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Joe Biden slams ‘macho’ refusal to wear masks as Donald Trump rips his off

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joe biden slams macho refusal to wear masks as donald trump rips his off

Former Vice President Joe Biden called out President Donald Trump‘s family for opting to take off their masks at last week’s presidential debate in Cleveland – while blasting a ‘macho’ attitude that avoids mask wearing.

Biden spoke Monday night just minutes after Trump left Walter Reed medical facility to reenter the White House – taking off his own mask to be photographed and then reentering the White House.

Biden, speaking at an NBC town hall in Florida, said he was not worried about himself having contracted the coronavirus from Trump, who debated him on the same stage in Cleveland on Tuesday, when the president may have already been infected with COVID-19.

Former Vice President Joe Biden blasted the 'macho' refusal to wear masks just minutes after President Trump staged a photo-op and returned to the White House from the hospital and then removed his own mask.

Former Vice President Joe Biden blasted the ‘macho’ refusal to wear masks just minutes after President Trump staged a photo-op and returned to the White House from the hospital and then removed his own mask. 

He told NBC’s Lester Holt he wasn’t worried about his own safety. ‘I’ve been fastidious about the social distancing.’

But he did take to task the president’s family. Ivanka Trump, Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump, and Lara Trump all took off their masks inside the debate hall.   

‘It was a little disconcerting to look out and see that his whole section no one had masks on,’ he said.

‘You could see people coming in and a lot of people didn’t have masks on,’ Biden explained – but did not identify Trump’s family members by name specifically. 

epa08723128 US President Donald J. Trump takes off his mask after returning to the White House, in Washington, DC, USA, 05 October 2020. Trump was returning to the White House following several days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for treatment for COVID-19. EPA/KEN CEDENO / POOL

epa08723128 US President Donald J. Trump takes off his mask after returning to the White House, in Washington, DC, USA, 05 October 2020. Trump was returning to the White House following several days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for treatment for COVID-19. EPA/KEN CEDENO / POOL

epaselect epa08723070 Marine One arrives at the South Lawn of the White House, carrying US President Donald J. Trump as he returns from Walter Reed hospital, in Washington, DC, USA, 05 October 2020. Trump was discharged from Walter Reed National Medical Center where he had receiving treatment after announcing he had tested positive for COVID-19 on 02 October. EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS

epaselect epa08723070 Marine One arrives at the South Lawn of the White House, carrying US President Donald J. Trump as he returns from Walter Reed hospital, in Washington, DC, USA, 05 October 2020. Trump was discharged from Walter Reed National Medical Center where he had receiving treatment after announcing he had tested positive for COVID-19 on 02 October. EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS

It was revealed Wednesday that members of the Cleveland Clinic, who cosponsored it, offered the Trump family members masks inside the event venue but they declined. 

With Trump revealing early Friday that he tested positive for COVID-19, he may well have been exposed during the debate. 

Later during the town hall, Biden teed off on people who don’t wear them. ‘Now what is this macho thing I’m not going to wear a mask,’ he said.  

Biden was on stage for the town hall format just days before he is scheduled to debate Trump October 15th in Miami for the second presidential debate – which will feature a similar format.

It was arranged in an outdoor venue that featured occasional traffic noise, and the candidate couldn’t always hear his masked questioners.

He told a voter he’s ‘not putting up with it’ if Trump goes after him again. She said she was concerned the president bullied him.  

Monday’s event took place outdoors with undecided voters.  Biden was seated in a chair feet away from host Lester Holt.  

 He called last week’s debate ’embarrassing for the nation. 

Biden said he himself ‘would communicate the right lesson to the American people’ and said emphatically that ‘masks matter.’

Asked about Trump’s photo-op return from the hospital, Biden said: ‘I hope no one walks away with the message thinking that it’s not a problem. It’s a serious problem. It’s an international pandemic and we have 4 percent of the population and 20 percent of the deaths.’

But he declined to go after Trump’s medical team for holding back information. 

He said that ‘moment to moment I’m not sure that that is an absolute requirement’ to reveal all information about the president’s health. He said it had national security implications.

‘You cannot mislead about certain things,’ Biden said. 

After blasting Trump on a variety of issues during the pandemic, Biden said: ‘I’m not being critical of the fact that every single detail was not released.’

That came despite a media pile-on for White House physician Sean Conley’s  refusal to divulge critical information about the president’s condition, including the state of his lungs and precise levels of oxygenation while he battles the coronavirus.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Olympian Allyson Felix Breaks Usain Bolt’s Record—10 Months After Emergency C-Section

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Brexit: Photos show 27-acre Kent field being turned into lorry park

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brexit photos show 27 acre kent field being turned into lorry park

Drone photos show a vast 27-acre Kent field dubbed ‘Farage’s Garage’ being turned into a lorry park for up to 2,000 trucks in case of mass hold-ups at Dover before the Brexit transition period ends this year.  

The development, next to Junction 10a in Ashford, Kent, is being constructed by the Government as it prepares for the negotiation period with the European Union to conclude in December.

Upon completion, the vast site will be used for HMRC customs checks, with an area available as a holding space for up to 2,000 trucks should delays arise for vehicles crossing the Channel. 

However, it is hoped vehicles will not need to be stored on the land and will be a ‘customs checking site’ by July. 

Some 29 lorry parks are expected to be built across England in order to cope with potential post-Brexit border trading chaos as hopes of a UK-EU free trade deal are repeatedly dashed. 

Locals will not have a say in the construction of the sites which are being built in Leicestershire, Warwickshire, Solihull, Kent, Essex, Yorkshire and Lincolnshire.  

The sites have been planned because of fears that truck drivers will face long delays to enter the EU.  

A view of the area near Sevington in Ashford, Kent, where the Government is developing the 27-acre site near the town

A view of the area near Sevington in Ashford, Kent, where the Government is developing the 27-acre site near the town

Drone photos show a vast 27-acre Kent field dubbed 'Farage's Garage' being turned into a lorry park for up to 2,000 trucks

Drone photos show a vast 27-acre Kent field dubbed ‘Farage’s Garage’ being turned into a lorry park for up to 2,000 trucks

Upon completion, the site will be used for HMRC customs checks, with an area available as a holding space for 1,700 lorries

Upon completion, the site will be used for HMRC customs checks, with an area available as a holding space for 1,700 lorries

Locals will not have a say in the construction of the sites which are being built in Leicestershire, Warwickshire, Solihull, Kent, Essex, Yorkshire and Lincolnshire (pictured, aerial view of the site near Sevington in Ashford, Kent)

Locals will not have a say in the construction of the sites which are being built in Leicestershire, Warwickshire, Solihull, Kent, Essex, Yorkshire and Lincolnshire (pictured, aerial view of the site near Sevington in Ashford, Kent)

A view of the area near Sevington in Ashford, Kent, where the Government is developing the 27-acre site near the town

A view of the area near Sevington in Ashford, Kent, where the Government is developing the 27-acre site near the town

A petition and online campaign are currently calling for the facility in Kent to be named after Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage, with some suggesting it be named 'Nigel's Folly' while others recommend 'Farage's Garage'

A petition and online campaign are currently calling for the facility in Kent to be named after Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage, with some suggesting it be named ‘Nigel’s Folly’ while others recommend ‘Farage’s Garage’

A petition and online campaign are currently calling for the facility in Kent to be named after Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage, with some suggesting it be named ‘Nigel’s Folly’ while others recommend ‘Farage’s Garage’. 

French minister threatens to veto Brexit trade deal if it does not protect ‘our interests’ and claims Britain is BLUFFING about being ready to walk away without an agreement as talks resume in London 

A senior French minister warned that the EU would not accept a trade deal if it did  not protect ‘our interests’ – and claimed the UK was bluffing about walking away from talks. 

French Europe Minister Clement Beaune said that all bets were off if Britain had ‘not shown sufficient movement’ amid a continuing stand-off over fishing rights in British waters.

The issue has emerged as the last remaining real stumbling block to a deal being complete before the end of the transition period on December 31. 

Post-Brexit trade talks between the UK and European Union will continue in London on Friday as Michel Barnier said both sides have a ‘common responsibility’ to strike a deal.

The European Union’s chief negotiator continued discussions with his UK counterpart Lord Frost as the deadline for an agreement looms.

Speaking to French Television, Mr Beaune said: ‘We thought the end of October was the final deadline. We are giving ourselves a few more days to give the negotiations a chance, but we need to know quickly.

‘Michel Barnier has several days ahead of him where he is going to negotiate and then he will talk to us.

He is going to tell the head of state and government of the EU27: ‘Here is a deal, and I think it is a good one’ – and then we have to evaluate it. Or: ‘I think the British have not shown sufficient movement to reach an agreement that protects our interests and then it’s no deal.’ 

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The Change.org petition, which has received thousands of signatures, says that ‘everyone should genuinely be able to refer to this diesel soaked Valhalla as Nigel’s Folly’, adding: ‘It may be that Mr Farage will be unable or unwilling to attend the unveiling of this great honour that we do him, but that shouldn’t get in the way of seeing his name gurn plastered all over the boundary fence at regular intervals.’ 

While it is not clear if construction of any other sites has begun, an existing carpark in Gravesend, which has been used as a coronavirus testing facility, is set to be turned into a customs check point.  

There are fears the UK could leave the EU without a free trade deal following the Brexit transition period, which could cause significant delays in vehicles crossing the border.  

It was previously claimed that a failure to strike a Brexit deal by Boris Johnson’s October deadline could mean up to 7,000 lorries would be forced to queue up ahead of crossing the Channel.   

It emerged in July that the Department for Transport was looking to purchase the land in preparation for any potential trade disruptions as a result of Brexit.  

Transport Minister Rachel Maclean later confirmed the move, adding there were ‘two primary uses’ for the land. 

She said: ‘First, government departments envisage using it as a permanent site for facilities related to future border processes, notably HMRC (as an office of departure/arrival for goods moved under ‘transit’ arrangements) and Defra (as a border control post for goods needing sanitary and phytosanitary checks).

‘Second, the site may also be used as a contingency lorry holding area for the particular, foreseeable risk of significant disruption at the end of the transition period.’ 

Ms Maclean added Downing Street had ‘no intention’ the site would become a permanent lorry holding facility for use in the event of ‘cross-Channel disruption’. 

The photos have appeared amid news that toilets and food and drink facilities for haulage drivers will line the M20 in Kent in preparation for the 7,000 lorries predicted to be stuck in static traffic on January 1.  

With two-day-long queues expected to halt the industry when the EU implement full import controls on the UK at the start of next year, industry executives have demanded that provisions be made for the welfare of drivers.

Richard Burnett, Chief Executive of the Road Haulage Association, who will be meeting with Michael Gove, the Minister for the Cabinet Office, on Friday said: ‘The devil is in the detail, we need to understand, will there be Portaloos down the M20? Will we be able to get water and food to drivers?  

‘We want that clarity out of Friday’s meeting to make sure that level of detail is being considered.’ 

The development, next to Junction 10a in Ashford, Kent, is being constructed by the Government as it prepares for the negotiation period with the European Union to conclude in December

The development, next to Junction 10a in Ashford, Kent, is being constructed by the Government as it prepares for the negotiation period with the European Union to conclude in December

Locals will not have a say in the construction of the sites which are being built in Leicestershire, Warwickshire, Solihull, Kent, Essex, Yorkshire and Lincolnshire (pictured, aerial view of the site near Sevington in Ashford, Kent)

Locals will not have a say in the construction of the sites which are being built in Leicestershire, Warwickshire, Solihull, Kent, Essex, Yorkshire and Lincolnshire (pictured, aerial view of the site near Sevington in Ashford, Kent)

A view of the area near Sevington in Ashford, Kent, where the Government is developing the 27-acre site near the town

A view of the area near Sevington in Ashford, Kent, where the Government is developing the 27-acre site near the town

Discussing the number of trucks expected to be held on their way to UK ports Mr Burnett said: ‘There’s going to be 2,000 trucks on the M20, 2,000 trucks on Mojo in Ashford, another site, and potentially 4,000 in Manston.’ 

Richard Ballantyne, CEO of British Ports Association, said that the ‘risk’ of queues at ports following January 1 ‘doesn’t have to be realised if the government takes a pragmatic approach’.

He added: ‘We are waiting for clarity of what support [facilities] drivers will have who are in these queues. This is not just about Kent, it’s facilities across the country.

‘What are those facilities and infrastructure going to be for drivers who are stuck in queues across the country – something we will touch on Friday.’

Speaking in a committee on Brexit preparedness in the transport sector Rachel Maclean MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Department for Transport said: ‘It is absolutely vital we consider the welfare of drivers and hauliers as these are hardworking people, we rely on the haulage industry for a supply of critical goods and we must consider their welfare. 

‘We have detailed plans for provision of not only portaloos but other facilities for drivers, not only in Kent if there is stationary traffic, but other places in the country.’

Maclean said: ‘We are working in a lot of detail with the Kent Resilience Forum. We will be drawing on a combination of temporary lorry holding at A20 Dover TAP [Traffic Assessment Project] site, M20 between junction 8 and 9 and off-road sites and also we are procuring some temporary lorry holding capacity at Ashford, Sevington, the wider plan will feed all of that into using those sites if it becomes necessary if Operation Brock is active.’

The committee also raised the issue of the severe limits expected to face UK hauliers if bilateral agreements with EU member states are not made, or delayed, in the case of a no deal. 

Toilets will line the M20 as part of 'Operation Brock'

Toilets will line the M20 as part of ‘Operation Brock’

Industry leaders warned that up to 39,000 UK haulage trucks could be rendered unusable after January 1 due to the limited number of ECMT permits allowed. 

Only 1 in 4 UK haulage companies (or 2,000 of the 8,000 UK haulage companies) will qualify for an ECMT permit.  

Elizabeth de Jong, Director of Policy at Logistics UK said: ‘There is a planned glide path to reciprocal arrangements – some reassurance that there won’t be a sudden market failure in this area.’

‘The ECMT permit system gives very little reassurance so it’s really important bilateral agreements are made. As only [2,000 of 8,000 UK hauliers] 1 in 4 UK hauliers could get a permit and they could only do one journey at a time with this permit.’

If bilateral agreements are not put in place the limits on ECMT permits could see UK facing a risk to it’s supply chain, said Mr Burnett.  

He added: ‘From my perspective ECMT is not a solution if we don’t get the right deal. It’s also fair to say bilateral arrangements are going to take some time to negotiate with each member states.

‘This equates to around 39,000 trucks, a significant gap for EU hauliers to access Europe in the event of ECMT.’

During the committee all three industry representatives suggested they had not been provided with enough ‘clarity’ to properly prepare for January 1. 

Mr Burnett of the Road Haulage Association said: ‘At this stage there is evidence that business are not prepared. 

‘The haulage industry works with its customers to make sure they are prepared and in a poll last week 91 per cent felt they didn’t have the clarity needed to be able to prepare.

‘It is happening too slowly at this moment in time.’

What is a ECMT permit? 

The permit, European Conference of Ministers of Transport (ECMT), allows travel through the European Union (minus Cyprus) and to the countries of Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, North Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Russia, Serbia, Turkey, and Ukraine. 

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‘At the moment we are seeing more and more EU hauliers holding back, suggesting they may not even trade or come to the UK from January 1 depending on the potential chaos, in terms of business processes, backload availability and queues, but that’s going to be a growing challenge for the market.

‘If we don’t strike the right deal with the right access it may be a risk to our own supply chain. Through the Covid pandemic for instance, when we had a shortage of drivers in Italy and Spain we had to send UK vehicles to pick up more volume and bring it back, if we don’t have the right deal this could be a risk to our supply chain if EU hauliers do stand and decide not to come.’ 

Mr Burner called a meeting held with Mr Gove a ‘wash out’ after it ‘broke down’ with 40 people on the round table raising ‘personal issues’ 

While it is hoped new ‘offices of departure’ across the country which will be used to process and stamp paper work will stop traffic from ‘funnelling into Kent’, Mr Ballantyne added ‘there may be queues there too.’ 

He said that he expects traffic to peak at Dover and the Euro Tunnel, in Folkestone. 

Mr Ballantyne said that he supported the Government’s new boarder crossing IT system, GVMS, ‘in principle’ but said that the 54 days left to implement it was a ‘very short time scales to get the industry used to it’. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Coronavirus: Guards are BACK on Irish border to monitor lockdowns

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coronavirus guards are back on irish border to monitor lockdowns

The Garda are back on the Irish border and carrying out checks on drivers after the highest-level lockdowns were imposed on both sides of the frontier. 

Officers have not carried out such stringent checks on drivers from Ulster since the days of the Troubles when the IRA moved guns and Semtex into the war-torn province.

Now they are on the lookout for people making non-essential journeys, after the Republic this week imposed swingeing Level 5 restrictions which ban people from travelling more than three miles (5km) from their home.  

Stormont has asked citizens not to make ‘unnecessary travel,’ but Dublin’s measures are more aggressive.

On Wednesday night, when Ireland’s new six-week national lockdown began, gardai were given new powers by Dublin to prosecute people making non-essential travel, with fines of up to €2,500 and jail for up to six months.

Cars at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey amid tightened coronavirus restrictions

Cars at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey amid tightened coronavirus restrictions

A guard asks a British-registered driver where he's going after the Republic imposed a new national lockdown on Wednesday evening

A guard asks a British-registered driver where he’s going after the Republic imposed a new national lockdown on Wednesday evening

Tailbacks form on the M1 motorway from Belfast to Dublin at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Tailbacks form on the M1 motorway from Belfast to Dublin at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Cars at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Cars at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Cars queue at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Cars queue at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Cars queue at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Cars queue at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

The Irish police have launched a colossal operation, with more than 130 static checkpoints and thousands of rolling checks set up across the country.

The Troubles and the hard border on the island of Ireland

The Troubles in Northern Ireland required that border checks were made from the early 1970s into the late 1990s to stop the flow of arms and terrorists.

Many smaller country roads were closed off and bridges blown up to force traffic through checkpoints and off the ‘unapproved roads.’

The border area of County Armagh was packed with British Army outposts, while the city of Londonderry, close to the border with County Donegal, was under tight patrols.

However, the frontier was too long and full of too many small roads across it to completely prevent the IRA and other paramilitaries from getting across it.

Taxation and currency differences also promoted smuggling of cigarettes, fuel, livestock and various other commodities over the decades.

However, the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, which forged peace in Northern Ireland, laid down statutory instruments to remove the checkpoint infrastructure from the border.

Britain and Ireland’s integration with the European Union has further helped to reduce any ‘hard border.’

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On Friday, a sizeable force was focused on the M1, which runs from Belfast to Dublin, causing heavy tailbacks.

A line of cones was laid out on the motorway, forcing traffic up an exit ramp where officers spoke to drivers to ask them details about their travel. 

Checkpoints were dismantled as per the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, with the last of the security infrastructure removed by 2005.

They were necessary from the early 1970s to the late 1990s during the Troubles when arms were smuggled into Northern Ireland by the IRA who were murdering civilians, as well as fighting the British Army and loyalist terror groups.

Since the end of September border checks to limit travel during the pandemic have been carried out, ending the invisible border. 

Northern Ireland has no specific travel advice for residents travelling to Republic and the North remains on Ireland’s ‘Green List,’ which means a quarantine is not required on entry.

However, the imposition of a ban on ‘unnecessary travel’ in the North, and a draconian ban on all travel outside a three mile radius in the South means that checks are in place.

Garda Commissioner Drew Harris has expressed reservations about using prosecution and fines to enforce the Level 5 travel restrictions in the Republic, saying it will only be done as a ‘last resort.’  

Asked if he supported the measures, he replied: ‘The good thing is the piece of legislation backs this up. I’m a public servant, a good and faithful servant at that, and I’ll do as I’m told.

‘We have fines, but they are set in an enforcement sphere. We have to discern then what our policy and practice is with respect of that enforcement.

‘But we have already set that out. Enforcement is our last resort. So the use of the fixed charge penalty notice, or a report to the DPP, is a last resort for us in all cases.’

The Irish police say they will continue to use the ‘4Es approach of engage, explain and encourage, and only where provided for and as a last resort, enforcement.’ 

The Republic entered a second national lockdown on Wednesday for six weeks, while Northern Ireland imposed its four-week ‘circuit breaker’ from last Friday.  

New figures released by the Central Statistics Office Ireland (CSO) show that more than 10 people have died from Covid-19 for each of the last six weeks.

The statistics, released on Friday, also show the number of weekly confirmed Covid-19 cases is more than 5,000 in each of the last two weeks up to and including October 16.

Hospital numbers are also growing, with more than 100 people hospitalised from the virus for each of the last three weeks.

Tailbacks form on the M1 motorway from Belfast to Dublin at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Tailbacks form on the M1 motorway from Belfast to Dublin at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Gardai at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as they conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Gardai at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as they conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Cars queue at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Cars queue at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Gardai at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as they conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

Gardai at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as they conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey

The median age of new confirmed Covid-19 cases was 31, while women and those aged between 25 to 44 continue to account for the highest number of confirmed cases.

Since July, those aged over 80 account for 2% of cases compared to 20% in March.

Despite tighter restrictions implemented in Dublin since September 19, the capital made up 26% of all new cases, a total of 1,555 cases, and it is the fifth week in a row that Dublin had more than 1,000 weekly cases.

The research also shows that more than half of all confirmed cases are now linked to an outbreak.

The Republic of Ireland has imposed far stricter lockdown restrictions than those in Northern Ireland, including closing gyms, churches and non-essential shops

The Republic of Ireland has imposed far stricter lockdown restrictions than those in Northern Ireland, including closing gyms, churches and non-essential shops

The prevalence of Covid-19 cases has been particularly high in some of the border counties

The prevalence of Covid-19 cases has been particularly high in some of the border counties 

This graph shows how Covid-19 cases are rising in Northern Ireland (in blue) and closing in on the Ireland figure (in green), having been much lower until recent weeks [CLICK TO EXPAND]

This graph shows how Covid-19 cases are rising in Northern Ireland (in blue) and closing in on the Ireland figure (in green), having been much lower until recent weeks [CLICK TO EXPAND]

A woman wears a face mask as she walks past a pub in Dublin in the rain on Monday

A woman wears a face mask as she walks past a pub in Dublin in the rain on Monday

Outbreaks in private houses account for 54% of cases linked to an outbreak in the last four weeks, extended family accounts for 9% while childcare facilities and schools together account for 5% of cases.

Those living in disadvantaged areas have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic, while health care workers now make up 3% of cases compared to a peak of 36% in April.

The average number of contacts per positive case per week was four in the week ending October 9. 

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Two-week half term holiday and gyms still open: Lockdown rules in Northern Ireland

  • Schools: Schools will have an extended half-term break from October 19 to 30. They will be shut to all pupils during these two weeks
  • Childcare: Can still be provided by a registered person or free of charge
  • Gyms, leisure centres and pools: Open for individual training only
  • Outdoor events: No organised events can take place with more than 15 people. Outdoor attractions, country parks and forest parks can remain open
  • Indoor events: Up to 15 people can meet indoors, except in someone’s home. There are exemptions for: a gathering in a workplace; a gathering to provide emergency or medical assistance to any person; a gathering in a place of worship for a religious activity; and elite sports.
  • Travel restrictions: People should ‘avoid all unnecessary travel’ and are asked to walk walk, cycle or use private transport where travel is necessary for work or education.
  • Public transport: Still operating with mandatory face coverings rule
  • Religious services: Places of worship remain open, with a limit of 25 people for wedding and funerals
  • Nursing homes: Care home visits are ‘recommended to be restricted’
  • Retail: All shops can remain open
  • Hotels: Accommodation can be provided for those already resident
  • Workplace: Individuals should work from home unless unable to do so
  • Sport: Indoor sport and outdoor organised contact sport involving household mixing is not permitted, other than at elite level. Outdoor non-contact sport is permitted for all, with a limit of 15 people
  • Pubs and restaurants: Can only be open for takeaway or food delivery
  • Construction: Builders can continue to go into people’s houses
  • Personal services (hairdressers/beauticians): Closed 
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