha Patel, 62, in Greenford at 5pm yesterday where she was found with head injuries

Two years ago he was seen fleeing their terraced house when it caught fire while he was home alone. 

A police helicopter was seen circling the house in search of the killer yesterday. Around 10 police cars and an ambulance were also deployed to the scene. 

They arrested a 31-year-old man who is still in police custody. 

Police officers and a forensic team were still at the scene on Thursday afternoon, and the road was closed off to non-residents.

A murder investigation has been launched led by Detective Chief Inspector Simon Harding of the Met’s Specialist Crime Command.

Residents say Mrs Patel lived with her husband and their son, who had a mental illness, while their older son lived in nearby Ruislip. Pictured: Forensic officers at the scene

Residents say Mrs Patel lived with her husband and their son, who had a mental illness, while their older son lived in nearby Ruislip. Pictured: Forensic officers at the scene

Residents say Mrs Patel lived with her husband and their son, who had a mental illness, while their older son lived in nearby Ruislip. Pictured: Forensic officers at the scene

DCI Harding said: ‘At this early stage we retain an open mind around the circumstances surrounding this incident.

‘However, we can confirm that the victim and the man arrested were known to each other, and we are not actively seeking any other suspects at this time.’ 

Akbar Khan, a civil engineer, said his wife was friends with Ms Patel who he said cared for her son.

He said: ‘She was a lovely lady, it’s very sad. She was a gentle person, a placid person.

‘My wife knew them well. Her son had some mental issues.

The son would often be heard talking to himself around the house and was described as a clever child before 'something flipped. Pictured: A policeman at the scene

The son would often be heard talking to himself around the house and was described as a clever child before 'something flipped. Pictured: A policeman at the scene

The son would often be heard talking to himself around the house and was described as a clever child before ‘something flipped. Pictured: A policeman at the scene

‘Recently you could hear him indoors. He used to talk very loud as if he was talking to someone in a very high pitches voice.

‘Whether he was talking to someone or to himself, I don’t know.

‘He was clever when he was young and I think he went to private school.

‘But I think something just flipped.

‘My wife felt so sad every time she saw him because I think he was a bright student. It’s a shame how it’s all happened.

‘Two years ago, the parents were away and he was at home alone. It was mid morning and the house caught fire.

‘He legged it like he did yesterday and the neighbours rang the police.

‘Yesterday, I left the house at about 5.05pm and my wife said as soon as I left, it all went crazy.

‘It’s quite shocking. The parents were really nice people, they were really nice people.

‘She worked in a hospital and her husband told her to retire early because of Covid.

A police helicopter was seen circling the house in search of the killer yesterday. Pictured: Police on the scene

A police helicopter was seen circling the house in search of the killer yesterday. Pictured: Police on the scene

A police helicopter was seen circling the house in search of the killer yesterday. Pictured: Police on the scene

‘I think it was an NHS hospital but I’m not sure what exactly she did.’

Commenting on social media, other neighbours shared thoughts for Ms Patel’s husband.

One person said: ‘I hope that her husband has people to support him.

‘He is dealing with the loss of his wife and essentially the loss of his son too.

‘This is when he will need neighbourly support even if it’s just a meal or a card dropped in.’

Another person added: ‘So sad thoughts to the family and I hope he gets some help as he does suffer from mental illness.

‘I really don’t think he would of done this on purpose. I know the son is ill I see him most days out walking and he keeps himself to himself never troubles anyone.

Around 10 police cars and an ambulance were also deployed to the scene

Around 10 police cars and an ambulance were also deployed to the scene

Around 10 police cars and an ambulance were also deployed to the scene

‘It’s very sad and I feel for the husband. They are great neighbours and this will be hard for the whole family.

‘So let’s be there for our fellow neighbours and try and help them out as best we can at this sad time.’

Warnings circulated last night as police scoured the streets for the killer with riot vans, flood lights and a helicopter.

One resident, who did not wish to be named, added: ‘There were flood lights, riot vans and offices searching the streets and the allotments.

‘They were a very nice family. It’s terribly sad.’

Aqib Minhas, 28, said: ‘There was a bit of a frenzy last night, police were telling everyone to stay indoors and stay away from the scene.

‘It was crazy and especially scary because it’s right on our doorstep – at the time everyone thought the guy did a runner and was on the loose.

‘People I’ve spoken to have said there was a bit of shouting from inside the house beforehand.

‘The neighbourhood is a bit shook up by it all.’

The woman’s next of kin are aware and a post-mortem examination will be scheduled in due course. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Tier 1 Cornwall residents call on rest of country to stay away in case they bring Covid with them

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tier 1 cornwall residents call on rest of country to stay away in case they bring covid with them

Cornwall residents today pleaded with people living in the rest of the country to stay away after the county was the only part of the mainland UK to be put in the loosest band of coronavirus restrictions. 

People in the region, along with those in the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight, will be living under Tier 1 measures – which allow socialising inside homes and pubs subject to the Rule of Six – after the blanket national lockdown ends on December 2.

But nearly 99 per cent of England will be in the toughest two levels next week, according to the breakdown released today.

Tier 3 will be brought in for huge swathes of the country including the bulk of the North, much of the Midlands, all of Kent, and Bristol – putting a wrecking ball through pubs, restaurants and clubs now forced to close except for takeaway. 

Soon after the announcement, worried Cornish residents took to Twitter and local media to warn people from other parts of the country to stay away. 

One wrote that it was ‘beyond stupid’ because ‘people from high rate areas will descend’ on the region, prompting another to reply, ‘God help Cornwall’.   

Cornwall residents today pleaded with people living in the rest of the country to stay away after the county was the only part of the mainland UK to be put in the loosest band of coronavirus restrictions

Cornwall residents today pleaded with people living in the rest of the country to stay away after the county was the only part of the mainland UK to be put in the loosest band of coronavirus restrictions

Cornwall residents today pleaded with people living in the rest of the country to stay away after the county was the only part of the mainland UK to be put in the loosest band of coronavirus restrictions

Another concerned woman wrote, ‘with Cornwall being one of three places on the lowest tier, please don’t think it’s ok to come here if you’re in the highest tiers because it’s really not.’ 

A third asked other Britons, ‘don’t all come to Cornwall now please just let us have our moment.’ 

A fourth Twitter user claimed putting Cornwall into Tier 1 was ‘asking for trouble’ and there would be ‘tourists inbound’.

Another resident demanded, ‘everyone stay away from Cornwall please, we’re ok on our own down here! 

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And in comments on articles by local news outlets, residents were similarly unhappy about a potential influx of Britons from elsewhere.  

One said that while people in the region should feel ‘very fortunate’ to be in Tier 1, they hoped people from other tiers ‘treat that with the respect it deserves.’ 

They added: ‘Other than masks, the rule of six, self-isolation, etc we’re pretty much back to a normal life or as much as a normal life can be.

‘We as individuals now control our destiny in terms of can we keep ourselves in Tier 1 or will peoples actions result in moving up a Tier.’ 

Isle of Wight pub owner delighted with Tier 1 news 

Victoria Calder, who runs the Anchor and the Pier View in Cowes, and the Lifeboat in East Cowes, told MailOnline: ‘It’s excellent news and we’re very pleased indeed. 

‘There’s quite a lot of regulars who come in the day and just like to have a drink and would have been disappointed if they couldn’t do that.

#Also in Tier 2 you can’t mix households, which is not good with Christmas party season coming up, but since the announcement this morning we’ve had the phone ringing constantly.’

Asked if she thought it was right for the Island to be in Tier 1, she said: ‘Definitely. Because we are way lower than the rest of the country and I think most people are being very careful.’

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Another resident added: ‘Cornwall is the only mainland place in the country that is in tier 1. 

‘Wonder how long that will last if the tier above are allowed to travel in and stay? 

‘I am sure if people do visit, they will all observe the guidance and follow the rules of their own tier!’

West Cornwall and Isles of Scilly MP Derek Thomas welcomed the news.

He wrote on Facebook: ‘Cornwall in Tier 1

‘As I predicted Cornwall has just been announced as being in Tier 1 of covid restrictions.

‘Thank you to everyone for doing your bit!  

‘Thank you to everyone for doing your bit! This is the best possible outcome both for our businesses and families.

‘Please let’s work to keep it this way!’  

Despite his positive tone, things are looking bleaker for the rest of the country.    

Although London and Liverpool were spared the harshest Tier 3 in small glimmers of light, just 700,000 people – one per cent of the population – will be subject to the loosest grade of restrictions. 

Most of England will be banned from mixing indoors with other households, apart from five days over Christmas. Pubs in Tier 2 will only be able to serve alcohol with ‘substantial’ meals. 

Tory rebel ringleader Steve Baker warned that the government must explain how it is balancing the economic harm with public health.

‘The authoritarianism at work today is truly appalling. But is it necessary and proportionate to the threat from this disease?’ he tweeted.

‘On the economy and on coronavirus, I fear we are now so far down the rabbit hole that we have forgotten we even entered it.’ 

Health Secretary Matt Hancock formally unveiled the breakdown of areas in the Commons after days of wrangling, saying the country has to stay ‘vigilant’. 

He also defended the criteria being used amid complaints that they are too vague and amount to ‘finger in the air’.

And he immediately signalled a retreat on the fortnightly reviews, suggesting that in fact the tiers could be rethought weekly. 

Amid shambolic scenes the government had set an online postcode checker live before the statement.

As residents, journalists and MPs scrambled to gather the news on what decisions had been taken, the website then promptly crashed under the weight of traffic.

Tier 3 means that millions of people face a ban on households mixing indoors and outdoors, and pubs will be only be able to provide takeaway service or must close altogether. 

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And in comments on articles by local news outlets, residents were similarly unhappy about a potential influx of Britons from elsewhere

And in comments on articles by local news outlets, residents were similarly unhappy about a potential influx of Britons from elsewhere

And in comments on articles by local news outlets, residents were similarly unhappy about a potential influx of Britons from elsewhere

The revised Tier 2 restrictions shut pubs unless they serve meals and order people not to meet other households indoors. 

Some 23million people will be in that category from next Wednesday, and 32million are in Tier 2.

London was spared after data showed coronavirus falling quickly in more than two-thirds of boroughs – and seemingly stalling in the rest. 

Liverpool has also run a successful campaign to control its outbreak after mass testing in the city. 

Mr Hancock pointed out that his own Suffolk constituency was going into Tier 2 despite having some of the lowest infection rates.

In a nod to anger on the Tory benches, he said he knew that many other places would prefer to be in the lowest bracket.

West Cornwall and Isles of Scilly MP Derek Thomas welcomed the news

West Cornwall and Isles of Scilly MP Derek Thomas welcomed the news

West Cornwall and Isles of Scilly MP Derek Thomas welcomed the news

The onerous tiered system will be in place across England from December 3 until the end of March, the Prime Minister said

The onerous tiered system will be in place across England from December 3 until the end of March, the Prime Minister said

The onerous tiered system will be in place across England from December 3 until the end of March, the Prime Minister said

And he rejected criticism that there are no specific thresholds for putting areas into the levels. 

Mr Hancock told MPs: ‘The indicators have been designed to give the government a picture of what is happening with the virus in any area so that suitable action can be taken. 

‘These key indicators need to be viewed in the context of how they interact with each other as well as the wider context but provide an important framework for decision making – assessing the underlying prevalence in addition to how the spread of the disease is changing in areas. 

‘Given these sensitivities, it is not possible to set rigid thresholds for these indicators.’ 

Shadow health secretary Jon Ashworth demanded that the government publishes a ‘scorecard’ showing exactly how each area measured against its criteria for deciding Tiers. 

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In the Commons, Conservative MP Greg Smith said he was ‘incredibly disappointed’ his Buckingham constituency was placed in Tier 2.

He said: ‘It’s incredibly disappointing news that Buckinghamshire having entered the national lockdown in Tier 1 will emerge from the national lockdown into the more punitive restrictions of Tier 2.

‘A decision that will be hard to understand in the rural communities of north Buckinghamshire that have relatively low infection rates and a decision that will be hard to understand given that there has been zero consultation between central government and Buckinghamshire Council and our local NHS.’

Tory MP for York Outer Julian Sturdy urged the Government to review the situation every week, rather than once a fortnight.

Mr Hancock appeared to concede that should happen.

‘We will review these in a fortnight, and then regularly, by which he can reasonably take weekly,’ he said.

‘And we will have a weekly cycle of meetings with the CMO chairing a meeting typically on a Tuesday, I then chair the meeting on a Wednesday for an announcement on Thursday for any change to the tiers.’ 

Greater Manchester mayor Andy Burnham criticised the lack of business support available to Tier 3 areas, and said he wanted the region moved down before Christmas if it continued to make progress.

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He said: ‘Greater Manchester’s infection rate is reducing faster than any other part of the country but we have to accept that it is still significantly higher than the England average.

‘That said, if the current rate of improvement continues, we will be asking the Government to move our city-region into Tier 2 in two weeks’ time.

‘What we believe is completely wrong is the Government’s decision to provide no additional business support to areas in Tier 3 than those in Tiers 1 and 2.

‘The new Tier 3 will hit the hospitality sector extremely hard. While there are grants for businesses forced to close, there is no extra support for business which supply them like security, catering and cleaning.

‘This will cause real hardship for people whose jobs will be affected and risk the loss of many businesses.’

Conservative mayor of the West Midlands Andy Street tweeted: ‘Tier 3 for the WM is very disappointing, but we must now focus on getting out ASAP.

‘The trajectory is good, and our stay should be short-lived if people stick to the rules.

‘However more support is needed whilst in T3, particularly for the hospitality and live events sectors.’

Sheffield City Region mayor Dan Jarvis warned that ‘lockdown must not become limbo’.

Mr Jarvis, who is also Labour MP for Barnsley Central, said: ‘I welcome Government plans to review our tier arrangements every two weeks, because every extra day we are under restrictions could be the difference between a business surviving the pandemic or going under.

‘It is now essential we get a roadmap to get us out of Tier 3 as a matter of urgency.’

He said: ‘We need absolute clarity and consistency from the government about the criteria for areas moving between the Tiers. We need a test and trace system that is fit for purpose and we need clear communications

‘There is light at the end of the tunnel. In South Yorkshire the rate of new infections, and more importantly the number of older people in hospital with the virus, is moving in the right direction.

‘We’ve been under tighter restrictions in South Yorkshire since October 24, and they are slowly suffocating businesses, particularly in the hospitality and events sectors. They are now being hit again just as they enter their busiest time of year.’

Mr Jarvis added: ‘It’s deeply concerning that the government yet again excluded mayors and local leaders from the decision-making process around the new Tiering arrangements.’

Earlier, Chancellor Rishi Sunak insisted people will ‘see a difference’ when England’s national lockdown ends next week. He told Sky News today: ‘Whichever tier you’re in I think people will see a tangible change.

‘That said, things are obviously not normal and I can’t pretend that next week things are going to feel like they were before the spring.’  

New coronavirus tiers: which one is your home in? 

TIER THREE: VERY HIGH

North East

Tees Valley Combined Authority:

Hartlepool

Middlesbrough

Stockton-on-Tees

Redcar and Cleveland

Darlington

North East Combined Authority:

Sunderland

South Tyneside

Gateshead

Newcastle upon Tyne

North Tyneside

County Durham

Northumberland

North West

Greater Manchester

Lancashire

Blackpool

Blackburn with Darwen

Yorkshire and The Humber

The Humber

West Yorkshire

South Yorkshire

West Midlands

Birmingham and Black Country

Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent

Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull

East Midlands

Derby and Derbyshire

Nottingham and Nottinghamshire

Leicester and Leicestershire

Lincolnshire

South East

Slough (remainder of Berkshire is tier 2: High alert)

Kent and Medway

South West

Bristol

South Gloucestershire

North Somerset

TIER 2: HIGH

North West

Cumbria

Liverpool City Region

Warrington and Cheshire

Yorkshire

York

North Yorkshire

West Midlands

Worcestershire

Herefordshire

Shropshire and Telford & Wrekin

East Midlands

Rutland

Northamptonshire

East of England

Suffolk

Hertfordshire

Cambridgeshire, including Peterborough

Norfolk

Essex, Thurrock and Southend on Sea

Bedfordshire and Milton Keynes

London

All 32 boroughs plus the City of London

South East

East Sussex

West Sussex

Brighton and Hove

Surrey

Reading

Wokingham

Bracknell Forest

Windsor and Maidenhead

West Berkshire

Hampshire (except the Isle of Wight), Portsmouth and Southampton

Buckinghamshire

Oxfordshire

South West

South Somerset, Somerset West and Taunton, Mendip and Sedgemoor

Bath and North East Somerset

Dorset

Bournemouth

Christchurch

Poole

Gloucestershire

Wiltshire and Swindon

Devon

TIER 1: MEDIUM 

South East

Isle of Wight

South West

Cornwall

Isles of Scilly

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Harley Street dentist says he ‘didn’t plan to have sex with patient at Savoy hotel’

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harley street dentist says he didnt plan to have sex with patient at savoy hotel

A Harley Street dentist to the stars who slept with a patient after wining and dining her at the Savoy said he only had a condom with him to carry water in an emergency.

Dr Sahil Patel, 28, said he had the contraceptive in his bag ‘for several years’ after attending a survival course.

The dentist twice met up with the woman at a pub in north London after providing her with his mobile phone number.

He then took the patient out to dinner at the Savoy on November 1 last year after completing her veneer treatment.

They carried on drinking until after midnight, when the dentist said he could not get home ‘as there are no underground trains,’ the General Dental Council heard.

Dr Sahil Patel (pictured), a Harley Street dentist to the stars who slept with a patient after wining and dining her at the Savoy, said he only had a condom with him to carry water in an emergency. Dr Patel, 28, said he had the contraceptive in his bag 'for several years' after attending a survival course, the General Dental Council heard today

Dr Sahil Patel (pictured), a Harley Street dentist to the stars who slept with a patient after wining and dining her at the Savoy, said he only had a condom with him to carry water in an emergency. Dr Patel, 28, said he had the contraceptive in his bag 'for several years' after attending a survival course, the General Dental Council heard today

Dr Sahil Patel (pictured), a Harley Street dentist to the stars who slept with a patient after wining and dining her at the Savoy, said he only had a condom with him to carry water in an emergency. Dr Patel, 28, said he had the contraceptive in his bag ‘for several years’ after attending a survival course, the General Dental Council heard today

The dentist twice met up with the woman at a pub in north London after providing her with his mobile number. He then took the patient out to dinner at the Savoy on November 1 last year after completing her veneer treatment. They carried on drinking until after midnight, when Dr Patel said he could not get home 'as there are no underground trains,' the tribunal heard

The dentist twice met up with the woman at a pub in north London after providing her with his mobile number. He then took the patient out to dinner at the Savoy on November 1 last year after completing her veneer treatment. They carried on drinking until after midnight, when Dr Patel said he could not get home 'as there are no underground trains,' the tribunal heard

The dentist twice met up with the woman at a pub in north London after providing her with his mobile number. He then took the patient out to dinner at the Savoy on November 1 last year after completing her veneer treatment. They carried on drinking until after midnight, when Dr Patel said he could not get home ‘as there are no underground trains,’ the tribunal heard

Dr Patel then went to the patient’s hotel room across the street and had sex with her, the tribunal heard.

The dentist is said to have referred to the woman a ‘Jewish princess’ but he denies using the phrase.

The disciplinary hearing is being held in Marylebone, central London, near The Harley Street Smile Clinic, where Dr Patel is an associate dentist.

The clinic lists former Everton and Scotland striker Andy Gray among its clients as well as TOWIE stars including Lauren Pope, James Lock, Frankie Essex and Kirk Norcross.

Giving evidence, Dr Patel admitted if the condom ‘was present without context then, yes it would show pre-planning’.

But he maintained he kept it ‘in a field craft kit which has been in my bag for several years, incidentally, since attending a training course. It’s used for water retention’.

He claimed ‘Patient A’ asked him to have sex a second time at the hotel.

In his witness statement, he said he turned her down because he was tired, and added today, ‘We couldn’t anyway, due to a lack of contraception’.

Dr Patel is said to have passed her his mobile number on September 27 last year and gone for a drink with her at the White Horse Pub in Parsons Green, south-west London.

Giving evidence, Dr Patel admitted if the condom 'was present without context then, yes it would show pre-planning'. But he maintained he kept it 'in a field craft kit which has been in my bag for several years, incidentally, since attending a training course. It's used for water retention'. Pictured: The General Dental Council building

Giving evidence, Dr Patel admitted if the condom 'was present without context then, yes it would show pre-planning'. But he maintained he kept it 'in a field craft kit which has been in my bag for several years, incidentally, since attending a training course. It's used for water retention'. Pictured: The General Dental Council building

Giving evidence, Dr Patel admitted if the condom ‘was present without context then, yes it would show pre-planning’. But he maintained he kept it ‘in a field craft kit which has been in my bag for several years, incidentally, since attending a training course. It’s used for water retention’. Pictured: The General Dental Council building

He then met her again on October 3 at the same pub, kissed her and the Savoy date was arranged, it is claimed.

But Dr Patel claims the kiss was on the cheek and not on the lips.

Dr Patel claimed he had not planned to have sex and insisted he was about to head home before she asked him to stay at her hotel. 

He told the panel after the Savoy date his ‘intention was to take the Tube home from Charing Cross Tube station.

‘I was invited by the patient to her hotel room which I accepted, which I appreciate now was wholly the wrong thing to do.

‘I’m not shying away from the fact that what I’ve done is wrong and it was unfair on the patient. I am sympathetic for the patient and I’m sorry everyone has to be here to analyse this case.

‘What happened was wrong and shouldn’t have happened, it was my mistake.’

Sam Thomas, for the dental council, asked: ‘You didn’t go prepared to have sex but it just so happened you had the kit with you?’

‘That’s correct,’ replied Dr Patel.

Dr Patel denied she was his patient, claiming she asked to be discharged before their date.

Mr Thomas pointed out no note was made of this request until the Monday after they had sex.

‘It slipped my mind as it’s not a common thing to be asked – to be discharged,’ said Dr Patel.

Mr Thomas replied: ‘Wouldn’t the fact it was uncommon mean it was more likely for you to have written it down because it’s more remarkable?

‘It’s the common mundane things that slip by, isn’t it? This note, after you had sex with Patient A, is very useful for you, isn’t it?

‘Your counsel will use as mitigation she was a former patient.’

Dr Patel denied this and said: ‘The mistakes I made stand whether for current or former patients.’

The charge sheet alleges his actions were ‘sexually motivated’ and Patel could face a ban if the panel finds his ‘fitness to practise is impaired by reason of misconduct’.

Dr Patel graduated from the University of Bristol, achieving merits in Restorative dentistry, Orthodontics, and Paediatrics.

He worked in Cornwall for a year before moving to the Harley Street practice in September 2016.

According to the Harley Street Smile Clinic’s website, he ‘established himself as a leader in cosmetic dentistry, and his wealth of experience has included creating the smiles of several reality TV personalities, Members of Parliament, professional athletes, and social media influencers’.

The post continues: ‘Aside from dentistry, Sahil serves in the Royal Navy Reserves, and he has appreciated an introduction into scuba diving, skydiving, cross-country skiing, and triathlon.

‘He has also committed himself to Performing Arts since the age of 10, leading to choreographing and performing for various organisations, including the BBC Proms. Today, he continues to practise several dance styles and train for selected triathlon events.’

Dr Patel accepts as fact he slept with the woman but denies she was a patient at the time.

He also denied calling the woman a ‘Jewish Princess’ but admitted using the phrase, claiming he was ‘not aware of it being a racial slur or seen it as causing offence’.

‘I mentioned the term in describing an anecdote from my school days, it was not directed at the patient.

‘She asked about my schooling. I mentioned I went to a school which was predominantly Asian and Jewish.

‘I described a couple of friends who were Jewish who referred to themselves as Jewish Princesses. The reason it was funny at the time is because it was an all boys’ school.’

When asked if he had a sexual desire for the patient, he replied ‘yes but no intentions to act upon it’.

The hearing continues on Friday. 

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