Connect with us

Main News

From UFO treehouses to ice hotels – and bone chilling Arctic baths, Sweden’s cool all year round!

Published

on

from ufo treehouses to ice hotels and bone chilling arctic baths swedens cool all year round

For a stunning break less than three hours from the UK, Sweden offers a wealth of experiences to enjoy at any time of the year, whether you want to explore on foot, drive through spectacular scenery or simply relax in a luxury spa. 

Here are some of the best you can book this autumn.

SPOT THE NORTHERN LIGHTS FROM YOUR TREETOP BED 

Treehotel, in Harads, has accommodation ranging from a mirrored cube to a ‘floating’ domed UFO (pictured)

Treehotel, in Harads, has accommodation ranging from a mirrored cube to a ‘floating’ domed UFO (pictured)

There’s no need to wait for deepest winter to see the Northern Lights, as they are at their most active from around this time of year. Spot them on a Northern Lights walk during a three-night break in Swedish Lapland, staying in one of the modern log cabins at Brandon Lodge. A wilderness skills session is included, where you’ll learn survival techniques such as fire-making.

Afterwards, head inland for a night at the Treehotel in Harads, which has unique treehouses placed high in the pines. Accommodation ranges in style from a mirrored cube and a bird’s nest to a ‘floating’ domed UFO. All have minimalist Scandi-chic interiors.

Then go zip-wiring, take a forest hike or head off on a moose safari, before dining 30ft up in the trees and another chance to spot those elusive lights.

Book: Four nights’ half board, plus lunch at the Treehotel, costs from £1,710pp, with flights and transfers (bestservedscandinavia.co.uk).

SEE THE CAPITAL WITHOUT BREAKING THE BANK 

Charming: The words budget and Sweden don’t usually feature in the same sentence, but you can cut costs on a Stockholm city break

Charming: The words budget and Sweden don’t usually feature in the same sentence, but you can cut costs on a Stockholm city break

While it’s easy to see the city on foot, it’s worth buying a metro pass (£14 for 24 hours) which includes ferries around the archipelago. Pictured is Stadion metro station

While it’s easy to see the city on foot, it’s worth buying a metro pass (£14 for 24 hours) which includes ferries around the archipelago. Pictured is Stadion metro station 

The words budget and Sweden don’t usually feature in the same sentence, but you can cut costs on a Stockholm city break.

Stay in the revitalised Brunkebergstorg area, which is near the station for an easy airport transfer (£14). The public areas at Hobo boutique hotel are a riot of colour, but its bedrooms are more calming, with lots of pale wood, guidebooks pegged to the wall and a bit of an Ikea vibe.

While it’s easy to see the city on foot, it’s worth buying a metro pass (£14 for 24 hours) which includes ferries around the archipelago. Get a great view of the old town, Gamla Stan, and the Royal Palace from Skeppsholmen (note that the changing of the guards ceremony is currently suspended). And using a metro pass gives you access to the incredible art on display in the subway stations.

For food, eat well at midday – many restaurants offer a special lunch of the day (dagens ratt) at a reasonable price – and turn to cheap food trucks in the evening.

Book: B&B doubles at Hobo cost from £75 a night with no window, and about £90 with one (hobo.se).

PACK YOUR BOOTS FOR 600 MILES OF WALKING

Head south of Stockholm to the Tyresta National Park where hikes take in pine and deciduous forests and beautiful lakes

Head south of Stockholm to the Tyresta National Park where hikes take in pine and deciduous forests and beautiful lakes

Running through the wilderness of Sormland, south of Stockholm, is a 600-mile walking trail that takes in coastline, dense forests and beautiful lakes. You can walk what is probably the best 60-mile section on a new trip from the Natural Adventure Company, starting in Nynashamn on the coast and ending in a suburb near the capital.

Hikes take in pine and deciduous forests, including the Tyresta National Park. There are Iron Age castles and Viking rune stones to see, and the option of taking a boat trip to Nattaro Island.

Luggage is transferred ahead for you, with nights spent in hotels and guesthouses. You can start the week-long trip any time in October.

For November departures, the circular Osterlen Way in south-east Skane makes a good alternative.

Book: The six-night Sormland Way hike costs from £855pp; the seven-night Osterlen Way trip costs from £955pp. Both options are on a B&B basis but exclude flights (thenaturaladventure.com).

TRY A WIDESCREEN VIEW OF THE BEAUTY OF NATURE

Vipp Shelter on the banks of Lake Immeln was designed by one of Scandinavia’s most famous architectural firms

Vipp Shelter on the banks of Lake Immeln was designed by one of Scandinavia’s most famous architectural firms

You don’t have to rough it to enjoy nature – the stylish lakeside Vipp Shelter is surrounded by woodland on the banks of Lake Immeln.

Designed by one of Scandinavia’s most famous architectural firms, Vipp Shelter has a state-of-the-art kitchen, wood-burning stove and underfloor heating. There isn’t a television, but floor-to-ceiling windows give you a widescreen to nature and the changing colours of the forest outside. Hike through the trees or take a boat out on to the lake from the private wooden pier, then return to curl up in the glass-ceiling loft bedroom.

Book: Two nights for two costs from £912 (vipp.com).

GET YOUR CLAWS INTO A LOBSTER SAFARI

Marstrand on Sweden's west coast is known for its colourful cottages and 17th Century fort

Marstrand on Sweden’s west coast is known for its colourful cottages and 17th Century fort

Slip into the slow lane and potter up the coastline from Gothenburg to Fjallbacka, taking in islands kissed with brightly painted houses and staying in pretty villages.

Seafood-lovers will be spoilt, with excellent restaurants in Gothenburg and a chance to go on a lobster safari from Fjallbacka, catching your own supper before returning to the hotel to cook it. You can also take a boat from Fjallbacka to the remote and rocky Weather Islands.

Other highlights include the 17th Century fort on Marstrand, Bronze Age rock carvings near Tanumshede and a visit to Nordens Ark wildlife park, which is home to many endangered animals.

Book: Seven nights’ B&B costs from £851pp, and includes a night at Gothenburg’s Clarion Hotel Post, car rental and flights. A five-night holiday costs from £668pp (discover-the-world.com).

SAMPLE TUSCAN WINES – AND A JAPANESE SPA

Japanese-style hotel Yasuragi is located 30 minutes from the centre of Stockholm. Pictured is one of the bedrooms

Japanese-style hotel Yasuragi is located 30 minutes from the centre of Stockholm. Pictured is one of the bedrooms 

Head to the sauna, alpine tub and outside pools with sea views

Head to the sauna, alpine tub and outside pools with sea views

Whether you’re into wine or wellness, you can indulge your passion in one of two hotels just outside Stockholm. There are no vineyards here, of course, but there is The Winery Hotel in the northern suburb of Solna, which produces 10,000 bottles a year using grapes from its own Tuscan estate.

The wine is made in the impressive high-ceilinged lobby, where you can enjoy a guided wine tasting, or use a pre-paid card for the wine dispensers. There’s good Italian food in the restaurant (with a bulging wine list), and a heated open-air pool on the top floor.

If onsen-style bathing is more your thing, check out the Japanese-style hotel Yasuragi, near Hasseludden, 30 minutes from the centre of Stockholm. Get changed into the supplied swimwear and head to the sauna, alpine tub and outside pools with sea views.

Sliding window screens in the pared-down rooms open on to sublime views of the Stockholm archipelago, while many rooms have futons and tatami mats, giving the feel of a traditional ryokan (inn).

Book: B&B at The Winery Hotel costs from £120 a night (thewineryhotel.se). Two nights’ half board for two at Yasuragi with one lunch costs £528 (yasuragi.se).

CUTTING-EDGE ART AND CINNAMON BUNS

Visit the Gothenburg Museum of Art, above, with its collection of 20th Century Nordic paintings

Visit the Gothenburg Museum of Art, above, with its collection of 20th Century Nordic paintings

The Liseberg Amusement Park or the vintage shops in the quaint Haga district (above) are also worth exploring

The Liseberg Amusement Park or the vintage shops in the quaint Haga district (above) are also worth exploring 

The city of Gothenburg is uber-cool, with plenty of cutting-edge fashion, art and creative cuisine.

Like Stockholm, it has an archipelago that can be reached by ferry. Water plays an important part in the laid-back port city, with its Dutch-designed 17th Century canals. Unsurprisingly, the seafood is superb.

Although the indoor fish market, Feskekorka, is closed for refurbishment at the moment, you can sample everything from oysters and cava at the bar to a full seafood dinner at Fiskbar in the Magasinsgatan neighbourhood. Here, too, you will find a branch of Da Matteo, the place to go for enormous sourdough cinnamon buns (there’s also a cardamom version), and the hip restaurants, bars and vegan cafes of Tredje Langgatan are nearby.

Visit the Gothenburg Museum of Art, with its collection of 20th Century Nordic paintings, the Liseberg Amusement Park or the vintage shops in the quaint Haga district.

One of the best places to stay in town is the centrally located Clarion Hotel Post, which mixes modern design with its history as an old post office, and comes with a rooftop pool offering great city views.

Book: B&B doubles cost from £104 a night (nordicchoicehotels.com).

ARE YOU BRAVE ENOUGH FOR AN ARCTIC BATH?

View to a chill: The circular central spa at Arctic Bath, which is filled with ice-cold river water, and two of its saunas

View to a chill: The circular central spa at Arctic Bath, which is filled with ice-cold river water, and two of its saunas 

What looks like a bird’s nest or a jumble of logs floating on the Lule River forms the hub of the incredible Arctic Bath.

Here lies the circular central spa filled with ice-cold river water into which brave guests plunge before racing to warm up in the semi-circle of surrounding saunas.

Deep in the forest near Harads, the spa also offers traditional treatments plus a range of activities that include Northern Lights photography sessions, horse-riding and even a moose safari. Beware if you take the last: the restaurant’s five-course gourmet meal may feature a relative of the creatures you spot, as well as reindeer and fish.

Half of the 12 wood-and-stone cabins float on or are frozen into the river, while the others are on land nearby, with enormous windows looking out on to the river.

Book: Three nights’ half board in November costs from £1,710pp, with flights, transfers and spa entry. Arctic Bath opens on November 21 (sunvil.co.uk).

A WARM WELCOME AT THE HOTEL MADE FROM ICE

At Icehotel 365 temperatures don’t rise above minus 5C, though beds come with with reindeer skins and thermal sleeping bags

At Icehotel 365 temperatures don’t rise above minus 5C, though beds come with with reindeer skins and thermal sleeping bags 

You don’t have to wait for winter to sleep in a room created from ice: the Icehotel 365 is, as its name suggests, open all year round.

Next to the site where a new ice hotel is created each year, it has nine suites inside a turfed-roof building cooled by renewable energy. Temperatures don’t rise above minus 5C, though beds do come with reindeer skins and thermal sleeping bags.

Before settling into your own mini Narnia, get some Dutch courage in the ice bar with a drink or two (on the rocks, of course) or champagne in hand-made glasses carved from ice.

A night at Icehotel 365 (which has much lower room rates outside the winter peak) features as part of a five-night break that includes a stay in the branches of the Treehotel at Harads followed by a four-hour train journey to Kiruna and Camp Ripan.

Both have plenty of activities, with a forest spa at the Treehotel and an Aurora Spa at Camp Ripan that is perfect for spotting the spectacular Northern Lights.

Book: Five nights’ B&B, with one night in Icehotel 365 and two nights each at the Treehotel and Camp Ripan, costs from £1,695pp, with flights (magneticnorthtravel.com).

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Main News

Disturbing pictures show Europe boiling over with rage at yet more coronavirus lockdown rules

Published

on

By

disturbing pictures show europe boiling over with rage at yet more coronavirus lockdown rules

As the coronavirus crisis drags on, the mood in Europe is turning ugly. Tempers are fraying. Frustration is at boiling point.

And, as the shocking photos on this page reveal, with new Covid restrictions being introduced across the continent, many countries are sliding into open rebellion.

Take Italy, for example, where this week at least a dozen cities have seen violent protests against the government’s reimposition of a tight lockdown.

The most serious occurred in Milan and Turin, where demonstrators committed arson, vandalised public transport, looted shops and attacked the police with stones and petrol bombs.

Protesters  clash with police during a protest against the measures implemented to stop the spread of the coronavirus pandemic in Rome

Protesters  clash with police during a protest against the measures implemented to stop the spread of the coronavirus pandemic in Rome

A police officer  during the demonstrations over the restrictions put in place in Rome

A police officer  during the demonstrations over the restrictions put in place in Rome

Demonstrators in Milan  protesting against the government¿s reimposition of a tight lockdown

Demonstrators in Milan  protesting against the government’s reimposition of a tight lockdown

Police officers stand by burning flares during a protest against the new measures in Rome

Police officers stand by burning flares during a protest against the new measures in Rome

The flames of discord have spread to Spain, where the declaration of a second state of emergency and the prospect of a six-month lockdown led to huge protests on the streets of Barcelona, with scores of rubbish bins set on fire.

There have been explosive anti-lockdown rallies in the Czech capital of Prague, at least one of which had to be broken up by the police using tear gas and water cannon.

Even Germany, where the public is renowned for its obedience to authority, is experiencing unrest.

‘Why aren’t you telling the truth, Mrs Merkel, about how we are losing our freedom, jobs and health?’ read one placard at a demonstration in Berlin.

Across the Channel in France, where a state of emergency has also been declared recently, there have been major protests in several cities, including Paris and Marseille.

Indeed, one poll yesterday showed that just 37 per cent of French voters think that the government of president Emmanuel Macron has handled the pandemic effectively – hardly a surprise given that the daily total of infections passed the milestone of 50,000 on Sunday. 

A firefighter walking past a burning dustbin after a demonstration against curfew in Barcelona

A firefighter walking past a burning dustbin after a demonstration against curfew in Barcelona

 So how long will it be until Britain follows suit and street protests are triggered?

Thankfully, our country has not yet reached the stage of combustible revolt. 

But, as stoicism gives way to scepticism, it is clear that there is far less unity now than there was back in the spring when the first lockdown was introduced.

Anti-lockdown demonstrations are a regular weekend occurrence in central London, while the willingness of normally law-abiding citizens to comply with ever-more complex regulations is beginning to fray.

This week even the BBC presenter Victoria Derbyshire admitted that if the rule of six were still in place by Christmas, she would ignore it. 

She later backtracked from this stance, but her initial statement reflected an increasingly widespread disenchantment with the current rules.

Protesters in Milan attacked the police with stones and petrol bombs

Protesters in Milan attacked the police with stones and petrol bombs

According to the latest polls, only 39 per cent of the public approve of the No 10’s Covid policy.

Even Tory MPs seem to have had enough, with a number of those in northern seats now on the verge of open rebellion against the Government’s perceived lack of a coherent exit strategy from the new Covid lockdowns being imposed on them with devastating economic impact.

As someone who has to self-isolate because of an underlying health problem – the onset of Parkinson’s Disease – you would expect me to support the current restrictions. 

Yet I have deepening reservations about the Government’s handling of this crisis.

For it appears to me that we have ended up in the worst of all worlds, governed by rules that are both draconian and ineffective.

A central part of the problem is that the public’s faith in officialdom has been badly eroded, largely due to the gross hypocrisy of those who devised Britain’s restrictions.

After all, it is impossible to maintain national cohesion when there is one law for the hard-pressed citizenry, another for the privileged elite. 

Police officers stand guard outside a Gucci boutique store during the protests in Turin

Police officers stand guard outside a Gucci boutique store during the protests in Turin

Too many of the rule-makers have turned out to be rule-breakers, refusing to tolerate the same sacrifices that they so piously demanded of others.

The most egregious purveyor of such double-standards was undoubtedly Downing Street’s chief strategist Dominic Cummings, whose notorious trip by car to Barnard Castle in County Durham after he had contracted Covid was a clear breach of the lockdown.

His lack of contrition, never mind his refusal to resign, has permanently undermined the Government’s credibility and, I would suggest, was a tipping point for the public mood which, over the past few months, has been increasingly restive.

There were, of course, others like him, such as Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick, who visited his self-isolating parents in distant Shropshire at the peak of lockdown, or SNP MP Margaret Ferrier, who shamelessly made a round-trip between Scotland and London last month despite knowing that she had tested positive for the virus.

Just as reprehensible was the behaviour of doom-mongering scientist Professor Neil Ferguson, the real architect of the lockdown strategy, whose illicit trysts with his married lover made a mockery of his own stern injunctions against household mixing.

 ‘I thought I was immune,’ he said in his defence, having tested positive for the coronavirus and isolated himself for ‘almost two weeks’ – an utterance that we now know contained more political than medical truth.

Meanwhile, the morale-sapping impact of such hypocrisy on the country has only been compounded by the Government’s heavy-handedness in meting out new restrictions.

Protesters in Milan during a protest against the new coronavirus measures

Protesters in Milan during a protest against the new coronavirus measures

More than 8million people in England are now living under the highest Tier 3 rules, while the devolved nations of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have even tougher lockdowns.

Indeed the Welsh government appears to have become a mix of theatrical farce, communist East Germany and Cromwellian puritanism. Bizarre, contradictory regulations on essential sales have led to books on supermarket shelves being cordoned off with police tape. 

‘I can buy a Babycham, but not baby milk,’ complained one shopper, highlighting the nonsense.

At the weekend, a service at a church in Cardiff was even raided by police with searchlights because it broke Wales’s particularly draconian ‘firebreak’ restrictions.

This assault on essential liberties is wholly unBritish. Freedom is meant to be central to this country’s heritage. 

Yet today, ordinary people are being heavily punished without trial for the breach of some arbitrary edict.

SNP MP Margaret Ferrier

Chief strategist Dominic Cummings

Rule-makers have turned out to be rule-breakers-SNP MP Margaret Ferrier (left) and chief strategist Dominic Cummings (right)

Just ask Manchester University student Carys Ingram, who was recently fined £6,600 after she posted a photo of herself on social media breaking quarantine rules during a visit to see her family in the Channel Islands.

Of course, it could have been worse. Last week individual penalties of £10,000 were imposed on three Nottingham students for holding a house party.

And in recent weeks we’ve seen just how easy it is for this jobsworth mindset to descend into outright cruelty.

That trend was epitomised earlier this month during a funeral at a Milton Keynes crematorium, where the ceremony was interrupted by an appallingly cold-hearted official who rushed forward to prevent a son from hugging his grieving mother.

It was a deeply disturbing indication of how individuals are being made to suffer unnecessarily by the current social-distancing measures.

Yet we must remember, too, that Britain as whole is also paying an enormous price for the current restrictions, both economically and in terms of our general health.

At the start of this year, who could have thought that by October we would be living in a country where the national debt is bigger than the size of the economy?

And so, after failing so miserably on so many fronts, it would take a Government of some nerve to now demand absolute obedience from the British public.

For if it does, it will only stoke the fires of indignation.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Main News

We made promises to voters in the North… we MUST keep them, writes DAVID DAVIS 

Published

on

By

we made promises to voters in the north we must keep them writes david davis

The North has always been Britain’s great industrial heartland. Yet that proud history has become its disadvantage during the pandemic.

If you work in an office-based job such as financial services, you may find it easy to do so from home. 

But anyone who works in a steel foundry, a garment factory or any business that relies on physical manufacturing has probably had a harder time of it.

And they are much more likely to be in the North.

Promises made to voters in the north must be kept, says former Brexit secretary David Davis

Promises made to voters in the north must be kept, says former Brexit secretary David Davis

That’s why, with 40 of my fellow MPs from the so-called ‘Blue Wall’ that stretches from the Irish Sea to the North Sea, I unhesitatingly put my signature to the letter sent this week to 10 Downing Street by Jake Berry, MP for Rossendale and Darwen in Lancashire. 

Our letter sets out to ensure that our constituencies are not ‘left behind’ in the aftermath of Covid: That the Government does not for a moment slacken on its vital ‘levelling-up’ agenda in the North.

Yes, Covid-19 is an alarming threat to the country. But it also provides the Government with an exceptional opportunity to make good on its promise to the North.

When he was elected as Prime Minister in a landslide victory last December, Boris Johnson pledged to Northern voters that he would ‘work around the clock to repay your trust and to deliver on your priorities’. Boris knew that many Blue Wall voters had put their cross next to a Conservative candidate for the first time in their lives.

David Davis says Covid-19 is an alarming threat to the country but it also provides the Government including Chancellor Rishi Sunak with an exceptional opportunity to make good on its promise to the North

David Davis says Covid-19 is an alarming threat to the country but it also provides the Government including Chancellor Rishi Sunak with an exceptional opportunity to make good on its promise to the North

Their continued support was by no means guaranteed.

If we let them down, we would pay for it dearly at the next election.

Our letter set out two concerns. First, people feel real fear in regions where tough Tier 3 lockdowns have been imposed.

Their fear stems from the authorities’ lack of clarity: No one can say how long these onerous restrictions are likely to last.

We’re told that these local lockdowns are ‘circuit-breakers’, ‘fire-breaks’ or whatever new jargon has been dreamt up this week.

What matters is that there is no guarantee when these restrictions on people’s lives will end.

Second, people in poorer Northern regions are deeply concerned that the country will be paying the cost of Covid for years to come.

The letter sets out two concerns. First, people feel real fear in regions where tough Tier 3 lockdowns have been imposed

The letter sets out two concerns. First, people feel real fear in regions where tough Tier 3 lockdowns have been imposed

All the promises of ‘levelling-up’ and new investment will be forgotten, lost in the economic aftermath of this crisis.

Yet boosting the North will be good for the whole of Britain.

That’s why I emphatically dismiss any suggestion that we 41 MPs are some sort of ‘party within the party’, or that the old divisions of the Thatcher era between ‘wets’ and ‘hardliners’ is being revived.

That’s nonsense.

As Boris himself said in a speech in June: ‘Too many parts of this country have felt left behind: Neglected, unloved…

‘This Government not only has a vision to change this country for the better: We have a mission to unite and to level up.’

I and my co-signatories will now ensure that this mission is carried out.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Main News

GBBO accused of ‘borderline racism’ for ‘Japanese week’ food choices

Published

on

By

gbbo accused of borderline racism for japanese week food choices

The Great British Bake Off has been accused of ‘borderline racism’ by viewers.

During Tuesday night’s episode, contestants decided to cook Chinese treats for ‘Japanese week,’ – with one amateur baker styling her first creations to look like Pandas – leaving fans of the Channel 4 show extremely offended. 

For their first challenge, contestants were tasked with creating Japanese steamed buns, but rather than opting for traditional Nikuman, the bakers chose to go for Chinese, Indian and American-style fillings.

Oh dear! The Great British Bake Off has been accused of 'borderline racism' by viewers

Oh dear! The Great British Bake Off has been accused of ‘borderline racism’ by viewers

The buns, named Nikuman, are traditionally filled with savory pork, shiitake mushroom, cabbage, and scallion. 

And so, viewers were bemused when some contestants opted for Chinese style fillings, while others went for Indian and American takes on the classic Japanese dish.

Hermine even styled her ‘chicken nikuman’ buns into Pandas, which originate from central China.   

Buns: For their first challenge during Thursday night's episode, contestants were tasked with creating Japanese steamed buns

Buns: For their first challenge during Thursday night’s episode, contestants were tasked with creating Japanese steamed buns

Pandas!? Hermine styled her 'chicken nikuman' buns into Pandas, which originate from China

Pandas!? Hermine styled her ‘chicken nikuman’ buns into Pandas, which originate from China

What the...? But viewers were bemused when some contestants opted for Chinese style fillings, while others went for Indian and American takes on the classic Japanese dish

What the…? But viewers were bemused when some contestants opted for Chinese style fillings, while others went for Indian and American takes on the classic Japanese dish

Taking to Twitter, those who tuned into the show voiced their fury, with one enraged viewer tweeting: ‘I am SO offended by tonight’s #GBBO So ignorant and racist. You’d think in the age – and climate – they’d do better.

‘It not only insulted us Japanese, they’ve insulted the Chinese – and everyone’s intelligence.’ 

Someone else tweeted: ‘I had hopes for Japanese week but generalising all Asian food with Japan feeds the racist narrative that all Asians are the same, which is not cool in any time but especially now as East Asians are being racially abused due to Coronavirus.’  

Burger buns? The buns, named Nikuman, are traditionally filled with savory pork, shiitake mushroom, cabbage, and scallion

Burger buns? The buns, named Nikuman, are traditionally filled with savory pork, shiitake mushroom, cabbage, and scallion

Dahl? Marc decided to go for an Indian take on traditional Japanese Steamed Buns

Dahl? Marc decided to go for an Indian take on traditional Japanese Steamed Buns

Racist narrative: 'generalising all Asian food with Japan feeds the racist narrative that all Asians are the same,' said one furious viewer

Racist narrative: ‘generalising all Asian food with Japan feeds the racist narrative that all Asians are the same,’ said one furious viewer

‘Why is everyone cooking Chinese on Japanese week? This is so rude/racist #gbbo.’ added another.

‘It’s JAPANESE week, people. Not CHINESE Week. #GBBO,’ pointed out another fan of the show. 

Someone else asserted: ‘This is an absolute trainwreck of an episode. It’s borderline racist #GBBO.’ 

Going into more detail, one viewer explained: This racist a** ‘Japanese week’ episode of #GBBO being: Bao (Chinese food) ‘Kawaii Cake’ (not a thing!) Matcha Mille Feuille (fair enough).  

Fan reaction: Taking to Twitter, those who tuned into the show voiced their fury

Fan reaction: Taking to Twitter, those who tuned into the show voiced their fury

34922580 8886231 image a 90 1603835484894

34922478 8886231 image a 93 1603835494841

34922476 8886231 image a 92 1603835492260

34922582 8886231 image a 89 1603835482049

34923668 8886231 image a 97 1603836246958

‘Imagine being this much of a flop when Japan has so much delicious cuisine. Plz try harder!’ 

Someone else tweeted: ‘But Pandas are from China, not Japan, bit racist really #GBBO.’

One viewer also claimed that Matt Lucas had blocked her on Twitter, positing that it could be because he ‘knew the user would tell him to stop making racist jokes on #GBBO.’   

MailOnline has contacted The Great British Bake Off for comment. 

Yikes! One viewer also claimed that Matt Lucas had blocked her on Twitter

Yikes! One viewer also claimed that Matt Lucas had blocked her on Twitter

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.