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Instagrammer with Crohn’s reveals what it’s really like to live with a debilitating bowel conditions

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instagrammer with crohns reveals what its really like to live with a debilitating bowel conditions

A woman who was forced to have her rectum removed and her anus sewed up to save her life says people still don’t understand enough about bowel conditions ‘you can’t see’. 

Speaking to BBC Stories, Crohn’s sufferer Rosie Campbell, from Essex, says ‘looking fine on the outside’ means others struggle to comprehend just how debilitating conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s can be.

Rosie, who was diagnosed at the age of 12 and suffered symptoms including diarrhea and chronic pain, says she often has to explain to people that she ‘doesn’t have a bum hole’ after undergoing a protectomy – also known as ‘Barbie butt’ surgery – to stop her anus and rectum from turning cancerous. 

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Rosie Campbell, from Essex, was first diagnosed with Crohn's disease at the age of 12 and suffered with debilitating symptoms during her teenage years including chronic pain; after surgery to remove her large intestine she has a stoma bag to empty her bowel

Rosie Campbell, from Essex, was first diagnosed with Crohn’s disease at the age of 12 and suffered with debilitating symptoms during her teenage years including chronic pain; after surgery to remove her large intestine she has a stoma bag to empty her bowel

Rosie's scars following her protectomy - also known as 'Barbie butt' surgery - which sewed up her anus and removed her rectum to stop them from turning cancerous

Rosie’s scars following her protectomy – also known as ‘Barbie butt’ surgery – which sewed up her anus and removed her rectum to stop them from turning cancerous

Crohn’s disease is a long-term condition that causes inflammation of the lining of the digestive system. Inflammation most commonly occurs in the last section of the small or large intestine but it can affect any part of the digestive system. 

The condition can cause chronic pain, weight loss, diarrhea and fatigue and it’s thought around 500,000 people across the UK currently live with inflammatory bowel disease. 

Rosie had already had surgery to remove her large intestine to form an ileostomy bag, leaving her with just a small colon and needing stoma bags.

She told BBC Stories journalist Bryony Hopkins: ‘On the outside you look fine, on the inside, it’s a completely different ball game. 

‘I haven’t got my large intestine any more because it was going to kill me but just because I look like this doesn’t mean I haven’t gone through that.’

A better person: Rosie told BBC Stories journalist Bryony Hopkins that she 'prefers this person to potentially what I might have been' had she not been through what she's been through

A better person: Rosie told BBC Stories journalist Bryony Hopkins that she ‘prefers this person to potentially what I might have been’ had she not been through what she’s been through

Rosie says she ‘lost part of who I was’ when she had the protectomy operation, but thinks she’s a better person because of what she’s been through. 

She explains: ‘I grieved for someone that I thought I was going to be and I’m actually glad that I went through what I did. 

‘I actually think I prefer this person to potentially what I might have been, without going through this.’

What is Crohn’s disease?

Crohn’s disease is a long-term condition that causes inflammation of the lining of the digestive system.

Inflammation most commonly occurs in the last section of the small or large intestine but it can affect any part of the digestive system. 

Common symptoms can include:

  • diarrhoea
  • abdominal pain
  • fatigue (extreme tiredness)
  • unintended weight loss
  • blood and mucus in your faeces (stools)

Remission occurs when people with the disease go long periods of time without symptoms however these periods can be followed by flare ups of symptoms.  

Why it happens

The exact cause of Crohn’s disease is unknown. However, research suggests a combination of factors may be responsible. These include:

genetics – genes you inherit from your parents may increase your risk of developing Crohn’s disease

the immune system – the inflammation may be caused by a problem with the immune system that causes it to attack healthy bacteria in the gut

previous infection – a previous infection may trigger an abnormal response from the immune system

smoking – smokers with Crohn’s disease usually have more severe symptoms than non-smokers

environmental factors – Crohn’s disease is most common in westernised countries such as the UK, and least common in poorer parts of the world such as Africa, which suggests the environment has a part to play 

Source: NHS 

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Awkwardness surrounds her condition, she says, and Rosie admits she often has frank conversations with people about it: ‘People don’t know how to talk to you and when you tell people you don’t have a bum hole, they’re like “What do you mean?”

She says she tells them: ‘It’s gone, it would have turned cancerous, that would have killed me. I chose to live, that’s what I chose’.

On Instagram, Rosie documents her life living with her condition, sharing bikini photos showing her stoma bag

On Instagram, Rosie documents her life living with her condition, sharing bikini photos showing her stoma bag

Reality: Her frank and honest posts shows the different sizes of bags she uses, saying she can only use smaller stoma bags when she's on holiday

Reality: Her frank and honest posts shows the different sizes of bags she uses, saying she can only use smaller stoma bags when she’s on holiday 

After the short film aired on BBC Stories, Rosie told her 5,000 Instagram followers that she’d been flooded with messages of support. 

The film also featured Anthony Andrews, a young man facing the removal of his large intestine and documents BBC journalist Bryony Hopkins’ own journey with Crohn’s disease, which she’s had since childhood. 

Speaking about her appearance in the film, Rosie urged her followers to be kinder to people saying it’s never clear what a person is going through. 

She wrote: ‘IBD is a life changing illness and affects every part of your life! Physically and mentally. No-one chooses to be sick, and to have surgery, and to have a stoma… BE KIND ALWAYS!!’ 

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Matt Hancock says Britons SHOULD grass on their neighbours if they break new self-isolation laws

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The Health Secretary said people should ‘absolutely’ tell police if they see rule breakers as he warned he could not rule out a second national lockdown if rules continued to be flouted

Matt Hancock today told Britons to grass up their neighbours if they break tough new coronavirus laws that could see them fined £10,000 – and admitted he would do it himself.

The Health Secretary said people should ‘absolutely’ tell police if they see rule breakers as he warned he could not rule out a second national lockdown if rules continued to be flouted.

But the Government appears to be at sixes and seven over whether Britain should become a nation of narks with contradictory views around the Cabinet.

Mr Hancock’s comments were at odds with Boris Johnson’s position, after the Prime Minister said last week that he did not like ‘sneak culture’ and urged people to inform on neighbours as a last resort, ‘if there is some huge kind of Animal House party taking place … hot tubs and so forth, and there is a serious threat to public health’.

However Home Secretary Priti Patel had earlier backed people informing on their neighbours if they were breaking the new rules, adding: ‘It’s not dobbing in neighbours, it’s all about us taking personal responsibility.’ 

Mr Hancock spoke today as ministers unveiled plans to fine Covid sufferers up to £10,000 if they leave their house when they are meant to be self-isolating under draconian new rules being brought in to tackle a sharp up-spike in Covid-19 cases across the UK. 

With his ministers locked in debate this weekend over whether to introduce a second lockdown that would devastate the economy, the Prime Minister announced that he was creating a new legal duty for people to self-isolate if they test positive for the virus or are told to do so by Test and Trace staff.

Asked this morning on Sky’s Ridge on Sunday if he would report a neighbour he said: ‘Yes, and everybody should. And the reason for that is that the way we control this virus is by breaking the chains of transmission.’

Repeating this view later on the BBC’s Andrew Marr show he added: ‘I’m not in this for a popularity contest. I’m in this to keep the country safe.’ 

The development came as:

  • The number of daily cases reached 4,422, the highest level since early May, with scientists fearing that infections are growing between two and seven per cent each day, with a national R rate between 1.1 and 1.4;
  • Sources said that Mr Whitty was on ‘resignation watch’ over fears he may quit if Ministers resist his calls for tougher restrictions – but Mr Johnson is said to be in Whitty’s ‘grip’;
  • Supermarkets ran out of online delivery slots as the spectre of a second national lockdown prompted fears of panic buying, as Morrisons introduced limits on the number of shoppers across its 500 supermarkets for the first time since the height of the pandemic in March;
  • Hospitality industry leaders warned they faced ‘economic disaster’ from a second lockdown with one in five of their venues – rising to a third in London – still closed and 900,000 employees on the Treasury furlough scheme which runs out at the end of October;
  • No 10 reacted angrily to a ‘brutal and personal’ report in The Times claiming that Mr Johnson was miserable and short of money;
  • Mr Sunak called for tough measures to balance the Treasury’s books in the wake of the Covid crisis, including a freeze on benefits and public sector pay, as officials mocked Mr Johnson’s ‘Operation Moonshot’ plan for mass testing as ‘Operation Moonf***’;
  • Anti-vaccine protesters clashed with police in London; leading to 32 arrests;
  • A third of the people recorded to have died from Covid in July and August may actually have passed away due to other causes, researchers at Oxford University suggested;
  • The British Medical Association called on the Government to consider further tightening rules about who can meet, in the wake of the rise in daily cases.

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Large groups of walkers enjoy the warm sunshine as Police patrol Hyde Park in London on the first weekend of the Rule of Six being in place

Large groups of walkers enjoy the warm sunshine as Police patrol Hyde Park in London on the first weekend of the Rule of Six being in place

Drinkers hit the town ahead of Boris Johnson's potential plan to close pubs in England. Nottingham was packed with revellers all enjoying a night out on Saturday September 19.

Drinkers hit the town ahead of Boris Johnson’s potential plan to close pubs in England. Nottingham was packed with revellers all enjoying a night out on Saturday September 19.

Make children the priority for coronavirus tests to keep schools open, says Labour 

Sir Keir Starmer is urging ministers to put children ‘at the front of the queue’ for coronavirus tests.

The Labour leader warned of a ‘flood’ of school closures unless pupils were able to get the tests they needed.

His call came amid reports that 350 schools in England and Wales were forced to close completely or to send children home last week following positive Covid-19 tests.

Sir Keir said it was essential that children whose schooling was disrupted by the lockdown did not lose out even more because a shortage of tests meant they were unable to return to the classroom.

‘If the Prime Minister does not get a grip of the testing crisis, children will be robbed of an education. We are seeing a growing flood of schools closures,’ he said.

‘The testing regime is not working, nor does it appreciate the unique challenges many families are having to cope with.

‘That is why I’m urging the Prime Minister, like our key workers, to put children at the front of the queue for testing. To this week give parents a cast iron guarantee that they can get their child a test within 24 hours and the result back 24 hours later.’

 

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Mr Hancock added: ‘If everybody follows the rules then we can avoid further national lockdowns, but we, of course, have to be prepared to take action if that’s what’s necessary. I don’t rule it out, I don’t want to see it.’

Under a ‘carrot and stick’ approach, four million people on low incomes who cannot work from home will receive a £500 lump sum if forced to self-isolate. 

But fines for those breaching the rules, which come into effect a week tomorrow, will start at £1,000 – rising to £10,000 for repeat offenders and ‘the most egregious breaches’, which would include business owners who threaten self-isolating staff with redundancy if they do not come to work.

Mr Hancock this morning told Sky’s Ridge on Sunday the nation was at a ‘tipping point’ and there was a choice between following the current rules like the Rule of Six and self-isolation ‘or we will have to take more measures’.

‘I don’t want to see more measures, more restrictive measures. But unfortunately if people don’t follow the rules that is how the virus spreads,’ he added.

‘It comes down to individual choices of the 60million people who live in this country as to whether we can keep it there with a local lockdown approach or whether we have to take further national action.’ 

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said his party supported the action that would target ‘a small number’ of people.

‘There are a few people that are breaking the rules and something has to be done about that,’ he told Ridge on Sunday.

‘But it’s not going to be the silver bullet … we have a testing system that, when we need it to be effective, is barely serviceable.’ 

He also warned the Prime Minister that he needed to take immediate and hard-hitting action to avoid a miserable Christmas for millions of British families.

In an interview with the Sunday Mirror, the opposition leader said: ‘He has to act swiftly and decisively now to get infections under control so that Christmas is not lost.

‘We were promised world-beating testing, but we haven’t even got a serviceable system.

‘It is astonishing that the Government didn’t anticipate that we would need to boost testing when children went back to school and people went back to work.’

Party animals in Nottingham seemed to shake off concerns about the coronavirus and social distancing as they gathered for a night out on Saturday.

Party animals in Nottingham seemed to shake off concerns about the coronavirus and social distancing as they gathered for a night out on Saturday.

Plenty of people were seen in on Saturday in large crowds at Stables Market in Camden, London, and in Nottingham, where people hit the pubs before they potentially close their doors again.

Long queues were seen around Nottingham, with security having to step in and ask people to space out more due to zero social distancing going on. Police and community protection were doing patrols. 

A sharp rise in the number of cases over recent weeks has triggered alarm in Downing Street, with the Government’s scientific advisers pushing for a ‘circuit breaking’ second lockdown – but Ministers led by Chancellor Rishi Sunak are warning of the devastating economic impact.

A No 10 source admitted last night: ‘It’s not looking good.’

In a carefully choreographed move, the advisers, including Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty, are expected to release data showing the rise in cases at a public event tomorrow.

Mr Johnson could then make a televised appearance on Tuesday to set out new measures.

The extent, and the duration, of the new rules are still being discussed by Ministers, but are likely to include a nationwide curfew on pubs and a ban on the mixing of households.

Matt Hancock said the number of hospital admissions for coronavirus was rising and would be followed by an increase in the number of deaths.

‘We have seen in other countries when the case rate shoots up, the next thing that happens is the numbers going into hospital shoot up,’ he told Marr.

‘Sadly, we have seen that rise, it is doubling every eight days or so – people going into hospital – then, with a lag, you see the number of people dying sadly rise.’

But he added that it is still possible that there could be a coronavirus vaccine before the end of the year.

‘There is still hope that we will get one of the vaccines over the line this year. The Oxford vaccine is still at the front of the queue. More likely is next year, and probably the early part of next year.

‘We have got the cavalry coming over the next few months – the vaccine, the mass testing and the improvements in treatments – but we have got to all follow the rules between now and then to keep people safe.’ 

Under a 'carrot and stick' approach, 4 million people on low incomes who cannot work from home will receive a £500 lump sum if forced to self-isolate. Pictured: People sit on a terrace enjoying the weather in London

Under a ‘carrot and stick’ approach, 4 million people on low incomes who cannot work from home will receive a £500 lump sum if forced to self-isolate. Pictured: People sit on a terrace enjoying the weather in London

The Prime Minister said last night: ‘The best way we can fight this virus is by everyone following the rules and self-isolating if they’re at risk of passing on coronavirus. And so nobody underestimates just how important this is, new regulations will mean you are legally obliged to do so if you have the virus or have been asked to do so by NHS Test and Trace.

‘People who choose to ignore the rules will face significant fines. We need to do all we can to control the spread of this virus, to prevent the most vulnerable people from becoming infected, and to protect the NHS and save lives’.

Under the new rules, Test and Trace call handlers will make regular contact with those self-isolating and will pass on suspicions about those breaking the rules to local authorities and the police. 

But one Government adviser, Professor Robert Dingwall, argued that it would be premature to reintroduce tougher measures, especially as existing rules have become ‘unenforceable’ because people do not buy into the spirit of the restrictions.

Under the new rules, Test and Trace call handlers will make regular contact with those self-isolating and will pass on suspicions about those breaking the rules to local authorities and the police. Pictured: Members of the public sit outside a cafe in southwest London today

Under the new rules, Test and Trace call handlers will make regular contact with those self-isolating and will pass on suspicions about those breaking the rules to local authorities and the police. Pictured: Members of the public sit outside a cafe in southwest London today

People in southwest London made the most of the good weather today to visit cafes and sit outside in the sun

People in southwest London made the most of the good weather today to visit cafes and sit outside in the sun

‘There is a sense among some of the scientific advisers that the Government is perhaps jumping the gun,’ he said. 

‘It’s a bit premature to say that we’re on this exponential growth curve when we may just be drifting up to a stable situation at a slightly higher level than we were a few weeks ago, which you would expect with the re-opening of the economy.’

Prof Dingwall also asked whether ‘we are drifting towards a situation where people are quite comfortable with the idea that 20,000 people will die every year from Covid as we are comfortable with the idea that 20,000 people will die every year from influenza. And we shrug our shoulders and get on with our lives.

‘We need to be having more of a national conversation that starts from the lives of ordinary people and what is practical to achieve, and what the costs of these measures are.’ 

Professor Carl Heneghan, director for the centre of evidence-based medicine at Oxford University, told Sky News the country cannot afford to introduce ‘harsh measures’ immediately to curb the spread of Covid-19, adding: ‘What we have to do now is slow down, this is a long winter.’

He said: ‘What we’re seeing is that the virus is operating in a seasonal way.

‘As we’ve gone back to schools, actually what’s happened now is we’ve seen about a 60% increase in consultations for all the acute respiratory infections and that’s what’s driving the problems in the Test and Trace programme.

‘All the young children who have coughs and colds and these infections, one is called rhinovirus.

‘As we look at the data, Covid is operating in a similar seasonal way, and mirroring those respiratory infections, so what we have to do now is slow down, this is a long winter.

‘We can’t afford to go now with harsh measures … the impact on the economy here is going to be significant.

‘What happens is as soon as you pause and then open up again, it tends to come back.

‘We still have to be vigilant about ensuring the infections stay manageable across the board.’

Rishi gets tough: Chancellor plans to FREEZE benefits and state pay 

Rishi Sunak is considering a freeze on benefits and public sector pay as he tries to get a grip on the spiralling cost of the coronavirus pandemic – and boost his own political ambitions.

With unemployment projected to rise to more than four million as a result of the crisis, the Chancellor has told fellow Ministers that he is deeply concerned about the long-term damage to the Treasury’s balance sheet.

In an attempt to claw back billions of pounds in economic bailouts, Mr Sunak has discussed scrapping inflation-linked increases to both welfare payments and public sector salaries – and is trying to persuade Boris Johnson to rip up the ‘triple lock’ which protects the income of pensioners.

It comes as Mr Sunak – whose public poll ratings during the pandemic have outstripped his colleagues, including the Prime Minister – has been making increasingly energetic efforts to meet ‘Red Wall’ MPs who entered Parliament in the 2019 Election to set out his political priorities.

This has led to mutterings on the Tory backbenches about the growing strength – and independence – of Mr Sunak’s operation.

Treasury staff are becoming increasingly outspoken about Downing Street’s grip on the Covid crisis, with Boris Johnson’s ‘Operation Moonshot’ plan to mass test ten million people a day by 2021 dismissively referred to in the department as a ‘Moonf***’ moneypit.

Mr Sunak has been the most hawkish Minister in the Government over the need to reopen the economy as quickly as possible, in the face of opposition from Health Secretary Matt Hancock and Government scientific advisers, led by Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty.

 

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Has the second wave of panic-buying begun? Ocado and Sainsbury’s warn delivery slots are booking up fast as Britain braces for second lockdown 

By EMER SCULLY for MailOnline 

Ocado and Sainsbury’s have warned customers that delivery slots are booking up fast – as fears of a second wave appear to be fuelling the return of panic-buying.

The online supermarkets pasted notices on their ‘pick a slot’ page warning customers the sites were experiencing high demand.

Ocado’s read: ‘Delivery slots are selling out faster than usual. If you can’t find a slot now, please use the ‘Next 3 days’ button to see available slots further in advance.’

It comes as Government scientists spooked Boris Johnson with warnings of hundreds of daily coronavirus deaths ‘within weeks’ as they said: ‘There is no alternative to a second national lockdown’. 

A senior citizen gets the last pack of toilet rolls at a Sainsbury's Supermarket on March 19, 2020, in Northwich. A spate of panic buying in March saw supermarket shelves stripped bare

A senior citizen gets the last pack of toilet rolls at a Sainsbury’s Supermarket on March 19, 2020, in Northwich. A spate of panic buying in March saw supermarket shelves stripped bare

A notice on Sainsbury’s delivery slots page said: ‘Slots are still in high demand. We have been working hard to expand our service.  More slots are now available and we are able to offer some of them to other customers. 

‘Customers who are vulnerable will get priority access and are able to book slots in advance of anyone else. We’re releasing new slots regularly so please check back if you can’t see any available.’

Meanwhile Tesco was fully booked until Wednesday with an available slots all priced at £5.50 – and there were no available spaces until Monday at Asda. 

Tesco (pictured) was fully booked until Wednesday with an available slots all priced at £5.50

Tesco (pictured) was fully booked until Wednesday with an available slots all priced at £5.50

The Prime Minister is now threatening to ‘intensify’ coronavirus restrictions as he blames the British public for the rise in cases – despite his repeated pleas for people to return to their desks and eat out at pubs and restaurants in a bid to resuscitate Britain’s economy. 

It has led to concerns the nation could return to the days of panic shopping seen at the beginning of the pandemic in March. 

On March 19 shoppers formed queues outside supermarkets up and down the country from 6am and stripped shelves bare by 9am.

And Ocado was forced to shut down its website and app on March 18 after being swamped with orders. 

Customers were not be able to book a new delivery or edit existing orders. 

It comes as the Prime Minister looks to ditch his Rule of Six and introduce fortnight-long ‘circuit breakers’ nationwide for six months, following claims that it was ‘inevitable’ that a second wave would hit the country last night.  

Senior citizens walk past empty shelves as they shop at Sainsbury's Supermarket on March 19, 2020 in Northwich, United Kingdom

Senior citizens walk past empty shelves as they shop at Sainsbury’s Supermarket on March 19, 2020 in Northwich, United Kingdom

Hundreds of customers queued for more than an hour with empty trollys zig-zaging through the car park at Costco wholesale warehouse, Sunbury-on-Thames, on March 19

Hundreds of customers queued for more than an hour with empty trollys zig-zaging through the car park at Costco wholesale warehouse, Sunbury-on-Thames, on March 19

The new approach to get the UK through winter would see it alternate periods of stricter measures, including bans on all social contact between households and shutting down hospitality and leisure venues like bars and restaurants, with intervals of relaxation. Schools will be shut as a ‘last resort’, a Whitehall source claimed.

It is understood that the new ‘circuit break’ shutdown could be announced via television press conference on Tuesday, in a move reminiscent of the Government’s behaviour during the peak of the pandemic.  

Visiting the Vaccines Manufacturing Innovation Centre construction site near Oxford, Mr Johnson said: ‘What I can certainly say about parents and schools is we want to keep the schools open, that is going to happen.

‘We want to try and keep all parts of the economy open as far as we possibly can – I don’t think anybody wants to go into a second lockdown but clearly when you look at what is happening, you have got to wonder whether we need to go further than the rule of six that we have brought in on Monday, so we will be looking at the local lockdowns we have got in large parts of the country now, looking at what we can do to intensify things that help bring the rate of infection down there, but also looking at other measures as well.’ 

Officials, including England’s chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance, are thought to be arguing for tough restrictions as panic within official circles grows. 

Today the Government’s original lockdown architect, Professor Neil Ferguson of Imperial College London, recommended ‘rolling back’ freedoms ‘sooner rather than later’ by ‘reducing contact rates between people’.  

The epidemiologist, who was sacked from SAGE for flouting his own lockdown rules, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘Right now we’re at about the levels of infections that we were seeing in late February, if we leave it at another two to four weeks we will be back at levels we were seeing more like mid March. 

Customers were seen shopping as shelves sat empty amid a nationwide panic on March 20

Customers were seen shopping as shelves sat empty amid a nationwide panic on March 20

‘That’s going to clearly cause deaths… I think some additional measures are likely to be needed sooner rather than later, the timing of any more intensive policy, temporary policy, is open to question’. 

But the measures are thought to have been met with protests from Chancellor Rishi Sunak, who has warned against introducing new blanket restrictions by pointing to huge damage already inflicted to the economy.

Government sources claim that Mr Sunak gave ‘sombre warnings’ to the Prime Minister as he highlighted the severity of the damage caused to the UK economy as a result of the March lockdown – while Mr Johnson shrugged off the ‘grim’ economic forecasts, claiming that ‘he was confident it will all be OK in the end’.  

Business leaders echoed the Chancellor’s concerns and warned that a second lockdown would tank the economy, with the British Chambers of Commerce saying: ‘Uncertainty and speculation around future national restrictions will sap business and consumer confidence at a delicate moment for the economy’.   

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How YouTube star Emily Hartridge became the first victim of electric scooters on UK roads

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TV presenter and YouTube star Emily Hartridge is believed to have been the first e-scooter rider to die on a British road.

The 35-year-old was killed in a collision with a lorry in July last year. A statement on her Instagram page the day after her death said: ‘We all loved her to bits and she will never be forgotten.’

Earlier this month, a coroner ruled she had been riding her e-scooter too fast with an under-inflated tyre at the time of the crash. 

The inquest, held at Westminster coroner’s court, Central London, heard that Emily, of Hambledon, Hampshire, died instantly of her injuries following the collision in Batttersea, South-West London. 

Dr Fiona Wilcox concluded that her death was accidental. 

YouTube star Emily Hartridge was riding an e-scooter too fast with an underinflated tyre when she was killed in a crash with a lorry, a coroner has ruled

YouTube star Emily Hartridge was riding an e-scooter too fast with an underinflated tyre when she was killed in a crash with a lorry, a coroner has ruled

The presenter, 35, died instantly of her injuries following the collision in Battersea, south London last July

The presenter, 35, died instantly of her injuries following the collision in Battersea, south London last July

In notes seen by the BBC, she wrote: ‘Ms Hartridge was riding an electric scooter on Queenstown Road when she lost control after passing over an inspector hatch in the cycle lane and was thrown under the path of an HGV.

‘She died instantly of injuries sustained by the HGV driving over her.

‘The scooter was being unsuitably driven, too fast and with an underinflated tyre and this caused the loss of control and her death.’

At the time, e-scooters were illegal to ride in the UK other than on private land with permission, but the were given the green light by the Department for Transport earlier this year to help cut down on congestion on public transport amid the Covid crisis.

The new rules state the vehicles can’t be ridden on pavements, are limited to a speed of 15.5mph and that helmets should be worn. 

Ms Hartridge was on her way to a fertility clinic when she tragically became the first person in the UK to have been involved in a fatal crash on an e-scooter

Ms Hartridge was on her way to a fertility clinic when she tragically became the first person in the UK to have been involved in a fatal crash on an e-scooter

A coroner said at Ms Hartridge's inquest: 'The scooter was being unsuitably driven, too fast and with an underinflated tyre and this caused the loss of control and her death'

A coroner said at Ms Hartridge’s inquest: ‘The scooter was being unsuitably driven, too fast and with an underinflated tyre and this caused the loss of control and her death’

However, they remain controversial and, earlier this summer, Future of Transport Minister Rachel Maclean told Parliament that it was ‘not a done deal’ that the e-scooters would stay after the 12-month trial ends. 

‘This is a very big market for e-scooter operators and we don’t want to rush into something that we may regret doing later,’ she added.

Just before her death, Ms Hartridge’s professional and personal life were both on the up. She attracted more than 340,000 subscribers on her YouTube channel, where she would post an episode of her show, 10 Reasons Why… every Monday, and boasted more than 40,000 followers on Instagram.

In recent years she had interviewed the likes of Russell Brand, Hugh Jackman, Amanda Seyfried and Eddie Redmayne, as well as hosting Virgin Media’s first YouTube Channel, The Snap. 

Ms Hartridge’s grieving boyfriend Jacob Hazell said last year he and the presenter – who he described as the ‘most beautiful woman in the world’ – were overcome with excitement as they planned for a baby. 

Earlier this month, a coroner ruled she had been riding her e-scooter too fast with an under-inflated tyre at the time of the crash

Earlier this month, a coroner ruled she had been riding her e-scooter too fast with an under-inflated tyre at the time of the crash

YouTube star Emily Hartridge, 35, lost her life in a collision with a lorry as she circled the roundabout while riding an e-scooter bought for her by her boyfriend Jacob Hazell, 28, as a birthday present less than a week before

YouTube star Emily Hartridge, 35, lost her life in a collision with a lorry as she circled the roundabout while riding an e-scooter bought for her by her boyfriend Jacob Hazell, 28, as a birthday present less than a week before

The 28-year-old said everything in their lives was ‘going right’. 

But in a heart wrenching interview, he recalled his creeping sense of dread when the clinic said Ms Hartridge had failed to turn up to the appointment. 

And he revealed his anxiety then turned into devastation after stumbling across the news that his girlfriend had died in a collision with a lorry in Battersea on Friday 12 July.

‘I am devastated. I got up first to leave home at 5am. I gave her a kiss on the lips. She was half asleep and mumbled, ‘I love you’. I’m so pleased I did that,’ Mr Hazell told the Sun.   

In her YouTube vlogs, Ms Hartridge would often speak candidly about her and Mr Hazell’s parenthood plans and had previously revealed she was getting her eggs frozen.

However, as Ms Hartridge was on her way to the take the next steps towards pregnancy, she was tragically killed on a roundabout in what is believed to be the UK’s first ever e-scooter accident.

And although Mr Hazell is still raw from the horrific crash and in mourning, he has revealed that some people have blamed him for his girlfriend’s death.

The presenter was killed after the e-scooter she was riding was involved in a collision with a HGV in Battersea, south west London last year (pictured, the scene of the crash)

The presenter was killed after the e-scooter she was riding was involved in a collision with a HGV in Battersea, south west London last year (pictured, the scene of the crash)

The personal trainer said: ‘People have told me I’m to blame because I bought it for her, but I can’t think that. Her family have told me I’m not.’ 

Mr Hazell said that when he first presented Ms Hartridge with the vehicle she was ‘over the moon’ but ‘knew the risks’ and would always wear a helmet.

He also said he does not think the vehicles should be banned, despite the accident leaving a ‘hole’ in his life.

He said: ‘We had just moved in together and were planning a family. I’m heartbroken she has gone…

‘I don’t think they should be banned for adults, as they are electric, go a maximum of 20mph and don’t do any harm to the environment.’          

In one of her last online posts, Ms Hartridge gushed she and Mr Hazell were hoping to start a family together, adding: ‘Jake is incredible and I feel beyond grateful to have him in my life.’   

Footage has since re-emerged of Ms Hartridge bringing together her family and friends for the Channel 4 series, ‘Oh S***, I’m 30’, which aired in 2016. 

The TV presenter was described as ‘one of a kind’ during a mock funeral service she hosted for a TV show three years before she was tragically killed.  

Davina McCall led tributes to the young presenter. She wrote: ‘My heart goes out to Emily’s family and friends. Such a shock. Sending you love and prayers.’ 

Her tragic death was first announced on the 35-year-old social media star’s Instagram account. 

A message posted said: ‘Hi everyone. This is a horrible thing to have to say over Instagram but we know many of you were expecting to see Emily today and this is the only way to contact you all at once.

‘Emily was involved in an accident yesterday and passed away. We all loved her to bits and she will never be forgotten.

‘She has touched so many lives it’s hard to imaging things without her.

‘She was a very special person.’   

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BBC ‘paid Radio 4 host James Naughtie £175k a year after he appeared on air for just 23 HOURS’

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bbc paid radio 4 host james naughtie 175k a year after he appeared on air for just 23 hours

The BBC has been slammed for reportedly paying Radio 4 host James Naughtie £175,000 a year after he appeared on air for just 23 hours.

The 69-year-old’s salary was released alongside other BBC presenters as part of an annual report which sparked backlash as the corporation cuts hundreds of jobs from its regional programmes.

But analysis by the Sun on Sunday showed that James Naughtie only worked for just over 23 hours which means his pay works out at £7,608 an hour or £126 a minute. 

Critics have pointed to the figure as proof the BBC is ‘out of touch’ as the corporation also continues to face backlash over changes to TV licensing for over-75s.

BBC is slammed for reportedly paying Radio 4 host James Naughtie £175,000 a year after he appeared on air for just 23 hours last year according to a report published earlier this month

BBC is slammed for reportedly paying Radio 4 host James Naughtie £175,000 a year after he appeared on air for just 23 hours last year according to a report published earlier this month

A source told the Sun: ‘It’s quite clear it’s been an old boy’s club at the top of the BBC. Naughtie has been a big name for years but I cannot see how the BBC can justify such an enormous salary for that amount of work.

‘He’s well respected and brilliant at what he does but that’s a huge sum and a kick in the teeth for those losing jobs. It shows how out of touch the BBC is.’

Tory MP Andrew Bridgen added: ‘This expenditure would be indefensible at the best of times but certainly not when they are charging over-75s for a licence fee.

‘I don’t know how BBC bosses can sleep at night.’

According to the Sun, Mr Naughtie presented two documentaries, an opera performance, interviews and a night of election coverage and also hosted 12 episodes of a book club series. 

It comes as the BBC came under fire after published accounts showed staff pay had soared 3.5 per cent up to £1.5billion this year.

Critics have blasted its decision to reward its staff with a total 3.5 per cent salary increase even after it announced plans to slim down its operations following the pandemic

Critics have blasted its decision to reward its staff with a total 3.5 per cent salary increase even after it announced plans to slim down its operations following the pandemic

BBC Rich List top ten

1. BBC Radio 2 breakfast show DJ Zoe Ball is on £1.36 million.

2. Match of the Day host Gary Lineker is on £1.35 million. 

3. Graham Norton takes about £725,000 for his Radio 2 show and some TV work, but not his chat show.

4. Radio 2 DJ Steve Wright is on about £475,000.

5. Newsreader and election night presenter Huw Edwards is on more than £465,000.

6. Fiona Bruce takes home over £450,000 for her work on Question Time.

7. BBC Radio London’s Vanessa Feltz is on about £405,000.

8. Desert Island Discs host Lauren Laverne is on more than £395,000.

9. Broadcaster Stephen Nolan is on more than £390,000 for his radio work, including 5 Live.

10. Match Of The Day’s Alan Shearer is on the same figure of £390,000 a year.

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Meanwhile the corporation is pushing ahead with plans to strip a million over-75s of their free TV licences.

Accounts published earlier this week showed that Zoe Ball is now the BBC’s highest earner after pocketing a £1million pay rise – knocking Gary Lineker off the top spot.

The Match of the Day star, 59, is understood to have signed a new five-year contract – and a nearly 25 per cent pay cut from £1.75million down to £1.35million. 

Critics have blasted its decision to reward its staff with a total 3.5 per cent salary increase even after it announced plans to slim down its operations following the pandemic.

BBC director-general Tim Davie defended Ball’s huge pay rise after she shed nearly a million listeners in the first year in her new role, saying it was a ‘punchy’ market.

‘Zoe is absolutely a broadcaster at the top of her game. She’s delivering over eight million listeners,’ he boasted. ‘I think we’re getting incredible value.’

Asked about the likes of Lineker still earning more than £1million, Mr Davie said he would expect ‘people to come to the BBC at a significant discount to what they’d get in the open market’.

But he added: ‘We will invest in very limited situations in particular markets to ensure we have got the best talent.’

In July, the BBC announced a huge shake-up of regional TV news and local radio in England which will lead to 450 job cuts.

Changes will see one instead of two presenters fronting 6.30pm regional TV news bulletins as the corporation looks to make £25million in savings.

Inside Out, the regional current affairs magazine show made in 11 different regions, will be axed and replaced with a new investigative journalism programme from six hubs.

A ‘simplified schedule’ introduced on local radio during the pandemic, with single instead of double presenters and a reduction in the number of shows, will become permanent.

Other detractors have pointed to the BBC’s shocking push to strip 1.5 million pensioners of their free TV licences as the BBC seeks to capture younger audiences in its war with Netflix.

Figures from the BBC’s annual report show fewer households are buying TV licences and that audiences for its major channels have also fallen, suggesting many families are relying on streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime.

The Corporation said 25.9million licences were in force in 2019/20 – down 237,000 in a year.

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With a licence costing £157.50, the fall cost the BBC just under £40million.

The BBC lost millions more because the Government has started to reduce the amount of money it gives the Corporation to pay for free licences for the over-75s.

The BBC has insisted it cannot afford the concession for all pensioners and says only around 900,000 who receive Pension Credit would continue to get it.

Gary Lineker

Radio 2 DJ Zoe Ball

Radio 2 DJ Zoe Ball will now overtake Gary Lineker as the BBC’s highest paid stars 

Meanwhile, Netflix bosses have thrown their weight behind the long-term future of the BBC and voiced support for continuing the licence fee.

They say the streaming service, which has been hoovering up viewers from traditional TV stations, benefits from a creative landscape crowded with thriving public service broadcasters.

According to this week’s report, younger people aged 16 to 34 watched or listened to just seven and a half hours of BBC content a week – only a slightly higher share than YouTube. 

Across all ages, the audience reach of BBC1 – the numbers that see the channel each week – fell from 68 per cent to 65.4 per cent in a year. BBC2 also saw a decline, from 42.9 per cent to 41.9 per cent.

CBBC, CBeebies and BBC Four also saw falls while the only increases were on the BBC News channel and BBC Parliament. 

Even among its most loyal viewers – the over-55s – audience reach across all BBC TV channels fell from 93 per cent to 92 per cent. 

Among those aged 16 to 34, the proportion fell from 58 per cent to 55 per cent. Radio 1 saw its audience reach fall from 17 to 16.6 per cent and Radio 2 dropped from 27.2 per cent to 26 per cent. 

The audience for Radio 4 was stable at 19.3 per cent and there were small rises at Radio 3 and 5 Live. 

The report said: ‘Young adults watched 11 hours a week on all TV channels on average – decreasing around 75 minutes year on year.

‘In contrast, the time they spent using the TV set for subscription video on demand, gaming, YouTube and other purposes increased – up to around 40 minutes per week to just over nine hours weekly on average.’ 

The annual report revealed a rise in the number of executives. The BBC now employs 253 senior managers – up from 250 the year before.

Of these, no fewer than 106 earn more than the Prime Minister’s £150,000. 

Together with 76 on-air talent staff, it means almost 200 staff at the BBC earn more than Boris Johnson. 

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