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PAUL THOMAS on… the coronavirus testing scandal

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A QUARTER of panic-bought food ends up in the BIN: Hoarders warned stockpiling is a ‘false economy’ 

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a quarter of panic bought food ends up in the bin hoarders warned stockpiling is a false economy

One in four items bought by hoarders goes to waste as shoppers are warned stockpiling is a ‘false economy’ a study has revealed.

The study, carried out by Topcashback, found that Britons spent nearly £10 billion a year on stockpiling items that are lost, forgotten or thrown away, causing unnecessary food waste and greenhouse gas emissions. 

With one in four bulk buys going to waste, the report reveals that shoppers are continuing to subscribe to what the cashback shopping site describes as ‘a false economy’.

The study shows that 80 per cent of shoppers identified ‘saving money’ as the number one reason to bulk buy.

Conversely, almost a quarter also said they regretted stocking up at one point or another – with nearly half citing being worse off financially as the reason. 

It comes as panic buying across the UK has resumed amid fears of a second wave of coronavirus and another lockdown with shoppers reporting queuing for 20 minutes to enter shops before similar further delays at checkouts.

And online customers found it near-impossible to get delivery slots from Asda, Morrisons, Ocado, Sainsbury’s and Tesco – some didn’t have free slots for up to two weeks.

Pictures from a Tesco in west London show shoppers have emptied shelves this weekend despite study showing one in four items bought in bulk goes to waste as warning to stockpilers

Pictures from a Tesco in west London show shoppers have emptied shelves this weekend despite study showing one in four items bought in bulk goes to waste as warning to stockpilers

However, shops have insisted that bare shelves would be quickly restocked. Pictured: A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

However, shops have insisted that bare shelves would be quickly restocked. Pictured: A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

The toilet roll running out at Tesco in Ely, Cambridgeshire, on Thursday afternoon as the store ration it to one pack per customer after customers have started panic buying items again

The toilet roll running out at Tesco in Ely, Cambridgeshire, on Thursday afternoon as the store ration it to one pack per customer after customers have started panic buying items again

Restrictions on items which vanished most quickly during the country’s first lockdown, such as flour and eggs, have been put in place.

However, shops have insisted that bare shelves once filled with toilet paper and pasta will be quickly restocked.  

The research showed that a quarter of purchases are wasted, predominantly because the product is not used before its use-by date.

The study estimates that the average shopper spends £200 a year on bulk buys that they do not use and ends up being thrown away – this works out at about £9.6 billion annually across the country.

The most popular items that were bought in bulk were tinned items, toilet roll, pasta, rice, frozen food and soap. 

Adam Bullock, from Topcashback.co.uk, said: ‘Shoppers believe they are helping the environment by bulk buying.

‘However, by continually throwing away a percentage of their purchases, they are making a negative impact, and are harming their wallet at the same time.

‘Being savvy with savings doesn’t necessarily require stocking up in bulk.’

Supermarket bosses have been forced to implement restrictions on essentials as shoppers continue to try and stockpile amid fears of a second lockdown. 

The executive director of Waitrose, James Bailey, told The Sunday Times that there was ‘enough food to go round’. 

He added: ‘But if one person fills their house will all the packs of pasta they can get their hands on, it inevitably means somebody else will go without. They could be the most vulnerable or key workers.’ 

It comes after Tesco became the latest supermarket to impose rationing on food and household goods.

In a bid to avoid the bulk buying which left shop shelves across the UK almost bare in March, the supermarket giant will limit items such as flour, dried pasta, toilet roll and anti-bacterial wipes to three per customer. 

Morrisons on Thursday announced rationing would be introduced on certain items in its stores up and down the country.

It has been reported supermarkets are boosting security and have doubled number of delivery slots amid fears Covid-19 panic buying could return. Pictured: Tesco in south east London

It has been reported supermarkets are boosting security and have doubled number of delivery slots amid fears Covid-19 panic buying could return. Pictured: Tesco in south east London

The executive director of Waitrose has slammed panic buyers saying their actions 'inevitably means someone else will go without'. Pictured: Empty shelves at a Sainsbury's in Wandsworth

The executive director of Waitrose has slammed panic buyers saying their actions ‘inevitably means someone else will go without’. Pictured: Empty shelves at a Sainsbury’s in Wandsworth

And restrictions on items which vanished most quickly during the country's first lockdown, such as flour and eggs, have been put in place. Pictured: Asda in Barnes Hill, Birmingham

And restrictions on items which vanished most quickly during the country’s first lockdown, such as flour and eggs, have been put in place. Pictured: Asda in Barnes Hill, Birmingham

The restrictions come as supermarket chiefs look to avoid a over repeat of the stockpiling panic seen in stores at the start of the pandemic in March.

Pictures from supermarkets across the UK have already shown empty or rapidly emptying toilet roll shelves, just days after the government announced tighter restrictions in a bid to stave off a second coronavirus wave.

A shopper has pleaded for people not to be ‘selfish’ by stockpiling household items after shelves in an Asda store in County Durham were left completely empty.

Keith Jackson said shelves of toilet roll in Asda in Stanley had been entirely emptied on Saturday.

When the Covid-19 lockdown was first introduced earlier this year, Britain’s shelves were stripped bare with pasta and toilet paper hard to find.

And it seems with tighter restrictions put in place in the North East, people are reporting a second wave of panic buying.

After seeing the bare shelves in his local supermarket, Keith pleaded for people not to stockpile saying it ‘deprives the vulnerable’ of everyday products adding to their stress.

Keith said: ‘It was just the toilet roll for now, although it wouldn’t surprise me if the pasta and hand wash are next to be stockpiled if we have a repeat of six months ago.

‘I can’t stand stockpiling, I think it’s selfish and unnecessary. There’s enough product in storage to go around.

‘Stockpiling just puts undue strain on supply chains and deprives the vulnerable of everyday products, adding to their stress and anxiety.

A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

‘This feels very much like it did the end of March when I had to go to petrol stations to buy toilet roll.

‘Sadly it feels some people have not learned anything in the last six months, their only concern is for themselves which is a shame.

‘It starts with a minority of people and then others start to panic and join in, for fear of not being able to get hold of the products they need.

‘Then it takes a month or two for the supermarkets to get their stock levels back to normal.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Sky News presenter Jacquie Beltrao thought lifestyle changes would stop her breast cancer returning

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sky news presenter jacquie beltrao thought lifestyle changes would stop her breast cancer returning

Sky News sports presenter Jacquie Beltrao has said it was a ‘kick in the guts’ to be diagnosed once again with breast cancer because she thought her lifestyle changes would prevent the illness from returning.  

Former Olympic gymnast Jacquie, 55, from Dublin, revealed in June that the cancer she first had seven years ago had come back in a ‘more aggressive’ form and appeared on Lorraine this morning with her daughter Amelia, 22, to speak about her diagnosis. 

The mother-of-three revealed she thought making changes to her diet and lifestyle would ‘be enough’ to stop her cancer coming back, and found it ‘really hard to deal with’ when her illness returned. 

Jacquie explained that while physically she felt fine, mentally she was ‘out of the game’ and felt unable to do everything she normally would as a mum, such as shopping and cooking. 

Sky News sports presenter Jacquie Beltrao, 55, has revealed she felt it was a 'kick in the guts' to be diagnosed once again with breast cancer (pictured with daughter Amelia, 22,)

 Sky News sports presenter Jacquie Beltrao, 55, has revealed she felt it was a ‘kick in the guts’ to be diagnosed once again with breast cancer (pictured with daughter Amelia, 22,)

Speaking of her second diagnosis, she said: ‘It was a total kick in the guts. I had made changes to my lifestyle, I was dairy-free, I do yoga all the time… I thought I had done enough to stop it coming back. 

‘It sort of doesn’t work like that, it’s something internal, something that I’m obviously prone to. 

‘I think if you have had breast cancer before you are also a little bit more prone to it as well.’ 

The mother admitted it felt like she was ‘losing her mind’ after discovering that her cancer was grade three stage four, meaning she’ll likely be dealing with it for the rest of her life. 

She appeared on Lorraine this morning with her daughter Amelia to speak about her second diagnosis

She appeared on Lorraine this morning with her daughter Amelia to speak about her second diagnosis 

‘It was really hard to deal with at first because it was worse than last time’, she told,  ‘it was more aggressive.

‘It’s a grade three stage four, which means I will probably be dealing with this for all of my life.’

She explained: ‘I thought I was losing my mind. It was a really hard thing to deal with mentally, physically I felt absolutely fine. But mentally I was out of the game.

‘As a mother, I sort of downed tools. I just couldn’t do it, I just couldn’t do what I normally do; shopping, cooking. I just didn’t feel I could do that.’

Mentally Jacquie said she 'out of the game' and felt unable to do everything she normally would as a mother, such as shopping and cooking. Pictured with sons Jorge (left) and Tiago (right).

Mentally Jacquie said she ‘out of the game’ and felt unable to do everything she normally would as a mother, such as shopping and cooking. Pictured with sons Jorge (left) and Tiago (right).

Jacquie has been sharing her treatment over social media, and admitted that a positive outlook helps her ‘kid herself into thinking everything is fine’. 

She said: ‘I’m sort of trying to kid myself that I am fine. Everything’s going to be fine and I’m going to be here when I’m 90, and if I keep saying it often enough in my head it must be true.’ 

Her daughter Amelia went on to explain that since her mother was diagnosed for a second time, she has tried her best to take on more responsibility, and be a ‘rock’ for her mother. 

She told: ‘Obviously, first time round I was very young, only 16. I wasn’t as involved in the process. Mum and Dad tried to keep it hidden from us, in terms of how they were dealing with it.

Jacquie told host Lorraine Kelly  that a positive outlook helps her 'kid herself into thinking everything is fine'

Jacquie told host Lorraine Kelly  that a positive outlook helps her ‘kid herself into thinking everything is fine’

‘This time around I sort of felt like I had to step up and be more of an adult, I’m 22 now. I know what is to come, I’m meant to be their rock.

‘It was a lot more responsibility I feel this time round, but I’m glad I did it.I thought I needed to give Mum an easy ride as much as I could.’

She added that she has taken over cooking and cleaning responsibilities, saying: ‘I don’t mind doing it, I quite enjoy doing it. As long as it made Mum feel more relaxed during the process, that’s all that matters.’

The presenter said the news had brought her family closer together, because most busy teenagers are usually focused on exams and seeing their friends.

She said: ‘At this point I feel like I have got Amelia back. She has been amazing throughout this whole time.’ 

Jacquie has now undergone 12 sessions of chemotherapy since her latest diagnosis, and speaking about having treatment during a pandemic, admitted that she was lucky to be diagnosed when she was

Jacquie has now undergone 12 sessions of chemotherapy since her latest diagnosis, and speaking about having treatment during a pandemic, admitted that she was lucky to be diagnosed when she was

Jacquie has now undergone 12 sessions of chemotherapy since her latest diagnosis, and speaking about having treatment during a pandemic, admitted that she was lucky to be diagnosed when she was. 

She told: ‘In a way, I was very lucky with the timing of when I found the lump, it was pretty much at the end of when we were coming out of lockdown.’ 

She said she was rushed in and had treatment straight away, but that it wouldn’t have been the case if she had been diagnosed at any other point.

‘I was in a state of absolute internal panic’, she said, ‘If I couldn’t have had my treatment, I was almost losing my mind anyway.

‘I feel so sorry for so many people who didn’t get what they needed when they needed it. It was a really bad situation if you had breast cancer at certain points during lockdown.’

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and affects more than two MILLION women a year

4EEF658C00000578 0 image a 27 1533739473058

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Each year in the UK there are more than 55,000 new cases, and the disease claims the lives of 11,500 women. In the US, it strikes 266,000 each year and kills 40,000. But what causes it and how can it be treated?

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer develops from a cancerous cell which develops in the lining of a duct or lobule in one of the breasts.

When the breast cancer has spread into surrounding breast tissue it is called an ‘invasive’ breast cancer. Some people are diagnosed with ‘carcinoma in situ’, where no cancer cells have grown beyond the duct or lobule.

Most cases develop in women over the age of 50 but younger women are sometimes affected. Breast cancer can develop in men though this is rare.

Staging means how big the cancer is and whether it has spread. Stage 1 is the earliest stage and stage 4 means the cancer has spread to another part of the body.

The cancerous cells are graded from low, which means a slow growth, to high, which is fast growing. High grade cancers are more likely to come back after they have first been treated.

What causes breast cancer?

A cancerous tumour starts from one abnormal cell. The exact reason why a cell becomes cancerous is unclear. It is thought that something damages or alters certain genes in the cell. This makes the cell abnormal and multiply ‘out of control’.

Although breast cancer can develop for no apparent reason, there are some risk factors that can increase the chance of developing breast cancer, such as genetics.

What are the symptoms of breast cancer?

The usual first symptom is a painless lump in the breast, although most breast lumps are not cancerous and are fluid filled cysts, which are benign. 

The first place that breast cancer usually spreads to is the lymph nodes in the armpit. If this occurs you will develop a swelling or lump in an armpit.

How is breast cancer diagnosed?

  • Initial assessment: A doctor examines the breasts and armpits. They may do tests such as a mammography, a special x-ray of the breast tissue which can indicate the possibility of tumours.
  • Biopsy: A biopsy is when a small sample of tissue is removed from a part of the body. The sample is then examined under the microscope to look for abnormal cells. The sample can confirm or rule out cancer.

If you are confirmed to have breast cancer, further tests may be needed to assess if it has spread. For example, blood tests, an ultrasound scan of the liver or a chest x-ray.

4EEF656900000578 0 image a 30 1533739503845

How is breast cancer treated?

Treatment options which may be considered include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone treatment. Often a combination of two or more of these treatments are used.

  • Surgery: Breast-conserving surgery or the removal of the affected breast depending on the size of the tumour.
  • Radiotherapy: A treatment which uses high energy beams of radiation focussed on cancerous tissue. This kills cancer cells, or stops cancer cells from multiplying. It is mainly used in addition to surgery.
  • Chemotherapy: A treatment of cancer by using anti-cancer drugs which kill cancer cells, or stop them from multiplying
  • Hormone treatments: Some types of breast cancer are affected by the ‘female’ hormone oestrogen, which can stimulate the cancer cells to divide and multiply. Treatments which reduce the level of these hormones, or prevent them from working, are commonly used in people with breast cancer.

How successful is treatment?

The outlook is best in those who are diagnosed when the cancer is still small, and has not spread. Surgical removal of a tumour in an early stage may then give a good chance of cure.

The routine mammography offered to women between the ages of 50 and 70 mean more breast cancers are being diagnosed and treated at an early stage.

For more information visit breastcancercare.org.uk, breastcancernow.org or www.cancerhelp.org.uk

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Parliament’s bars WILL stop serving alcohol at 10pm in U-turn

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parliaments bars will stop serving alcohol at 10pm in u turn

Parliament’s bars will stop serving alcohol by 10pm, it was announced today – following fury that MPs were not subject to the same rules as the rest of the country.

The authorities at the Houses made the change with ‘immediate’ effect as they faced a huge backlash at an apparent exemption.

The exclusive outlets on the estate had been classed as a ‘workplace canteen’, meaning they were not covered by the tough restrictions imposed by Boris Johnson last week.

But a Parliament spokesman said today: ‘Alcohol will not be sold after 10pm anywhere on the parliamentary estate.’ 

It comes just a week after the Prime Minister set out a raft of measures designed to clampdown on Covid-19, including imposing a 10pm curfew on all pubs, bars and restaurants in England.

Despite the new measures, staff and visitors inside Parliament can still enter its handful of bars without being forced to leave at 10pm and are also not required to provide a name and contact number upon entry, The Times reported.

Bars inside Parliament are exempt from the Government's newly imposed 10pm curfew which came into effect this week. Pictured: Boris Johnson and Michael Gove pulling pints at the Old Chapel pub in Darwen, Lancashire

Bars inside Parliament are exempt from the Government’s newly imposed 10pm curfew which came into effect this week. Pictured: Boris Johnson and Michael Gove pulling pints at the Old Chapel pub in Darwen, Lancashire

The revelations come after a number of bars in Parliament, including the Strangers’ Dining Room, the Adjournment and the Members’ Smoking Room and Pugin Room, were reopened to MPs before the summer recess.

One source told The Times the rules were ‘a massive own goal’ for Parliament.  

This week Boris Johnson announced a new wave of Covid-19 restrictions that could last up to six months- including a 10pm curfew on bars, pubs and restaurants in England.

The 10pm curfew on the hospitality sector sparked an immediate industry backlash as the UKHospitality group said it was ‘another crushing blow’.

There were also fears the move could have unintended consequences amid warnings of a potential ‘surge of unregulated events and house parties’.

Tory MPs also expressed concerns about the curfew plans, describing them as a ‘terrible blow’ for the hospitality industry and warning there must not be another ‘major lockdown’.

The Strangers’ Dining Room (pictured) was among a number of bars that was opened to staff inside Parliament following the national lockdown

The Strangers’ Dining Room (pictured) was among a number of bars that was opened to staff inside Parliament following the national lockdown

Facilities serving alcohol inside the Palace of Westminster are not subject to the 10pm curfew as they are classified as a 'workplace canteen'. Pictured: The Strangers dining hall

Facilities serving alcohol inside the Palace of Westminster are not subject to the 10pm curfew as they are classified as a ‘workplace canteen’. Pictured: The Strangers dining hall

It was claimed that Mr Johnson had initially backed a total shutdown of the hospitality and leisure sectors before Chancellor Rishi Sunak persuaded him to take a less severe course after warning of economic carnage. 

Just hours after setting out the new measures, the Prime Minister issued an emotional plea to the nation and warned Britons they faced a long hard winter of police-enforced curbs on their freedom to see off coronavirus.

He also hit out at his critics – including Tory MPs and business leaders who warned of the economic impact of the tough measures, adding: ‘To those who say we don’t need this stuff, and we should leave people to take their own risks, I say these risks are not our own.

‘The tragic reality of having Covid is that your mild cough can be someone else’s death knell. 

‘And as for the suggestion that we should simply lock up the elderly and the vulnerable – with all the suffering that would entail – I must tell you that this is just not realistic.

‘Because if you let the virus rip through the rest of the population it would inevitably find its way through to the elderly as well, and in much greater numbers.’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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