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Legoland announces new land for 2021 at its Windsor resort based around mythical creatures

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legoland announces new land for 2021 at its windsor resort based around mythical creatures

It promises to be a creature feature like no other. 

Legoland Windsor Resort has revealed it will open a new multi-million-pound land where mythical Lego creatures will ‘come to life’.

The land, called Lego Mythica: World of Mythical Creatures, will open in spring 2021 and according to the resort will ‘feature thrilling new attractions and experiences, including a never-before-seen UK ride’.

Legoland Windsor Resort has revealed it will open a new multi-million-pound land where mythical Lego creatures will 'come to life'

Legoland Windsor Resort has revealed it will open a new multi-million-pound land where mythical Lego creatures will ‘come to life’ 

The new land marks the single biggest investment at the park since its gates opened 25 years ago and Legoland promises it will allow ‘children’s imaginations and creativity to run wild’.

A teaser video for the new attraction, shared on social media this morning, shows a mythical portal to another world opening for the first time at the theme park.

In a hint to the creatures that families may find in this ‘parallel universe’, huge footprints shake the resort, a winged shadow flies overhead and the 30-second film ends with an ice storm engulfing Legoland Windsor’s iconic entrance.

The resort said: ‘Working in partnership with Kids Industries, the Legoland Windsor team behind the new land spent a year discussing and testing ideas and concepts with seven-to-11-year-olds and their parents, who influenced everything from the final ride experiences, names and characters.’

The land is currently under construction and is located between Heartlake City and the Resort’s Lego-themed hotels.

Thomas Jellum, divisional director at the Legoland Windsor Resort, said: ‘What better way to celebrate our 25th birthday than by unveiling a unique experience like nothing else we have launched at the resort since we opened.

‘At the heart of Lego Mythica: World of Mythical Creatures will be epic rides, including a UK first, and breathtaking mythical creatures designed to capture children’s imaginations and inspire them to build and play.

Lego Mythica: World of Mythical Creatures will mark the single biggest investment at Legoland Windsor since its gates opened 25 years ago

Lego Mythica: World of Mythical Creatures will mark the single biggest investment at Legoland Windsor since its gates opened 25 years ago 

‘Our new land has been two years in the making and co-created with families to make sure it delivers what children and their parents want from a theme park in 2021.

‘We can’t wait to share more details soon.’

Legoland Windsor is one of eight Legoland parks across the world.

The others can be found in the Danish town of Billund, California, Florida, Germany, Dubai, Malaysia and Japan.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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MPs accuse tech giants of fuelling an ‘e-waste tsunami’ by designing products with short shelf life

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mps accuse tech giants of fuelling an e waste tsunami by designing products with short shelf life

Apple and other tech giants have been accused of fuelling an ‘e-waste tsunami’ by designing products with a short shelf life.

MPs say the companies are contributing to 155,000 tons of waste electricals being sent to landfill or burned every year.

In a report, they say tech firms had been found to glue and solder together components making any repairs by consumers impossible.

Today, MPs are calling for a change in the law to stop manufacturers from deliberately making products that have ‘planned obsolescence’ in an attempt to stop a tech waste tsunami

Today, MPs are calling for a change in the law to stop manufacturers from deliberately making products that have ‘planned obsolescence’ in an attempt to stop a tech waste tsunami

Today, MPs are calling for a change in the law to stop manufacturers from deliberately making products that have ‘planned obsolescence’ in an attempt to stop a tech waste tsunami

And repair charges offered by firms ‘can be so expensive it is more economical to replace the item completely,’ MPs said.

The environmental audit committee, which has previously challenged fast fashion retailers for generating huge amounts of waste, said the UN has warned of an ‘e-waste tsunami’.

It said it is time for ministers to support a new culture of reusing and repairing items. This could be done through enshrining the right to have items repaired in law and a cut in VAT on repair services, as is the case in many EU countries.

Bricks and mortar electrical stores are legally required to offer collection and recycling of tech products. Currys PC World recycles over 65,000 tons of waste electronics each year. MPs say tech giants should be required to offer the same level of recycling.

An Apple spokesman said: ‘We were disappointed with the report, which does not reflect our efforts to conserve resources and protect the planet. 

‘There are more options for customers to trade in, recycle and get safe, quality repairs than ever before.’

Pictured: Shoppers queue to get into an apple store in London earlier in November

Pictured: Shoppers queue to get into an apple store in London earlier in November

Pictured: Shoppers queue to get into an apple store in London earlier in November

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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High blood pressure in your 40s and 50s significantly affects the brain in later life

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high blood pressure in your 40s and 50s significantly affects the brain in later life

High blood pressure in your 40s and 50s significantly affects the brain in later life, researchers have found. 

A study based on brain scans from 37,000 people reveals that raised blood pressure in middle age – even at levels that wouldn’t usually require drug treatment – leads to extensive damage to the ‘white matter’ of the brain.

This can lead to dementia, stroke, physical disabilities and depression in later life.

Alarmingly, the Oxford University researchers found even small increases in blood pressure – at levels that would usually not be considered a problem – can make a major difference to the brain.

Blood pressure is expressed as two numbers, systolic – the upper number – and diastolic – the lower one.

Currently people in the UK are considered to have hypertension if blood pressure above 140/90.

The researchers found for every 10-point increase in systolic blood pressure above this level, the damage to white matter increased by about 13 per cent.

A study by University of Oxford researchers based on brain scans from 37,000 people revealed that raised blood pressure in middle age – even at levels that wouldn’t usually require drug treatment – leads to extensive damage to the ‘white matter’ of the brain (stock image)

A study by University of Oxford researchers based on brain scans from 37,000 people revealed that raised blood pressure in middle age – even at levels that wouldn’t usually require drug treatment – leads to extensive damage to the ‘white matter’ of the brain (stock image)

A study by University of Oxford researchers based on brain scans from 37,000 people revealed that raised blood pressure in middle age – even at levels that wouldn’t usually require drug treatment – leads to extensive damage to the ‘white matter’ of the brain (stock image)

And for every 5-point increase in diastolic blood pressure, damage increased by 11 per cent.

And the scientists also found some evidence of damage at lower blood pressure – with some people displaying brain damage at systolic levels above 120 and diastolic levels above 70.

The findings, published in the European Heart Journal, come from a study of 37,041 participants aged 40 to 69 years old, enrolled in the UK Biobank project.

The researchers examined MRI brain scans to look for ‘white matter hyperintensities’ – signs of damage to the small blood vessels in the brain.

This damage is linked to severe problems in old age, including general decline in thinking abilities and the development of dementia and mental health issues.

Researcher Dr Karolina Wartolowska, of Oxford’s Centre for Prevention of Stroke and Dementia, said: ‘Not all people develop these changes as they age, but they are present in more than 50 per cent of patients over the age of 65 and most people over the age of 80 even without high blood pressure, but it is more likely to develop with higher blood pressure and more likely to become severe.’

Among the top 10 per cent of people with the greatest brain damage, 24 per cent of this damange could be attributed to having a systolic blood pressure above 120, and 7 per cent could be attributed to having diastolic blood pressure above 70.

Dr Wartolowska said: ‘We made two important findings. Firstly, the study showed that diastolic blood pressure in people in their 40s and 50s is associated with more extensive brain damage years later.

‘This means that it is not just the systolic blood pressure, the first, higher number, but the diastolic blood pressure, the second, lower number, that is important to prevent brain tissue damage.

‘Many people may think of hypertension and stroke as diseases of older people, but our results suggest that if we would like to keep a healthy brain well into our 60s and 70s, we may have to make sure our blood pressure, including the diastolic blood pressure, stays within a healthy range when we are in our 40s and 50s.’

She added: ‘The second important finding is that any increase in blood pressure beyond the normal range is associated with a higher amount of white matter hyperintensities.

‘This suggests that even slightly elevated blood pressure before it meets the criteria for treating hypertension has a damaging effect on brain tissue.

Alarmingly, the Oxford University researchers found even small increases in blood pressure - at levels that would usually not be considered a problem - can make a major difference to the brain

Alarmingly, the Oxford University researchers found even small increases in blood pressure - at levels that would usually not be considered a problem - can make a major difference to the brain

Alarmingly, the Oxford University researchers found even small increases in blood pressure – at levels that would usually not be considered a problem – can make a major difference to the brain

‘Our results suggest that to ensure the best prevention of white matter hyperintensities in later life, control of diastolic blood pressure, in particular, may be required in early midlife, even for diastolic blood pressure below 90, whilst control of systolic blood pressure may be more important in late life.

‘The long time interval between the effects of blood pressure in midlife and the harms in late life emphasises how important it is to control blood pressure long-term, and that research has to adapt to consider the very long-term effects of often asymptomatic problems in midlife.’

Dr Richard Oakley, head of research at the Alzheimer’s Society, which part-funded the study, said: ‘High blood pressure doesn’t just affect our hearts, but our heads too.

‘Although this study didn’t look for a specific link between blood pressure and dementia, it’s an important step forward in understanding how high blood pressure is linked to changes in the brain that can increase our risk of dementia.

‘With few dementia treatments available and researchers still searching for a cure, it’s vital we do what we can to keep our minds healthy, as well as our bodies.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Britain has ’50/50 chance’ of becoming the first to have an approved coronavirus vaccine

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britain has 50 50 chance of becoming the first to have an approved coronavirus vaccine

Britain has a ’50/50 chance’ of being the first country in the world to approve a Covid vaccine, it has been revealed.

A decision could come as early as next week, with one source suggesting Britain could be the first to be awarded a license to start offering vaccinations.

NHS workers will be the first to be protected against the deadly virus before care home workers and other vulnerable Brits.

A Government source told The Sun it is ‘very likely’ Pfizer will be the earliest vaccine licensed, but ‘it’s looking pretty close’. 

Ministers are also being prepped to launch a TV and radio campaign to encourage Brits to get the vaccination as early as next week.         

A decision could come as early as next week, with one source suggesting Britain could be the first to be awarded a license to start offering vaccinations. Pictured, Chancellor Rishi Sunak during a visit to Imperial Clinic Research Facility at Hammersmith Hospital in London

A decision could come as early as next week, with one source suggesting Britain could be the first to be awarded a license to start offering vaccinations. Pictured, Chancellor Rishi Sunak during a visit to Imperial Clinic Research Facility at Hammersmith Hospital in London

A decision could come as early as next week, with one source suggesting Britain could be the first to be awarded a license to start offering vaccinations. Pictured, Chancellor Rishi Sunak during a visit to Imperial Clinic Research Facility at Hammersmith Hospital in London

Final safety data for the Pfizer jab, which is 95 per cent effective, was given to regulators on Monday.

And officials are quietly confident the UK can get approval ahead of the US and the EU.  

The Pfizer jab has to be stored at -70C and can only be thawed in batches of 1,000 which could become a nightmare for the NHS.

It was previously reported Britain could have 19million doses of Oxford and AstraZeneca’s coronavirus vaccine by the end of the year.

President of AstraZeneca, Tom Keith-Roach said, on top of the four million doses on standby for the UK, a further 15million could be ready to roll out by the end of next month. 

The vaccine is expected to cost just £2 per dose and can be stored in ordinary equipment, unlike other jabs made by Pfizer and Moderna that showed similarly promising results last week but need to be kept in ultra-cold temperatures using expensive equipment.

Gina Plata-Nino receives an injection from RN Bethany Trainor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, MA on September 4. Plato-Nino is taking part in a clinical trial for a COVID-19 vaccine

Gina Plata-Nino receives an injection from RN Bethany Trainor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, MA on September 4. Plato-Nino is taking part in a clinical trial for a COVID-19 vaccine

Gina Plata-Nino receives an injection from RN Bethany Trainor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, MA on September 4. Plato-Nino is taking part in a clinical trial for a COVID-19 vaccine

It’s also a fraction of the price, with Pfizer’s costing around £15 per dose and Moderna’s priced at about £26 a shot. 

Oxford’s trials found the jab has a nine in ten chance of working when administered as a half dose first and then a full dose a month later. Efficacy drops to 62 per cent when someone is given two full doses a month apart.

More than 24,000 volunteers were involved in Oxford’s phase three trials in the UK and Brazil, half of whom were given the vaccine and the rest were given a fake jab. 

There were only 30 cases of Covid-19 in people given the vaccine compared to 101 in the placebo group. None of the participants who took the vaccine fell seriously ill.

The result also showed lower levels of asymptomatic infection in the smaller dose group which ‘means we might be able to halt the virus in its tracks,’ according to Professor Andrew Pollard, director of the Oxford Vaccine Group. 

The Pfizer jab has to be stored at -70C and can only be thawed in batches of 1,000 which could become a nightmare for the NHS (file image)

The Pfizer jab has to be stored at -70C and can only be thawed in batches of 1,000 which could become a nightmare for the NHS (file image)

The Pfizer jab has to be stored at -70C and can only be thawed in batches of 1,000 which could become a nightmare for the NHS (file image)

He said today was ‘a very exciting day’ and claimed his team’s jab would play a key part ‘in getting the world back to normal’.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock also hailed the results, saying millions of doses will be ready to go by the end of December. 

He told the BBC: ‘It’s really encouraging news… nobody who took it ended up in hospital or had serious conditions. We hope to be able to start vaccinating next month. The bulk of the vaccine roll out programme will be in January, February, March. And we hope that sometime after Easter things will be able to start to get back to normal.’

Oxford’s jab is viewed as Britain’s best chance of mass-inoculation of the population by the end of spring because Boris Johnson has pre-ordered 100million doses, enough to vaccinate 50million people. 

The UK already has 4million ready to go as soon as the jab is approved, which could see 2million people inoculated before the end of 2020.  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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