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Four people rushed to hospital with serious injuries after ‘multiple stabbing’ attack in Plymouth

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four people rushed to hospital with serious injuries after multiple stabbing attack in plymouth

Four people have been rushed to hospital with serious injuries after a ‘multiple stabbing’ attack in Plymouth.  

Officers attended the scene on Albert Road at 10pm on Saturday with reports of numerous casualties.

The suspect initially fled the scene but Devon and Cornwall Police confirmed they have since arrested a 50-year-old man on suspicion of attempted murder.  

Four people have been rushed to hospital with serious injuries after a 'multiple stabbing' attack in Plymouth (scene pictured)

Four people have been rushed to hospital with serious injuries after a ‘multiple stabbing’ attack in Plymouth (scene pictured)

Police have released a statement on Twitter that read: ‘Police were called just after 10pm on Saturday night following a serious incident having occurred near the Railway Inn on Albert Road in the Stoke area of Plymouth. 

‘Police units attended and found four people having sustained serious but not life threatening injuries; all have since been taken to Derriford hospital for treatment.

‘The suspect had fled the scene by the time police attended.

‘Follow up enquiries meant that armed offices attended an address in the Beacon Park area of Plymouth in an attempt to locate the suspect; he was no at the address.

‘Further enquiries and proactive police work led to officers stopping a vehicle near Ide on the outskirts of Exeter in which a man in his 50s was apprehended.

‘The suspect had been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder but has initially been taken to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital.

‘Police enquiries continue in this matter.

‘Anyone with information and who has yet to speak to officers is asked to contact 110 quoting log number 1112 19th September.’ 

The residential road remains sealed off and witnesses have said that a police helicopter has been circling the scene. 

One resident told ITV: ‘I live on Albert Road and drove home to find it closed but explained I lived here. 

‘Was told to go in and lock doors. Multiple police cars and emergency services including a helicopter and armed police.’ 

More follows. 

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Quarantine to be cut to seven days – but businessmen ‘exempt in push for global trade’

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quarantine to be cut to seven days but businessmen exempt in push for global trade

Coronavirus quarantine could be slashed to just seven days amid fears Britons are flouting the tough 14-day requirement.

The government’s Covid-19 taskforce is understood to be considering slashing self-isolation for those who come into contact with infected individuals to between a week and 10 days.

There are also claims that City dealmakers, hedge fund managers and company bosses flying into the UK could be exempted from border quarantine rules to help boost ‘global Britain’ after Brexit

The quarantine changes – which could come into force within weeks but would not apply to those who test positive for the disease – come amid growing dissatisfaction with the performance of the Test & Trace system among ministers and MPs.

Boris Johnson admitted that the service needed to get better last week and is believed to have been infuriated by bungles with testing figures recently.

Concerns have also been rising that people are failing to cooperate with Test & Trace due to the prospect of a lengthy period unable to work or go out.

Boris Johnson (pictured at Downing Street last week) has admitted that the Test & Trace service needs to get better and is believed to have been infuriated by bungles with figures recently

Boris Johnson (pictured at Downing Street last week) has admitted that the Test & Trace service needs to get better and is believed to have been infuriated by bungles with figures recently

Test and Trace - headed by the Conservative peer Baroness Harding (pictured) - last week hit a record low with just 59.6 per cent of the contacts of people who tested positive for the disease being successfully contacted and told to self-isolate

Test and Trace – headed by the Conservative peer Baroness Harding (pictured) – last week hit a record low with just 59.6 per cent of the contacts of people who tested positive for the disease being successfully contacted and told to self-isolate

Just one in 10 stay at home after being told to self-isolate 

Only one in ten stay at home for two weeks after being told to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace, Sage documents revealed last week.

Of those who were told they had been in close contact with a confirmed Covid-19 case, just 10.9 per cent isolated for the following 14 days.

The alarming figures undermine the premise of the Test and Trace system, which aims to prevent the spread of the virus.

The main reasons people gave for not properly quarantining were not developing symptoms, not thinking it was necessary to stay away from those outside the household, or popping to the shops for food.

The figures were revealed in documents by Sage – the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies. 

The study, carried out by King’s College London, was discussed at their meeting in September.

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‘Compliance is not as high as we would like and self-isolation is key if we are going to beat the virus,’ a No10 source told the Sunday Telegraph.

It comes after Test and Trace – headed by the Conservative peer Baroness Harding – last week hit a record low with just 59.6 per cent of the contacts of people who tested positive for the disease being successfully contacted and told to self-isolate.

In a further sign of the unrest at Westminster, senior Tory backbencher Sir Bernard Jenkin launched a scathing attack on the performance of the system, saying public consent and co-operation was ‘breaking down’.

Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, he said there was a ‘vacuum of leadership’ at the top of the organisation and called for a change that was ‘visible and decisive’ with a senior military figure being put in charge.

‘There is a spaghetti of command and control at the top, which is incapable of coherent analysis, assessment, planning and delivery,’ he wrote.

‘The immediate priority is to fill the vacuum of leadership in Test and Trace, which is destroying cooperation and compliance.

‘Government harnessed the military to regain control in the foot and mouth crisis; the Prime Minister should follow that example today, by installing a single leader, a three or four star military commander with a reputation for handling complexity under stress.

‘Test and trace should then be tasked with generating and sustaining a campaign targeted at achieving behaviour change by consent.’

Sir Bernard, who chairs the Liaison Committee of senior MPs which questions the Prime Minister twice a year, added that Lady Harding should be given a ‘well-earned break’ so she and others could ‘reflect on the lessons learned so far’.

In response, the Department of Health and Social Care acknowledged there were areas where the service needed to improve, but said people should be ‘talking it up, not down’.

‘Dido Harding and her leadership team – drawn from the military, public and private sectors – have built the largest diagnostic industry the UK has ever seen,’ a spokesman said.

‘It is the equivalent of building an operation the size of Tesco in a matter of months. The NHS Test and Trace system has built a testing capacity of 400,000 tests a day, from a starting point of 2,000 a day in March.

‘This capacity is bigger per head than France, Germany, Italy and Spain and we have contacted over 1.1 million people and asked them to self-isolate.

‘We need to improve in areas and we are very much focused on that, but we should be talking it up, not down.’

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34809344 8876423 image a 11 1603610979898

Business Secretary Alok Sharma and Trade Secretary Liz Truss are ‘sympathetic’ to demands for an exemption for international business travellers, according to the Sunday Times. 

Guidelines could cover senior bankers, hedge fund managers and executives. 

Currently there are extremely limited exemptions, mainly for the armed forces and truck drivers.

‘It seems ridiculous that people who are coming to the UK for five or six meetings in a day and then flying out are forced to quarantine, especially when most of them come in private jets and have a chauffeur-driven car,’ a government source told the Sunday Times.

‘The changes will need to be easy to implement and police because what we don’t want is for people to come to London for one day of meetings and then head  off for five days sightseeing.’

But it would infuriate ordinary families, who need to isolate for 14 days on returning from half-term holidays or face a £1,000 fine.

Lucy Powell, the shadow business minister, said: ‘It beggars belief that ministers are focusing on bending the rules for high net worth individuals rather than fixing their broken test, track, trace and isolate system.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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‘The next frontier in human flight’: LUCY JONES tests £340,000 jet suit capable of 200MPH speeds

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the next frontier in human flight lucy jones tests 340000 jet suit capable of 200mph speeds

I’ve never needed the services of the paramedics before – but right now I fear I might.

I’m about to try out one of the £340,000 jet suits that the ambulance service are training to use to allow them to flit across treacherous terrain in minutes.

Inventor Richard Browning, 41, created the astonishing means of travel – bringing something that we’d normally see in a Hollywood sci-fi movie to reality.

Looking distinctly like Marvel’s Iron Man, Browning put the 1,050 brake horsepower jet pack through its paces in a test flight with the Great North Air Ambulance Service in the Lake District last month.

The carbon-fibre device, which can fit in just two suitcases, would radically reduce rescue times from 25 minutes on foot to 90 seconds.

Now, Browning has given me the unique opportunity of putting his ground-breaking suit through its paces at his training and experience centre at Goodwood, in West Sussex.

Lucy Jones tests the £340,000 jet suit that the ambulance service are training to use to allow them to flit across treacherous terrain in minutes

Lucy Jones tests the £340,000 jet suit that the ambulance service are training to use to allow them to flit across treacherous terrain in minutes

Inventor Richard Browning, 41, created the astonishing means of travel – bringing something that we'd normally see in a Hollywood sci-fi movie to reality

Inventor Richard Browning, 41, created the astonishing means of travel – bringing something that we’d normally see in a Hollywood sci-fi movie to reality

The former Royal Marine reservist and BP oil trader founded Gravity Industries in March 2017 to pioneer the ‘next frontier in human flight’.

His carbon-fibre device looks a bit like a rucksack with gas canisters stuck to the side – which in a way it is – and weighs 35kg including fuel.

‘It has the potential to propel whoever is wearing it through the air at up to 200mph, but I set the world record at 85mph last year,’ Browning tells me as he straps me into it.

Despite this, I won’t be going any faster than 40mph or hovering higher than about four or five feet above grass level for my training session ‘for safety reasons’.

I’ll also be tethered to a metal frame that Browning has equipped to give support as I attempt to handle the thrust of the turbines – and to ensure I don’t float off into mid-air.

As Browning fires up the suit – with the jets inner spindles rotating 110,000 times a minute – the first thing that strikes me is the noise.

The thunderous roar is the same kind of decibel level as a large aeroplane on the runway at Heathrow – and it is more than enough to rumble through the ear defenders clamped firmly on the heads of everyone watching.

Carbon-fibre device looks a bit like a rucksack with gas canisters stuck to the side - which in a way it is - and weighs 35kg including fuel

Carbon-fibre device looks a bit like a rucksack with gas canisters stuck to the side – which in a way it is – and weighs 35kg including fuel

The violent throbbing emanates from two micro jet engines on both of my arms and one on my back, which are powered by Jet A1 or diesel fuel, allowing for movement to be controlled.

‘The way the micro turbines blow so much air downwards allows you to lift off the ground,’ Browning, tells me.

I’m told I need to keep arms straight as I point the cylinder-like arm engines down, with my chest pointing forwards.

I do exactly that but – at first – it proves to be a lot more difficult than Browning makes it look.

After a few goes, I finally find my feet lifting up, with my body floating in the air.

The feeling of complete weightlessness is exhilarating.

While I felt like a superhero during that moment, when I look back at the footage I look far from Browning who appears bird-like when he demonstrates the suit.

'It has the potential to propel whoever is wearing it through the air at up to 200mph, but I set the world record at 85mph last year,' says Browning

‘It has the potential to propel whoever is wearing it through the air at up to 200mph, but I set the world record at 85mph last year,’ says Browning

It’s not just Browning’s jet pack which is taking off though – his company is too, with its influence spanning the globe.

He has picked up investment from Tim Draper, one of Silicon Valley’s most prominent venture capitalists, and his son Adam.

He also has an inbox full of requests from some of the world’s wealthiest individuals who are looking purchase their own jet suits.

A prototype was sold to an anonymous Japanese billionaire for £200,000 and in 2018 he sold a jet suit to an entrepreneur in New York for £340,000.

Not one to rest on his jet engine, Browning has also been developing a means by which the jet pack could become an attraction at theme parks.

‘We are building an electric tether system to train people which you could have at theme parks – we’re working with some people on that,’ he says.

‘It’ll be a cheaper experience that more people can enjoy.’

Covid has also accelerated people’s interest in Browning’s jet packs.

‘I think people enjoy getting a bit of a distraction at looking at something that’s so exciting and engaging and a bit super-heroey and a bit comic book.

‘There’s also a bit of a subliminal metaphor of going above and beyond and setting free and escaping.

‘When it comes to lockdown and politics it’s quite a nice refreshing change.’

So could we be approaching an age when people can pop on a flying suit and whiz themselves to the shops at the push of a button?

Browning says: ‘The dream of flight is owned by both men and women – the world is a hard place to predict at the moment but we will see where it goes. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Care homes are demanding mandatory testing of inspectors to prevent putting elderly ‘lives at risk’

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care homes are demanding mandatory testing of inspectors to prevent putting elderly lives at risk

Care homes are demanding mandatory testing of inspectors to prevent putting elderly ‘lives at risk’ after more than 100 reported coronavirus symptoms. 

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) had suspended inspections for five months in an attempt to slow the spread of coronavirus. 

But last month the watchdog took the decision, sanctioned by the Department of Health, to redeploy inspectors.

The CQC, which employs around 1,300 inspectors, is set to launch 500 inspections over the next six weeks – but testing for those visiting care homes is not currently compulsory.

Care provides have fiercely criticised the move after it was estimated that 16,000 care home residents died with Covid-19 during the first wave of coronavirus. 

Care homes are demanding mandatory testing of inspectors to prevent putting elderly 'lives at risk' after more than 100 reported coronavirus symptoms (stock image)

Care homes are demanding mandatory testing of inspectors to prevent putting elderly ‘lives at risk’ after more than 100 reported coronavirus symptoms (stock image)

Data obtained under the Freedom of Information Act by The Sunday Telegraph revealed that more than 100 CQC inspectors reported Covid-19 symptoms or were forced to self-isolate.

It showed that during the period from March to October 20, 11 CQC staff tested positive for coronavirus which included six who were inspectors. 

A further 225 members of CQC staff, 103 of whom were inspectors, self-isolated as a precaution.

The report also showed that the watchdog had received one complaint in relation to its inspectors not wearing appropriate personal protective equipment during an inspection.

Care home managers have since called on the organisation to introduce mandatory testing for all inspectors as they insist that otherwise ‘lives will be put at risk’. 

The report also showed that the watchdog had received one complaint in relation to its inspectors not wearing appropriate personal protective equipment during an inspection (stock image)

The report also showed that the watchdog had received one complaint in relation to its inspectors not wearing appropriate personal protective equipment during an inspection (stock image)

Labour MP Barbara Keeley has since said that the data proved why it was now vital that inspectors were regularly tested in order to protect elderly lives.

She told The Independent: ‘On the basis of these numbers, inspectors may be potentially taking infections into care homes. Given the risk Covid-19 poses in care homes, this cannot be allowed to happen.

‘It’s just not acceptable that the inspectors are not being tested regularly… It is clear from these numbers that the only way for CQC inspections to resume in a safe manner is for all inspectors to have access to regular Covid-19 testing, even if they are asymptomatic.’

MailOnline has contacted the Care Quality Commission for comment. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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