Connect with us

Main News

Parents of private school pupils could be ‘hounded’ for unpaid fees

Published

on

parents of private school pupils could be hounded for unpaid fees

Parents of private school pupils could be ‘hounded’ for unpaid fees by a debt collection agency, it was claimed yesterday.

It comes after the Independent Schools Association (ISA) announced that Frontline Collections has become a ‘gold preferred supplier’ to its 535 members.

The firm will ‘assist independent schools across the UK in recouping unpaid school fees’.

Parents of private school pupils could be ‘hounded’ for unpaid fees by a debt collection agency, it was claimed yesterday

Parents of private school pupils could be ‘hounded’ for unpaid fees by a debt collection agency, it was claimed yesterday

It already works with a number of ISA members but the official endorsement means it is likely to be used more widely by schools.

The ISA said the sustainability of private schools was a ‘major challenge many are currently facing’.

But Lord Storey, Liberal Democrat education spokesman in the House of Lords, said the use of debt collectors to recoup money from struggling families during the pandemic was ‘just not acceptable and very insensitive’.

The firm will ‘assist independent schools across the UK in recouping unpaid school fees’

The firm will ‘assist independent schools across the UK in recouping unpaid school fees’

He told Schools Week: ‘Imagine the national outcry there would be if state schools employed debt collectors to collect dinner money or after-school club [fees]. Parents need support, not being hounded by a debt agency.’

ISA chief executive Rudolf Eliott Lockhart said a ‘significant number’ of private schools had cut fees and scrapped rises, and some had used hardship funds to help families.

But he added that ‘like many businesses’, private schools sometimes use debt collectors as a ‘last resort’.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Main News

Lockdowns’ full costs should be disclosed, says senior Tory MP

Published

on

By

lockdowns full costs should be disclosed says senior tory mp
Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Committee of backbenchers, said that figures for excess deaths and lost jobs should be shown alongside Covid-19 statistics

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Committee of backbenchers, said that figures for excess deaths and lost jobs should be shown alongside Covid-19 statistics

A senior Tory MP has called for the full cost of lockdowns to be disclosed as he highlighted their ‘extraordinary toll’ on mental health, the NHS and the economy.

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Committee of backbenchers, said that figures for excess deaths and lost jobs should be shown alongside Covid-19 statistics.

The influential Tory MP represents a northern constituency, Altrincham and Sale West, which is among those now under the harshest Tier Three restrictions.

In a warning to the Prime Minister, he said that the current lockdown strategy let ‘people fall through the cracks’ and in some cases cost them their lives.

The measures were taking an ‘extraordinary toll’ on peoples’ lives and were having ‘severe’ effects on the economy without continued Treasury support, he added.

34926914 8886627 image m 81 1603841817224

In a warning to the Prime Minister, Sir Graham said that the current lockdown strategy let ¿people fall through the cracks¿ and in some cases cost them their lives. (Above, file image of an intensive care unit at the Royal Papworth Hospital)

In a warning to the Prime Minister, Sir Graham said that the current lockdown strategy let ‘people fall through the cracks’ and in some cases cost them their lives. (Above, file image of an intensive care unit at the Royal Papworth Hospital)

Writing on the Conservative Home website, he warned: ‘Suicide rates are up. People are missing out on life-saving operations and essential care.’

‘Millions are struggling with their mental health as restrictions cut them off from friends, family, and other support. 

‘Domestic violence is on the rise as women are trapped at home with violent partners.

‘Young people, amongst those least at risk from Covid-19, are paying a huge price. School has been disrupted, formative moments and milestones missed, and now many are confined to their dormitories at university. 

‘Does anyone honestly think this is sustainable for a year, or more?’

He added: ‘As we brace for what might be a long-haul fight against the pandemic, the Government must start accounting properly for the real costs of Covid-19.

‘The Department of Health should compile and publish the statistics for excess deaths arising from reduced access to care. 

‘The Treasury should do the same for shuttered businesses and lost jobs.

‘The Government is rightly committed to trying to save as many people as possible. 

‘A strategy which fixates on Covid patients at the expense of letting other people fall between the cracks does not do this.’  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Main News

Test and Trace ‘even worse than we think’: Experts say missing data means infections could be higher

Published

on

By

test and trace even worse than we think experts say missing data means infections could be higher

Britain’s test and trace system is ‘getting worse’ and struggling to cope with the resurgence of coronavirus, according to experts.

Gaps in the data make it impossible to know whether official restrictions are reducing the spread of infection, say the researchers.

Scientists led by University College London say the gaps are starkly illustrated by their new ‘data dashboard’ Covid Red, which is designed to bring together all available virus information.

Professor Christina Pagel, a co-developer, said: ‘We don’t know what percentage of people with symptoms are actually isolating for the full length of time or their contacts.’

Scientists led by University College London say Britain's test and trace system is struggling to cope with the resurgence of coronavirus. Pictured: NHS England's Test and Trace app

Scientists led by University College London say Britain’s test and trace system is struggling to cope with the resurgence of coronavirus. Pictured: NHS England’s Test and Trace app

She added: ‘If people are not isolating then it’s just window dressing. We would like that to be collected and reported weekly. It is such an important thing.’

Researchers also found that some of the best available data was up to two weeks old. 

They urged health authorities to prioritise real-time information to ‘inform and support the necessary responses, including regional or local lockdowns’.

Covid Red – full name the Covid Response Evaluation Dashboard – has been designed for use by both officials and the public. 

It collates and presents data from the Office of National Statistics, Public Health England and the NHS under five categories: Find, test, track, isolate and support for those asked to isolate.

A new 'data dashboard' has shown a rising number of people test and trace has failed to find within 24 hours, as well as a rising number only traced after 72 hours which is 'too late' to stop infection spread, Professor Christina Pagel from University College London said. Pictured: A worker advises a woman attending a drive-in test facility

A new ‘data dashboard’ has shown a rising number of people test and trace has failed to find within 24 hours, as well as a rising number only traced after 72 hours which is ‘too late’ to stop infection spread, Professor Christina Pagel from University College London said. Pictured: A worker advises a woman attending a drive-in test facility

It shows a rising number of people that test and trace fails to find within 24 hours, along with a rising number only traced after 72 hours, which Professor Pagel said was ‘too late’ to stop infection spread.

Getting contacts of new cases to isolate was vital to ‘break the chain of transmission’, she added. Numbers missed had hugely increased since September, showing the ‘system starting to get overloaded’.

Co-developer Professor Deenan Pillay said coronavirus case numbers were now doubling every two weeks and real-time data was essential to monitor ‘hotspots’ of infection going into winter.

He added: ‘We will depend on test and trace in the long term for ensuring we capture infections, we don’t continue to have to go into more and more lockdowns.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Main News

Holidaymakers are no more likely to get infected than if they stay at home, study suggests 

Published

on

By

holidaymakers are no more likely to get infected than if they stay at home study suggests

Travel bosses demanded an end to quarantine last night as data revealed the infection rates of people who travel abroad are similar to those who stay at home.

Ministers insist the 14-day quarantine policy is essential to stop large numbers of coronavirus cases being brought into the country.

An ONS study previously found that there were more cases of the virus among people who had travelled abroad compared to those who had not.

The percentage of travellers who tested positive after returning from abroad was as high as rate of people testing positive who stayed in the UK between September 25 and October 8

The percentage of travellers who tested positive after returning from abroad was as high as rate of people testing positive who stayed in the UK between September 25 and October 8

But data from September 25 to October 8 shows there is now barely any difference between the two groups.

According to the study 0.58 per cent of people who recently travelled abroad tested positive for coronavirus. This compared to 0.49 per cent who tested positive having not left the country.

Katherine Kent, co-head of analysis for the ONS Covid-19 infection survey, said: ‘Analysis now shows that, unlike before, there is no longer a difference in the rate of infections between those who have travelled abroad and those who haven’t.’

Aviation industry leaders said the study proves there is little justification for forcing passengers to quarantine on arrival.

The policy has been blamed for destroying the holiday hopes of millions while severely hampering Britain’s economic recovery.

Spain and Italy have both seen infections increase to record levels along with those in France, Britain and other countries, although the Czech Republic and Belgium have the highest rates of any major countries in Europe

Spain and Italy have both seen infections increase to record levels along with those in France, Britain and other countries, although the Czech Republic and Belgium have the highest rates of any major countries in Europe  

The Daily Mail’s Get Britain Flying Again campaign has led calls for the rule to be scrapped and replaced with an air passenger testing regime to rescue the aviation industry and bolster the economy.

Business chiefs have warned failure to act will lead to tens of thousands of job losses in the months to come as airports and airlines desperately try to save money.

Although Transport Secretary Grant Shapps recently announced a ‘global travel taskforce’ to look at halving the quarantine time to seven days, airline executives say any length of quarantine will continue to strangle the economy.

Travel consultant Paul Charles, of The PC Agency, said: ‘The Government’s own statistics now show that those entering the UK hardly carry the virus, so the current blunt quarantine rules should be abandoned.’

Julia Lo Bue-Said, chief executive of the Advantage Travel Partnership of travel agents, said: ‘The recent addition of the Canary Islands last week on to the safe corridor list provided a much-needed boost to the industry and customers alike. Let’s keep the momentum going, get rid of quarantine regulations that have no bearing on our health and focus on a considered testing regime to getting the country travelling safely again.’

It comes as Airports Council International revealed yesterday that nearly 200 airports in Europe will face insolvency in the coming months if passenger traffic does not start recovering by the end of the year. Sources said this includes regional airports in the UK.

Olivier Jankovec, director-general of ACI, said: ‘The figures paint a dramatically bleak picture. Eight months into the crisis, all of Europe’s airports are burning through cash to remain open, with revenues far from covering the costs of operations, let alone capital costs.’

Separately the International Air Transport Association warned yesterday that the average airline has just 8.5 months of cash left.

The global trade body predicted a 46 per cent drop in total industry revenues in 2021 compared to 2019.

Alexandre de Juniac, director-general of IATA, said: ‘Unless governments act fast, some 1.3million airline jobs are at risk. And that would have a domino effect putting 3.5million additional jobs in the aviation sector in jeopardy along with a total of 46million people in the broader economy whose jobs are supported by aviation.’

A Department for Transport spokesman said: ‘We’re now working at pace to make international travel smoother and our global travel taskforce is exploring how a testing model can be implemented in the UK.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.