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Man, 50, live-streamed his suicide to 400 Facebook viewers

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man 50 live streamed his suicide to 400 facebook viewers

Facebook failed to stop the live stream of a father’s suicide despite reports of dozens of people warning the platform what was happening. 

Jonathan ‘Bazza’ Bailey, 50, posted that he was going to kill himself at 1pm on Saturday before starting a live stream, according to The Sun.  

More than 400 people are believed to have watched the live stream, some of whom desperately tried to alert Facebook to the situation.  

Jonathan 'Bazza' Bailey, 50, posted that he was going to kill himself at 1pm on Saturday before starting a live stream

Jonathan 'Bazza' Bailey, 50, posted that he was going to kill himself at 1pm on Saturday before starting a live stream

Jonathan ‘Bazza’ Bailey, 50, posted that he was going to kill himself at 1pm on Saturday before starting a live stream

A friend wrote on Facebook to say he drove to Mr Bailey’s house in Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, to try and stop him from hanging himself but when he arrived police had already taken him away. 

Mr Bailey is believed to have written, ‘I’m Going to Hang Myself Today’, on Facebook before starting a live stream, according to an obituary on The Arts of Entertainment

His daughter, Lucy Bailey, took to Facebook to detail her despair at mental health services in the UK. 

She wrote: ‘Something needs to change, I can’t explain how many times you’ve been let down by the mental health services. 

‘I’m never going get my head around the fact we can’t speak everyday anymore I can’t see you hug you. 

‘I’m forever going to try and do you proud.’

Alongside her emotional post she uploaded two screenshots of text messages from Mr Bailey where he explains how he wasn’t being offered enough advice on correct medications to take for his depression. 

He detailed how he rang a crisis team to ask for help but was simply told that it would take four to six weeks for the medication to have an effect. 

And he vented his frustration that his medication was only allowed to be changed by his psychiatrist but he wasn’t able to get an appointment with his psychiatrist until November 22.   

More than 400 people are believed to have watched the live stream, some of whom desperately tried to alert Facebook to the situation

More than 400 people are believed to have watched the live stream, some of whom desperately tried to alert Facebook to the situation

More than 400 people are believed to have watched the live stream, some of whom desperately tried to alert Facebook to the situation

Facebook issued a statement after the incident and claimed it sent ‘support documents’ to Mr Bailey after his initial suicidal status was uploaded.  

A spokesman said: ‘Our thoughts go out to Mr Bailey’s family at this difficult time. 

‘We can confirm that the livestream was deleted very soon after being posted and this further post has also now been removed at the family’s request. 

‘We take the responsibility of keeping people safe on our platforms seriously, and we will continue to work closely with experts like The Samaritans to ensure our policies continue to support those in need.’

According to Facebook’s Community Standards, the company has been ‘advised by experts’ to not remove live videos of ‘self-injury while there is an opportunity for loved ones and authorities to provide help or resources’.  

Mr Bailey, who was a mental health campaigner and local hero in his area, founded a gym in Chesterton and was a member of a local anti-drugs group – Stoke-on-Dust.

Facebook issued a statement after the incident and claimed it sent 'support documents' to Mr Bailey after his initial suicidal status was uploaded

Facebook issued a statement after the incident and claimed it sent 'support documents' to Mr Bailey after his initial suicidal status was uploaded

Facebook issued a statement after the incident and claimed it sent ‘support documents’ to Mr Bailey after his initial suicidal status was uploaded

The Facebook page for Stoke-on-Dust wrote an emotional tribute which read: ‘Bazza Bailey, an extraordinary man that we had the honour of getting to know. 

‘Although it was over a short period of time, the impact Baz had on the whole Stoke-on-Dust team was truly heartening, one that can’t be summarised into a few words. 

‘The news is devastating and our condolences go out to his family, friends and loved ones. 

‘A true legend in the city of Stoke, his activism and perseverance in making the community a better place was legendary and we hope that his legacy lives on in those he inspired. 

‘Rest in Peace.’  

A GoFundMe page to raise money for Mr Bailey’s funeral has already raised £6,595. 

A GoFundMe page to raise money for Mr Bailey's funeral has already raised £6,595

A GoFundMe page to raise money for Mr Bailey's funeral has already raised £6,595

A GoFundMe page to raise money for Mr Bailey’s funeral has already raised £6,595

It’s creator, Stefan Albert Hanks, wrote: ‘I’m sure Baz has touched the heart of everyone in Stoke-on-Trent, if not personally but inspirationally.

‘I can honestly say he’s helped me a lot in life, knowing him over 20 years, he’s a man that would go out of his way to help others, even though he needed help himself.

‘We would often talk of all the things we have done for people over the years, and often asked, how do you do what you do for others, and the answer is we did it because it made us feel better, but really it was Baz who needed the help. 

‘I’ve spoken to Baz’s family and Baz meant a lot to me and so many others I want to help to give Baz the send off he deserves, so please show your support with as much or little as possible, and let’s make this day special.

‘Thank you.’

Facebook has been contacted for comment.

For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123 or visit a local Samaritans branch, see www.samaritans.org for details.  

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Is Boris about to make Charles Moore – a pro-hunting, anti-licence fee Brexiteer – new BBC chairman?

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is boris about to make charles moore a pro hunting anti licence fee brexiteer new bbc chairman

It would be the BBC‘s worst nightmare made real – a fox-hunting, Old Etonian Brexiteer being appointed its chairman on a platform of abolishing the licence fee.

The Mail on Sunday understands that Charles Moore, the former editor of The Daily Telegraph and The Spectator, is Downing Street‘s favoured choice to take over at the Corporation when Sir David Clementi’s three-year term expires in February.

It would be a provocative option even by the standards of Boris Johnson‘s No 10: Lord Moore, 63, is a vehement critic of the Corporation’s Left-wing ‘woke’ values – and objects to its guaranteed £4 billion-a-year income from the fee.

In 2010, he was fined £262 for not possessing a licence, having donated the equivalent sum to charity in protest at the BBC’s refusal to sack Jonathan Ross for making prank calls with comedian Russell Brand to the actor Andrew Sachs.

BBC staffers will be hoping that No 10 plumps for one of the names lower down the Government’s shortlist: both former Culture Secretary Nicky Morgan and former Chancellor George Osborne are pro-Remain liberals who would represent the business-as-usual option.

The Mail on Sunday understands that Charles Moore, the former editor of The Daily Telegraph and The Spectator, is Downing Street's favoured choice to take over as BBC chairman

The Mail on Sunday understands that Charles Moore, the former editor of The Daily Telegraph and The Spectator, is Downing Street’s favoured choice to take over as BBC chairman

The other serious candidate, combative current affairs presenter Andrew Neil, is more likely to secure a new on-screen role.

Relations between the BBC and No 10 have been fraught since last year’s Election, with Downing Street saying the Corporation spoke only to a pro-Remain metropolitan bubble. 

It prompted a temporary boycott of flagship news programmes such as Radio 4’s Today, and led to the acceleration of its plans to ‘whack’ the £157.50-a-year fee by decriminalising its non-payment.

Tim Davie took up the poisoned chalice of being the BBC’s new director-general this month.

Earlier this year, Lord Moore, who was Mr Johnson’s boss when the Prime Minister worked for the Telegraph, wrote that the BBC could ‘not carry on as before’, saying: ‘It is essential to understand that technological and generational change has already destroyed the BBC’s century-old ‘wider still and wider’ doctrine.

‘It is simply not possible for it to dominate all fields any longer. The BBC must start to decolonise. It needs Government help to do this in a dignified manner – more like British imperial decline than like the fall of the Soviet Union.’

He described the BBC’s bias as ‘not chiefly party political (though it is certainly anti-Tory). It is politico/cultural – woke, pro-Remain, credulously green, anti-market, obsessed with issues connected with ‘diversity’, yet itself not truly diverse at all… if you had watched only the BBC in 2016, it would have come as an almost total shock to you when 17.4 million people voted Leave’.

Most chillingly for BBC staff, he added: ‘The greatest single wrong on which the BBC rests is the licence fee. It is an offence to freedom and a poll tax for anyone with a television (and, nowadays, a computer or mobile phone). Non-payers, almost always poor, clog the magistrates’ courts.’

Nor will Lord Moore have endeared himself to most BBC staff by suggesting last year that actress Olivia Colman was a poor choice to play the role of the Queen in the Netflix drama The Crown because she had a ‘distinctly Left-wing face’.

Despite being described as ‘the incarnation of intellectual Conservatism’, Moore, who wrote an acclaimed biography of Margaret Thatcher, comes from a family of Liberal Party members, only switching to the Tories after graduating from Cambridge. 

Sir David Clementi's three-year term at the head of the Corporation expires in February

Sir David Clementi’s three-year term at the head of the Corporation expires in February

But he displayed flashes of his liberal roots in 2001 with a signed editorial in the Telegraph which argued in favour of hunting, pornography and the legalisation of cannabis.

He converted to Roman Catholicism following the Church of England’s decision to allow the ordination of women as priests in 1992.

Lord Moore – an expert on parsonages who was nicknamed Lord Snooty by Private Eye – was critical of David Cameron’s efforts to modernise the Tory Party and failure to address the inefficiencies of the National Health Service, which he described as ‘a terrible organisation’.

Father-of-two Moore, whose wife Caroline is a former English don at Cambridge, attracted criticism five years ago when he questioned whether Labour leadership contenders Yvette Cooper and Liz Kendall had ‘got the looks for a leadership contest’, adding: ‘There is an understanding that no leader – especially, despite the age of equality, a woman – can look grotesque on television and win a General Election.’

He has described being Mr Johnson’s boss at the Telegraph as ‘a nightmare’, because he was always ‘so late – and I mean terribly late – with his copy’.

Lord Moore has also marvelled at Mr Johnson’s ability to bounce back from repeated scandal and setbacks. A Government source said: ‘Charles would shake things up, which is exactly what the BBC needs.’

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Sir Simon Stevens is poised to step down as NHS chief executive

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sir simon stevens is poised to step down as nhs chief

Sir Simon Stevens is poised to step down as head of the NHS within the next few months – as the shake-up of public jobs under Boris Johnson‘s Government continues apace.

Sir Simon is understood to be in discussions about leaving his position as the chief executive of NHS England early next year, with Dido Harding the head of the Government’s controversial test and trace programme, the early favourite to succeed him. 

The planned move, at a time when the health service is going through the most demanding period in its history, will spark speculation that he is another casualty of the Whitehall revolution launched by No 10 adviser Dominic Cummings, which has seen a number of senior mandarins – including former Cabinet Secretary Sir Mark Sedwill – leave their jobs.

Sir Simon Stevens, pictured, is poised to step down as head of the NHS within the next few months ¿ as the shake-up of public jobs under Boris Johnson's Government continues apace

Sir Simon Stevens, pictured, is poised to step down as head of the NHS within the next few months – as the shake-up of public jobs under Boris Johnson’s Government continues apace

Last night a senior Government source said: ‘Simon has been doing the job since 2014, which is longer than most of his predecessors, and talks are under way about a new role in the public sector.’

Sir Simon, 54, has been friends with Mr Johnson since their time together at Oxford University, where he helped secure Mr Johnson’s election as president of the Oxford Union.

From 1997 to 2004 Sir Simon acted as an adviser to Tony Blair’s government, including three years in the No 10 policy unit. 

David Cameron said he recruited him to run the health service because he ‘knows more about NHS problems and market solutions than any man alive’.

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PETER HITCHENS: Can’t we put the Johnson Junta in a nice rest home?

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peter hitchens cant we put the johnson junta in a nice rest home

Months ago, I predicted that we would all come to hate the narrow, bossed-about new life the Government wants to force us to live. I was wrong. 

Most people have far too readily accepted limits to their lives which the world’s tyrannies would once have hesitated to impose on their citizens.

Well, have you had enough yet? Because the Johnson Junta has only one tool in its box. That tool is restriction. 

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is pictured during a visit to the Jenner Institute in Oxford.  Most people have far too readily accepted limits to their lives which the world¿s tyrannies would once have hesitated to impose on their citizens

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is pictured during a visit to the Jenner Institute in Oxford.  Most people have far too readily accepted limits to their lives which the world’s tyrannies would once have hesitated to impose on their citizens

And it has only one aim, one that has never been achieved by any state in the history of the world – the total suppression of a coronavirus. Who would have thought that the rule of clowns would be so unfunny?

But it now looks as if this will go on for ever, unless we can somehow lead these people away to secluded rest homes where kindly nurses can indulge their wild power-fantasies with soothing repetitions of ‘Yes, dear’, cold compresses and cups of Ovaltine. It is certainly increasingly dangerous for them to be out and about.

Take the Health Secretary, Mr Matthew Hancock. I know I have laughed at him in the past as a sort of crazy prep-school headmaster raging at his tiny pupils. But for goodness sake, the man is a Cabinet Minister, and he has real power over us. 

He can smash up your business, make you stay at home, part you from your nearest and dearest at the ends of their lives, destroy your wedding plans, wreck your education, ruin your holiday, take away your job, set the police on you for refusing to wear a pro-Government badge across half your face. He can and he does.

Take the Health Secretary, Mr Matthew Hancock. I know I have laughed at him in the past as a sort of crazy prep-school headmaster raging at his tiny pupils. But for goodness sake, the man is a Cabinet Minister, and he has real power over us

Take the Health Secretary, Mr Matthew Hancock. I know I have laughed at him in the past as a sort of crazy prep-school headmaster raging at his tiny pupils. But for goodness sake, the man is a Cabinet Minister, and he has real power over us

And he has taken leave of the truth. On Friday morning, Mr Hancock said that the number of hospitalisations for Covid is doubling every seven to eight days.

Now, ‘hospitalisations for Covid’ is a slightly tricky figure. It may well be affected by the Government’s endless futile, frantic hunt for signs of a disease which has largely vanished from among us, and whose main symptom is that you feel just fine, thank you. 

Deaths, a figure very hard to massage, are low and remain low after a long fall from their peak on April 8. People must at all costs be distracted from this fact.

I have to wonder about the hospital admission figures, given the slipperiness of the Government throughout this episode. Could it be that people who have tested positive for Covid in one of Mr Hancock’s vast trawls, but who go into hospital mainly for other reasons, get added to this total? 

I wouldn’t be a bit surprised. Could it be that our hospitals are being encouraged to admit mild cases for observation, which they would previously have sent home? Who knows? Just guessing.

But then we come to the hospitalisation figures. Yes, they have edged up a bit since mid-August. But bear in mind that in March they were regularly more than 2,500 a day.

On August 1, the total of Covid hospital admissions in England was 50. On August 8 it was 78. On August 15 it was 38. On August 22 it was 25. On August 29 it was 52. On September 5 it was 94. On September 12 it was 143. This is hardly an established pattern.

Now, I know, because the Health Department told me, that if you took a different and much shorter date range (August 24, 41; August 31, 52; September 7, 84; September 14, 172) you could – sort of – back up their claim. I’d have thought ‘every seven or eight days’ meant over a far longer period than that. ‘Every’ is a powerful word.

But, as I said to the Ministry spokesperson who manfully tried to persuade me that his boss’s claim of hospitalisations doubling every week had been honest, it seems to me to be unscrupulous panic-mongering, which would shame a banana republic.

Sensible Coventry, refusing to let itself be browbeaten or cajoled by the slick, nasty lobby for e-scooters. 

These things are dangerous, especially to pedestrians, and it is absurd to pretend that they are healthy (no exercise) or green (battery power comes from power stations). 

Always remember the case of Isabelle Albertin, pianist at the Paris Opera for 30 years, left unable to play after one of these jolly horrors smashed into her, breaking two bones in her arm. Ban the nasty things.  

The new ITV production of The Singapore Grip, starring Georgia Blizzard, above, is ¿ like so many of these dramas ¿ a moving museum

The new ITV production of The Singapore Grip, starring Georgia Blizzard, above, is – like so many of these dramas – a moving museum

Glamorous Georgia… and another costume drama to sneer at

If we can have Shakespeare in modern dress, then it is time we had the British imperial era in modern dress.

The new ITV production of The Singapore Grip, starring Georgia Blizzard, is – like so many of these dramas – a moving museum.

It is a procession of double-breasted suits, double-breasted cars and flying boats. Its production must have used up about a ton of bright red lipstick and enough cigarettes to give cancer to a small town. 

And of course there are swing bands, playing away as the Japanese approach. So we can all sneer at the bigoted attitudes of the distant, alien people who float through this remote world.

Actually they were pretty much like us, following the political fashions of the times as we follow the fashions of our own. And one day others will portray us with the same disdain.

Businessman Simon Dolan’s badly needed court case against the Government’s unlawful rule by decree has been postponed yet again, because one of the Government’s lawyers has gone on holiday. 

Yes, really. All I can say is, it wouldn’t have happened to Gina Miller’s case. 

Axe looms for a dusty little attic of Empire 

Like most sensible residents of Oxford, I have kept quiet about what was until recently the most wonderful museum in the world, the Pitt Rivers.Half its crazy charm came from the fact that hardly anyone could find it during its brief opening hours. On a silent winter afternoon it was a dimly-lit feast for the imagination and an unbeatable evocation of the era of exploration and wonder. Is it ‘racist’? Only to racists.

A man-trap from a 19th Century English estate hardly proclaims the benefits of Western civilisation. It is really just an attic of Empire.The wonderful James Fenton wrote a witty poem about it, saying it was where ‘myths go when they die’.

We feared that publicity –which has lately come to it in books and TV dramas – would doom it. And now this has happened. A new boss has got rid of the Shrunken Heads. Who knows how long the totem pole, the man-trap and the spring-gun will now survive?

2-metre farce gives us the measure of Boris

The quackery of the regulations imposed on us knows no bounds.

The British Weights and Measures Association, a fine body which defends our familiar, human yards and pounds against the chilly, bureaucratic imposition of metres and kilos, has uncovered a fascinating detail of how the ‘two-metre’ rule was arrived at. Official guidance was that one metre (just over 3ft 3in) would be enough.

Expert Professor Robert Dingwall has revealed in a little-publicised interview that a senior public health specialist explained to him: ‘We knew it was one metre but we doubled it to two because we did not think the British population would understand what one metre was and we could not trust them to observe it so we doubled it to be on the safe side.’

I should stress that Prof Dingwall is quoting someone else here and is not the author of these contemptuous words. I asked Prof Dingwall to identify the speaker, but he wouldn’t, though it is plain it is someone pretty well-known.

You also see here the Johnson Government’s crabby reluctance to use traditional British measures – which Mr Johnson claims to like.

Expert Professor Robert Dingwall has revealed in a little-publicised interview that a senior public health specialist explained to him: ¿We knew it was one metre but we doubled it to two because we did not think the British population would understand what one metre was and we could not trust them to observe it so we doubled it to be on the safe side'

Expert Professor Robert Dingwall has revealed in a little-publicised interview that a senior public health specialist explained to him: ‘We knew it was one metre but we doubled it to two because we did not think the British population would understand what one metre was and we could not trust them to observe it so we doubled it to be on the safe side’

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