Connect with us

Main News

Coronavirus London: Tier 2 lockdown ‘risks 250k hospitality jobs’

Published

on

coronavirus london tier 2 lockdown risks 250k hospitality jobs

What is the difference between Tier One and Tier Two? 

TIER ONE 

Normal social distancing should be followed. Face masks on public transport and in shops etc.

Rule of Six on gatherings indoors and outdoors, and 10pm curfew on pubs. 

 TIER TWO

The Tier One rules still apply. 

In addition, households are banned from mixing in any indoor setting.

That means that socialising inside homes and bars is off limits.

However, in pub gardens, private gardens and other outdoor spaces it is still permitted as long as the Rule of Six is obeyed. 

Advertisement

Furious hospitality chiefs today blasted Sadiq Khan for ‘cursing’ London as they warned that plunging the UK capital into Tier Two lockdown will cause ‘catastrophic business closures and widespread job losses’.

London is braced for tighter controls from midnight tomorrow after a deal was done with Mr Khan, who is demanding yet more money from the Government and calling for a national ‘circuit breaker’.

Residents will be banned from mixing with other households indoors, including in bars and other venues, while socialising outdoors — including pub and private gardens — will still be allowed under the Rule of Six.

Offices and public transport can remain open, although the Government’s general advice to work from home where possible remains in place.

Today angry hospitality bosses, including restaurateurs, hoteliers and Britain’s biggest pub trade association, all lined up to warn City Hall that further coronavirus restrictions would lead to economic devastation.

It has now emerged that UKHospitality boss Kate Nicholls warned the London Mayor that more draconian action would lead to ‘mass job losses’, as much as 250,000 in the capital alone, yesterday — a full day before London was moved into Tier Two.

Her letter to Mr Khan added that ‘we have moved into a new phase of financial peril for our businesses, their employees, the capital’s tourism offer, and the social and cultural prospects for Londoners’.

MailOnline has asked City Hall if it consulted with UKHospitality before entering London into Tier Two lockdown, and the economic chaos that entails. 

Ms Nicholls’ letter warned that his request to plunge London into lockdown would be ‘incredibly damaging without additional financial support and urge you to work with us to secure that is in place before any changes to London’s classification is made’.

Responding to the announcement, she called on Ministers to remove employer contributions from the Job Support Scheme for hospitality ‘or apply tier 3 job support to tier 2 businesses’.

‘If it does not, we are looking at catastrophic businesses closures and widespread job losses in the capital as early as 1 November,’ she said, according to Sky News.

34423666 8842449 image a 17 1602755784586

The UKHospitality boss also requested a package of financial support measures, including enabling hospitality businesses outside the most severe restrictions to be allowed to close voluntarily while still accessing emergency funding.

‘With the announcement of the new tiered restrictions system, focused almost entirely on the hospitality sector, we have moved into a new phase of financial peril for our businesses, their employees, the capital’s tourism offer, and the social and cultural prospects for Londoners,’ she wrote.

‘The current restrictions — the 10pm curfew, the instruction to work from home and various other impositions on customers and staff — have combined to severely dampen trade, particularly in London. Across the UK, London has the lowest proportion of pubs, bars and restaurants open of any region – with one in six (16 per cent) still closed.

She warned: ‘Mass job losses — potentially up to 250,000 in London alone — will become unavoidable if more support is not forthcoming.’

Responding to news that London is being plunged into a Tier Two lockdown from midnight tomorrow, Ms Nicholls said businesses will be ‘trapped in a no man’s land of being open, but with severe restrictions that will significantly hit custom, all while being unable to access the job support available in Tier Three’.

She called the situation ‘the worst of both worlds for businesses’, adding: ‘The Government must remove employer contributions from the Job Support Scheme for hospitality or apply Tier 3 job support to Tier Two businesses. If it does not, we are looking at catastrophic businesses closures and widespread job losses in the capital as early as November 1.’ 

Guillaume Marly, managing director at London’s Hotel Café Royal, called the move into Tier Two ‘the nail in the coffin for many hospitality businesses and no doubt, a lot more people are now going to lose their jobs, livelihoods and the ability to survive’.

He told MailOnline: ‘Operating a safe and secure environment has been a huge focus and our sole priority since re-opening and following the recent news, we are already seeing cancellations as I am sure most hospitality businesses will face in the coming days. 

‘Once again, whilst I appreciate the challenges presented by this virus, very little consideration has been given to our industry and very little dialogue has happened to seek our recommendations or what we though could be done to manage this crisis together with the Government.’

Tory mayoral candidate Shaun Bailey also criticised Mr Khan’s policy, suggesting that ‘calling for more lockdowns and more restrictions’ would ‘severely hurt’ hospitality businesses already ‘struggling’. 

He told MailOnline: ‘In the meantime, Sadiq Khan needs to stop blaming others and start doing his job. That means getting people safely back into central London.’ 

At City Hall earlier, Mr Khan said: ‘Nobody wants to see more restrictions, but this is deemed to be necessary in order to protect Londoners lives by myself, London Council Leaders and by ministers. As part of our discussions, I’ve also made clear to the Government that we need more financial support for London’s businesses, workers and public services as we face more restrictions, and we will continue to make this case.’

It comes as Health Secretary Matt Hancock told the Commons he ‘hated’ bringing in new measures, but it was the ‘only way’ to save lives. He said cases were ‘on a steep upward path’ in London.

‘Unless we suppress the virus we cannot return to the economy we had,’ he added. In a grim message he warned: ‘Things will get worse before they get better.’ 

In other coronavirus developments today: 

  • The Queen sought to send a reassuring message to the country as she got back to business without a mask, carrying out her first public engagement outside of a royal residence since before the coronavirus pandemic;
  • Covidiot MP Margaret Ferrier will face no police action despite travelling 800 miles across Britain while ill with coronavirus, Scotland Yard said; 
  • Former government advisor Louise Casey has warned that locked down workers could be forced to ‘prostitute’ themselves because government support is inadequate; 
  • As many as 13 London boroughs have breached the infection threshold of 100 cases per 100,000 people; 
  • Police chiefs have warned Mark Drakeford’s plan to impose a travel ban on English visitors to Wales from coronavirus hotspots is ‘unenforceable’;  
  • The UK’s total coronavirus deaths rose to 43,155 yesterday, while the number of cases diagnosed since the outbreak began in March reached 654,644.
Ros Morgan, Chief Executive at Heart of London Business Alliance

UKHospitality boss Kate Nicholls

UKHospitality boss Kate Nicholls (right) warned the London Mayor that more draconian action would lead to ‘mass job losses’, as much as 250,000 in the capital alone, yesterday — a full day before London was moved into Tier Two. Also responding to the decision to impose further restrictions on London, Ros Morgan (left), chief executive of the Heart of London business group, questioned whether the Government’s decision to shutdown ‘key sectors for the UK economy’ was ‘evidence-based’

Sadiq Khan warned this morning that Londoners face a 'difficult winter ahead'

London is braced for tighter controls from midnight tomorrow after a deal was done with London Mayor Sadiq Khan, who is demanding yet more money from the Government and calling for a national ‘circuit breaker’. From Saturday, Londoners will be banned from mixing with other households indoors, including in bars and other venues, while socialising outdoors — including pub and private gardens — will still be allowed under the Rule of Six 

34435714 0 image a 24 1602774921610

34427226 8842449 image a 41 1602761803593

34423288 8842449 image a 13 1602755705062

34390276 8844045 image a 21 1602774111380

34344350 8840885 image a 7 1602742467653

PM could impose ‘urban circuit breaker’ at school half-term

Boris Johnson is looking at placing millions of people in urban areas into a total ‘circuit breaker’ lockdown at half term.

Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove and the PM’s assistant Dominic Cummings are said to be pushing for a two-week closure from October 26 – but limit it to the worst-affected parts of England.

This would allow him to appear to be taking decisive action in the face of wide-support for the measure but avoid handing a political victory to Labour leader Keir Starmer, who demanded a nationwide lockdown this week.

It would cover all areas in the top Tier 3 Very High category but could also include some areas currently at Tier 2 High.

It came as it was announced London will go into Tier 2 lockdown from midnight on Friday night, with ministers expected to announce Greater Manchester would be put into the highest Tier 3 later today.

Mr Johnson has not ruled out a circuit-breaker, but in a combative performance at Prime Minister’s Questions yesterday, he said it would mean misery for millions.

He rounded on Sir Keir Starmer over his call for the UK to be plunged back into a national lockdown for a temporary period.

The PM is also likely to have stiff opposition from the Chancellor. Responding to Keir Starmer’s call for a full circuit breaker, Rishi Sunak last night said Britain was already facing an ‘economic emergency’ – and said Labour ‘do not seem to care about the long-term stability of the public finances’.

Advertisement

Also responding to the decision to impose further restrictions on London, Ros Morgan, chief executive of the Heart of London business group, questioned whether the Government’s decision to shutdown ‘key sectors for the UK economy’ was ‘evidence-based’.

She told the Evening Standard: ‘Currently there is limited persuasive evidence. Existing measures are already having a profound impact on businesses in central London with some businesses already shutting up shop as a result. Further lockdown, without further Government support, will be catastrophic. We cannot let this become the new normal.’

Restaurateur Rahul Khanna, whose company operates Pali Hill in Fitzrovia, added: ‘This ruling shows that the Government has little understanding of how restaurants have been operating, or what they are offering to the public.’

Meanwhile, The British Beer & Pub Association, the leading trade association representing brewers and pubs, warned that Tier Two restrictions will ‘decimate pubs, brewers and their supply chains in these regions unless a proper package of support is given to them’.

Chief executive Emma McClarkin said: ‘All pubs are already particularly struggling of the 10pm curfew, rule of six and low consumer confidence exacerbated by low footfall caused by a lack of tourists and commuters. These further restrictions will leave most pubs fighting for their very survival.

‘Tier two measures mean pubs can remain open, but households cannot mix inside them. This completely kills our pubs’ business model making many of them totally unviable, yet under tier two restrictions they are not eligible for any additional financial support from Government, unlike in tier three where additional support is provided.

‘The knock-on effect to brewers and pubs’ supply chain partners will devastate them too without more support.

‘Without additional financial support, specifically access to financial grants and a job retention scheme closer to that in tier three, many pubs will be closing their doors for good.

‘The Government must now do the right thing and immediately announce financial support measures to ensure pubs in these regions can survive, to continue serving their local communities and supporting thousands of jobs.

‘They must also clarify how long these restrictions will be in place and what criteria the decisions for moving in and out of the tiering system will be based on. We urge the Government to work with us on this.’ 

Mr Khan has been pushing for the capital to be moved up from Tier One – which just means normal social distancing rules, the Rule of Six and a 10pm curfew on pubs – to Tier Two.

However, he has been angling for more funding to go alongside the curbs, and there was resistance within government, local councils and Tory MPs to treating London as a whole, with infection rates varying widely in different boroughs. 

EALING is now London’s Covid-19 hotspot 

34421214 8842449 image a 29 1602760360345

Ealing has become London’s new Covid-19 hotspot, figures revealed today as it was confirmed that the capital is being thrust into a Tier Two lockdown from tomorrow night.

Government data shows the West London borough diagnosed 144.5 cases for every 100,000 residents in the week ending October 9, topping Richmond upon Thames (137.9). 

Ealing’s seven-day rolling average number of weekly Covid-19 cases has jumped up to 144.5 per 100,000 people in the week ending October 9, from 132.5 just yesterday.

Some parts of the borough are significantly harder hit than others, according to the government’s dashboard.

For example, South Ealing’s infection rate currently stands at 293.6, Southall North’s is 274.3 and Elthorne Park’s is 295.3. 

The Government coronavirus dashboard reveals the borough has moved up from the third spot to the top in one day, overtaking Richmond-upon-Thames and Hackney and City of London.

Thirteen boroughs now have infection rates over 100 per 100,000 people, the equivalent of one person in every 1,000 catching the coronavirus every week. 

None of the 32 boroughs had tipped the threshold before this week, according to separate Public Health England data. 

Advertisement

Ealing has become London’s new Covid-19 hotspot, figures revealed today. Government data shows the West London borough diagnosed 144.5 cases for every 100,000 residents in the week ending October 9, topping Richmond upon Thames (137.9). 

Ealing’s seven-day rolling average number of weekly Covid-19 cases has jumped up to 144.5 per 100,000 people in the week ending October 9, from 132.5 just yesterday.

Some parts of the borough are significantly harder hit than others, according to the government’s dashboard.

For example, South Ealing’s infection rate currently stands at 293.6, Southall North’s is 274.3 and Elthorne Park’s is 295.3. 

The Government coronavirus dashboard reveals the borough has moved up from the third spot to the top in one day, overtaking Richmond-upon-Thames and Hackney and City of London.

Thirteen boroughs now have infection rates over 100 per 100,000 people, the equivalent of one person in every 1,000 catching the coronavirus every week. 

None of the 32 boroughs had tipped the threshold before this week, according to separate Public Health England data. 

The dramatic step was criticised by some London Tories.

London Mayoral Candidate Shaun Bailey said: ‘Sadiq Khan’s constant calls for more restrictions and more lockdowns are incredibly irresponsible. It’s almost like he wants people to pay attention to anything other than his terrible record as Mayor.

‘I fully support the government’s decision to put London into Tier Two. It’s a sensible move that may help us avoid another lockdown while keeping Londoners safe.

‘To be absolutely clear, London’s economy would be hit hard by a second lockdown. So even though it’s right to keep all options on the table, we should do everything we can to avoid a second lockdown.’

Former Conservative leader Iain Duncan Smith demanded to know whether London was being sacrificed to demonstrate the South was not being treated more leniently. 

‘London is huge, whether people like it or not it is very diverse and each of the boroughs, many of them are bigger than most of the towns in the rest of the UK,’ he said in the Commons.

‘Surely we need to look again at the nature of this London-wide Tier 2 position because there could even be regional areas that could be taken out, there are big disparities.

‘Please think again, otherwise, as one constituent has literally rang me today has said – is this in fact a London-wide Tier 2 to stop the North/South divide argument running?’

Mr Hancock replied: ‘No, just on the last point, absolutely not. The decision has been taken on the basis of the data across London.

‘And we did consider the borough-by-borough approach that he understandably advocates, but the decision that we came to is because the cases are rising throughout the capital therefore it was right for the capital to move as a whole – and that was supported by the cross-party team who are working on this at a London level.’

Bromley and Chislehurst MP Sir Bob Neill said the ‘one-size-fits-all approach’ for the capital was a mistake. The senior Conservative told Sky News: ‘I think it’s a mistake. I think it’s disproportionate for the whole of London.

‘I can see some parts of London the test is met, but… there is a cluster of south-east and southern London boroughs where the rates are very much lower.

‘And although they are increasing I think to move this way for the whole of London, this one-size-fits-all approach, is a mistake because of the very real harm it will do to businesses.’

Wimbledon MP Stephen Hammond said he was surprised that the Tier 2 measures were being imposed across the capital.

‘Yes, London infections are rising but they are rising at different rates in different parts of London, different levels of hospitalisation,’ the senior Tory told BBC Radio 4’s World At One.

‘You are taking a very, very broad sweep and it’s not clear that the Government has actually made the case that there should be a complete London-wide lockdown.’

In the Commons, Mr Hancock stressed his distaste for the infringement of civil liberties. But he cemented his reputation as the leading ‘dove’ in Cabinet by insisting action had to be taken before cases rise further. 

‘The central change is that people cannot now meet other households socially indoors. This applies in any setting at home, or in a restaurant or in any other venue. The rule of six still applies in any outdoor setting and although you may continue to travel to open venues, you should reduce the number of journeys where possible,’ he said.   

Can I still meet my friends in a pub garden? Should I cancel my half-term trip to Cornwall? Your questions answered as nine million Londoners are plunged into Tier 2 lockdown 

Nine million people in London are set to face tougher coronavirus restrictions banning households mixing indoors from midnight on Friday night.

MPs have been told London will move to ‘tier two’, meaning households will be banned from mixing indoors – including in pubs – from Saturday at 0.01am.  

The ban on households mixing indoors could be devastating for the capital’s 3,640 pubs and 7,556 restaurants – who will see business suffer but will not be eligible for Government support available to premises which have been ordered to close.

The move is part of the new three-tier strategy of local lockdown measures for England announced by Boris Johnson in efforts to curb rising Covid-19 rates. 

People in London will not be able to meet socially with friends and family indoors in any setting unless they live with them or have formed a support bubble with them.

Up to 15 guests will still be allowed at weddings and up to 30 people allowed at funerals, while shops, gyms, all education settings and churches will remain open. 

The travel advice for those living in tier two is to reduce the number of journeys they take where possible and avoid travel into very high tier three areas.  

Areas in tier two today included Greater Manchester, Cheshire, Derbyshire, Lancashire, West Yorkshire, South Yorkshire, Durham, Northumberland, Tyne and Wear, Tees Valley, West Midlands, Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire.

London, Essex, Elmbridge, Barrow-in-Furness, York, North East Derbyshire, Chesterfield and Erewash will move to tier two from 0.01am on Saturday. 

You can find out the current alert level in your area with the Government’s postcode checker by clicking here, but note it may change this weekend.

Here, MailOnline looks at what it will mean for Londoners from Saturday:

34433430 8842449 image a 51 1602772441060

Can I still go to my friends’ house tonight or tomorrow night?

Yes. Tomorrow will be the last day when you can visit a friend’s house for now, but you must ensure no more than six people gather – and you leave before midnight.

Can I have my friends over from Saturday?

No. People must not meet with anybody outside their household or support bubble in any indoor setting, whether at home or in a public place.

Can I see my friends inside a pub or a restaurant?

No. You must not meet socially with friends and family indoors in any setting unless you live with them or have formed a support bubble with them. 

This includes private homes, and any other indoor venues such as pubs and restaurants. 

Can I meet my friends in a pub garden?

Yes. You can gather in groups of six outside at venues which are following Covid-secure guidance, including pubs, restaurants, shops, leisure and entertainment venues and places of worship.

At least one person in the group should give their contact details to the venue or check in using the official NHS Covid-19 app so NHS Test and Trace can contact you if needed.

Drinkers outside a pub in Westminster last month. You will only be allowed to have a drink with friends from a different household at the pub outdoors from Saturday - and not indoors

Drinkers outside a pub in Westminster last month. You will only be allowed to have a drink with friends from a different household at the pub outdoors from Saturday – and not indoors

Can I see friends outside?

Yes. You may continue to see friends and family you do not live with (or have not formed a support bubble with) outside, including in a garden or other outdoor space. 

When you do so, you must not meet in a group of more than six. 

Do children count in the ‘rule of six’ outdoors?

Yes. This limit of six for meeting people outdoors includes children of any age.

Can I still meet inside with people from my support bubble?

Yes. You will still count as one household who can meet together indoors or outdoors.

A support bubble is where a household with one adult joins with another household. 

Households in that support bubble can still visit each other, stay overnight, and visit public places together. 

Informal childcare can also be provided via childcare bubbles (see below).

Is the support bubble affected by London changing tier?

No. Your support bubble is still valid despite London going into a higher tier, so you can continue to function as one household. 

Can my friends visit if they are from outside London?

No. If you live in a ‘tier two’ area you also cannot meet indoors with people from outside of the area, unless exceptions apply (see final question below). 

Can I go to stay at a hotel or Airbnb home within London? 

Yes. You can still travel within high alert level areas to hotels and other guest accommodation, but you should only do this with people in your household or support bubble.

You can only stay in a private home – which includes self-catered accommodation such as holiday cottages, apartments or boats – with members of your own household or support bubble.

You can stay in a hotel or similar accommodation (for example, a hostel or bed and breakfast) with another household.

However you should avoid sharing rooms with people you do not live with or otherwise socialising indoors, for example in each other’s rooms, in reception areas, or in restaurants and bars.

Can I still go on holiday outside London?

Yes, with exceptions. You can still go on holiday outside of high alert level areas, but you must only do this with people in your household or support bubble.

Can I still go on holiday to Wales? 

Probably not. Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford is proposing a travel ban on visits to Wales by people living in areas of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland with high levels of Covid-19 from Friday. 

He said police in Wales could use number plate technology to catch people from UK coronavirus hotspots who illegally enter the country. 

Can I still go on holiday to a tier three area like Liverpool?

No. You should avoid travelling to any part of the country subject to very high local Covid alert levels.

Can I still move home or look at a house in London?

Yes. You can still move home. Estate and letting agents and removals firms can also continue to work and people looking to move home can continue to undertake viewings. 

Do I have to end my current holiday outside London if it’s with another household?

No. At the time that the new local restrictions are brought in, if you are currently on holiday with another household outside London, but are from London, and are staying in a private home and it is not reasonable for you to curtail your stay, you should finish your holiday as planned. 

The Government advises that until the end of this holiday you should ‘make every effort to reduce socialising indoors outside of your household and follow local regulations and guidance’.

Can I still use public transport?

Yes, but with restrictions. The Government says you may continue to travel to venues or amenities which are open, for work, voluntary, charitable or youth services, or to access education, but you should ‘aim to reduce the number of journeys you make where possible’. 

If you need to travel, the Government encourages people to walk or cycle where possible, or to plan ahead and avoid busy times and routes on public transport. This will allow you to practise social distancing while you travel. 

People wearing face masks pass by market stalls at Covent Garden in Central London today

People wearing face masks pass by market stalls at Covent Garden in Central London today

Do the tier two rules follow me if I travel outside my area? 

Yes. The rules are based on the highest tier level out of a) where you live and b) where you are visiting. 

Therefore, if you live in London, you must abide by London’s rules wherever you go.

But if you are from a tier one area and are visiting London, you must abide by the rules for London.

Can I visit my parents in an area outside of London?

Yes. However you must follow the rules applying to where you live, so you would have to meet them outside and ensure there is not a group of more than six people.

Can I still commute into London if I live in a tier one region outside the capital? 

Yes. The Government says people can continue to travel into a high alert area for work, but should ‘aim to reduce the number of journeys you make where possible’.

Are the exceptions to the rule of six for children? 

Yes. There are exceptions from legal gatherings limits for registered childcare, education or training, and supervised activities provided for children, including wraparound care, youth groups and activities, and children’s playgroups. 

This means you can continue to use early years and childcare settings, including childminders, after-school clubs and nannies. 

Who can provide childcare support in private homes and gardens?

Registered childcare providers including nannies, people in your support bubble or people in your childcare bubble.

What is the definition of a childcare bubble? 

A childcare bubble is where someone in one household provides informal (unpaid and unregistered) childcare to a child aged 13 or under in another household. 

For any given childcare bubble, this must always be between the same two households.

Friends or family who do not live with you and are not part of a support or childcare bubble must not visit your home to help with childcare. 

Childcare bubbles are to be used to provide childcare only, and not for the purposes of different households mixing where they are otherwise not allowed to do so. 

Can I meet with a household from another flat inside the property where I live? 

No. The Government’s definition of a household is one person living alone, or a group of people (not necessarily related) living at the same address who share cooking facilities and share a living room, sitting room or dining area. 

A household can consist of a single family, more than one family or no families in the case of a group of unrelated people. 

Therefore people who live in different self-contained flats cannot meet with each other.

Can I visit my grandparent in a care home?

No, with exceptions. You should not visit a care home except in exceptional circumstances, for example to visit an individual who is at the end of their life. 

Will shops still be open?

Yes. Non-essential retail as well as essential stores will remain open for customers.

Will I be fined if I am caught having a meeting in a group that is illegal? 

Yes. Meeting in larger groups is against the law, although there are certain exceptions (see final question). 

The police can take action against you if you meet in larger groups, which includes breaking up illegal gatherings and issuing fixed penalty notice fines.

You can be fined £200 for the first offence, doubling for further offences up to a maximum of £6,400. 

If you hold, or are involved in holding, an illegal gathering of over 30 people, the police can issue fines of £10,000.

The newly married Lucy and James Bone after their wedding at St Michael and all Angels Church in Ingram, Northumberland, on July 4 - the that weddings were once again permitted

The newly married Lucy and James Bone after their wedding at St Michael and all Angels Church in Ingram, Northumberland, on July 4 – the that weddings were once again permitted

Can I attend a wedding? 

Yes, with restrictions. Up to a maximum of 15 people can attend weddings or equivalent ceremonies and receptions where the organiser has carried out a risk assessment and ‘taken all reasonable measures to limit the risk of transmission of the virus’. 

But receptions should be sit down meals to ensure people can keep their distance from each other, and must not take place in private homes. 

Can I attend a funeral? 

Yes, with restrictions. Up to a maximum of 30 people can attend a funeral. Wakes and other commemorative events are permitted with up to 15 people present, but these cannot take place in private dwellings. 

Where food or drink is consumed, this should be in the form of a sit down meal. 

Anyone working at a wedding, civil partnership ceremony, reception, wake or funeral is not generally counted as part of the limit. 

People living outside of London in a tier one area can travel to the capital to attend an event, but they must not meet with another household indoors. 

Can I still go to church?

Yes. You can still attend places of worship for a service in London. However, you must not mingle with anyone outside of your household or support bubble.   

Can I attend an indoor exercise class? 

Yes, with restrictions. Indoor exercise classes and other activity groups can only continue provided that households or support bubbles do not mix. Where it is likely that groups will mix, these activities must not go ahead. 

There are exceptions to enable disability and youth sport and physical activity indoors, in any number.

Can I still take place in sports activities outdoors?

Yes. In line with guidelines from national sporting bodies, you can take part in sport and physical activity outdoors.

Can I still have a street party?

Yes, but as long as it is outside and no more six people gather, following Covid restrictions. 

Can a tradesperson come into my house? 

Yes. A tradesperson can go into a household without breaching the rules if they are there for work.  

What if I am clinically vulnerable?

The Government advises that those aged 70 or over, pregnant women or those with an underlying health condition can go outside as much as they like but ‘should still try to keep your overall social interactions low’.

Should I share a car with someone from outside my household?

No, in most cases. The Government says it is difficult to socially distance during car journeys and transmission of coronavirus can occur in this context. 

So you should avoid travelling with someone from outside your household or your support bubble unless you can practise social distancing. 

Does the 10pm curfew still apply to pubs and restaurants?

Yes. Certain businesses selling food or drink on their premises are still required to close between 10pm and 5am. 

Businesses and venues selling food for consumption off the premises can continue to do so after 10pm as long as this is through delivery service, click-and-collect or drive-through. Orders must be made via phone, online or by post. 

A group of women carry their drinks in London's Soho after the 10pm curfew began last month

A group of women carry their drinks in London’s Soho after the 10pm curfew began last month

Are hospitality venues at motorway services still exempt from the curfew? 

Yes. Hospitality venues in ports, on transport services and in motorway service areas do not need to close at 10pm, but must not serve alcohol after that time.  

Can I still go to work in the office?

Yes, with exceptions. The Government advises that ‘office workers who can work effectively from home should do so over the winter’. 

It adds: ‘Where an employer, in consultation with their employee, judges an employee can carry out their normal duties from home they should do so.’

Public sector employees working in essential services, including education settings, should continue to go into work where necessary.

The Government also says that ‘anyone else who cannot work from home should go to their place of work’. 

Those classed as clinically extremely vulnerable can go to work as long as the workplace is Covid-secure, but should still work from home wherever possible.

Can I still go to school or college?

Yes. The Government says it has ‘prioritised ensuring all children can attend school safely, to support their wellbeing and education and help working parents and guardians’.

Can I still go to university? 

Yes. Universities have welcomed students back and students are allowed to move home and travel to go there.

However those in tier two areas must not move backward and forward between their permanent home and term time address during term time – subject to limited exemptions.

Students living at their university term time address in a high alert level area should follow the same guidance on meeting other people and travel as others in that area. 

Pupils wear protective face masks on the first day back to school at Outwood Academy Adwick in Doncaster on September 2 as schools in England reopened to pupils following the lockdown

Pupils wear protective face masks on the first day back to school at Outwood Academy Adwick in Doncaster on September 2 as schools in England reopened to pupils following the lockdown

Can I commute into London or another high alert level area to go to university?

Yes. Commuter students – defined as those who live at a family home and travel to/from university each day – should be able to continue to travel to/from their university as required, for education purposes.

However, you must not meet people you do not live with in their home inside the area, unless they’re in your household, childcare or support bubble

You can also not host people you do not live with in your home, if they live in the affected area, unless they’re in your childcare or support bubble

You must also not meet people you do not live with in their student halls, whether inside or outside of the area, unless they’re in your childcare or support bubble.

If you move out of, or currently live outside of, an affected area you should not host people you do not live with in your home or student halls if they live in a high alert level area, unless they’re in your household, support bubble or childcare bubble.

Will Remembrance Sunday at the Cenotaph go ahead?

Yes, with restrictions. Remembrance Sunday at the Cenotaph on November 8 will take place but will be closed to the public.

Crowds will not be allowed to go to the service and will be asked to mark the day at home. The usual Royal British Legion march past has also been cancelled.

It is expected that members of the Royal Family and dignitaries will still attend to lay wreaths to remember the fallen. 

What are the exceptions on people from different households gathering?  

  • in a legally permitted support bubble or childcare bubble
  • for work, volunteering to provide voluntary or charitable services
  • for registered childcare, education or training
  • for arrangements where children do not live in the same household as both their parents or guardians
  • for prospective adopting parents to meet a child or children who may be placed with them
  • for supervised activities provided for children, including wraparound care (before and after school childcare), youth groups and activities, and children’s playgroups
  • for birth partners
  • to see someone who is dying
  • to provide emergency assistance, and to avoid injury or illness, or to escape a risk of harm
  • to fulfil a legal obligation, such as attending court or jury service
  • to provide care or assistance to someone vulnerable
  • to facilitate a house move
  • for elite sportspeople and their coaches if necessary for competition and training, as well as parents or guardians if they are a child
  • for outdoor exercise and dance classes, organised outdoor sport, and licensed outdoor physical activity
  • indoor organised team sports for disabled people, and youth sport
  • support groups of up to 15 participants – formally organised groups to provide mutual aid, therapy or any other form of support (not to take place in private dwellings)
  • protests – if organised in compliance with Covid-secure guidance

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Main News

Suspected killer of estate agent was ‘spotted hurling large suitcase into canal after she vanished’

Published

on

By

suspected killer of estate agent was spotted hurling large suitcase into canal after she vanished

The suspected killer of estate agent Suzy Lamplugh was spotted hurling a large suitcase into a canal in west London three days after she vanished, a retired detective has revealed.

Ms Lamplugh, 25, disappeared 34 years ago, it is believed after going to meet a client who called himself ‘Mr Kipper’ in Fulham, south west London.  

Killer John Cannan, 66, is currently serving three life sentences at Full Sutton Prison in York after being convicted of murder, attempted kidnap and rape in 1988.

He has never been charged in connection with Ms Lamplugh’s murder, but is believed to have told a former girlfriend that he strangled her and buried her body in concrete.

Now former detective superintendent Jim Dickie, who was in charge of a re-investigation into the case, says he was told last year that Cannan was seen dumping a big trunk into the Grand Union Canal in Brentford. 

Killer John Cannan, above, 66, is currently serving three life sentences at Full Sutton Prison in York

He has never been charged in connection with the murder of Suzy Lamplugh (above)

Killer John Cannan (left), 66, is currently serving three life sentences at Full Sutton Prison in York but has never been charged in connection with the murder of Suzy Lamplugh (right)

Former detective superintendent Jim Dickie says he was told last year that Cannan was seen dumping a big trunk into the Grand Union Canal (pictured above) in Brentford, west London

Former detective superintendent Jim Dickie says he was told last year that Cannan was seen dumping a big trunk into the Grand Union Canal (pictured above) in Brentford, west London

A lorry driver is said to have witnessed the scene while on his way to work at 5am, three days after Ms Lamplugh vanished.

Cannan was alleged to be seen with the suitcase on a trolley, and ran away after a splashing sound was heard.

Mr Dickie told The Sun: ‘I believe the canal sighting is the best piece of information to have emerged about Suzy’s potential whereabouts since she went missing more than 34 years ago.’

Cannan was jailed for life with a minimum of 35 years in April 1989 for the rape and murder of Shirley Banks, 29, in Bristol. 

The former detective drew similarities between the two cases, noting that Ms Banks’ body was found in a rural location near a main road, while the Grand Union Canal is close to the A4 and M4. 

 He added: ‘We think that after leaving the bail hostel, Cannan had a room somewhere where he took Suzy and murdered her before hiding the body.

‘There were warehouses around that area at the time where he could easily have got a trolley.’

Ms Lamplugh’s car was found in the evening on the same day she disappeared, parked in a Fulham street a mile from the house, with its handbrake off but with her purse still in the door pocket. 

Police activity in July last year on a roadside verge adjoining a field near Pershore, Worcestershire, in connection with the murder of the estate agent 34 years ago

Police activity in July last year on a roadside verge adjoining a field near Pershore, Worcestershire, in connection with the murder of the estate agent 34 years ago

Six years later, the Metropolitan Police revealed its prime suspect in the case to be serial rapist and convicted killer Cannan – but the Crown Prosecution Service ruled there was insufficient evidence to prosecute. 

Ms Lamplugh was officially declared dead, presumed murdered, in 1994 and her parents Paul and Diana both died without finding out what happened to their daughter.

The estate agent’s disappearance is one of the most puzzling cases of the 20th century.

Witnesses reported seeing a woman meeting her description arguing with a man outside a property in Shorrolds Road at about 1pm on July 28, 1986.

In August 2010, police began searching a field off the B4084 between Pershore and Drakes Broughton, about three miles from the former Norton Barracks in Worcestershire, where a search had previously been carried out in December 2000 and February 2001.

In December 2000, police had also searched a nearby brickworks, which had been mentioned in several of the original witness statements.

Suzy Lamplugh: Timeline of one of the UK’s most notorious cold cases

July 28 1986: Ms Lamplugh leaves her estate agency office in Fulham, west London, at 12.40pm to meet a client called Mr Kipper. At 10pm, her white Ford Fiesta is discovered in Stevenage Road, Fulham. The doors are unlocked, the handbrake is off and the ignition keys are gone. Her purse, still containing £15, is in the pocket of the driver’s door. A massive police hunt is launched. 

December 1986: The Suzy Lamplugh Trust is set up by Suzy’s parents, Paul and Diana Lamplugh, to tackle violence and support stalking victims.

October 1987: With few leads, the police inquiry into the disappearance is closed. The file remains open.

April 1989: John Cannan is jailed for life with a minimum of 35 years for the murder of newlywed Shirley Banks in Bristol. He is also sentenced for a rape and an attempted kidnap.

February 1994: Ms Lamplugh is officially declared dead, presumed murdered.

December 1999: Her mother receives new information from a secret source claiming her daughter’s body could be within the grounds of abandoned Army barracks at Norton, Worcestershire. Scotland Yard says the information is not new but orders a review because of the complex twists in the case.

December 4 2000: Cannan is questioned in prison in connection with the kidnap and murder of Ms Lamplugh. No charges are brought.

December 11 2000: Officers begin a fingertip search of a disused brickworks and a surrounding copse and lake near Norton Barracks in Worcestershire. Investigators return to the scene several times but are not thought to have made significant developments.

June 14 2002: Police submit a new file to the CPS to examine if there is enough evidence to prosecute a suspect.

November 5 2002: Mr Lamplugh speaks of his ‘anger and frustration’ at news the CPS will not charge Cannan, citing insufficient evidence.

December 2002: Reports first surface that Ms Lamplugh may be buried in the garden of the West Midlands home previously owned by the suspect’s mother, Sheila. There is talk of excavating the garden in Sutton Coldfield but Jim Dickie, the detective superintendent leading the investigation at the time, later confirmed his officers did not dig or perform an ‘extensive’ search of the home.

August 2010: Police end their search in a meadow between Pershore and Drakes Broughton in Worcestershire with no remains found.

August 18 2011: Mrs Lamplugh dies aged 75 after suffering a stroke.

June 12 2018: At the age of 87, Mr Lamplugh dies after living with Parkinson’s disease. His death ends hopes that the parents may see justice for their daughter.

October 29 2018: Investigators led by the Metropolitan Police return to Cannan’s mother’s former home in Shipton Road, Sutton Coldfield, to prepare to excavate its garden in the hope of ending the 32-year mystery.

November 2 2018: Cannan reiterates his innocence in the case, saying through his solicitor that he hopes the search of the property will conclude swiftly to ‘end speculation’ that he was responsible.

November 12 2018: The ‘painstaking’ two-week search of the garden finds no evidence. Police insist the case remains open.

July 3 2019: Police begin searching land in Pershore, Worcestershire following new information about the disappearance.

Advertisement

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Main News

Jaffa Cakes bombshell: McVitie’s reveal chocolate is on the BOTTOM

Published

on

By

jaffa cakes bombshell mcvities reveal chocolate is on the bottom

For a small inoffensive treat, Jaffa Cakes can cause a lot of debate.

Is it a biscuit? Is it a cake? Should you eat it all in one or nibble off the edge before the jelly?

These are questions asked in households across the UK, and while theses questions may always remain a mystery, McVitie’s has baffled fans by putting an end to one debate.

The Edinburgh-biscuit company have revealed the chocolate is actually on the bottom of the Jaffa Cake, contrary to popular belief. 

In a screenshot of a Twitter conservation shared widely on UK Facebook groups, McVitie's appear to have confirmed that chocolate goes on the bottom of a Jaffa Cake

In a screenshot of a Twitter conservation shared widely on UK Facebook groups, McVitie’s appear to have confirmed that chocolate goes on the bottom of a Jaffa Cake

UK social media user known as David claims to have asked the Jaffa Cake team to confirm which side of the treat is the top via Facebook messenger.

In screenshots that have since been shared widely, they said: ‘Hi David, our Jaffa Cakes go through a reservoir of chocolate, so the chocolate is the bottom, Thanks Jaffa Cake’ to which David quickly replied: ‘WTF’.

The post was then shared to the Facebook group Family Lockdown Tricks and Tips, where many disagreed with the news.

‘Lol no really not accepting this. The cake part is the bottom,’ said one.

McVitie's have previously weighed in on the debate, revealing that it's not just Jaffa Cakes but all their sweet treats that have the chocolate on the bottom

McVitie’s have previously weighed in on the debate, revealing that it’s not just Jaffa Cakes but all their sweet treats that have the chocolate on the bottom

‘Omg that’s like eating a ham salad sandwich with the ham on the bottom and salad on top. All wrong,’ added another.

”I refuse to accept this,’ said a third.

‘The bad news just keeps on coming. What a year,’ a fourth wrote.

35071092 8899861 image a 14 1604135858273

35071088 8899861 image m 13 1604135847843

35071084 8899861 image m 11 1604135832924

35071080 8899861 image m 5 1604135744542

35071082 8899861 image m 9 1604135817023

Users also took to Twitter to share their shock, with one writing they were 'horrified' at the news.

Users also took to Twitter to share their shock, with one writing they were ‘horrified’ at the news.

‘Their own advert shows choc side up on the plate!’ a fifth noticed. 

Users also took to Twitter to share their shock, with one writing they were ‘horrified’ at the news. 

McVitie’s have previously weighed in on the debate, revealing that it’s not just Jaffa Cakes but all their sweet treats that have the chocolate on the bottom.  

35071078 8899861 image a 17 1604135939348

The post was then shared to the Facebook group Family Lockdown Tricks and Tips , where many disagreed with the news

The post was then shared to the Facebook group Family Lockdown Tricks and Tips , where many disagreed with the news

Marketing director Kerry Owens previously told MailOnline: ‘When we make our McVitie’s chocolate biscuits – whether that be Chocolate Hobnobs, Chocolate Digestives, or even Jaffa Cakes – they go through a reservoir of chocolate on the production line.

‘This essentially “enrobes” the bottom in chocolate – so we can confirm that the chocolate is officially on the bottom of the biscuits.’ 

FEMAIL has contacted McVitie’s for comment.  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Main News

Coronavirus cases are falling in ALL of Liverpool’s local authorities

Published

on

By

coronavirus cases are falling in all of liverpools local authorities

Infections are dropping across Liverpool’s six local authorities, official data reveals, in a clear sign that Tier Three restrictions are driving the city’s outbreak into reverse.

Department of Health data shows infection rates fell by between nine and 15 per cent over the three days between a week after the harshest measures were imposed and October 23, the latest date for which figures are available.

Experts argue infection rates should be compared from a week after Tier Three restrictions are imposed to establish whether they are having an impact because it takes at least five days for a person infected with coronavirus to develop symptoms.

Restrictions in Liverpool saw the shutters pulled down on bars, cafes and pubs not serving substantial meals, bans on mixing in households and gyms and leisure centres forced to bolt their doors. But on October 23 fitness centres were allowed to reopen following negotiations with the Government. 

Of the city’s six local authorities – Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool City, Sefton, St Helens and the Wirral – only St Helens had an infection rate above the level it was at when lockdown was first imposed.

It is still too early to tell whether Tier Three restrictions have had an impact in Lancashire, as the infection rate is only available for the first week that the measures were in force – but all of its local authorities have a downward trend in infections. Nonetheless, only seven of its 14 local authorities have rates below the level they were at when restrictions were imposed on October 17. 

It can take the Government up to a week to calculate infection rates because of a mounting backlog of swabs in labs. The rates are calculated based on specimen dates – the day a test was taken – meaning it can take several days for all the data to become available.

Scientists warned it was difficult to tell what impact Tier Three restrictions were having in Liverpool because the Government does not release data on the number of tests done by local authority – which would reveal whether fewer swabs are being completed in the areas triggering the fall. But it is thought this situation is unlikely as swabs are normally directed to outbreak areas, which receive priority.

Infection rates across Liverpool's six local authorities have started to fall ten days after Tier Three was imposed

Infection rates across Liverpool’s six local authorities have started to fall ten days after Tier Three was imposed

Almost 60 per cent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be under stricter rules by Monday

Almost 60 per cent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be under stricter rules by Monday

LIVERPOOL, CITY OF: Infections in the centre declined by 15 per cent compared to their levels a week after Tier Three was imposed. Experts said infections should be considered from this point because it takes up to a week for someone who is infected to develop symptoms of the virus

LIVERPOOL, CITY OF: Infections in the centre declined by 15 per cent compared to their levels a week after Tier Three was imposed. Experts said infections should be considered from this point because it takes up to a week for someone who is infected to develop symptoms of the virus

KNOWSLEY: This local authority was once the UK's coronavirus hotspot, but it recorded the second fastest decline in infections in Liverpool ten days after Tier Three restrictions were imposed

KNOWSLEY: This local authority was once the UK’s coronavirus hotspot, but it recorded the second fastest decline in infections in Liverpool ten days after Tier Three restrictions were imposed

HALTON: Infections in Halton have also begun to decline in response to the tightened measures in the city

HALTON: Infections in Halton have also begun to decline in response to the tightened measures in the city

LIVERPOOL’S CHANGING FORTUNES: TIER THREE IS WORKING, SAYS DATA

LOCAL AUTHORITY

LIVERPOOL CITY

SEFTON

KNOWSLEY

HALTON

ST. HELENS

WIRRAL

INFECTION RATE ON OCTOBER 23

309.7

148.3

110.7

57.3

109.7

126.6 

% FALL AGAINST OCTOBER 21

-15%

-13%

-13%

-10%

-9%

-10% 

Liverpool’s Tier Three restrictions were launched on October 14, when the city became the first place in the country to experience the harsher measures

Advertisement

Liverpool was the first city in England to be plunged into Tier Three restrictions on October 14, and as such is the best measure of how well they are working.

A week after its restrictions came in three local authorities – Halton, St Helens and the Wirral – all recorded rises in their infections.

But after this deadline was crossed all local authorities started to register downward trends.

The biggest fall was in Liverpool City, where infections dropped 15 per cent from 365.7 to 309.7 cases per 100,000 people.

It was followed by Sefton and Knowsley, which both registered 10 per cent falls in infections to 148.3 and 110.7 per 100,000 respectively.

Only St Helens has an infection rate above the level when Tier Three was imposed – at 109.7 compared to 109 per 100,000 when Tier Three was first imposed.

In Lancashire Blackpool registered the biggest fall in infections, from 101.9 to 96.4 per 100,000.

It was followed by Lancaster, with a 15 per cent drop from 87.9 to 65.6 per 100,000, and Burnley, with a 11 per cent drop from 62.9 to 51.3 per 100,000.

The largest spike was in Hyndburn, where infections rose 20 per cent from 51.6 to 60 per 100,000.

It was followed by hotspot Blackburn with Darwen and Preston – where infections rose by 13 per cent in each region to 164.3 and 98.6 respectively.

The UK has previously received international praise for its Three-Tier approach to coronavirus restrictions.

Dr David Nabarro, from the World Health Organization, said this week the Government’s measures had been ‘very effective’ in some parts of the North of England.

‘Well the first thing to say is just how interesting the UK has been in apparently being able to slow the spread in some parts of the North of the country with very effective local action,’ he told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

‘But what’s that led to, is as you say, a sort of levelling up. And it seems like southern parts of the UK are speeding up.’

The South of England is seeing the highest rates of infection – with SAGE saying the R rate in London may have risen as high as three – meaning the region may soon be put under harsher coronavirus restrictions.

Tier Three restrictions have, however, come in for a roasting today amid warnings the Government could impose a second national lockdown across the country by Wednesday.

Percentage change in coronavirus cases across London in the week to October 25: The five local authorities where the infection rate grew the most are: Kingston upon Hull City, 92.81 per cent; Derby, 91.84 per cent; North Somerset, 82.99 per cent; Medway, 77.17 per cent; and Bath and North East Somerset 69.72 per cent

 Percentage change in coronavirus cases across London in the week to October 25: The five local authorities where the infection rate grew the most are: Kingston upon Hull City, 92.81 per cent; Derby, 91.84 per cent; North Somerset, 82.99 per cent; Medway, 77.17 per cent; and Bath and North East Somerset 69.72 per cent

Professor John Edmunds, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine who also sits on SAGE, slammed the Tier system today – and said the UK has been above their worst-case scenario prediction for several weeks.

‘Tier Three (is) probably slowing the growth a little bit but it isn’t stopping it, nevermind reducing it,’ he warned.

‘If you assume that Tier Three will hold the reproduction number of one that means that places that are in Tier Three not only have very high incidence, but will continue to have very high incidence for the forseeable future. Meanwhile, the rest of the country catches up.’

He added a second national lockdown could drive down cases enough to ensure families could enjoy Christmas together.

‘I think the idea of a lockdown is to save lives primarily,’ he argued, ‘and the only real way that we have to relatively save Christmas is to get the incidence rate right down’.

‘Otherwise, Christmas I think is very difficult for people and nobody wants to have a disrupted Christmas holiday period, where you can’t see your family and so on.

‘So I think the only way that that can be safely achieved is to bring the incidence rate right down and in order to do that we have to take action right now, and that action needs to be stringent unfortunately.’

Sir Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, also slammed the Tier system this morning for failing to curb the spread of infections.

‘Doctors and scientists agree that none of the current restrictions have been enough to stop the virus spreading,’ he said.

‘Without a change, the NHS would have been overwhelmed within weeks and it would have been difficult if not impossible to cope in the winter months with the inevitable increase in caring for people with Covid-19 as well as non-Covid illnesses.’

He added: ‘The only way to get things back to normal quickly is to get the virus under control as soon as possible.

‘The measures being reported today, if implemented and respected, will reduce transmission, get R below 1 and reset us to an earlier stage of the pandemic.

‘This buys us time before we start to see treatments and vaccines in early 2021.’

Professor John Edmunds, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, criticised Tier Three today

And Sir Jeremy Farrar, from the Wellcome Trust, also said it did not go far enough

Despite the success Tier Three came in for a roasting today from Professor John Edmunds, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Sir Jeremy Farrar, who heads up the Wellcome Trust

Infection rates in some Tier 3 areas are finally beginning to fall – but most are still facing rising figures, data shows. 

Liverpool, which entered the strictest Tier 3 lockdown on October 14, has seen a 21% drop in the rate of Covid infections in the most recent week, according to figures from Public Health England’s weekly surveillance report.

Recent data suggests the harsh restrictions — which ban socialising with anyone outside your own household and mean many businesses have to close — are beginning to work, but scientists say the true effect won’t be clear until a few weeks have passed. 

The city, along with Halton, Knowsley, Sefton, Sheffield and St Helens are among the Tier 3 areas that have seen a drop in the infection rate recently – but the majority of those hit by the harshest restrictions are still seeing rises in the rate of transmission. 

The rate in Liverpool from Week 43 (October 19-25) was still a worrying 462% – but this represents a drop of one-fifth from the 584% of the previous week, indicating that Liverpudlians may have finally passed the peak of this wave. 

St Helens in Merseyside, which went into Tier 3 on October 14, was another area to see a drop in the infection rate. The most recent week’s figure is 3.80% less than in the previous week – 421%, down from 437%, and still lower than the 443% in week 41 – the apparent peak.

The town suffered an explosion in the infection rate from 6% in week 35 (late August) to 50% in week 36.

Sefton, another October 14 lockdown, saw a drop of 12% in the weekly rate, and Sheffield, which entered Tier 3 on October 24, saw a small drop of 2% in the rate.  

Halton and Knowsley both entered Tier 3 on October 14, and each saw a drop of 7% and 18% respectively. 

Knowsley’s rate had exploded from 11% in week 35 to 51% in week 36 (early September), and kept increasing until an apparent peak in week 41 (early October) of 700%. The following week the rate was 663%, and the week after it was 542%.

While these areas spark hope for an end to the threat of Covid – and the draconian restrictions brought into to try and combat it – many areas now under the harshest lockdown are still facing explosive rises in infection rates. 

Blackburn with Darwen, which entered Tier 3 on October 16, has seen a 34.30% growth in the infection rate over the most recent week. The latest rate is a staggering 774%, up from 576% the previous week and 446% the week before.  

Doncaster, which was locked into Tier 3 on October 24, saw a 46% growth in the rate in the most recent week. The latest figure is 513%, up from 350% the week before, and 220% the week before that. 

TIER 3 AREAS THAT ARE SEEING IMPROVEMENTS – AND THOSE STILL STRUGGLING 

Below is a list of areas the entered Tier 3 restrictions before October 30, followed by when they entered Tier 3 (T3), and the most recent change in the weekly coronavirus infection rate: 

DECREASES:

Halton; entered Tier 3 (T3) on October 14; down 7.95% 

Knowsley; T3 on October 14; down 18.18%

Liverpool; T3 on October 14; down 20.98% 

Sefton; T3 on October 14; down 12.54%  

Sheffield; T3 on October 24; down 2.46%  

St Helens; T3 on October 14; down 3.80%  

INCREASES:   

Barnsley; T3 on October 24; up 9.12% 

Blackburn; T3 on October 16; up 34.30% 

Bolton; T3 on October 23; up 23.60% 

Blackpool; T3 on October 16; up 0.34%   

Bury; T3 on October 23; up 22.26% 

Doncaster; T3 on October 24; up 46.44% 

Lancashire; October 16; up 10.01% 

Manchester; T3 on October 23; up 10.75% 

Nottinghamshire; T3 on October 14; up 19.38% 

Oldham; T3 on October 23; up 41.22% 

Rochdale; T3 on October 23; up 12.81%  

Rotherham; T3 October 24; up 27.71

Salford; T3 October 23; up 18.88% 

Stockport; T3 on October 23; up 32.05% 

Tameside; T3 on October 23; up 38.41% 

Trafford; T3 on October 23; up 31.27%   

Warrington; T3 on October 27; up 16.67% 

Wigan; T3 on October 23; up 42.40%  

Wirral; T3 on October 14; up 5.78% 

Advertisement

The area had been under control for many weeks, with a rate below 10% for around two months – until an explosion in the rate around Week 36, with exponential growth ever since. 

Oldham, which only last week entered Tier 3 on October 23, still endured a brutal 41% growth in the infection rate in the most recent week – 662%, up from 469%.  

Experts have insisted that it is too early to tell if the tough measures have truly worked, but the figures will add to growing pressure for tougher lockdown rules to be used in the South, which has so far largely escaped anything harsher than the Tier One social distancing laws.    

Scientists warned infections are ‘speeding up’ in the South and a worrying Government-funded study by Imperial College London found that the outbreak appears to be growing fastest in London and the South West, where rules are comparatively lax. 

Although the situation is not as bad yet in the southern regions – there are fewer people testing positive or being admitted to hospital – ministers face growing pressure to act early and stop surging outbreaks before they become disastrous. 

Dr David Nabarro, of the World Health Organization (WHO), praised the UK Government’s decision to impose local measures, claiming they have been ‘very effective’ in some parts of the North.

But he warned in the South infections are ‘speeding up’ on BBC Radio 4, adding: ‘This will mean of course the Government in Britain, like other governments in Europe, will be thinking “do we need to have some sort of over-arching position in the country, with tougher restricions?”‘. 

Delays in processing Covid-19 tests mean it is only possible to see the impact of Tier Three up to October 21, the latest day for which local authorities infection rates are available. The infection rate has been released up to October 23 on the Government’s experimental website, but is yet to be finalised.

It comes after a Government-led study revealed the R rate – how many people an infected person spreads the virus to on average – has begun to decline in the North West, where millions are living under Tier Three curbs.

The rate may have dropped as low as 0.72 for the week ending October 25, the academics said, a significant decline from the previous week’s lowest value of 1.12 and the first sign the outbreak in the region may be falling. 

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) has called for a new national lockdown to curb the spread of the virus, but Housing Minister Robert Jenrick today insisted the Government would avoid the potentially ruinous measure saying you ‘can’t stop-start a country’.

Lockdown critics have warned another one would be ‘catastrophic’ for the country and the ‘final nail in the coffin’ for many businesses that are ‘on their last legs’. 

Most of the authorities where epidemics have grown the most remain in Tier One, where only the rule of six and 10pm curfew apply. Scientists have argued these rules are not stringent enough to shrink the outbreak, with top Government advisers warning the current growth is ‘very bleak’.  

For example, North Somerset and Bath and North East Somerset, where cases jumped up 83 per cent and 70 per cent in one week, have yet to be hit by any tougher virus-controlling restrictions.  

Public Health England’s weekly surveillance report revealed only 20 of all 150 authorities in England saw a drop in infections last week, including Nottingham where cases dropped by 30 per cent. Despite the city’s outbreak shrinking, it will be thrown under the toughest Tier Three restrictions from tomorrow, along with the rest of the county.

WHERE DID THE INFECTION RATE GROW THE MOST? 

Kingston upon Hull, City of 92.81%

Derby 91.84%

North Somerset 82.99%

Medway 77.17%

Bath and North East Somerset 69.72%

South Gloucestershire 62.13%

Herefordshire, County of 58.10%

Derbyshire 57.98%

Stoke-on-Trent 56.79%

Lincolnshire 55.26%

Staffordshire 55.21%

Leicestershire 54.29%

Southampton 54.02%

Brighton and Hove 52.57%

Milton Keynes 50.88%

Swindon 49.99%

East Riding of Yorkshire 49.32%

Dudley 49.07%

West Sussex 46.89%

Leicester 46.57%

 

Advertisement

WHERE DID THE INFECTION RATE GROW THE LEAST? 

Nottingham -30.00%

Liverpool -20.98%

York -20.25%

Windsor and Maidenhead -20.09%

Knowsley -18.18%

County Durham -15.51%

Sefton -12.54%

Rutland -11.63%

Devon -11.12%

Camden -10.03%

Halton -7.95%

South Tyneside -5.35%

Hackney and City of London -4.60%

Richmond upon Thames -3.96%

St. Helens -3.80%

Hartlepool -3.68%

Slough -3.02%

Sheffield -2.46%

Leeds -1.22%

Newcastle upon Tyne -0.42%

 

Advertisement

Ministers are understood to analyse a ‘basket’ of indicators to make decisions on Covid-19 restrictions, including the infection rate, hospital admissions and speed of growth. 

Dominic Raab says Government is ‘ready’ for TIER FOUR COVID restrictions 

Dominic Raab today hinted the Government could introduce a new Tier Four set of even stricter coronavirus restrictions as he refused to rule out a national lockdown. 

The Government’s current local lockdown system is based on three tiers but there are fears that even the most draconian rules in Tier Three are not enough to stop the spread of the disease. 

A new Tier Four could see non-essential shops told to close and travel limited to getting to work and school. 

Mr Raab said the Government is ‘always ready for further measures’ as he insisted ministers intend to stick to their localised approach of cracking down on infections. 

But the Foreign Secretary admitted that both Germany and France had also used a strategy of local crackdowns before ultimately being forced into new nation shutdowns. 

He would only go so far as saying the Government is ‘striving to avoid’ following the UK’s European neighbours as he resisted imposing a ‘blanket approach or a blunt approach’. 

Mr Raab told the BBC’s Radio 4 Today programme: ‘We are always ready for further measures that we can take but I think the most important thing about further measures is we continue on the track that we are on of targeting the virus.

‘The difference between now and the first lockdown is we are in a much better place to really focus on where the virus is the greatest and I think that is right, not only in scientific and virus management terms, I think in terms of the way people feel about tackling the virus it is fair, it fits the natural justice that we are focusing on the areas where the uptick is the greatest and we are not taking a one-size-fits-all approach or a blanket approach or a blunt approach.’

Mr Raab said the Government wanted to avoid the ‘arbitrariness of a blanket approach’ as he claimed the public favour targeted restrictions. 

However, he did not rule out eventually having to impose a national lockdown after France and Germany made the move earlier this week. 

He said: ‘You mention France. France of course tried a localised approach and then fell back on the national approach.

‘What I think that shows you, Germany is the same, is how important it is that we all rally together at local level through to national level, communities, local leaders, national leaders, and really lean in to the localised focused approach.

‘That is the most effective way to tackle the virus and avoid the blanket approach which I don’t think would be in the best interests of this country and which we are striving to avoid.’

Mr Raab said it is ‘crucially important’ to ‘carry the public with us’ and that he believed the Government’s tiered approach is the best way to do that. 

Advertisement

South Gloucestershire, in the south west, and Herefordshire in the West Midlands, also saw their outbreaks rapidly grow in the space of one week, by around 60 per cent. However, their infection rates are also lower than the national average and currently stand at 192 and 86, respectively.

The figures indicate the ‘second wave’ is now affecting all corners of England, and not just the north.   

Scientists warned this week infections are ‘speeding up’ in the south.

A worrying Government-funded study by Imperial College London found that the outbreak appears to be growing fastest in London and the South West, where rules are comparatively lax, and slowest in the northern regions with the toughest restrictions. 

They predicted the R rate — the average number of people each carrier infects — is also higher than two in the South East, East and South West, which have mostly escaped any tough local lockdowns.  

But the R rate in the capital is higher than anywhere else in England, at three. For comparison, the experts claimed the national R rate is around 1.6. Cases are doubling every three days compared to every nine days in the rest of England, the study claimed.  

The PHE data shows just 20 out of 149 councils recorded a fall in their Covid-19 infection rates in the week ending October 25. For comparison, 23 saw a dip the week before. 

A  number of large cities saw their infection rates drop in the week to October 25. This includes Nottingham (down 30 per cent), Liverpool (down 21 per cent), Sheffield (down 2.46 per cent) and Leeds (down 1.22 per cent).

But despite this, Nottingham and Leeds will be plunged into Tier Three restrictions this weekend. And there are no clear path for Liverpool and Sheffield to move out of their local ‘lockdowns’.

Liverpool, and the rest of Merseyside including Halton, Knowsley, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral, went straight into Tier Three when the tiered system came into force on October 14. All those places saw infection rates drop in the most recent week, other than Wirral, where cases only rose by 6 per cent. 

A number of places under Tier Two also saw drops in infection rates, including York (20 per cent), South Tyneside (5 per cent) and Newcastle upon Tyne (down a slight 0.42 per cent).

Parts of London — Camden (down 10 per cent), Hackney and City of London (down 4.60 per cent) and Richmond upon Thames (down 3.96 per cent) — also saw improvements in infection rates. These areas have some of the highest infection rates in London, suggesting that residents have acted to control the coronavirus.

But it’s understood London could be thrown into Tier Three lockdown within two weeks unless infection rates drop significantly across the whole capital. 

Londoners are currently banned from meeting indoors with anyone they don’t live with. 

However London Mayor Sadiq Khan is piling on pressure on No10 to drag the city into Tier Three, despite infection rates varying across the 32 different boroughs – from 223 positive tests per 100,000 people in Ealing over the most recent week, to 103 per 100,000 in Lewisham. 

It comes after the Government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) reportedly said this week all of England could be in Tier Three lockdown by mid-December if a national lockdown is not adopted before.

They said virus rates all over the country will soar past the levels seen in areas already put into the ‘very high’ category by the festive season, The Sun reported, with ‘a government source’ saying: ‘The latest Sage numbers are utterly bleak.’

SAGE has piled fresh pressure on Boris Johnson to impose tougher restrictions as it warned up to 85,000 people could die in a second wave. A ‘reasonable worst case scenario’ put forward by SAGE suggested daily deaths could remain above 500 for three months or more until March next year.

London ‘will go into Tier 3 lockdown in two weeks’ as Britain faces a super-spreader Christmas

London could be plunged into Tier 3 lockdown within two weeks as England creeped closer towards full national lockdown by the back door last night, with millions told they will face extra curbs.    

Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays, and sources close so Sadiq Khan expect the capital to be locked down imminently.

Senior figures are warning that the UK’s three-tier system is not enough to ‘get on top of the numbers’, with deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam reportedly beginning to change his mind over whether regional lockdowns will suppress the virus . He backed the move at a No 10 press conference last week

Presenting what one source called ‘very, very bleak’ data to a meeting of Covid-O, the the Cabinet subcommittee on coronavirus, he said that daily hospital admissions had reached the highest level since April at 1,404.  

There are fears that the whole country will be at Tier 3 by Christmas, and unable to meet extended family members unless the Government takes harsh, draconian action before the season.

Allowing people to visit family at Christmas will be a ‘spreader event’ that could cause a spike in infections many times worse than that caused by the return of university students, experts believe. 

But introducing national restrictions before and after Christmas, while lifting them for the big day could help minimise the impact. 

One senior health official told the Telegraph that anti-Covid measures were most likely to be successful if they were taken on a national basis rather than toughening up the rules for Tier 3. 

They added that a post-Christmas ‘circuit-breaker’ lockdown could also help reverse numbers and curb rising numbers of hospitalisations as fears spread that Britain’s ICUs could be overrun.

‘Releasing measures for two days is unlikely to cause a big upswing,’ a source said.’ But it won’t do nothing. Christmas brings people from all over the country to sit inside together, so its quite likely to be a spreading event.

‘But people want to see their loved ones and they want to make physical contact, and we have to recognise that.’ 

Advertisement

Independent experts told MailOnline it’s likely most of the places in England that are in Tier One will move into Tier Two by Christmas because the Rule of Six and 10pm curfew are not enough to stamp out rising infections. 

Martin McKee, a professor of European public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and member of Independent Sage, said: ‘We unfortunately have allowed the infection to get out of control and as a consequence we are going to need to turn this around, otherwise it will just keep going up, more will get seriously ill and more people will die.

‘The sooner we impose tighter restrictions, the better. I see MPs saying “the rates are low in my area so we shouldn’t do anything”. It’s not about if case are low, it’s about if they are increasing rapidly. 

‘We saw very clearly in March that it’s better sooner than later. So we really should be doing this now, we really have no time to lose.’

But Professor McKee stressed that with tighter restrictions, three essential things are needed — a clampdown on indoor social mixing where the virus can spread easily, mental health support, and a working test and trace system. Currently the UK’s NHS Test and Trace is not performing to the ‘world beating’ status that was promised.

Professor McKee added: ‘As long as infections are going up, we have a major problem. Simply because of the nature of exponential growth. It’s a simple nature of mathematics. Even if the infections are going up even slightly, the rate of growth will go upwards faster. 

‘On the other hand, if we can put in really stringent measure to stop people mixing with each other, you can get a large drop in quite a short period of time.

Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease expert at the University of East Anglia, said: ‘The Tier One restrictions are clearly not working in terms of suppressing the epidemic. I suspect the government would decide to increase, in most areas of the country, will at least move into Tier Two in the next month. And some of the current Tier Two will move into Tier Three. 

‘The interesting thing is it’s not going up quite as quickly in the northern cities as it was. And in some of those cities, such as Liverpool, it does seem to be declining a bit already.

‘I think it’s a little too early to say whether these Tier Two/Tier Three levels are not working. The bottom line is the higher restrictions may be working but it’s too early to be sure.

‘In the southern small town rural areas, that’s where a lot of the current increases are at the moment. It’s very obvious cases are increasing in the south now. Pretty much everywhere in between is on the up.

‘The issue is what time will they decide that is no longer acceptable or tolerable and then increase restrictions in those areas.’

Simon Clarke, an associate professor in cellular microbiology at University of Reading, said: ‘Are local restriction enough? They should be, but the problem is not so much going from Tier Two to Three, but going from One to Two. We know in certain parts of the country that is not happening quickly enough.

‘My gut feeling is we are heading for tightening restrictions between now and into the new year. I think that it will be something like Tier Three or perhaps tighter. I think we will get a tier 4 added on top. But it’s just a guess.’ 

Britain is slowly creeping one step closer to a de facto lockdown every day, with the UK confirming another 23,065 positive test results and 280 deaths yesterday.

Cases are up 8.6 per cent on the 21,242 announced last Thursday, while deaths have increased by 48 per cent in the same time. 

35007482 8893769 image a 6 1604074593156

35007224 8892463 image a 16 1603988699093

Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays

Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays

Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays, and sources close so Sadiq Khan expect the capital to be locked down imminently.

Senior figures are warning that the UK’s three-tier system is not enough to ‘get on top of the numbers’, with deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam reportedly beginning to change his mind over whether regional lockdowns will suppress the virus . He backed the move at a No 10 press conference last week

Presenting what one source called ‘very, very bleak’ data to a meeting of Covid-O, the the Cabinet subcommittee on coronavirus, he said that daily hospital admissions had reached the highest level since April at 1,404. 

Allowing people to visit family at Christmas will be a spreader event that could cause a spike in infections many times worse than that caused by the return of university students, experts believe.

But introducing national restrictions before and after Christmas, while lifting them for the big day could help minimise the impact. 

Almost 60 per cent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be under stricter rules by Monday, and it is understood London could be moved into the top tier in two weeks unless infection rates drop significantly.

Sixteen areas will move into the ‘high risk’ Tier Two at midnight including Oxford, Luton, East Riding of Yorkshire, Kingston Upon Hull, Derbyshire Dales, Derby and Staffordshire.

That means that more than 21.6 million face the restrictions that include a ban on socialising indoors with anyone from another household, whether at home or in bars, restaurants and cafes. 

A further 11 million will be in the ‘very high risk’ Tier Three from midnight on Sunday when Leeds and the rest of West Yorkshire are added to the places where pubs are closed unless serving food.

This will leave only 23.7million without enhanced restrictions.

With tougher restrictions in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, it means just over three-fifths of the UK population are living under extra lockdown restrictions.

HOW HAVE INFECTION RATES CHANGED IN YOUR AREA? 
Local authority name Sept 21 to 27 Sept 28 to Oct 4 Change Oct 5 to 11 Change Oct 12 to 18 Change Oct 19 to 25 Change
Barking and Dagenham 62 63.41 39.18% 98.17 54.82% 119.3 21.52% 131.51 10.23%
Barnet 43.2 86.39 267.77% 110.64 28.07% 114.68 3.65% 140.7 22.69%
Barnsley 76.56 148.66 336.85% 279.91 88.29% 457.33 63.38% 499.06 9.12%
Bath and North East Somerset 37.25 67.78 367.77% 120.03 77.09% 112.79 -6.03% 191.43 69.72%
Bedford 47.9 74.44 138.90% 81.37 9.31% 87.14 7.09% 88.29 1.32%
Bexley 28.19 56.39 141.40% 66.05 17.13% 82.97 25.62% 113.58 36.89%
Birmingham 147.92 159.31 28.64% 190.92 19.84% 227.36 19.09% 257.75 13.37%
Blackburn with Darwen 182.37 257.86 30.41% 446.24 73.06% 576.5 29.19% 774.24 34.30%
Blackpool 91.79 197.21 169.60% 288.28 46.18% 424.54 47.27% 425.97 0.34%
Bolton 244.13 265 9.80% 335.25 26.51% 442.01 31.84% 546.34 23.60%
Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole 25.55 74.12 252.95% 134.57 81.56% 144.44 7.33% 184.91 28.02%
Bracknell Forest 25.3 40.8 212.40% 53.04 30.00% 81.6 53.85% 84.86 4.00%
Bradford 184.34 293.27 98.37% 335.14 14.28% 395.72 18.08% 481.13 21.58%
Brent 50.64 79.45 181.74% 99.16 24.81% 98.55 -0.62% 113.41 15.08%
Brighton and Hove 21.66 62.22 448.68% 82.51 32.61% 93.51 13.33% 142.67 52.57%
Bristol, City of 28.27 66.47 275.54% 156.46 135.38% 245.37 56.83% 333.64 35.97%
Bromley 27.68 55.67 242.58% 70.11 25.94% 89.97 28.33% 108.93 21.07%
Buckinghamshire 24.82 48.35 182.75% 88.98 84.03% 86.77 -2.48% 104.6 20.55%
Bury 216.24 290.59 52.89% 389.55 34.05% 430.39 10.48% 526.21 22.26%
Calderdale 97.42 173.56 135.27% 242.6 39.78% 311.65 28.46% 410.49 31.72%
Cambridgeshire 18.06 45.29 355.18% 65.34 44.27% 67.48 3.28% 82.17 21.77%
Camden 27.4 55.55 138.11% 111.84 101.33% 121.84 8.94% 109.62 -10.03%
Central Bedfordshire 23.56 37.76 67.67% 51.27 35.78% 61.67 20.28% 71.37 15.73%
Cheshire East 61.17 141.35 287.90% 168.68 19.33% 173.11 2.63% 215.8 24.66%
Cheshire West and Chester 78.12 143.7 220.12% 191.21 33.06% 199.08 4.12% 214.53 7.76%
Cornwall and Isles of Scilly 40.4 26.58 32.17% 32 20.39% 30.78 -3.81% 44.95 46.04%
County Durham 110.55 201.29 209.30% 338.05 67.94% 329.56 -2.51% 278.44 -15.51%
Coventry 74.56 108.2 95.13% 166.34 53.73% 184.11 10.68% 199.99 8.63%
Croydon 32.58 66.46 307.98% 75.25 13.23% 79.39 5.50% 105.76 33.22%
Cumbria 51.2 86.6 252.03% 121.6 40.42% 152.4 25.33% 170.2 11.68%
Darlington 103.93 176.03 358.53% 206.92 17.55% 286.51 38.46% 296.81 3.59%
Derby 43.14 82.78 124.21% 134.08 61.97% 171.39 27.83% 328.8 91.84%
Derbyshire 44.35 93.44 201.23% 144.51 54.66% 186.5 29.06% 294.63 57.98%
Devon 18.82 84.37 957.27% 105.69 25.27% 78.52 -25.71% 69.79 -11.12%
Doncaster 62.84 147.81 177.73% 220.27 49.02% 350.76 59.24% 513.64 46.44%
Dorset 11.36 25.1 352.25% 60.76 142.07% 72.39 19.14% 103.3 42.70%
Dudley 56.28 79.29 90.28% 102.3 29.02% 150.81 47.42% 224.82 49.07%
Ealing 55.29 98.01 248.91% 139.85 42.69% 162.08 15.90% 212.4 31.05%
East Riding of Yorkshire 49.83 109.33 372.06% 133.36 21.98% 172.35 29.24% 257.35 49.32%
East Sussex 14.72 30.51 359.49% 44.86 47.03% 50.43 12.42% 58.32 15.65%
Enfield 42.54 72.8 158.52% 93.77 28.80% 137.21 46.33% 138.41 0.87%
Essex 26.66 48.35 176.92% 69.97 44.72% 90.25 28.98% 99.05 9.75%
Gateshead 162.33 241.02 83.08% 255.38 5.96% 259.34 1.55% 355.84 37.21%
Gloucestershire 19.62 40.5 200.00% 62 53.09% 62.63 1.02% 68.6 9.53%
Greenwich 36.47 50.7 217.27% 75.36 48.64% 85.43 13.36% 92.73 8.55%
Hackney and City of London 55.36 101.77 311.03% 132.37 30.07% 164.35 24.16% 156.79 -4.60%
Halton 265.82 343.1 80.49% 387.91 13.06% 340 -12.35% 312.96 -7.95%
Hammersmith and Fulham 45.91 75.08 238.96% 115.59 53.96% 163.12 41.12% 190.12 16.55%
Hampshire 16.78 35.08 219.20% 55.48 58.15% 68.35 23.20% 94.32 38.00%
Haringey 40.95 89.34 192.73% 116.88 30.83% 126.93 8.60% 142.57 12.32%
Harrow 42.2 95.95 244.28% 116.26 21.17% 127.81 9.93% 133.78 4.67%
Hartlepool 153.74 250.9 213.35% 274.39 9.36% 348.06 26.85% 335.24 -3.68%
Havering 58.18 60.49 80.46% 100.56 66.24% 126.76 26.05% 148.72 17.32%
Herefordshire, County of 12.97 22.3 152.83% 37.86 69.78% 54.46 43.85% 86.1 58.10%
Hertfordshire 30.94 66.83 166.79% 87.35 30.70% 90.79 3.94% 106.68 17.50%
Hillingdon 57.35 75.28 117.95% 102.32 35.92% 135.24 32.17% 160 18.31%
Hounslow 57.82 81.39 166.24% 105.7 29.87% 139.21 31.70% 177.15 27.25%
Isle of Wight 11.29 12.7 259.77% 17.63 38.82% 24.69 40.05% 31.04 25.72%
Islington 42.89 76.3 198.40% 90.32 18.37% 121.25 34.24% 126.62 4.43%
Kensington and Chelsea 24.34 81.34 262.80% 94.15 15.75% 135.14 43.54% 138.99 2.85%
Kent 16.44 34.46 240.51% 50.46 46.43% 54.25 7.51% 75.24 38.69%
Kingston upon Hull, City of 35.41 95.85 555.16% 107.01 11.64% 144.74 35.26% 279.08 92.81%
Kingston upon Thames 33.24 72.11 255.57% 101.97 41.41% 144.78 41.98% 184.22 27.24%
Kirklees 118.92 192.37 106.85% 254.44 32.27% 300.37 18.05% 388.82 29.45%
Knowsley 335.41 602.54 182.30% 700.64 16.28% 663.52 -5.30% 542.88 -18.18%
Lambeth 41.71 77.6 272.00% 92.94 19.77% 122.38 31.68% 137.1 12.03%
Lancashire 160.6 246.02 139.88% 347.6 41.29% 387.44 11.46% 426.22 10.01%
Leeds 170.46 379.13 239.39% 394.63 4.09% 393.5 -0.29% 388.71 -1.22%
Leicester 111.51 140.31 23.94% 184.06 31.18% 222.46 20.86% 326.06 46.57%
Leicestershire 51.12 92.19 124.47% 161.58 75.27% 176.87 9.46% 272.89 54.29%
Lewisham 34 64.09 206.21% 77.16 20.39% 79.13 2.55% 90.57 14.46%
Lincolnshire 27.85 63.19 238.82% 92.61 46.56% 103.65 11.92% 160.93 55.26%
Liverpool 342.94 580.27 186.43% 681.47 17.44% 584.69 -14.20% 462.01 -20.98%
Luton 61.96 72.28 41.28% 89.65 24.03% 141.28 57.59% 150.2 6.31%
Manchester 307.67 558.19 215.22% 474.62 -14.97% 438.99 -7.51% 486.2 10.75%
Medway 17.59 30.87 177.36% 38.77 25.59% 45.59 17.59% 80.77 77.17%
Merton 26.63 47.93 266.72% 77.95 62.63% 95.38 22.36% 134.11 40.61%
Middlesbrough 136.19 259.61 375.30% 280.89 8.20% 351.82 25.25% 353.95 0.61%
Milton Keynes 24.86 45.28 139.20% 65.69 45.08% 63.46 -3.39% 95.75 50.88%
Newcastle upon Tyne 299.19 492.37 204.91% 466.94 -5.16% 313.39 -32.88% 312.07 -0.42%
Newham 66.26 75.04 100.75% 103.36 37.74% 129.41 25.20% 142.16 9.85%
Norfolk 17.3 38.01 228.52% 50.89 33.89% 63.89 25.55% 84.71 32.59%
North East Lincolnshire 35.1 76.46 481.00% 162.32 112.29% 237.52 46.33% 339.68 43.01%
North Lincolnshire 47.59 94.03 224.02% 151.49 61.11% 170.06 12.26% 191.54 12.63%
North Somerset 27.9 39.99 56.33% 54.87 37.21% 71.15 29.67% 130.2 82.99%
North Tyneside 156.32 232.31 137.93% 251.55 8.28% 210.67 -16.25% 279.44 32.64%
North Yorkshire 67.47 113.1 188.82% 134.29 18.74% 141.09 5.06% 164.39 16.51%
Northamptonshire 24.43 60.14 198.02% 96.25 60.04% 107.53 11.72% 127.31 18.39%
Northumberland 171.2 180.19 114.38% 175.54 -2.58% 176.47 0.53% 179.88 1.93%
Nottingham 94.32 609.79 1523.94% 927.91 52.17% 610.69 -34.19% 427.46 -30.00%
Nottinghamshire 49.74 137.04 387.17% 220.47 60.88% 272.27 23.50% 325.03 19.38%
Oldham 193.58 295.64 62.27% 382.52 29.39% 468.56 22.49% 661.72 41.22%
Oxfordshire 25.59 64.48 309.14% 86.31 33.86% 89.35 3.52% 111.9 25.24%
Peterborough 35.1 62.3 223.13% 81.58 30.95% 95.92 17.58% 125.09 30.41%
Plymouth 23.27 37.77 80.03% 68.68 81.84% 103.01 49.99% 141.55 37.41%
Portsmouth 32.11 50.72 194.54% 104.7 106.43% 144.25 37.77% 163.79 13.55%
Reading 29.67 43.89 343.78% 74.79 70.40% 95.81 28.11% 109.41 14.19%
Redbridge 73.06 110.74 78.84% 125.15 13.01% 136.95 9.43% 168.4 22.96%
Redcar and Cleveland 70.73 173.53 395.80% 210.72 21.43% 280.71 33.21% 323 15.07%
Richmond upon Thames 39.39 108.58 593.36% 144.94 33.49% 153.02 5.57% 146.96 -3.96%
Rochdale 202.78 335.41 126.06% 429.83 28.15% 508.97 18.41% 574.16 12.81%
Rotherham 100.98 203.08 228.66% 279.57 37.66% 386.19 38.14% 493.2 27.71%
Rutland 42.58 85.16 580.19% 132.74 55.87% 107.7 -18.86% 95.17 -11.63%
Salford 195.49 317.19 114.36% 390.21 23.02% 495.3 26.93% 588.79 18.88%
Sandwell 113.26 114.78 19.67% 146.45 27.59% 216.17 47.61% 275.23 27.32%
Sefton 226.84 371.19 194.83% 477.19 28.56% 438.48 -8.11% 383.49 -12.54%
Sheffield 121.74 385.74 519.76% 455.16 18.00% 431.05 -5.30% 420.45 -2.46%
Shropshire 42.4 59.11 193.79% 86.34 46.07% 84.48 -2.15% 119.45 41.39%
Slough 82.92 86.93 217.03% 92.28 6.15% 155.14 68.12% 150.46 -3.02%
Solihull 90.12 119.7 61.87% 174.7 45.95% 209.36 19.84% 223.69 6.84%
Somerset 13.87 32.9 362.73% 39.13 18.94% 45.89 17.28% 61.36 33.71%
South Gloucestershire 24.2 58.58 255.25% 88.04 50.29% 118.56 34.67% 192.22 62.13%
South Tyneside 221.89 274.88 37.42% 245.07 -10.84% 235.14 -4.05% 222.55 -5.35%
Southampton 19.01 42.77 199.93% 60.19 40.73% 74.05 23.03% 114.05 54.02%
Southend-on-Sea 31.13 42.59 143.79% 48.05 12.82% 68.81 43.20% 82.46 19.84%
Southwark 47.99 60.53 114.42% 79.35 31.09% 95.66 20.55% 121.69 27.21%
St. Helens 254.17 347.76 167.24% 443.56 27.55% 437.47 -1.37% 420.85 -3.80%
Staffordshire 38.66 82.2 173.82% 121.2 47.45% 169.06 39.49% 262.4 55.21%
Stockport 110.42 227.32 162.62% 297.18 30.73% 299.91 0.92% 396.02 32.05%
Stockton-on-Tees 100.84 233.6 339.02% 342.54 46.64% 357.24 4.29% 447.43 25.25%
Stoke-on-Trent 49.54 60.46 54.99% 118.19 95.48% 192.3 62.70% 301.51 56.79%
Suffolk 8.41 33.49 298.22% 46.37 38.46% 55.03 18.68% 72.63 31.98%
Sunderland 215.7 296.72 108.61% 299.24 0.85% 321.92 7.58% 323.72 0.56%
Surrey 27.08 66.29 350.65% 83.01 25.22% 94.8 14.20% 106.58 12.43%
Sutton 23.75 36.83 162.14% 81.9 122.37% 90.14 10.06% 114.85 27.41%
Swindon 19.35 27.9 181.82% 45.46 62.94% 69.31 52.46% 103.96 49.99%
Tameside 174.4 245.48 74.84% 322.75 31.48% 371.31 15.05% 513.92 38.41%
Telford and Wrekin 43.92 56.16 173.02% 81.73 45.53% 154.01 88.44% 211.28 37.19%
Thurrock 24.09 43.02 226.16% 75.14 74.66% 122.17 62.59% 157.74 29.12%
Torbay 14.68 49.9 466.40% 82.19 64.71% 100.54 22.33% 126.23 25.55%
Tower Hamlets 62.51 85.61 164.80% 97.92 14.38% 133.64 36.48% 148.73 11.29%
Trafford 139.88 279.75 277.28% 336.63 20.33% 327.36 -2.75% 429.74 31.27%
Wakefield 86.13 163.93 243.96% 238.87 45.71% 310.64 30.05% 401.08 29.11%
Walsall 83.37 122.25 81.76% 168.84 38.11% 211.57 25.31% 305.8 44.54%
Waltham Forest 47.3 79.43 147.21% 94.95 19.54% 102.53 7.98% 135.75 32.40%
Wandsworth 37.92 71.89 243.48% 101.31 40.92% 114.35 12.87% 143.78 25.74%
Warrington 197.61 268.55 102.15% 337.6 25.71% 348.55 3.24% 406.64 16.67%
Warwickshire 40.49 70.94 98.05% 101.05 42.44% 126.14 24.83% 166.63 32.10%
West Berkshire 22.72 39.13 181.92% 49.23 25.81% 57.43 16.66% 83.94 46.16%
West Sussex 21.64 33.1 148.69% 43.06 30.09% 50.35 16.93% 73.96 46.89%
Westminster 29.08 71.18 220.63% 88.02 23.66% 108.3 23.04% 135.08 24.73%
Wigan 160.04 274.45 124.39% 407.71 48.56% 460.66 12.99% 655.99 42.40%
Wiltshire 15.2 32.8 221.57% 53.8 64.02% 68 26.39% 84.2 23.82%
Windsor and Maidenhead 31.7 80.57 335.75% 113.59 40.98% 141.33 24.42% 112.93 -20.09%
Wirral 193.82 252.77 61.86% 315.42 24.79% 267.27 -15.27% 282.71 5.78%
Wokingham 28.64 45 327.76% 61.36 36.36% 76.55 24.76% 95.26 24.44%
Wolverhampton 83.16 75.94 21.21% 133.66 76.01% 191 42.90% 246.43 29.02%
Worcestershire 43.47 70.83 232.22% 93.15 31.51% 105.24 12.98% 128.4 22.01%
York 72.64 195.14 341.89% 266.36 36.50% 307.19 15.33% 244.99 -20.25%

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.