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INXS manager, 50, fights tycoon father’s bid to move her out of a £3million Chelsea house

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inxs manager 50 fights tycoon fathers bid to move her out of a 3million chelsea house

A businesswoman who once managed hellraising rock star Michael Hutchence is fighting a court battle with her own father over a £3million house in Chelsea.

If she loses, Maria-Christina Perez de la Sala says she and her four children could be kicked out of the property where she has lived for almost 25 years.

Until three years ago she shared it with her now estranged husband, former SAS major James Copinger-Symes, whom she is divorcing.

But her fabulously wealthy father Robert Perez de la Sala claims the house is his to sell, and his alone – and has gone to London’s High Court to prove it.

Miss Perez de la Sala, 50, a member of an Australian shipping dynasty worth £500million, learned of his case against her when she was handed an envelope she assumed contained a gift, only to discover it was legal documents.

Maria-Christina Perez de la Sala (pictured with Michael Hutchence) says she and her four children could be kicked out of the property where she has lived for almost 25 years

Maria-Christina Perez de la Sala (pictured with Michael Hutchence) says she and her four children could be kicked out of the property where she has lived for almost 25 years

Maria-Christina Perez de la Sala (pictured with Michael Hutchence) says she and her four children could be kicked out of the property where she has lived for almost 25 years

In response, she says her name is on the title deeds, along with those of her father and mother – and that the money for the house was a gift from her uncle Ernest and that her father has no right to take it from her. She says the house is her family’s ‘principal home’.

Miss Perez de la Sala moved to London in 1995 and for some time was European manager for INXS, the Australian rock band fronted by Hutchence, who was found dead in his hotel room in 1997.

Jonathan Lopian, barrister for her father – who lives in a nine-bedroom waterfront mansion in Sydney – told the High Court that the Chelsea house was bought outright for £300,000 in 1991 after one of his companies stumped up the cash.

Mr Lopian said: ‘It is owned beneficially by my client, out of whose assets the purchase monies came.’

He said Miss Perez de la Sala had signed a trust deed verifying that her father was the true owner. 

Her fabulously wealthy father Robert Perez de la Sala claims the house (pictured) is his to sell, and his alone ¿ and has gone to London¿s High Court to prove it

Her fabulously wealthy father Robert Perez de la Sala claims the house (pictured) is his to sell, and his alone ¿ and has gone to London¿s High Court to prove it

Her fabulously wealthy father Robert Perez de la Sala claims the house (pictured) is his to sell, and his alone – and has gone to London’s High Court to prove it

But he added: ‘She doesn’t admit to signing it, and says that, if she did, her signature was procured by undue influence. Robert is seeking a declaration that his daughter’s share was held on trust for him and that she should transfer her share to the joint name of him and his wife.’

Mr Perez de la Sala also denies his daughter’s suggestion she will have nowhere to live if turfed out of the house, saying she has ‘other homes in which she lives at other times’.

Miss Perez de la Sala’s QC, Mark Warwick, said that she denies not only that her father owns the whole house, but also his claim that he paid for it – instead saying that the money came from her uncle Ernest.

Mr Warwick referred to a letter sent by Ernest to Robert in 1993, referring to a £350,000 loan made to purchase the property. It said: ‘I have decided to tidy up my financial affairs and accordingly wish to make you, Terrill [Robert’s wife] and Christina a gift of this loan.’

The case will return to court at a later date. Miss Perez de la Sala declined to comment. But a friend said: ‘Her parents took against her after she decided to divorce.’

She married Mr Copinger-Symes in 1998. Both later trained in business and helped manage the family companies and investments.

Ironically, Miss Perez de la Sala, her father and her estranged husband are all on the same side in another court battle over claims that Ernest transferred a huge chunk of the family companies’ fortune to his personal accounts.

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Body is found in the sea off Brighton

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body is found in the sea off brighton

Police in Sussex are trying to identify the body of a man who was found in the sea off the coast of Brighton yesterday afternoon. 

The man was recovered from the sea in Lancing at 1.40pm yesterday. A dinghy containing a shopping trolley and mobile phone was discovered nearby. 

Officers believe the man was from the Sussex area. 

The body of a man was recovered off the coast of West Sussex yesterday

The body of a man was recovered off the coast of West Sussex yesterday 

A major search operation was launched yesterday after the body was reported into the water

A major search operation was launched yesterday after the body was reported into the water

Police recovered this dinghy containing a shopping trolley and mobile phone from the sea near the man's body

Police recovered this dinghy containing a shopping trolley and mobile phone from the sea near the man’s body

A Sussex Police spokesman said: ‘At 1.40pm on Monday afternoon (10 August) police were informed by the Coastguard that a small unoccupied dinghy had been found floating in the sea off Shoreham and was being brought to shore.

‘A search of the area off Shoreham has been continuing for any person or any items from the dinghy, which is not thought to be connected with asylum seekers.’ 

A coastguard helicopter was also involved in yesterday's search and rescue operation

A coastguard helicopter was also involved in yesterday’s search and rescue operation 

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Boris Johnson is urged take on teachers like the miners in 1980s

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boris johnson is urged take on teachers like the miners in 1980s

Boris Johnson was today urged to emulate Thatcher’s battle against coal miners and force teaching unions to get children back in schools.

Tory MPs are demanding the PM stays ‘unbreakable’ despite claims of attempts to sabotage his drive to get all pupils back in classes in England next month.

There are also increasing signs of a backlash against Education Secretary Gavin Williamson, with complaints he has been ‘practically invisible’ and comparisons with hapless comedy character Frank Spencer. 

Mr Johnson turned up the heat in the standoff yesterday by insisting that there is a ‘moral duty’ to get all schools up and running in England in September. Scotland’s schools are returning from today, because their holidays end earlier. 

The comments came after one union said ministers should have a plan B – such as a ‘week-on, week-off’ rota system for pupils – in case of further lockdowns and spikes in Covid-19 cases.

Margaret Thatcher in 1987

Boris Johnson visits a school yesterday

Tory MPs are urging Boris Johnson (pictured right visiting a school yesterday) to emulate Margaret Thatcher’s (left) battle against coal miners and force teaching unions to get children back in schools

Scotland's schools are returning from today, because their holidays end earlier. Pictured, pupils arrive at Kelso High School in the Scottish Borders

Scotland’s schools are returning from today, because their holidays end earlier. Pictured, pupils arrive at Kelso High School in the Scottish Borders

There are signs of a Tory backlash against Education Secretary Gavin Williamson (pictured last month), with complaints he has been 'practically invisible' and comparisons with hapless comedy character Frank Spencer

There are signs of a Tory backlash against Education Secretary Gavin Williamson (pictured last month), with complaints he has been ‘practically invisible’ and comparisons with hapless comedy character Frank Spencer

There have also been extensive lists of safety demands – which critics say are designed to be impossible to meet. 

On a visit to a school in London yesterday, Mr Johnson said he hoped schools would not be forced to close as a result of local lockdowns, adding it was the ‘last thing’ that the Government wanted to do.

‘But clearly what we are doing – the way we are trying to manage the Covid pandemic – is to have local measures in place and local test and trace to introduce restrictions where that’s necessary,’ he said.

‘As we have all said, the last thing we want to do is to close schools. We think that education is the priority for the country and that is simple social justice.’

Ministers have become increasingly frustrated with the teaching unions in recent days, particularly after the National Education Union published a ‘nit-picking’ list of 200 safety demands for all schools to adhere to.

But the government is facing increasing pressure to take a tough line. 

The Tory chair of the education select committee, Robert Halfon, told the Telegraph: ‘The Government needs to be absolutely unbreakable on this. If teachers won’t go in, be Maggie about it and say ‘we will find alternatives’. ‘ 

Former party leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith added: ‘Unions have got one objective – to use their political muscle to damage Boris Johnson. 

‘It’s a re-run of the Eighties except it’s not the coal miners, it’s the teaching unions.’ 

One backbencher delivered a withering verdict on Mr Williamson’s performance, telling the paper: ‘Boris has got to show the courage of Thatcher in his battle with the unions, but that’s quite difficult when his divisional commander is Frank Spencer.’  

The unions insist they are not trying to sabotage the back-to-school plans but are asking genuine questions about the Government’s approach and the lack of a plan B should virus cases escalate again.

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said: ‘This idea that demonising the trade unions lets the Government off the hook with difficult questions we are asking. 

Mr Johnson (pictured visiting a school in Upminster yesterday) turned up the heat in the standoff yesterday by insisting that there is a 'moral duty' to get all schools up and running in England in September, and it is the 'right thing for everybody'

Mr Johnson (pictured visiting a school in Upminster yesterday) turned up the heat in the standoff yesterday by insisting that there is a ‘moral duty’ to get all schools up and running in England in September, and it is the ‘right thing for everybody’

‘They ought to be facing difficult questions because we are in the middle of something extremely challenging.’

Mr Barton added: ‘We would like to see more thought given to blended learning as a back-up plan, which could be a rota system of children in for one week and then learning at home for one week. This would be better than children returning solely to remote education.’

Avis Gilmore, deputy general secretary of the National Education Union, called for a more robust test, track and trace system to be in place to ensure the welfare of pupils and school staff.

She said: ‘Government could do much more to assure schools and local authorities that, should a second spike occur, either nationally or locally, there is a clear Plan B in place.

‘This plan needs to spell out what action must be taken in a variety of situations, so that schools and colleges can make the preparations parents expect of them.’

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Inventive vicar uses extra-long chopsticks to dish out bread to worshippers amid Covid pandemic

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inventive vicar uses extra long chopsticks to dish out bread to worshippers amid covid pandemic

In a world changed by social distancing, everyone is looking for new ways to keep the old traditions alive. 

That has sparked one vicar to come up with an inventive to give bread during Holy Communion.

Tapping into her Southeast Asian heritage, the Rev Eileen Harrop, who is vicar of St Mary’s in Gainford and St Andrew’s in Winston, County Durham, is using extra-long chopsticks to pass the bread to parishioners while maintaining social distancing. 

Rev Harrop, who left Singapore for the UK in 1979 and was ordained in 2012, has since administered the bread at the Eucharist at both of the churches she serves.

Tapping into her Southeast Asian heritage, the Rev Eileen Harrop, who is vicar of St Mary's in Gainford and St Andrew's in Winston, County Durham, is using extra-long chopsticks to pass the bread to parishioners while maintaining social distancing

Tapping into her Southeast Asian heritage, the Rev Eileen Harrop, who is vicar of St Mary’s in Gainford and St Andrew’s in Winston, County Durham, is using extra-long chopsticks to pass the bread to parishioners while maintaining social distancing

She said: ‘Many of my parishioners were quite anxious at the thought of taking communion, even though we are only permitted to do so under strict guidelines to ensure that there is no chance of transmission of the virus.

‘I thought ‘Why can’t I use a long pair of chopsticks, real bread rather than wafers, and drop it into the communicants’ hands?’

‘Administering the communion in this way ensures that there is no cross-contamination and my parishioners feel reassured and confident to take part.

‘It’s rather special that the long chopsticks I use are normally used for the festive occasion ‘Lo Hei’, meaning ‘stir the uplifted breath of life’.

‘They take on an even greater meaning used in this context.

‘This is a first for both churches, and perhaps a first in any parish church in the diocese.’

Rev Harrop came to Keele University in 1979 and met her husband of 35 years, Brian.

Rev Harrop, who left Singapore for the UK in 1979 and was ordained in 2012, has since administered the bread at the Eucharist at both of the churches she serves

Rev Harrop, who left Singapore for the UK in 1979 and was ordained in 2012, has since administered the bread at the Eucharist at both of the churches she serves

The couple moved to Singapore before relocating to the UK again in 1996, after which she was ordained in 2012.

The current Church of England Covid-19 advice for Holy Communion states that communicants should be offered only bread, not wine as there should be no ‘common cup’.

Mrs Harrop has been using chunkier bread rather than the traditional wafers for Communion as it is easier to grip.

The Eucharist is a key part of Christian worship and is celebrated around the world as a memorial of the death and resurrection of Jesus.

The Church of England say the shared meal of bread and wine recalls Jesus’ Last Supper with his disciples, where he associated the breaking of bread and sharing of wine with his own imminent death. 

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