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Estate of late Holocaust survivor sues to keep her interview out of Borat sequel

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estate of late holocaust survivor sues to keep her interview out of borat sequel

The estate of a deceased Holocaust survivor has filed a lawsuit to keep her interview out of Sasha Baron Cohen’s upcoming Borat sequel, saying she believed the film was a serious documentary.

Judith Dim Evans, who passed away over the summer, was interviewed for the Borat film in a Georgia synagogue on January 29, according to a lawsuit filed this week in Fulton Superior Court. 

‘Upon learning after giving the interview that the movie was actually a comedy intended to mock the Holocaust and Jewish culture, Ms. Evans was horrified and upset,’ the lawsuit states, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

‘Had Ms. Evans been informed about the true nature of the film and purpose for the interview, she would not have agreed to participate in the interview,’ it continues.

The estate of a deceased Holocaust survivor has filed a lawsuit to keep her interview out of Sasha Baron Cohen's upcoming Borat sequel

The estate of a deceased Holocaust survivor has filed a lawsuit to keep her interview out of Sasha Baron Cohen’s upcoming Borat sequel

Cohen’s Borat character, a buffoonish journalist from Kazakhstan, is notoriously anti-Semitic, although the actor himself is Jewish.

Previews for the new mockumentary film, set to be released on Amazon Prime on October 23, show Borat and his daughter, Sandra Jessica Parker Sagdiyev, traversing the country and making fools of everyday Americans in apparently unscripted encounters.

Evans' daughter Michelle Dim St. Pierre (above) filed the lawsuit on her behalf

Evans’ daughter Michelle Dim St. Pierre (above) filed the lawsuit on her behalf

The film is officially titled Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan. 

Evans’ attorney Adam Hoipkemier declined to tell the AJC whether she had signed any release form to appear in the film. Such releases typically give producers the right to use footage in any way they see fit.

Hoipkemier said that he had not seen the film, but knew that the footage of Evans would be included in the final cut.

Evans’ daughter Michelle Dim St. Pierre filed the lawsuit on her behalf as executor of her estate.

The suit names Amazon Prime and Oak Springs Productions as defendants, and seeks to have footage of Evans removed from the film, as well as damages of less than $75,000. 

Cohen's Borat character, a buffoonish journalist from Kazakhstan, is notoriously anti-Semitic, although the actor himself is Jewish

Cohen’s Borat character, a buffoonish journalist from Kazakhstan, is notoriously anti-Semitic, although the actor himself is Jewish

Previews for the new mocumentary film, set to be released on Amazon Prime on October 23, show Borat and his daughter, Sandra Jessica Parker Sagdiyev, traversing the country and making fools of everyday Americans in apparently unscripted encounters

Previews for the new mocumentary film, set to be released on Amazon Prime on October 23, show Borat and his daughter, Sandra Jessica Parker Sagdiyev, traversing the country and making fools of everyday Americans in apparently unscripted encounters

The first Borat film, released in 2006, earned more than $262 million worldwide. 

Last week, the trailer to the sequel was released. It revealed that Cohen was the Trump impersonator who crashed Mike Pence’s CPAC speech in February.

The film follows Borat’s journey to the United States where he wears a fat suit and a Trump face mask and bursts his way into the 2020 Conservative Political Action Conference convention.

Baron Cohen is seen carrying his daughter in the film over his shoulder and shouts to Pence: ‘Michael Pennis I’ve brought the girl for you!’

At the time the outburst made headlines and the impersonator was escorted out of the conference at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in Maryland after shouting about ten minutes into the speech about Trump.

The trailer to Borat 2 released on October 1 reveals Sacha Baron Cohen was the Trump impersonator who crashed Mike Pence’s CPAC speech in February. Cohen pictured in a Trump mask and suit with his daughter in the movie over his shoulder shouting, 'Michael Pennis I’ve brought the girl for you!'

The trailer to Borat 2 released on October 1 reveals Sacha Baron Cohen was the Trump impersonator who crashed Mike Pence’s CPAC speech in February. Cohen pictured in a Trump mask and suit with his daughter in the movie over his shoulder shouting, ‘Michael Pennis I’ve brought the girl for you!’

Pence is seen giving Cohen an angry glare for the interruption, about ten minutes into his speech at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in Maryland

Pence is seen giving Cohen an angry glare for the interruption, about ten minutes into his speech at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in Maryland

At the time of the outburst no one knew who the impersonator who crashed the convention was. Cohen pictured wearing a Trump mask and suit in his grand entrance

At the time of the outburst no one knew who the impersonator who crashed the convention was. Cohen pictured wearing a Trump mask and suit in his grand entrance

Only recently was it revealed that Cohen was the person behind the Trump costume.

In the sequel Borat seeks to gift his daughter to ‘someone close to the throne’ in the Trump administration, likely meaning Pence in the chaotic scene.

Throughout much of the trailer the actor pokes fun at the coronavirus pandemic and Republican voters and politicians. 

Other highlights from the trailer show Borat decide to get a disguise after realizing he’s too recognizable and purchase a fat suit saying, ‘I take this to be fat like American man.’

Looking at other outfits on display Borat asks if Harry Potter is ‘a sex offender’.

Borat later asks a stranger outside a store if he can quarantine with them during the coronavirus lockdown crisis.

In the trailer Borat travels to the US and purchases a fat suit, saying: 'I take this to be fat like American man.'

In the trailer Borat travels to the US and purchases a fat suit, saying: ‘I take this to be fat like American man.’

Prior to the trailer release, Sacha posed for an extremely risqué poster for the upcoming Borat 2 movie, ahead of its release on October 23 on Amazon Prime

Prior to the trailer release, Sacha posed for an extremely risqué poster for the upcoming Borat 2 movie, ahead of its release on October 23 on Amazon Prime

Wearing a thong at the man’s home and dancing, Borat asks: ‘What’s more dangerous… this virus or democrats?’ to which the person and his friend both reply: ‘Democrats!’

Borat then tries to kill the coronavirus with a hammer on the wall, to which the man explains you ‘can’t see it’ and instead encourages him to spray Covid with an anti-bacterial spray. 

Playing with politics is a recurring theme in the comedian’s work.

His 2018 show This is America sees him play different characters and trick political names including former Vice President Dick Cheney, former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, and former Republican Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh. 

His pranks led Georgia State Representative Jason Spencer to resign after Cohen tricked him into shouting the n-word and exposing his buttocks in a fake counter-terrorism training exercise.      

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Dye uses synthetic melanin to mimic natural hair pigmentation

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dye uses synthetic melanin to mimic natural hair pigmentation

Scientists in the US have synthesised a range of hair dyes, from blonde to black, using enzymes to catalyse synthetic melanin. 

Melanin – a natural pigment that gives skin, hair and eyes a dark colour – is in every type of organism, making it a readily available and versatile material.

Researchers combined enzymes from mushrooms – which are rich with melanin – with an amino acid to mimic the melanin production in the body. 

Synthesised melanin is less toxic than chemicals currently used to strip hair of its pigments before recolouring, which can cause skin irritation. 

It could also provide an alternative for people with an allergy to hair dye who still want to be able to touch up their roots. 

Researchers said they can achieve an arrange of colours by changing the concentration of melanin

Researchers said they can achieve an arrange of colours by changing the concentration of melanin

‘From a biomedical perspective, there’s a huge market of people with a hair dye allergy,’ said Nathan Gianneschi at Northwestern University in Illinois. 

‘Our first thought was it would be great to have a solution to help those people.’ 

BENEFITS OF SYNTHETIC MELANIN  

– Synthetic melanin avoids the use of ammonia as a base layer.

– The precursors to treating hair with melanin are less toxic.

– The process uses safer, more scalable chemicals.

– There is vast potential in future cosmetic translations of synthetic melanin. 

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In the typical process of colouring hair at the salon, stylists use bleach to strip melanin from hair, then add ammonia and dye to open and penetrate the hair cuticles. 

Replacing melanin instead of removing it as a way of depositing colour on the surface of hair could create a more sustainable way to create lasting colour.  

In humans, melanin acts as a defence mechanism against UV-ray sun damage, which is why people from hotter climates tend to have darker skin.  

‘In humans, it’s in the back of our eye to help with vision, it’s in our skin to help with protecting skin cells from UV damage,’ said Gianneschi. 

‘But birds also use it as a spectacular colour display – peacock feathers are made of melanin entirely.’ 

As well as being a milder process than traditional dye, coating hair in synthetic melanin also has the potential to protect hair from sun damage, which can cause whitening. 

Researchers said they can achieve an array of colours, from light to dark by changing the concentration of their synthetic melanin. 

The product would be in the form of a dye and would be applied in a similar way to usual hair colour, as a paste from a bottle. 

Preliminary studies have also revealed potential for the coloured melanin layer to persist through several washes.  

In the typical process of colouring hair, stylists use bleach to strip melanin from hair, then add ammonia and dye to open and penetrate the hair cuticles for permanent colour

In the typical process of colouring hair, stylists use bleach to strip melanin from hair, then add ammonia and dye to open and penetrate the hair cuticles for permanent colour 

‘The dyeing process is similar from a stylist’s point of view, but these conditions are milder, so they take a little longer,’ said lead study author Claudia Battistella. 

‘Though it could be combined with a base, it’s not necessary to use one, and there is no need for chemical pigments.’ 

And because we already have melanin in our bodies, researchers think it is unlikely people would have an allergic reactions to it. 

Traditional hair dye, on the other hand, is estimated to cause allergies and skin irritation in an estimated 1 per cent of humans.  

Repeated use of some dyes has been linked to cancer – last year, researchers found women who regularly used permanent hair dye over eight years were 9 per cent more likely to develop breast cancer, compared to those who hadn’t.  

Studies have indicated that people who dye their hair regularly may have a higher risk of cancer

Studies have indicated that people who dye their hair regularly may have a higher risk of cancer 

And those who had a chemical hair straitening treatment every five to eight weeks had a 30 per cent higher risk.  

The researchers warn chemicals are able to get into the skin through the scalp and fumes may also be inhaled while applying the dye.   

Given the industry’s desire to move away from carcinogens and other toxic chemicals, synthetic melanin should be able to break through the regulatory industry, the experts believe. 

They now aim to find a commercial partner willing to develop the dye on a larger scale and bring it to shops worldwide. 

The research has been published in the journal Chemistry of Materials. 

WHAT EVIDENCE IS THERE THAT HAIR DYE CAUSES CANCER?

Researchers have been studying a possible link between hair dye use and cancer for many years with inconclusive results.

Some chemicals in hair dyes can be absorbed in small amounts through the skin or inhaled from fumes in the air. 

Some of the ingredients used in hair dyes have been shown to cause cancer in lab animals, but it’s not clear how these results might relate to people’s use of hair dyes. 

Although studies have shown that some of the dye applied to an animal’s skin is absorbed into the bloodstream, most have not found a link between skin application and cancer risk.

Some human studies show people who work around hair dyes regularly as part of their jobs, such as hairdressers, stylists, and barbers, are likely to be exposed more than people who just dye their hair on occasion.  

A small but fairly consistent increased risk of bladder cancer have been found in people in those jobs, and findings have been mixed for studies into leukemias and lymphomas, the American Cancer Society says. 

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has concluded that workplace exposure as a hairdresser or barber is ‘probably carcinogenic to humans,’ based on the data regarding bladder cancer.

The National Toxicology Program (NTP), formed from parts of several different US government agencies, has not classified exposure to hair dyes as to its potential to cause cancer. However, it has classified some chemicals that are or were used in hair dyes as ‘reasonably anticipated to be human carcinogens’.

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The rise of witchcore! How it’s influencing fashion, film and social media

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the rise of witchcore how its influencing fashion film and social media

Lockdown saw the emergence of the so-called ‘cottagecore’ trend, when Instagram feeds were flooded with pictures of women dressed in flowing dresses, frolicking in fields and planting their own vegetable patches. 

But as the months rumble on, and with the dark nights of winter fast approaching, there is a hankering for a far darker, supernatural aesthetic as people seek to escape the reality of what has been a difficult year. 

Cue the arrival of ‘witchcore’, a term coined by the TikTok generation to describe an aesthetic and way of life that draws on aspects of witchcraft, the occult and old-fashioned Gothic glamour.

'Witchcore' is a term coined by the TikTok generation to describe an aesthetic and way of life that draws on aspects of witchcraft, the occult and old-fashioned Gothic glamour. Pictured, a dress from the Vampire's Wife x H&M collaboration that perfectly captures the trend

‘Witchcore’ is a term coined by the TikTok generation to describe an aesthetic and way of life that draws on aspects of witchcraft, the occult and old-fashioned Gothic glamour. Pictured, a dress from the Vampire’s Wife x H&M collaboration that perfectly captures the trend

The trend was noted by Guardian writer Leah Harper, among others, who pointed to the big splash made by H&M’s recent sell-out collaboration with The Vampire’s Wife, a brand that specialises in bewitchingly beautiful frocks complete with capes, frilly bell-sleeved dresses, and lashings of black lace.  

Witchcore is also a breakout social media trend, with #witchcore used to share everything from their dark interior design mood boards to tarot card tips and spells for attracting good fortune. 

Jennifer Cownie, who co-founded literary tarot cabaret and consultancy, told the Guardian that she believes the the emergence of ‘witchcore’ is linked to the current social, political and economic climate.  

‘I think that Brexit, Trump and Covid have all had their part to play in creating a climate where people feel able to tap into their less rational, more intuitive sides,’ she said. ‘I now leave my flat about twice a week, so go big or go home, surely? Social and cultural expectations about how we dress are being relaxed so if you feel like a witch on the inside, I reckon there’s never been a better time to look like that on the outside.’ 

Gabriela Herstik, a witch and the author of Craft: How to Be a Modern Witch, added: ‘While we don’t have the opportunity to express ourselves outside of our homes, there’s a comfort in wearing something that makes you feel connected to your magic.’ Here’s what you need to know… 

SOCIAL MEDIA

TikTok is the home of 'witchcore'. The #witchesoftiktok hashtag has 1.1billion views, while #witchcore has 5.5billion - showing just how much interest there is. Above, a TikTok user who claims to have summoned a storm while 'working on her energy skills'

TikTok is the home of ‘witchcore’. The #witchesoftiktok hashtag has 1.1billion views, while #witchcore has 5.5billion – showing just how much interest there is. Above, a TikTok user who claims to have summoned a storm while ‘working on her energy skills’ 

Instagram (pictured) and TikTok are full of posts from people showing off their paraphernalia

Instagram (pictured) and TikTok are full of posts from people showing off their paraphernalia

TikTok is the home of ‘witchcore’. The #witchesoftiktok hashtag has 1.1billion views, while #witchcore has 5.5billion – showing just how much interest there is.   

Videos range from mystics who claim to be able to tell the future in the space of a 90-second video, to witches who are able to cast spells on your behalf (for a fee). 

One recent video shows a woman playing a flute in the forest, in such a way that she believes she conjured up the wind spirits.

Another woman with apparent control over the elements brought forth an entire storm using just a few crystals. 

Responses to such clips are largely positive, with users congratulating them on their achievements. 

THE FASHION

The Vampire's Wife x H&M range captures the aesthetic perfectly and proved a hit with shoppers desperate to get their hands on the cult label at a far more reasonable price point

A maxi dress from the collection

The Vampire’s Wife x H&M range captures the aesthetic perfectly and proved a hit with shoppers desperate to get their hands on the cult label at a far more reasonable price point.

Think less green faces, pointy shoes and black hats and more sumptuous fabrics, lace and occult symbols. 

The Vampire’s Wife x H&M range captures the aesthetic perfectly and proved a hit with shoppers desperate to get their hands on the cult label at a far more reasonable price point.

The collaboration brought ‘witchcore’ style to the great British high street, while designers like Dior are catering to high-end customers. The French fashion house released a line inspired by a tarot deck, while cool-girl labels like Ganni and Rixo offer dresses with celestial prints. 

FILM

There is no shortage of witches in Halloween films, but this year offers up a particularly stylish one in the form of Anne Hathaway in the latest film adaptation of Roald Dahl's The Witches

There is no shortage of witches in Halloween films, but this year offers up a particularly stylish one in the form of Anne Hathaway in the latest film adaptation of Roald Dahl’s The Witches

There is no shortage of witches in Halloween films, but this year offers up a particularly stylish one in the form of Anne Hathaway in the latest film adaptation of Roald Dahl’s The Witches. 

Costume designer Joanna Johnston was inspired by 60s style icons such as Jackie Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe, according to Vogue, and it shows in Anne’s Grand Witch’s power shoulders, bold houndstooth print and bouffant wigs. 

The slick of red lipstick and evening gloves adds an extra touch of glamour and proves adopting the ‘witchcore’ trend doesn’t need to look homespun. 

INTERIORS

A quick search of #witchcore on Instagram will bring up thousands of posts showing bedrooms, living rooms and bathrooms decked out in crystals, dried flowers and herbs - the modern-day witchcraft starter pack. Pictured, one such example found on Instagram

A quick search of #witchcore on Instagram will bring up thousands of posts showing bedrooms, living rooms and bathrooms decked out in crystals, dried flowers and herbs – the modern-day witchcraft starter pack. Pictured, one such example found on Instagram

Witchcore interiors inspiration includes photos like this dark boudoir shared on Instagram

Witchcore interiors inspiration includes photos like this dark boudoir shared on Instagram

A quick search of #witchcore on Instagram will bring up thousands of posts showing bedrooms, living rooms and bathrooms decked out in crystals, dried flowers and herbs – the modern-day witchcraft starter pack. 

The commitment to the look ranges from dark, cavernous rooms that look more crypt-like than homey, all the way to university dorm rooms that are sprinkled with just a touch of witchy-ness. 

The online community is quick to offer tips on where you might pick up your next essential purchase, making it easy to realise your own witchcore dreams. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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RAF serviceman found hanged in his barracks after worrying about having first child, inquest hears

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raf serviceman found hanged in his barracks after worrying about having first child inquest hears

An RAF serviceman was found hanged in his barracks after worrying about having his first child with his ex-girlfriend, a coroner has heard. 

Luke Neeson, 25, had been socialising with his colleagues at The Eagle Public House in Oxfordshire on Boxing Day when he started saying he was ‘anxious’ about becoming a first-time father.

He was found dead in his barracks the next day. 

A friend of Mr Neeson’s, Kieran Galt, told the inquest how his friend had been nervous about having a child with his ex-girlfriend, Angela Mullan. 

Mr Galt said: ‘Luke explained he was nervous about having a child with a previous partner who was due to give birth soon but he was looking forward to going back to Ireland because he had a friend’s wedding to attend on December 31.

Luke Neeson (pictured with his ex-girlfriend Angela Mullan), 25, had been socialising with his colleagues at The Eagle Public House in Oxfordshire on Boxing Day when he started saying he was 'anxious' about becoming a first-time father

Luke Neeson (pictured with his ex-girlfriend Angela Mullan), 25, had been socialising with his colleagues at The Eagle Public House in Oxfordshire on Boxing Day when he started saying he was ‘anxious’ about becoming a first-time father

‘Luke spoke about another female he was going away with called Naomi. Throughout the night, he spoke about his future with Naomi and his up and coming weekend with her. He explained they were going to stay in a hotel.’

Mr Neeson was last seen heading back to his barracks at RAF Brize Norton, Carterton, Oxfordshire, that evening before he failed to appear for work the next morning – December 27.

Worried friends flagged up a welfare concern after Luke would not open his door or answer his phone and at 10am, RAF duty officer William Henry used a master key to get in, discovering the grim scene. 

Mr Neeson was found dead in his barracks on December 27

Mr Neeson was found dead in his barracks on December 27

Paramedics rushed to the young man at 10.19am but on arrival it was quite clear that he was dead as blood had pooled in his hands. After searching his ‘incredibly tidy room’, officers found a raw pizza tucked away in his miniature oven.

The Senior Aviation Technician had joined the RAF in 2015, leaving his home in Arran Gardens, Larne, Northern Ireland, to live in the Oxfordshire barracks working for five days in and five days off.

Having travelled from Northern Ireland, his mother Bernadette Mason, alongside her new husband and brother Ben, heard yesterday how Luke was anxious about the birth of his unborn baby, who was later named Kayden.

Having bought a home with his partner Angela in 2018, she became pregnant before they split up. Despite their on-off relationship, the pair had spoken on the night before his death, where she noted Luke had sounded ‘stressed.’

His mother Bernadette told the assistant coroner for Oxfordshire: ‘They were very on and off, it just depended on the day of the week.’

The inquest heard how the engineer had a history of anxiety following childhood family trauma.

In a statement, Bernadette said: ‘Luke had developed some anxiety due to difficulties in family dynamics when he was young, none of that was his fault.

A friend of Mr Neeson's, Kieran Galt, told the inquest how his friend had been nervous about having a child with his ex-girlfriend, Angela Mullan (pictured together)

A friend of Mr Neeson’s, Kieran Galt, told the inquest how his friend had been nervous about having a child with his ex-girlfriend, Angela Mullan (pictured together)

‘He grew up as a bit of a worrier, he would get anxious about major and minor issues over the years and he took failure very badly.

‘He had bought a house together with his ex-partner in March 2018 and they were expecting their first child together in March 2020. They had ups and downs in their relationship, it was struggling and they were no longer together at the time.

‘It was getting harder to pull him back. He sought advice from different people which became confusing for him, so much so that I pulled back. He started to go through a phase which I can only describe as ”gallivanting” but it seemed to make him more worried and anxious.’

The heartbroken mother explained that Mr Neeson was working over the Christmas period so she and her partner were jetting off abroad for Christmas on December 21.

‘Before we went away, Luke spent the whole day in bed, he would not talk, eat or drink but the day after he was up before me and seemed much brighter. He took us to the airport and we said our goodbyes.

‘I was surprised he had taken his own life, it had been my greatest fear and it was always niggling at me. When he last came home he was finding it hard to cope with his demons. I think he saw himself as the problem but unfortunately I will never have the chance to prove him otherwise.’

Sitting at Oxford Coroner’s Court, assistant coroner Ms Hayes concluded a verdict of suicide.

Appearing over video link, his father Ivan Neeson said: ‘I was with my son on December 23, he was showing me photographs of the hotel he was going to be staying in, he was looking forward to it.’

The assistant coroner concluded: ‘It is very hard to lose people in these circumstances, unfortunately in my job I see this all too often, particularly with young men with so much to look forward too.’

For support call Samaritans on 116 123 or visit their website samaritans.org  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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