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Doctors plan to discharge Trump from Walter Reed as early as TOMORROW

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doctors plan to discharge trump from walter reed as early as tomorrow

The president’s doctors said Sunday that he could be discharged from Walter Reed as early as Monday as Trump’s top physician detailed he was given a steroid and put on oxygen as a treatment for COVID-19.

‘Our plan for today is to have him to eat and drink, be up out of bed as much as possible, to be mobile,’ Dr. Brian Garibaldi, one of the doctor’s on Trump’s team, said. ‘And if he continues to look and feel as well as he does today, our hope is that we can plan for a discharge as early as tomorrow to the White House where he can continue his treatment course.’

He also detailed that Trump would continue taking doses of Remdesivir, a broad-spectrum antiviral medication, and dexamethasone, a steroid, whether he remains at Walter Reed or is transferred to the White House. 

The president’s top doctor, Navy Commander Sean Conley, deflected blame during the briefing, claiming there was some confusion over Trump’s condition because Chief of Staff Mark Meadow’s comments were misrepresented.

‘The Chief and I work side-by-side,’ Conley said of Meadows. ‘And I think his statement was misconstrued.’

‘What he meant was that 24 hours ago, when he and I were checking on the president, that there was that momentary episode of a high fever. And that temporary drop in the saturation, which prompted us to act expediently to move him up here,’ he said of the president’s swift movement from the White House to Walter Reed on Friday.

‘Fortunately that was a very transient, limited episode,’ he continued in a briefing with some press outside the hospital center. ‘A couple hours later he was back up, mild again. I’m not going to speculate what that limited episode was about so early in the course. But he’s doing well.

Mike Pence and second lady Karen Pence both tested negative for coronavirus on Sunday, paving the way for the vice president to take power should the president become incapacitated. 

Conley, a Navy Commander and physician to the president, revealed during the briefing that Trump was treated with the steroid dexamethasone after a drop in oxygen levels on Saturday.

‘Over the course of his illness, the president has experienced two episodes of transient drops in his oxygen saturation. We debated the reasons for this and whether we’d even intervene. As a determination of the team, based predominantly on the timeline for the diagnosis, that we initiate dexamethasone,’ Conley said.

The physician then detailed the timeline of Trump’s treatment and the decision Friday to move him to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center just hours after the president announced that he and first lady Melania Trump tested positive for coronavirus.   

Donald Trump's doctors revealed Sunday that they treated the president with a steroid and put him on oxygen Saturday as they were concerned over the rapid progression of the virus

Donald Trump’s doctors revealed Sunday that they treated the president with a steroid and put him on oxygen Saturday as they were concerned over the rapid progression of the virus

Physician to the President Dr. Sean Conley, a Navy Commander, was forced to explain during the briefing Sunday that there was some confusion over Trump's condition because Chief of Staff Mark Meadow's comments were 'misconstrued'

Physician to the President Dr. Sean Conley, a Navy Commander, was forced to explain during the briefing Sunday that there was some confusion over Trump’s condition because Chief of Staff Mark Meadow’s comments were ‘misconstrued’

33972668 8803631 Meadows v Conley Meadows rubbed his forehead Sunday as Conley sp m 44 1601831127718

33972674 8803631 image m 42 1601831116524

Meadows v. Conley: Meadows rubbed his forehead Sunday (left) as Conley spoke to reporters outside Walter Reed. ‘The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery,’ Meadows told reporters anonymously and it was later revealed he was the source of the remarks

The masked doctors gave their second update in two days on Trump's condition as questions emerged over conflicting statements on how the disease and his treatment was progressing

The masked doctors gave their second update in two days on Trump’s condition as questions emerged over conflicting statements on how the disease and his treatment was progressing

‘Thursday night into Friday morning when I left the bedside, the president was doing well with only mild symptoms and his oxygen was in the high 90’s. Late Friday morning when I returned to the bedside, president had a high fever and his oxygen level was transiently dipping below 94 per cent,’ Conley said.

‘Given these two developments, I was concerned for possible rapid progression of the illness,’ he continued. ‘I recommended the president try some supplemental oxygen.’

Conley said Trump was ‘very adamant that he didn’t need it. Was not short of breath. He was tired, had the fever, and that was about it.’

He said after a minute of oxygen, Trump’s levels were back up above 95 per cent – but said that he kept the president’s on the measure for about an hour.

Conley explained that the president’s oxygen level did not dip into the 80’s and reiterated that he was up and about shortly after the ‘transient’ episode.

Meadows received backlash Saturday after it appeared his comments on Trump’s condition contradicted others’ assessments, including the president’s.

‘The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery,’ Meadows told reporters anonymously and it was later revealed he was the source of the remarks.

Meadows’ comments came just after a White House team of doctors said that Trump’s condition was improving and that he was already talking about returning to the White House.

One doctor said Trump told them, ‘I feel like I could walk out of here today.’

How Mark Meadows infuriated Trump by telling reporters that his ‘vitals are very concerning’ in off-the-record health update

Chief of Staff Mark Meadows’ revelation to reporters that Donald Trump’s ‘vitals are very concerning’ reportedly angered the president and prompted him to post an upbeat video update on his condition Saturday. 

The New York Times claimed that people close to the situation said that Trump was infuriated by the comments and acted to counteract the perception that he was very sick.    

The president uploaded the four-minute video to his Twitter page on Saturday night in which he said he was ‘much better’ and fighting coronavirus, as his physician gave a optimistic update on his symptoms. 

Yet earlier in the day, Meadows was caught asking to go off the record with White House reporters as an ‘anonymous’ source revealed the true extent of the president’s condition.  

‘The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery,’ Meadows told reporters on the initial condition that he not be identified. 

He was later named as the source of the quote.  

Chief of Staff Mark Meadows' revelation to reporters that Donald Trump's 'vitals are very concerning' reportedly angered the president and prompted him to post an upbeat video update on his condition Saturday

Chief of Staff Mark Meadows’ revelation to reporters that Donald Trump’s ‘vitals are very concerning’ reportedly angered the president and prompted him to post an upbeat video update on his condition Saturday

Meadows’ comments came just after a White House team of doctors said that Trump’s condition was improving and that he was already talking about returning to the White House. 

One doctor said Trump told them: ‘I feel like I could walk out of here today.’ 

Meadows did not clarify the discrepancy in his comments. 

A Trump adviser who spoke on condition of anonymity said the president was not happy to learn of Meadows’ initial remarks, according to Reuters.  

Hours later, the president posted a video from the hospital where he is battling Covid-19, saying he was improving and would be ‘back soon’ – but acknowledging the crucial coming days would be ‘the real test.

Trump attempted to reassure the public that he was not suffering severe coronavirus symptoms and called his treatment ‘miracles from God’ as he worked to counteract Meadows’ comments. 

‘I came here, wasn’t feeling so well. I feel much better now,’ he said from his business suite at Walter Reed military medical center. ‘We’re working hard to get me all the way back… I think I’ll be back soon and I look forward to finishing up the campaign the way it was started.’

Appearing relaxed in an open-collar blue suit and jacket, Trump acknowledged that there was uncertainty about the course of the disease, which can hit recovering patients hard with no warning.

‘I’m starting to feel good. You don’t know over the next period of a few days, I guess that’s the real test, so we’ll be seeing what happens over those next couple of days.’

Several hours later, Deputy White House Press Secretary Judd Deere posted a picture showing Trump working into the night from the hospital. 

The video came after Meadows’ earlier comments spread and led to concern about how ill the president is, despite the optimistic updates from his personal physician. 

Meadows quickly tried to step back his words as the news spread, telling Reuters shortly afterward that Trump was doing ‘very well’ and that doctors were in fact pleased with his vital signs.

‘The president is doing very well. He is up and about and asking for documents to review. The doctors are very pleased with his vital signs. I have met with him on multiple occasions today on a variety of issues,’ Meadows said. 

He made a third comment on the president’s condition to Fox News on Saturday night in which the Chief of Staff confirmed that there had been a cause for concern when the president was hospitalized on Friday evening.

The White House had said that Trump was traveling to Walter Reed Military Medical Center out of an ‘abundance of caution’ and would continue to work from they for a ‘few days’ as he underwent tests. 

‘Yesterday morning he was real concerned with that. He had a fever and his blood oxygen level had dropped rapidly,’ Meadows said to Fox’s Judge Jeanie. 

Yet, he added that Trump’s condition had improved. 

‘He is doing extremely well. I am very, very optimistic based on the current result,’ Meadows added. 

‘He’s made unbelievable improvement from yesterday’ Meadows continued after again saying the doctors were ‘very concerned’. 

‘We are still not on a clear path to a full recovery,’ he added.  

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The new comments from the president’s medical team comes as Trump’s campaign advisers Stephen Miller and Steve Cortes claimed Sunday the president is eager to get back to campaigning even after Conley said Saturday he is not yet ‘out of the woods.’ 

Miller, the campaign’s senior adviser, said he spoke to Trump recently and said the president told him ‘he’s going to defeat this virus… and our campaign is going to defeat this virus.’

‘Once he gets out of the hospital, he’s ready to get back to the campaign trail,’ Miller told NBC’s Chuck Todd during an interview on ‘Meet the Press’ Sunday morning. ‘He sounded pretty energetic.’

‘But he said something else that I thought that was important too,’ Miller said, ‘and that was to be careful, and that was to remind folks to wash their hands, use hand sanitizer, make sure that if you can’t socially distance, distance to wear a mask. And I thought that was a pretty important message to send and a reminder to the rest of the country.’

Cortes, another senior campaign adviser, reiterated the president’s fitness during an interview with Chris Wallace on ‘Fox News Sunday.’

‘He’s doing well,’ Cortes attested. 

Senior Trump campaign adviser Jason Miller said Sunday that the president is 'ready to get back to the campaign trail'

Senior Trump campaign adviser Jason Miller said Sunday that the president is ‘ready to get back to the campaign trail’

Fellow senior campaign adviser Steve Cortes (right) told Fox News' Chris Wallace (left): 'He was as upbeat and assertive as he's ever been' and claimed: 'This president is going to recover'

Fellow senior campaign adviser Steve Cortes (right) told Fox News’ Chris Wallace (left): ‘He was as upbeat and assertive as he’s ever been’ and claimed: ‘This president is going to recover’

The comments come the morning after White House Physician, Navy Commander  Dr. Sean Conley, said in a briefing Trump is 'not yet out of the woods'

The comments come the morning after White House Physician, Navy Commander  Dr. Sean Conley, said in a briefing Trump is ‘not yet out of the woods’ 

‘We spoke to the president yesterday, we meaning senior campaign staff,’ Cortes said. ‘He was as upbeat and assertive as he’s ever been.’

He added: ‘This president is going to recover, we are highly confident of that.’

Trump announced overnight Thursday via Twitter that he and first lady Melania tested positive for coronavirus as the two took a test following the revelation that Counselor to the President Hope Hicks received a positive diagnosis hours earlier.

Trump’s chief doctor, Navy Commander Sean Conley, along with other doctors gave an update on the president’s condition during a briefing Saturday.

‘While not yet out of the woods, the team remains cautiously optimistic,’ Conley said, adding that Trump moved around his medical suite without difficulty as he conducted business.

The White House physician also said that Trump had been exhibiting ‘clinical indications’ of coronavirus as early as Thursday afternoon.

There are conflicting reports and statements on whether the president has needed supplemental oxygen at any point since arriving at Walter Reed Friday or how high his fever has reached.

Trump provided his own account of his medical condition on Saturday evening, releasing a video of him working from the presidential suite at the hospital in a white button down with no tie and the first button undone.

‘I’m starting to feel good’ the president said in a video posted to Twitter as he promised that he was fighting the virus for COVID-19 patients ‘all over the world’.

The 74-year-old president added that the treatments he is receiving are ‘miracles from God’ as he said Melania’s symptoms were not as severe as his own.

‘We’re both doing well,’ Trump said in the four-minute video showing images of him working from the medical center.

‘Melania is really handling it very nicely. As you’ve probably read, she’s slightly younger than me, just a little tiny bit,’ he said of his 50-year-old wife.

‘And therefore, we know the disease, we know the situation with age versus younger people and Melania is handling it statistically like it’s supposed to be handled and that makes me very happy, and it makes the country very happy, but I’m also doing well and I think we’re gonna have a very good result again.’

He said in the video that he is feeling better and will ‘be back soon.’

Trump released a video with him working from the Presidential Suite at Walter Reed Saturday where he said he will 'be back soon'

Trump released a video with him working from the Presidential Suite at Walter Reed Saturday where he said he will ‘be back soon’

Feeling better: 'I'm starting to feel good' Trump said in a Twitter video as he promised he was fighting the virus for COVID-19 patients 'all over the world'

Feeling better: ‘I’m starting to feel good’ Trump said in a Twitter video as he promised he was fighting the virus for COVID-19 patients ‘all over the world’

‘I spoke with the President yesterday afternoon and he’s in very good spirits,’ Miller said. ‘Both Bill Stepien, the campaign manager, and I spent about a half hour on the phone with the president and going through all the updates on what’s going on with the campaign.’

Miller also said he believes the campaign, White House and medical team are just taking ‘very precautionary’ steps toward ensuring the president’s health.

It appears the two ‘spreader’ events could have been when Trump announced Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court at the White House last Saturday and during his rally Wednesday in Minnesota.

Hicks, who traveled with the president to the rally this week, tested positive for coronavirus hours after the event – where she was in close proximity to the president and several of his White House and campaign staffer.

Several individuals who participated in Trump’s debate prep last week, including former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and former White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway, tested positive for coronavirus.

Miller told ABC News’ ‘This Week’ on Sunday morning that he tested negative on Friday – as well as Senior Advisor to the President Stephen Miller and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who also participated in debate preparations.

Misleading medical reports, backtracking doctors and a confused timeline: How a paranoid Trump’s fear of leaks has left his own team in the dark about severity of his condition – and how exposed THEY are to COVID-19 

The White House has been thrown into chaos and confusion in the wake of Trump‘s coronavirus diagnosis as staffers are left in the dark about the president’s condition and potential risks to their own health.  

Over the past four days Trump’s team has offered a number of conflicting reports surrounding the president’s illness, sowing doubt about when he tested positive and how severe his symptoms have been.  

Meanwhile the virus has continued to spread through the White House, infecting at least 12 people who work there by Saturday night, as staff try to stay informed via the media in the absence of transparency from top brass in the Trump administration.  

One senior White House official lifted the lid on the state of the 1600 Penn in an interview with Intelligencer on Saturday, decrying how paranoid attempts to avoid leaks have not only failed, but are threatening the health and safety of staff. 

‘Ninety percent of the [White House] complex most certainly learned about it in the news, as has been the case ever since,’ the senior official said. 

‘There are reports that COVID is spreading like wildfire through the White House. Since this whole thing started, not one email has gone out to tell employees what to do or what’s going on.’

The official said that the majority of staff has received little to no reliable information, about the president’s condition or about anything else regarding the outbreak.  

 ‘I think most of it is paranoia about leaks,’ they said, ‘yet … the leaks continue.’ 

The White House has been thrown into chaos and confusion in the wake of Donald Trump's coronavirus diagnosis as staffers are left in the dark about the president's condition and potential risks to their own health. Pictured: Marine One leaves the White House on Friday as Trump is transported to Walter Reed National Military Hospital for treatment

The White House has been thrown into chaos and confusion in the wake of Donald Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis as staffers are left in the dark about the president’s condition and potential risks to their own health. Pictured: Marine One leaves the White House on Friday as Trump is transported to Walter Reed National Military Hospital for treatment 

Outside the White House, confusion erupted on Saturday when Trump’s team of doctors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center offered a vague but sunny update on his health that was then contradicted by the president’s Chief of Staff Mark Meadows.  

‘This morning, the president is doing very well. The team and I are extremely happy with the progress the president has made. He’s been fever free for 24 hours and we are cautiously optimistic,’ Trump’s personal physician Sean Conley told reporters outside Walter Reed.   

Conley’s depiction was far more hopeful than one put forward by Meadows, who spoke to a press pooler on background immediately after the briefing ended. 

Trump's personal physician Sean Conley (pictured) offered a vague update on his condition outside Walter Reed on Saturday morning, saying the president is doing 'very well'

Trump’s personal physician Sean Conley (pictured) offered a vague update on his condition outside Walter Reed on Saturday morning, saying the president is doing ‘very well’

‘The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery,’ Meadows said.  

The briefing raised more questions than answers as Conley declined to say what temperature Trump had when he had a fever or whether he was on oxygen. 

Conley also said that the president was ’72 hours into the diagnosis’, indicating that Trump could have tested positive as early as Wednesday – not Thursday night as the White House had claimed.  

If he was 72 hours into his diagnosis, that would mean Trump was positive a day after the presidential debate with Joe Biden and positive during a Minnesota rally Wednesday and a fundraising event in New Jersey attended by 100 people Thursday. 

Conley and other senior officials spent the rest of Saturday backtracking, claiming that the doctor misspoke when he said ’72 hours’ and that he actually meant ‘day three’. 

After the presser Chief of Staff Mark Meadows (pictured) told a pool reporter: 'The president's vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We're still not on a clear path to a full recovery'

After the presser Chief of Staff Mark Meadows (pictured) told a pool reporter: ‘The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery’

Trump announced his diagnosis just before 1am Friday, hours after it emerged that his top aide, Hope Hicks, had tested positive after she started feeling sick on Wednesday while traveling to Minnesota with the president for his rally.  

The White House sought to keep Hicks’ diagnosis under wraps and apparently didn’t inform its own staff despite the possibility that they could have been exposed to her.

Questions over the timeline are concerning both within and outside the White House because the president had traveled to multiple states and was exposed to countless people in the days before his diagnosis was announced.  

On Wednesday the president appeared before a crowd of hundreds of people, who were notably not socially distanced, at a rally in Duluth, Minnesota. 

He spoke for 45 minutes, far less than his usual performances of more than an hour. At the rally he was seen throwing red MAGA caps into the crowd. Then he fell asleep on Air Force One in contrast to normally watching television and tweeting.  

The following day Trump traveled to his golf course and resort in Bedminster, New Jersey for an indoor fundraiser with about 100 attendees.  

Trump reportedly met about 19 high-dollar GOP donors in private and seemed ‘lethargic’ at that fundraiser. 

The contact tracing process is underway in New Jersey and Gov Phil Murphy is urging anyone at the Bedminster event or around it to self quarantine and get tested.

Organizers of the fundraiser have sent out an email to attendees informing them of Trump’s diagnosis, urging them to get tested if they experience symptoms.

It is unclear whether Trump caught the virus directly from Hicks, who traveled with him Tuesday for his debate against Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Cleveland and on Wednesday to Minnesota. 

On Wednesday the president spoke before a crowd of hundreds of people, who were notably not socially distanced, at a rally in Duluth, Minnesota

On Wednesday the president spoke before a crowd of hundreds of people, who were notably not socially distanced, at a rally in Duluth, Minnesota

It is unclear whether Trump caught the virus directly from Hicks, who traveled with him Tuesday for his debate against Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Cleveland and on Wednesday to Minnesota. Hicks pictured with White House advisor Jared Kushner and White House social media director Dan Scavino walking to Air Force One Wednesday

It is unclear whether Trump caught the virus directly from Hicks, who traveled with him Tuesday for his debate against Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Cleveland and on Wednesday to Minnesota. Hicks pictured with White House advisor Jared Kushner and White House social media director Dan Scavino walking to Air Force One Wednesday

By Friday evening the president was flown on Marine One to Walter Reed hospital for a several days long stay to undergo treatment ‘out of an abundance of caution’ after reporting symptoms of fever, cough and congestion that the White House described as ‘mild’. 

Rumors that officials were downplaying the severity of Trump’s condition began to swirl on Friday night as an anonymous White House official claimed he was hospitalized because he was having ‘trouble breathing’. 

Dr Conley said Saturday that he was speaking ’48 hours after’ Trump received his first dose of Regenron’s experimental polyclonal antibody cocktail. That would mean on Thursday morning. 

And another doctor – Brian Garibaldi – said: ‘About 48 hours ago the president received a special antibody therapy directed against the coronavirus. We are working very closely with the company to monitor him in terms of that outcome. Yesterday evening he received his first dose of IV remdesvir.’ 

Then in a statement Conley said Regenron was first administered on Friday – but not when. That means two doctors have now said the White House has misspoken.  

Conley repeatedly refused to answer questions about whether the president had ever been placed on supplemental oxygen, merely stating that he wasn’t on it at the time of the briefing.  

The physician said Trump’s medical team was still assessing the president to determine when he can be discharged from Walter Reed but asserted that he was on the mend.  

Both Conley and the White House maintained that Trump’s hospitalization was precautionary, rather than a sign that his case was growing more serious.  

However, Intelligencer spoke to Panagis Galiastatos, a pulmonary and critical-care physician at Johns Hopkins who has treated more than 100 COVID-19 patients in his hospital’s ICU, challenged that suggestion. 

Galiastatos said that the details about Trump’s remdesivir treatment indicated that he is suffering from a ‘moderate’ or ‘severe’ case of COVID-19.  

The doctor said he suspects Trump ‘probably had COVID-19 around Wednesday’, noting that patients are understood to be contagious ‘several days before’ showing symptoms. 

If that’s the case, it could mean that Trump was positive during Tuesday night’s debate with Biden. Both Biden and his wife Jill tested negative after the news of Hicks’ diagnosis.  

Meadows contradicted Conley’s assertion that Trump was doing ‘very well’ in his comment to the press pool immediately after the Walter Reed briefing. 

The chief of staff apparently did not intend for his message to reach the wider press pool – but after it did, he appeared on Fox News on Saturday night and admitted that Trump’s condition had been ‘very concerning’ on Friday. 

Multiple sources also claimed that Trump had been placed on oxygen prior to being admitted to Walter Reed, which the White House confirmed later on Sunday evening. 

The president addressed the nation himself in a video from the hospital on Saturday night, saying he was feeling better while acknowledging, as Meadows had said, that the next two days are critical.  

‘I came here, I wasn’t feeling so well, I feel much better now. We’re working hard to get me back. I have to get all the way back because we still have to make America great again,’ Trump said in the video posted to Twitter.  

‘I don’t know the next period of a few days, I guess. That’s the real test so we’ll be seeing what happened over those next couple of days.’   

The president is said have been upset over the confusion surrounding his condition after Meadows appeared to undermine Conley’s optimistic report.  

But equally frustrated are those working in the White House, who are only getting updates via the media amid fears that they could be the next staffer infected with the virus.  

Speaking to the senior White House official, Intelligencer placed the ordeal in a broader context, asking how Americans could trust the Trump administration’s portrayal of the coronavirus nationwide given the chaotic handling of this internal outbreak.  

‘I can’t,’ the official replied. 

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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University students could be forced to self-isolate before and after Christmas

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university students could be forced to self isolate before and after christmas

Students are facing a nightmare before and after Christmas this year with ministers planning to force them into two periods of self-isolation this winter, according to reports.

In a rushed bid to prevent the spread of coronavirus from university cities to more rural areas, ministers are said to be drawing up plans to order students to isolate in their halls of residence before leaving for the winter break.

They will then be ordered to carry out a second period of isolation before they return to their universities, according to The Times.

Ministers are in a race against time to prepare the plans, with some universities breaking for Christmas as early as December 7, and are said to be working with vice-chancellors in order to give them enough time to prepare.

It comes as the latest figures show 310 Covid-19 victims were recorded in the UK last night and 367 the day before, in the highest daily toll since the end of May.

There were also 26,688 infections reported yesterday – the first week-on-week fall in a month. 

It also comes as two universities, Durham and De Montfort in Leicester, have reportedly began trials to test asymptomatic Britons, with the Department of Health and Social Care. 

Ministers are said to be drawing up plans to order students to isolate in their halls of residence before leaving for the winter break. Pictured: Students put up signs in their window during isolation earlier this year

Ministers are said to be drawing up plans to order students to isolate in their halls of residence before leaving for the winter break. Pictured: Students put up signs in their window during isolation earlier this year

It also comes as two universities, Durham and De Montfort in Leicester (pictured), have reportedly began trials to test asymptomatic Britons, with the Department of Health and Social Care

It also comes as two universities, Durham and De Montfort in Leicester (pictured), have reportedly began trials to test asymptomatic Britons, with the Department of Health and Social Care

The trials will help uncover those with the virus, who are not displaying symptoms - who can quickly spread the virus

The trials will help uncover those with the virus, who are not displaying symptoms – who can quickly spread the virus 

New leaked SAGE ‘worst case scenario’ predicts 85,000 COVID second wave deaths and argues a lockdown will be needed until MARCH 

Scientists increased pressure for a tougher national lockdown last night amid suggestions that up to 85,000 could die in a second wave of coronavirus.

The new ‘worst case’ scenario came in a leaked Sage committee paper as government-commissioned research claimed nearly one million in England are currently infected.

The study warned the country was at a ‘critical stage’ in the second wave and urgent action was needed to get the R number below one.

Boris Johnson is under growing pressure from scientists for a national ‘circuit breaker’ lockdown or a return to the kind of restrictions the country faced in spring.

The newly-revealed document claims that late February next year would see deaths peak at around 800 a day, with the potential for 25,000 in hospital at the worst part of the peak and as many as 5,000 in intensive care in England by March, The Spectator reported.

It emerged yesterday that ministers were given an analysis by Sage suggesting the second wave could be deadlier than the first, with many in the group of scientists believing the Government needs to take drastic action now.

The revelations came as a new Imperial College study found nearly 100,000 Britons are getting infected with coronavirus every day, according to results of the surveillance study that suggests the UK is hurtling towards a second peak that could rival the first.

Experts behind the research warned cases were just weeks away from surpassing levels seen during the darkest days of the pandemic in March and April. Previous projections have estimated there were slightly more than 100,000 daily cases in spring, which led to over 40,000 deaths in the first wave.

The latest official study, released last night, was conducted by Imperial College London researchers and based on random swab testing of 86,000 across England between October 16 and 25.

It found the spread of the virus accelerated dramatically in the past fortnight, with the number of new cases doubling every nine days. The national R rate is almost 1.6.

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Meanwhile, top ministers believe they can get the UK’s devolved authorities on-board with plans for the winter break, according to The Times

Thousands of students leave England to study in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, with many undergraduates also coming the other way.

Because of this, it is understood top officials in all of the devolved authorities want consensus on the so-called ‘controls’.

Last night, government officials reportedly accepted measures would need to be in place before and after the Christmas break, but did not give further details.

It comes after more than 1,500 students at Manchester Met University (MMU) were asked not to leave their flats and self-isolate after a coronavirus outbreak at its accommodation blocks.

The lockdown sparked fury, with many teenagers and young adults, being locked in their halls having just moved their – often their first experience of living away from home. 

Students at the Birley and Cambridge Halls went into lockdown following an outbreak of 127 Covid cases.

Students reportedly said they only found out when security staff at the gates told them they couldn’t leave, and a few days later they were told the lockdown was optional.

Larissa Kennedy, president of the National Union of Students, said many students in lockdowns had been left struggling to access food and wellbeing resources – with universities disputing this, saying they had put measures in place.   

The latest discussion by top government officials comes after plans put forward by Michelle Donelan, the universities minister, in a bid to combat the spread of Covid-19 at the Christmas break reportedly went down ‘incredibly badly’ with vice-chancellors.

Ms Donelan is said to have proposed forcing students to isolate in their halls of residence and privately rented accommodation from December 8 to December 22.

But vice-chancellors are reportedly said to have raised fears of having to ‘imprison’ students in their halls – having seen students locked down during the outbreak at MMU. 

The proposals come after a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) group called for measures to be put in place ahead of the winter break. 

Professor Sir Ian Diamond, the UK’s national statistician and a member of SAGE, said the country faced a ‘moment of danger’ if no measures were in place when students return home for Christmas.

Currently, cities in the north-west, all of which have universities, are some of the worst hit for coronavirus.

Liverpool, which has four universities, and Manchester, which has five, are both under the toughest Tier 3 restrictions.

Larissa Kennedy, president of the National Union of Students, said many students in lockdowns had been left struggling to access food and wellbeing resources - with universities disputing this, saying they had put measures in place. Pictured: Students in isolation put signs on their windows

Larissa Kennedy, president of the National Union of Students, said many students in lockdowns had been left struggling to access food and wellbeing resources – with universities disputing this, saying they had put measures in place. Pictured: Students in isolation put signs on their windows

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34989978 8892135 image a 25 1603962704978

NHS role during coronavirus crisis has inspired a rise of student medics as applications jump 21 per cent on last year 

The heroics of NHS doctors during the coronavirus pandemic has helped inspire record numbers to apply to study medicine.

Applications for medicine courses jumped 21 per cent compared to last year, the University and Colleges Admission Service (Ucas) has revealed.

Its figures show that 28,690 people have applied to study medicine in 2021, with increases in applicants from all four countries of the UK.

Ucas chief executive Clare Marchant said: ‘The inspirational work of the NHS, particularly during 2020, will have undoubtedly encouraged students to apply for medicine courses, and it’s heartening that so many want to be part of the recovery as we emerge from the pandemic.’

Applications from students outside of the EU for medicine courses have also risen, but applications from EU students have dropped by 15%, from 1,680 this time last year to 1,430.

Overall, 76,940 people have applied for all degree courses with an October 15 deadline, up 12% on last year, the admissions service added.

A record 2,800 18-year-olds from the most disadvantaged backgrounds in the UK have applied.

Meanwhile, international applicants from outside the EU have increased by 20% to 17,510, while EU applicants have fallen to 5,220, from 6,480 last year.

Ms Marchant added: ‘It’s great news to see students aim high and aspire to a future beyond the current limits of Covid with their choices for next year.

‘The marked increase in students from the most disadvantaged backgrounds applying is especially welcome, particularly as universities are ready to use the contextual data available to them when considering applications.’

A Universities UK (UUK) spokesman said: ‘Despite the enormous challenges posed by the pandemic, the appetite to continue learning is stronger than ever across the UK, with individuals recognising the value of a university education.

‘It is particularly pleasing to see the growth in applicants for medicine.’

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There are fears that students from more rural areas, many of which are currently in the lowest Tier 1 category, could bring the virus back, creating local outbreaks.  

Meanwhile, scientists increased pressure for a tougher national lockdown last night amid suggestions that up to 85,000 could die in a second wave of coronavirus.

The new ‘worst case’ scenario came in a leaked Sage committee paper as government-commissioned research claimed nearly one million in England are currently infected.

The study warned the country was at a ‘critical stage’ in the second wave and urgent action was needed to get the R number below one.

Boris Johnson is under growing pressure from scientists for a national ‘circuit breaker’ lockdown or a return to the kind of restrictions the country faced in spring.

The newly-revealed document claims that late February next year would see deaths peak at around 800 a day, with the potential for 25,000 in hospital at the worst part of the peak and as many as 5,000 in intensive care in England by March, The Spectator reported.

It emerged yesterday that ministers were given an analysis by Sage suggesting the second wave could be deadlier than the first, with many in the group of scientists believing the Government needs to take drastic action now.

The revelations came as a new Imperial College study found nearly 100,000 Britons are getting infected with coronavirus every day, according to results of the surveillance study that suggests the UK is hurtling towards a second peak that could rival the first.

Experts behind the research warned cases were just weeks away from surpassing levels seen during the darkest days of the pandemic in March and April. Previous projections have estimated there were slightly more than 100,000 daily cases in spring, which led to over 40,000 deaths in the first wave.

The latest official study, released last night, was conducted by Imperial College London researchers and based on random swab testing of 86,000 across England between October 16 and 25.

It found the spread of the virus accelerated dramatically in the past fortnight, with the number of new cases doubling every nine days. The national R rate is almost 1.6.

Meanwhile,  two universities, Durham and De Montfort in Leicester, have reportedly began trials to test asymptomatic Britons, with the Department of Health and Social Care. 

The antigen tests, which use swabs or saliva samples, are designed to identify those who have coronavirus, who do not display symptoms. 

They hope such a test would allow those who test negative to carry on their lives as normal. 

Coronavirus second wave has claimed the lives of just 17 victims under 40: Official figures show the disease is 100 times as deadly for the oldest victims as it is for the young 

Fewer than 20 people aged under 40 have died with coronavirus since the second wave began.

Official figures reveal the disease is now 100 times as deadly for the oldest in society as for the young, and that increased infections among children and young adults has not led to their hospitalisations or deaths.

And including deaths in private homes as well as hospitals, only 17 people under 40 died with Covid between the end of August and the middle of this month.

The latest NHS update published yesterday showed that just one person under the age of 20, and another 13 under 40, have died with coronavirus in English hospitals since the start of September.

By contrast, 1,425 patients over 80 have died over the same period, along with another 1,093 aged between 60 and 79.

It means the elderly account for a staggering 94 per cent of hospital deaths this time round.

Wider figures from the Office for National Statistics covering all deaths across the UK tell the same story, with just 247 deaths among working-age people since the end of summer compared with 2,026 among pensioners.

They cover a slightly shorter period than the NHS figures.

It will put fresh pressure on ministers to avoid a new nationwide lockdown that could lead to other deadly diseases such as cancer and heart disease going untreated, and further damage young people’s mental health and job prospects.

Last night cancer consultant Prof Karol Sikora said: ‘On the whole, it is not a young person’s illness, healthy young people especially.

‘But they are playing the societal price in terms of education, university and social activities, and they will be paying the bill one day because the old people won’t be there.

It’s a matter of balance and we’ve not got it right. It’s really important we don’t throw all the resources at Covid.’

And Conservative backbencher Steve Baker – who led a rebellion against the Government’s imposition of Covid restrictions – said: ‘These data show vividly that we need a Plan B to rescue our economy and our family lives before we run out of road.

In my experience, people want to do their duty but they are going to be wondering why so much of their future is going to be sacrificed in the circumstances.’

Data from researchers and official bodies showed that Covid-19 death rates among the young were low when the pandemic first hit in the spring, and that they are lower still despite concern over pub-goers, holidaymakers and protesters spreading infection over the summer.

The latest daily NHS figures show that of the 2,677 patients who have died with the virus in English hospitals between September 1 and this Tuesday, only 14 – half of 1 per cent – were aged under 40.

By contrast, 52 per cent were over 80. More detailed ONS figures tell the same story.

Including deaths in private homes as well as hospitals, only 17 people under 40 died with Covid between the weeks ending August 28 and October 16, just 0.8 per cent of the 2,061 total across England and Wales. The over-70s accounted for 1,701 deaths – 82 per cent of the total.

Those aged between 80 and 84 had the highest death numbers – 404 since the second wave began – in line with this newspaper revealing earlier this month that the average age of a Covid victim is 82.4.

Statistician Professor David Spiegelhalter, of Cambridge University, said: ‘Age is the overwhelmingly most important factor when it comes to the risk of dying from Covid.

‘Young people have always got the virus more than older people, but that hasn’t translated into hospitalisations and death.’

 

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Bobby Ball has died at the age of 76 after testing positive for Covid-19

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Bobby Ball, one half of comedy double act Cannon & Ball, has died at the age of 76, his manager has said.

A statement said: ‘It is with great personal sadness that on behalf of Yvonne Ball, and the family, and Tommy Cannon, I announce that Bobby Ball passed away at Blackpool Victoria Hospital on October 28, 2020 approximately 9.30pm.

‘Bobby had been taken to the hospital for tests as he started with breathing problems. At first it was thought to be a chest infection but a test proved positive for Covid-19.

Bobby Ball appears on The Alan Titchmarsh Show on ITV in London on September 15, 2014

Bobby Ball appears on The Alan Titchmarsh Show on ITV in London on September 15, 2014

Ball (left) and Tommy Cannon at the British Soap Awards at MediaCityUK Salford in May 2013

Ball (left) and Tommy Cannon at the British Soap Awards at MediaCityUK Salford in May 2013

Ball, wife Yvonne and their daughter Joanne are pictured for the Daily Mail in January 2007

Ball, wife Yvonne and their daughter Joanne are pictured for the Daily Mail in January 2007

Ball and his wife Yvonne Harper on I'm a Celebrity...Get Me Out of Here! in December 2005

Ball and his wife Yvonne Harper on I’m a Celebrity…Get Me Out of Here! in December 2005

Tommy Cannon (left) and Bobby Ball (right) pose for an ITV publicity photo in May 2001

Tommy Cannon (left) and Bobby Ball (right) pose for an ITV publicity photo in May 2001

Comedy duo Cannon (left) and Ball (right) are pictured together in April 1993

Comedy duo Cannon (left) and Ball (right) are pictured together in April 1993

Cannon (left) and Ball (right) with guests The Nolans (left to right) Bernie Nolan, Coleen Nolan, Maureen Nolan and Anne Nolan ahead of their summer season in Bournemouth in May 1986

Cannon (left) and Ball (right) with guests The Nolans (left to right) Bernie Nolan, Coleen Nolan, Maureen Nolan and Anne Nolan ahead of their summer season in Bournemouth in May 1986

Cannon (left) and Ball (right) preparing for their first film "Boys In Blue", outside the Dominion Theatre in London in May 1982

Cannon (left) and Ball (right) preparing for their first film ‘Boys In Blue’, outside the Dominion Theatre in London in May 1982

Cannon (left) and Ball (right) outside the Dominion Theatre in London's West End in May 1982

Cannon (left) and Ball (right) outside the Dominion Theatre in London’s West End in May 1982

‘His wife Yvonne said the hospital and staff could not have been more wonderful, as they were outstanding in their care of duty and they did everything possible for him and she cannot praise them enough.

‘She said that the family and Tommy would like to express their sincere thanks to the many, many people who have been fans of Bobby and they know that they will all share in part the great loss and total sadness that Yvonne, the family and Tommy all feel.

‘Yvonne added that their need for privacy at this time has to be a priority. No further announcements or statements will be made.’

Ball’s wife Yvonne said: ‘I will always miss him, he was so joyful, full of fun and mischievous.’

Tommy Cannon said: ‘Rock on, my good friend, I can’t believe this, I’m devastated.’

Ball’s manager Phil Dale said: ‘Bobby was a true comedy star who loved entertaining people and he loved life itself. I spoke to him every day and it would always end in laughter.’

More to follow 

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Hotel review: Mallory Court near Leamington Spa in Warwickshire

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A big sign greets arrivals at Mallory Court, saying ‘we’re no longer able to greet you warmly with a handshake or hug, but rest assured we will be raising our imaginary hat,’ and it goes on to remind guests about hand-washing, keeping a ‘thoughtful’ distance from others and avoiding touching your face.

Quite right, I suppose. But signs like this have become divisive, a reminder of the radically different approaches to the pandemic. 

This is amplified by seeing the sign dominating the stone porch of this Grade II-listed, ivy-clad, Arts and Crafts house, which was built in 1915 but seems much older.

Mallory Court, which is part of the Eden Collection and located near Leamington Spa in Warwickshire

Mallory Court, which is part of the Eden Collection and located near Leamington Spa in Warwickshire 

The lounge at Mallory Court. The Inspector says a big sign greets arrivals, saying 'we're no longer able to greet you warmly with a handshake or hug, but rest assured we will be raising our imaginary hat'

The lounge at Mallory Court. The Inspector says a big sign greets arrivals, saying ‘we’re no longer able to greet you warmly with a handshake or hug, but rest assured we will be raising our imaginary hat’

Mallory Court, near Leamington Spa in Warwickshire, is part of the Eden Collection (Bovey Castle, Brockencote Hall et al). It recently added a large ESPA spa and more rooms in addition to those both in the main building and the long-standing Orchard House. 

I had assumed that if you are a guest of the hotel then you could use the pool (if numbers permit). In fact, you have to pay an extra £15, which does not seem in keeping with those intended hugs on arrival.

Our superior room is snug and pretty, but there’s no bath so we ask if we can switch to one that does. 

This turns out to be an inferior room but we’ve travelled far and are looking forward to a soak.

One of the superior deluxe rooms at Mallory Court.  The Inspector writes: 'Our superior room is snug and pretty, but there's no bath so we ask if we can switch'

One of the superior deluxe rooms at Mallory Court.  The Inspector writes: ‘Our superior room is snug and pretty, but there’s no bath so we ask if we can switch’ 

In the dining room, pictured, the Inspector says he was confused by the menu. He writes: 'There seems to be two extremes: a £69 tasting menu or soup and sandwiches, with a few larger options such as ham, egg and fries'

In the dining room, pictured, the Inspector says he was confused by the menu. He writes: ‘There seems to be two extremes: a £69 tasting menu or soup and sandwiches, with a few larger options such as ham, egg and fries’ 

Mallory Court recently added a large ESPA spa. The Inspector says: 'I had assumed that if you are a guest of the hotel then you could use the pool (if numbers permit). In fact, you have to pay an extra £15'

Mallory Court recently added a large ESPA spa. The Inspector says: ‘I had assumed that if you are a guest of the hotel then you could use the pool (if numbers permit). In fact, you have to pay an extra £15’ 

The main drawing room has been given over to a second dining room, so everyone has drinks near the reception desk. 

I have a margarita that costs £16 — two sips and it’s gone. Absurd. 

We are confused by the menu. There seems to be two extremes: a £69 tasting menu or soup and sandwiches, with a few larger options such as ham, egg and fries.

But it’s not really a tasting menu. The first course is a tiny pot of olives, the second three canapes, the third is bread to share.

The long-standing Orchard House at Mallory Court, where doubles start from £99 per night

The long-standing Orchard House at Mallory Court, where doubles start from £99 per night 

Where it gets interesting is the salmon, beetroot and creme fraiche starter, which is actually far less substantial than my wife’s plate of smoked salmon from the other menu. 

We mix and match and go big on the bread, while admiring the wood-panelled walls and mullioned windows.

Breakfast goes well; my full English is top-notch — but anything other than classical music is such a risk at this time of day. 

Boy George’s Karma Chameleon has us scuttling back to our room as soon as possible. Which is such a pity. 

TRAVEL FACTS  

Mallory Court, Harbury Lane, Bishops Tachbrook, Leamington Spa, CV33 9QB. Doubles from £99. For more information visit mallory.co.uk or call 01926 330214. 

Rating: rating showbiz 3

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