Connect with us

Main News

Pharmacy refuses to serve mother recovering from surgery to reattach her nose

Published

on

pharmacy refuses to serve mother recovering from surgery to reattach her nose

A mother was left in tears when pharmacy staff would not serve her while she was trying to get painkillers after surgery to reattach her nose after a dog attack. 

Shereen Mawson said an employee at her local Catts Pharmacy Snodland, Kent, which is run by Paydens, shouted at her for not wearing a face mask. 

But it is too painful for the 36-year-old to wear a mask after a dog attack left her with the cartilage from her nose hanging off and extremely painful injuries to her face.

It is too painful for Shereen Mawson (pictured with stitches) to wear a mask after surgery to reattach her nose

It is too painful for Shereen Mawson (pictured with stitches) to wear a mask after surgery to reattach her nose

It is too painful for Shereen Mawson (pictured with stitches) to wear a mask after surgery to reattach her nose 

A dog attack that happened two weeks left her with her cartilage hanging out, broken and protruding

A dog attack that happened two weeks left her with her cartilage hanging out, broken and protruding

A dog attack that happened two weeks left her with her cartilage hanging out, broken and protruding

Miss Mawson said she tried to explain why she was exempt from wearing a face mask but the employee would not listen. 

She said: ‘My stitches are so visible and she was just so rude I couldn’t believe it.

‘She went to her manager and he also refused to let me in but he didn’t even come and see me.

‘Then the member of staff said she could serve me outside and I said: “Okay that’s absolutely fine”.

‘When she found out I was paying by card she then refused me again and at that point I became so overwhelmed I literally bawled my eyes out.

‘I was in tears and ended up having a panic attack outside because I was so embarrassed.’  

Catts Pharmacy Snodland, Kent, which is run by Paydens, (pictured) deny allegations that staff were rude to Miss Mawson

Catts Pharmacy Snodland, Kent, which is run by Paydens, (pictured) deny allegations that staff were rude to Miss Mawson

Catts Pharmacy Snodland, Kent, which is run by Paydens, (pictured) deny allegations that staff were rude to Miss Mawson 

Thankfully a different nearby pharmacy agreed to serve her and she was able to get her painkillers.   

Miss Mawson added: ‘Given what my nose looks like at the minute I didn’t really want to go out in the first place but I was in so much pain I had to.

‘I’m a quiet person and I have serious anxiety so for that to happen it really knocked my confidence.

‘I wish I could wear a face mask because I understand how important they are but I physically can’t have any pressure on it, even the wind blowing on it is quite painful.

‘I have to be extremely careful where the hole in the stitching goes, any kind of cloth could have pulled it all off. 

‘Even the wind means I have to cover my face with my hand when I walk.’ 

 ‘I’ve not left my house since that Wednesday. 

‘I’ve been sending the kids out to do stuff and even just going to the shops to get food I’m hesitant and would rather wait until someone comes to help me.’  

The dog attack happened two weeks ago when her friend’s dog was being attacked by another dog and she was helping to clean her friend’s dog’s wounds. 

She said: ‘My friend’s dog had been attacked by another dog which wasn’t on its lead so I ran over to help my friend clean his wounds and that’s when it happened.

‘As I tilted his head to look at the puncture wound I must have hurt him and he bit out.

Miss Mawson, who runs a horse livery yard and rescues animals for a living, said she did want the dog to be put down. 

‘I’ve known that dog for years and know he didn’t do it on purpose, it was just a quick snap reaction,’ she said.  

A Paydens spokesperson said: ‘Catts Pharmacy are sorry this customer found our service unsatisfactory, in these unprecedented times our front line staff are working extremely hard to do their best for all our patients.

‘Whilst there are exemptions from wearing face coverings for certain individuals, our company policy advises staff that any customer not wearing a face covering, whether exempt or not, should be politely asked to wait outside the premises and we will attend to them at the door.

‘The reason for this is that despite being exempt from wearing a face covering, we need to protect our staff and other members of the public using our pharmacies.

‘Many of the customers visiting pharmacies are vulnerable and need to feel safe whilst in enclosed spaces, and in particular, in healthcare environments. Face coverings are mainly intended to protect others, not the wearer, from coronavirus.

‘Our initial investigations into the complaint so far have highlighted a difference in the way this event has been reported and the pharmacy refute any claims that they were rude to the patient.’

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Main News

Boom crown rat: Magawa the bomb disposal rodent is awarded animal George Cross

Published

on

By

boom crown rat magawa the bomb disposal rodent is awarded animal george cross

A landmine detection rat has been awarded the animal equivalent of a George Cross for his ‘lifesaving bravery’. 

Magawa, a giant African pouched rat, has discovered 39 landmines and 28 items of unexploded ordnance since he was trained by charity APOPO, which specialises in training animals to detect landmines and tuberculosis.

He is the charity’s most successful Hero Rat, having cleared more than 141,000 square metres of land – the equivalent of 20 football pitches.

Magawa, a giant African pouched rat, has discovered 39 landmines and 28 items of unexploded ordnance since he was trained by a charity. He is pictured above wearing his miniature gold medal

Magawa, a giant African pouched rat, has discovered 39 landmines and 28 items of unexploded ordnance since he was trained by a charity. He is pictured above wearing his miniature gold medal

Magawa has been formally recognised for his work and been presented with a miniature PDSA Gold Medal, the animal equivalent of the George Cross.

He is the first rat in the charity’s 77-year history to receive such an award.

He is the charity's most successful Hero Rat, having cleared more than 141,000 square metres of land - the equivalent of 20 football pitches

He is the charity’s most successful Hero Rat, having cleared more than 141,000 square metres of land – the equivalent of 20 football pitches

Christophe Cox, chief executive of APOPO, told the PA news agency: ‘To receive this medal is really an honour for us. I have been working with APOPO for over 20 years.

‘Especially for our animal trainers who are waking up every day, very early, to train those animals in the morning.

‘But also it is big for the people in Cambodia, and all the people around the world who are suffering from landmines. The PDSA Gold Medal award brings the problem of landmines to global attention.’

He said rats are ‘intelligent’ and will work at repetitive tasks for food rewards better than other animals.

Their size means they are in less danger when they walk through landmine fields.

The rats require a year of training before they are certified.

They work for around half an hour a day, in the early morning.

Once they detect a landmine, they scratch the top, which alerts their human handlers.

The rats are trained to detect a chemical compound within explosives, and because they ignore any scrap metal lying around, they work faster than a metal detectorist.

Magawa, who is now nearing retirement age, can search the area of a tennis court in 30 minutes, something that would take a human with a metal detector up to four days.

PDSA director general Jan McLoughlin said: ‘The work of Magawa and APOPO is truly unique and outstanding.

‘Cambodia estimates that between four and six million landmines were laid in the country between 1975 and 1998, which have sadly caused over 64,000 casualties.

‘Magawa’s work directly saves and changes the lives of men, women and children who are impacted by these landmines. Every discovery he makes reduces the risk of injury or death for local people.

‘The PDSA Animal Awards programme seeks to raise the status of animals in society and honour the incredible contribution they make to our lives.

‘Magawa’s dedication, skill and bravery are an extraordinary example of this and deserve the highest possible recognition. We are thrilled to award him the PDSA Gold Medal.’

Cambodia has the highest number of mine amputees per capita in the world – more than 40,000 people.

Magawa, who is now nearing retirement age, can search the area of a tennis court in 30 minutes, something that would take a human with a metal detector up to four days

Magawa, who is now nearing retirement age, can search the area of a tennis court in 30 minutes, something that would take a human with a metal detector up to four days

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Main News

Sins of the sex-obsessed Jesus of Siberia

Published

on

By

sins of the sex obsessed jesus of siberia

SergeI Torop got a rude awakening this week when the Russian secret police mounted a dawn raid on his home in a remote part of Siberia.

Four helicopters and dozens of heavily armed troops in a fleet of vans and buses descended on the hamlet of Petropavlovka, 2,600 miles east of Moscow.

Within minutes they had located their target and masked men in camouflage gear bundled the handcuffed Torop into a waiting chopper, as others with machine guns kept his associates at bay.

The unusual aspect of the operation was that Torop, 59, was not a murderer, or an oligarch wanted for tax fraud, but a former traffic cop known as the ‘Jesus of Siberia’, whose Church Of The Last Testament was based in a settlement he had renamed City of Sun.

SergeI Torop, 59, head of the Vissarion sect, greets his followers in the village of  Petropavlovka, 2,600 miles east of Moscow, in 2002

SergeI Torop, 59, head of the Vissarion sect, greets his followers in the village of  Petropavlovka, 2,600 miles east of Moscow, in 2002

Usually seen in long, flowing robes reminiscent of the Messiah himself, Torop — who goes by the name of Vissarion — was clad, instead, in an unspiritual-looking tracksuit.

He stands accused of exploiting his 5,000 Russian followers — 200 of whom lived with him in the City of Sun — using ‘psychological violence’ and causing ‘serious harm to their health’.

His arrest prompted comparisons with that other notorious Russian mystic, Grigori Rasputin, who inveigled his way into the affections of Russia’s imperial royal family in the early 20th century.

And there are striking similarities between the men, not least in their sexual liberalism.

Rasputin — dubbed ‘Russia’s greatest love machine’ by the pop group Boney M — claimed that by sleeping with a woman, he took on her sins and thus helped her find ‘the grace of God’. Free with his favours, he had a penchant for orgies with nuns.

A century later, the Siberian Jesus appears to have espoused a moral code similarly at odds with the Christian church’s teachings.

Following a visit in 2009, a French journalist described the annual gathering to celebrate the anniversary of Torop’s first ‘sermon’ in 1991.

‘The crowd parted in a human tunnel to allow the approach of the man they know as The Teacher,’ she wrote. ‘The mood was a throwback to the hippy fervour of the Sixties with a dash of apocalyptic fanaticism.’

Torop’s view was that women should serve men, just as men serve God.

Three years ago he told the BBC: ‘We have a school of noble maidens here. We’re preparing girls to become future wives, future brides for worthy men.’

He has fathered six children of his own and, to boost the community’s birth rate still further, insisted women should share their husbands in polygamous so-called ‘Triangles’.

The former Red Army conscript stands accused of exploiting his 5,000 Russian followers

The former Red Army conscript stands accused of exploiting his 5,000 Russian followers

While men have to wait for their wife’s permission before bringing a new partner home, his own marriage did not survive the experiment — his first wife leaving him after he married a 19-year-old who had modelled for his paintings.

We might wonder how a Messiah had time for such hobbies. But the Church of the Last Testament appears to have been shaped very much around Torop and what suited him. Indeed, it set its calendar by the years since his birth in 1961, putting us in the year 59.

The son of a construction worker from Krasnodar, southern Russia, he was conscripted into the Red Army before working in a factory then pursuing law enforcement which, he later admitted, was a strange choice for the Son of God.

‘My behaviour was very different to other officers,’ he said. ‘I wanted to forgive people and free them too easily.’ This may explain why he lost his job in 1989, the year before his ‘awakening’. 

His arrest prompted comparisons with the other notorious Russian mystic, Grigori Rasputin (pictured)

His arrest prompted comparisons with the other notorious Russian mystic, Grigori Rasputin (pictured)

This initially involved believing Jesus was watching over us from close to Earth, and that the Virgin Mary was ‘running Russia’.

Later, he decided he was reborn the Son of God. With the fall of the Soviet Empire bringing an abrupt end to 70 years of official atheism in 1991, he journeyed to Moscow and told passers-by: ‘Our heavenly Father sent me here today’.

People were hungry for something to believe in, and Torop attracted an eager crowd, including such notable figures as his future chief priest Sergei Chevalkov who, in the Red Army, had been one of the men in charge of the Soviet Union’s nuclear missiles.

He sold his home, left his job and followed ‘Vissarion’ to the wilds of Siberia, along with hundreds of others, among them many doctors and lawyers.

Proclaiming the end of the world was nigh, Vissarion promised disciples salvation as long as they surrendered to him their money and possessions and followed the strict rules in The Last Testament, his nine-volume ‘sequel’ to the Bible.

Along with such laudable aims as kindness to all, there were some surprisingly specific diktats — including which brand of washing powder they should use.

Although assimilating many Orthodox rituals, Vissarion also prohibited alcohol and tobacco, enforced veganism, and banned money. Dissent was not tolerated.

Not that he seemed to abide by many of his rules himself. While his followers endured freezing winters in the thin-walled huts they built, he rarely appeared among them.

Torop (being escorted away by law enforcement officers in Russia) has fathered six children of his own

 Torop (being escorted away by law enforcement officers in Russia) has fathered six children of his own

Instead, he luxuriated in the three-storey chalet they had constructed for him on a mountain peak, reportedly equipped with wooden verandas and warm towels along with the latest hi-fi equipment and a flat-screen TV.

While he disappeared on lavish visits to spiritual friends in India — including late sitar guru Ravi Shankar — they contented themselves with portraits of him that adorned their walls and could not even look forward to Christmas.

Along with New Year, that was abolished in favour of a feast day on his birthday — January 14.

On such occasions he would roar down the mountain on his snow-mobile, accompanied by Vadim Redkin, a former drummer in a Soviet boy-band who, as his John the Baptist, was one of two aides arrested with him this week.

A witness recalled his followers being ‘enthralled’ as they lit candles, sang songs and watched Vissarion blessing loaves of bread.

But, as the temperature dropped to minus 50c, one woman collapsed and slumped unconscious into the snow before being carried away. Other disturbing accounts suggest that, in the Nineties, some devotees died either of suicide — a practice said to have been endorsed by Vissarion — or a lack of conventional medical care.

The authorities have released photographs of a suicide note and a noose as evidence against Vissarion. It’s thought they relate to complaints of ‘psychological abuse’ made by former followers.

He has countered that his accusers have ‘mental disorders’ and some Russian sources have suggested other reasons for the authorities acting now.

One suggests it was a reprisal for having become involved in a dispute with local business interests.

If convicted, he will face up to 12 years in jail, which begs the question of what will happen to his followers?

He is said to hold sway with up to 50,000 around the world — attributable in no small part to his habit of preaching over Skype.

But, if Rasputin’s resilience is anything to go by we should be wary of writing off Torop too soon.

The mad monk was famously difficult to kill.

Accounts of his winter’s night murder in 1916 suggest he defied death, even ingesting cyanide and being shot at point-blank range.

It was only when they drowned him that he succumbed. It remains to be seen whether Vissarion proves to be as durable.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Main News

ANDREW PIERCE: Patrick Vallance made £5m from company racing to find vaccine

Published

on

By

andrew pierce patrick vallance made 5m from company racing to find vaccine
For it has emerged that Vallance (above) holds shares worth £600,000 in GlaxoSmith-Kline, the drugs giant racing to develop a Covid vaccine. Not so long ago, he sold other shares worth £5million

For it has emerged that Vallance (above) holds shares worth £600,000 in GlaxoSmith-Kline, the drugs giant racing to develop a Covid vaccine. Not so long ago, he sold other shares worth £5million

During a rare interview, Sir Patrick Vallance, the Government’s chief scientific adviser, was asked to describe himself in three words. He replied: ‘Introverted, curious… and geeky.’

Yesterday, jaws across Britain dropped when they learned quite how accurately he might have added a fourth adjective: rich.

For it has emerged that Vallance holds shares worth £600,000 in GlaxoSmith-Kline, the drugs giant racing to develop a Covid vaccine. Not so long ago, he sold other shares worth £5million.

A senior Tory MP was not alone in arguing that his current shareholding represents a ‘potential conflict of interest’ with Vallance being at the heart of the Downing Street race to find a vaccine against coronavirus.

The MP added: ‘If he is making decisions on vaccines and advising the Government on them then he either needs to divest himself of the shares or make a declaration… Every time he is talking about vaccines or on TV, he should put it on the table.’

Even more surprisingly, it appears that Vallance, chairman of the Government’s expert advisory panel on vaccines, did not think it necessary to inform Boris Johnson or Health Secretary Matt Hancock about his shares. 

Mr Hancock admitted yesterday: ‘The first I knew about it was when I read it in the newspapers.’

If GSK produces a successful vaccine against the coronavirus, it stands to make billions from the discovery – and Vallance’s shares could be expected to rocket, potentially making him yet more millions.

Already, the US government has provided £1.65billion to GSK and its partner Sanofi for vaccine development.

Vallance was president of research and development at GSK, Britain’s biggest drug company, between 2012 and 2018, when he left to become a top mandarin.

‘I think you will find Patrick Vallance is the wealthiest civil servant in the history of Whitehall,’ said one senior source last night.

If GSK produces a successful vaccine against the coronavirus, it stands to make billions from the discovery ¿ and Vallance¿s shares could be expected to rocket, potentially making him yet more millions. A researcher is pictured above in a GlaxoSmithKline lab in 2009.

If GSK produces a successful vaccine against the coronavirus, it stands to make billions from the discovery – and Vallance’s shares could be expected to rocket, potentially making him yet more millions. A researcher is pictured above in a GlaxoSmithKline lab in 2009.

Not surprisingly, given his wealth, Vallance has a gourmet palate, favouring langoustine, pigeon with figs and rare cheeses, though he admits he rarely drinks his expensive wine collection. 

If he had his time all over again, he once said he would have liked to train as a chef.

The image of fine dining could not be further from the Vallance who appeared on TV next to the similarly gloomy chief medical officer Chris Whitty in a dispiriting press conference – leading to the duo being dubbed ‘Glum and Glummer’.

In previous appearances flanking the Prime Minister with Whitty, Vallance often seemed dour and defensive. He was regularly asked about the prospects of Britain developing the first viable Covid vaccine.

Joining the Government, he took a huge pay cut. He was on £780,000 at GSK but is now paid around £180,000, although it is clear he could afford the reduced salary.

With his wife Sophia Ann, whom he married in 1988, he bought a large, fire-damaged house in south London two years ago for £1.85million, paying cash.

The new house requires extensive renovation – though happily the couple sold another house in south London last year for £2.95million, which may help to fund the works.

Vallance was born in Essex in 1960 and educated at Truro school in Cornwall, where boarding fees today are almost £30,000 a year. 

He studied medicine at St George’s at the University of London, becoming a senior lecturer in medicines policy and for a while was a doctor seeing patients – but it did not suit him.

‘Every time I didn’t give a patient enough time,’ he said.

‘Every mistake I made resulted from not giving 100 per cent to the patient I was with – and it is dreadful to short-change people when they are at their most vulnerable.’ 

Vallance was president of research and development at GSK, Britain¿s biggest drug company, between 2012 and 2018, when he left to become a top mandarin

Vallance was president of research and development at GSK, Britain’s biggest drug company, between 2012 and 2018, when he left to become a top mandarin

In 2006 he joined GSK as head of drug discovery and four years later became head of medicines, then president of research and development.

He may be ‘geeky’, but he is also passionate about certain causes, including assisted suicide which, interestingly, is not Government policy.

‘Having had both of my parents ask me to help them die, I support doctor-assisted suicide for terminally ill people under certain conditions,’ he has said.

Knighted in the New Year honours list in 2019, Vallance eschews party politics but is a huge admirer of Aneurin Bevan, the Welsh Labour MP who was one of the founders of the NHS. ‘I understand the true and lasting importance of Bevan’s remarkable vision.’

Despite the growing brouhaha about his vast shareholding and potential conflict of interest, Boris is keeping this adviser close.

The Government insists he has done nothing wrong.

A spokesman for the Cabinet Office said that ‘appropriate steps were taken to manage [Vallance’s] interests in line with advice provided at the time… The chief scientific adviser has no input into contractual and commercial decisions on vaccine procurement which are taken by ministers following a robust cross-Government approvals regime’.

Vallance himself has remained tight-lipped about the matter. His self-professed ‘introversion’ may continue to serve him well.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.