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Seven out of ten heart disease deaths are caused by poor diet

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seven out of ten heart disease deaths are caused by poor diet

Poor diet is the number one lifestyle reason for deaths from heart disease, a study has found.

It comes in ahead of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking and drinking as the number one avoidable killer.

An international study looking at almost nine million deaths from heart attacks and angina in 2017 estimates that more than two-thirds could have been avoided if the victims ate better.

An international study looking at almost nine million deaths from heart attacks and angina in 2017 estimates that more than two-thirds could have been avoided if the victims ate better

An international study looking at almost nine million deaths from heart attacks and angina in 2017 estimates that more than two-thirds could have been avoided if the victims ate better

For the UK, where around 87,000 people died from these forms of heart disease, a healthier diet could potentially have saved more than 60,000 lives

For the UK, where around 87,000 people died from these forms of heart disease, a healthier diet could potentially have saved more than 60,000 lives

For the UK, where around 87,000 people died from these forms of heart disease, a healthier diet could potentially have saved more than 60,000 lives.

‘This was consistent in both developed and developing countries’, said Dr Xinyao Liu, senior author of the study. ‘More than six million deaths could be avoided by reducing intake of processed foods, sugary beverages, trans and saturated fats, and added salt and sugar, while increasing intake of fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts and whole grains.’

Researchers from Central South University in China, looked at 11 factors which could increase the risk of dying from a heart attack or angina, including drinking, smoking, poor diet and lack of exercise.

The other lifestyle factors included high blood sugar, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, weight, air pollution, lead exposure and impaired kidney function.

Deaths were analysed from the Global Burden of Disease Study, which was conducted in 195 countries between 1990 and 2017 and is regarded as the most comprehensive worldwide study of disease patterns to date.

It was possible to see how individuals lived based on their health records, and work out how much risky behaviours were likely to have contributed towards their deaths using statistical modelling based on the medical evidence. The results suggest the top three heart disease killers are poor diet, causing 69.2 per cent of deaths, high systolic blood pressure which was linked to 54.4 per cent of deaths, and high levels of ‘bad’ cholesterol, which was estimated to cause more than 40 per cent of deaths.

It means more than 47,000 UK deaths from heart attacks and angina could potentially be prevented by people lowering their blood pressure, assuming all other risk factors remained unchanged, and almost 36,500 lives could be saved by people trying to lower their cholesterol. Perhaps surprisingly, alcohol use was the least important factor linked to deaths, while low levels of physical activity came in behind air pollution.

Inhaled pollution particles are believed to get into the bloodstream, where they may damage blood vessels, making blood clots which can cause heart attacks more likely.

The study, published in the European Heart Journal – Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, found tobacco use was the fourth biggest heart disease killer for men but only the seventh for women. A high body mass index was the fifth highest contributor to deaths in women and sixth in men.

Heart attacks and angina, collectively called ‘ischaemic’ heart disease by doctors, cause around one in six deaths per year.

Dr Liu said: ‘While progress has been made in preventing heart disease and improving survival, particularly in developed countries, the numbers of people affected continues to rise because of population growth and ageing.’

Putting 15p on the price of a pint could save hundreds of lives a year

Raising the cost of a pint by just 15p could prevent hundreds of booze-related deaths a year, scientists said yesterday.

Their study backs up the decision to impose a minimum unit cost for alcohol in England in 2018. The findings were based on comparative data from Canada showing 15p more on a pint in the UK could have saved 327 lives in 2014.

The leading alcohol-related causes of deaths and hospital visits are unintentional injuries, psychiatric conditions, cancer, digestive conditions and communicable diseases. Adam Sherk, of the University of Victoria in British Columbia, said: ‘This report adds to the growing body of evidence that minimum unit pricing policies are an effective way for governments to reduce alcohol-related hospital visits and save lives.’

Dr Sherk said the results were especially important amid concerns that the coronavirus pandemic was putting healthcare systems under huge pressure.

The study was published in The Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

Putting 15p on the price of a pint could save hundreds of lives a year, a new study found

Putting 15p on the price of a pint could save hundreds of lives a year, a new study found

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Millionaire minister says parents don’t want the ‘label’ of free school meals in Rashford snub

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millionaire minister says parents dont want the label of free school meals in rashford snub

A millionaire minister snubbed England striker Marcus Rashfood’s plea for free school meals for the poorest pupils in the holidays by insisting struggling parents would rather pay than accept the ‘label’ attached to handouts. 

Business Minister Nadhim Zahawi also insisted ‘it isn’t as simple as writing a massive cheque’ as the Government continued to oppose the Manchester United ace’s campaign.

Pressure is mounting on ministers to perform a U-turn and back his call for free meals for children over the school holidays, after a petition attracted hundreds of thousands of signatures in a matter of days.

But Mr Zahawi, who co-founded the YouGov polling firm, said Universal Credit benefits were available to support hard-pressed families and suggested that research from holiday clubs shows that parents prefer to pay a small sum for food. 

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘The research when we did the pilot demonstrates that families didn’t just want the meals.

‘Although they valued the meals, they didn’t like the labelling of them being free. They actually prefer to pay a modest amount, £1 or £2. 

Business Minister Nadhim Zahawi also insisted 'it isn't as simple as writing a massive cheque' as the Government continued to oppose the Manchester United ace's campaign.

Business Minister Nadhim Zahawi also insisted ‘it isn’t as simple as writing a massive cheque’ as the Government continued to oppose the Manchester United ace’s campaign.

Pressure is mounting on ministers to perform a U-turn and back rashford's call for free meals for children over the school holidays, after a petition attracted hundreds of thousands of signatures in a matter of days

Pressure is mounting on ministers to perform a U-turn and back rashford’s call for free meals for children over the school holidays, after a petition attracted hundreds of thousands of signatures in a matter of days

‘But they valued the additional focus on exercise and on reading fun books and so on through the holiday.’ 

In 2018 Mr Zahawi, the Tory MP for Stratford-on-Avon, was revealed to be the highest-paid MP in the Commons via a second job.

He was chief strategy officer at Gulf Keystone Petroleum, and reported outside earnings which were the equivalent of an annual salary of £765,000, before resigning when he became minister for children and families.

Mr Rashford, who has been made an MBE for his services to vulnerable children, forced a Government U-turn on free school meal vouchers for eligible pupils over the summer holidays.

And a parliamentary petition he started, calling for food to be provided during all holidays and for free school meals to be expanded to all households on Universal Credit, has garnered around 300,000 signatures since being launched late last week.

The fact that his petition attracted more than 100,000 signatures means it must now be considered for debate by MPs, under Parliamentary petition guidelines.

Labour will force a Commons vote on the extension of free school meals to eligible children after the Government refused to prolong the scheme through the October half-term break.

It will table a motion calling on the Government to continue directly funding free school meals over the holidays until Easter 2021 to ‘prevent over a million children going hungry during the coronavirus crisis’.

Labour said more than 1.44 million children who are eligible for free school meals will benefit if the scheme is extended.

‘Over a million children are at risk of going hungry over the holidays without access to free school meals. It is essential the Government provides this support urgently,’ shadow education secretary Kate Green said.

‘We gave the Prime Minister the chance to change course, but he refused to do so. Now his MPs must decide if they want to vote for their constituents to get this vital support or if they will leave families struggling to put food on the table.’

The Welsh Labour Government has pledged to provide free school meals during the holidays until Easter next year. 

Mr Rashford stepped up the pressure on the Government by urging his 3.4 million Twitter followers to lobby their MPs ahead of Wednesday’s vote.

‘Whilst I don’t agree with another sticking plaster method, these children do need protecting during the upcoming holidays,’ the footballer said.

‘If your MP doesn’t deem providing vulnerable children with vital food resources a priority then you must ask yourself why.’

However, Downing Street has shown reluctance to extend the scheme, with a spokesman indicating last Thursday that ministers would not provide free school meals to children in England during the Christmas break.

A Number 10 spokesman said last week: ‘It’s not for schools to regularly provide food to pupils during the school holidays.’     

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Treasury hints at bailout for struggling firms in Tier Two areas

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treasury hints at bailout for struggling firms in tier two areas

Ministers today prompted speculation Rishi Sunak could soon announce a bailout for businesses which are ‘open in name only’ due to Tier Two coronavirus rules. 

The Government has pledged extra financial support for pubs, bars and restaurants which are forced to close in Tier Three areas. 

But there are growing concerns about businesses in Tier Two parts of the country which are not required to shut but have suffered a massive drop in customers due to restrictions on household mixing.  

Treasury minister Jesse Norman told the House of Commons the Government is ‘acutely aware of the financial costs on those businesses’ in Tier Two.

And in a potential hint that there may be more help to come he said the current programme of support for businesses is ‘evolving and comprehensive’. 

Chancellor Rishi Sunak is under pressure to bring forward support for businesses in Tier Two areas which are 'open in name only'

Chancellor Rishi Sunak is under pressure to bring forward support for businesses in Tier Two areas which are ‘open in name only’

The issue was raised in the Commons today by Labour shadow Treasury minister Abena Oppong-Asare.  

Ms Oppong-Asare told MPs: ‘In regions facing Tier Three restrictions many businesses have been forced to close. 

‘In Tier Two regions many businesses, especially in hospitality, are open in name only – running up all the costs without the customers.

‘What does the Government have to say to those businesses which realistically cannot operate and are not legally required to close?’

Mr Norman replied: ‘The answer to the question (Ms Oppong-Asare) raises is, of course, that we are acutely aware of the financial costs on those businesses, as we are on businesses that have been forced to close.

‘That is why we have put in place an evolving and comprehensive programme of support for business.’

Mr Sunak announced earlier this month that the Government’s Job Support Scheme, the replacement to the furlough programme, would be expanded to support businesses required to close because of local coronavirus restrictions.   

The Treasury has committee to paying two thirds of employees’ salaries in affected areas while cash grants of up to £3,000 per month are being offered to businesses told to shut.

The forced closure of pubs, bars and restaurants is reserved to Tier Three areas – the top level of restrictions. 

But many businesses in Tier Two areas feel they have been left in limbo because while they are technically allowed to remain open, other rules mean customer numbers have dropped significantly. 

Tier Two includes a total ban on households mixing indoors but they can mix outdoors, including in pub gardens, as long as they stick to the Rule of Six.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Canadian town of Asbestos changes its name to Val-des-Sources

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canadian town of asbestos changes its name to val des sources

The Canadian town of Asbestos has officially changed its name to Val-des-Sources (Valley of the Springs) after connotations with the cancer-causing mineral resulted in ‘harmed tourism.’

Approximately half of the town’s 6,800 residents (2,796) turned out for a parking lot-based car vote or directly voted at the council offices last week in the municipality, located in southeastern Quebec.

The results were announced Monday evening with the winning name – related to its proximity to the source of three lakes – garnering 51.5 percent of the votes up against five other options; L’Azur-des-Cantons, Jeffrey-sur-le-Lac, Larochelle, Phénix and Trois-Lacs.

Last November, a poll was announced for residents to participate in the rebranding of the town – home to the mineral widely used around the world to insulate buildings, before it was discovered that its fibers lead to various lung conditions and mesothelioma.

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The Canadian town of Asbestos has officially changed its name to Val-des-Sources

This photo taken on July 21 2020, shows what's left of the Jeffrey mine in Asbestos, Quebec. The open-pit mine was first opened in 1849 and was once the largest employer in the region, employing more than 2,000 people

This photo taken on July 21 2020, shows what’s left of the Jeffrey mine in Asbestos, Quebec. The open-pit mine was first opened in 1849 and was once the largest employer in the region, employing more than 2,000 people

This September the options of Apalone, Jeffrey, Phénix and Trois-Lacs were put forward.

Alapone was suggested by Greenpeace Canada but Facebook user Lyne Dion was among those unimpressed, writing: ‘I wouldn’t be proud to say that I live in a soft turtle city.’

There also concern that Jeffrey could continue the harmful reputation of the town as it’s named after W.H. Jeffrey and the world’s largest asbestos mine which was closed in 2012.

The open-pit mine was first opened in 1849 and was once the largest employer in the region, employing more than 2,000 people.

Canada officially banned asbestos in 2018.

However Mayor Hugues Grimard claimed investors refused to take his business cards during a trip to Ohio and many people were struggling in the aftermath of the closure the mine.

Visitors to Asbestos can explore the heritage on its three trails. The Townships Trail explores the traces of culture American, Loyalist, Irish and Scottish settlers left in the architecture of the homes, churches, covered bridges, round barns and village centers

Visitors to Asbestos can explore the heritage on its three trails. The Townships Trail explores the traces of culture American, Loyalist, Irish and Scottish settlers left in the architecture of the homes, churches, covered bridges, round barns and village centers

The Moulin 7 Microbrasserie brew pub that honors the town's heritage by naming drinks after the area - Mineur (miner)

The Moulin 7 Microbrasserie brew pub that honors the town’s heritage by naming drinks after the area – Mineur (miner)

Customers sit inside Moulin 7 Microbrasserie, brew pub that honors the town's heritage,  on February 9, 2018. Locals have struggled in the aftermath of the closure the mine

Customers sit inside Moulin 7 Microbrasserie, brew pub that honors the town’s heritage,  on February 9, 2018. Locals have struggled in the aftermath of the closure the mine

Visitors to Asbestos can explore the heritage on its three trails; English Tea, Fall Colours and Christmas Markets. They look at the unique American and British heritage of the Eastern Townships through its landscapes and local hospitality.

Plus the Townships Trail explores the traces of culture American, Loyalist, Irish and Scottish settlers left in the architecture of the homes, churches, covered bridges, round barns and village centers.

The area is also known for its Nordic spas, four seasons hiking, cross-country ski trails, plus gourmet food and mineral festivals. 

Outdoorsy people enjoy the 25-year-old La Route verte bike path (3,291 miles) along the coast, plus camping at l’Ouiseau Blu, which has a golf course and lake swimming. The latter area is home to Fromagerie l’Ouiseau Blu restaurant which serves Latin American cheeses.

The second main restaurant, Moulin 7 Microbrasserie, honors the town’s heritage by naming drinks after the area – eg. Mineur (miner).

There are two accommodations; the 2-star Complexe Hotelier Le Williams with 25 rooms and 4-star Centre 03 with 24 rooms.  

The area is known for its various relaxing Nordic spas which offer privacy indoors or the option of outdoor views

The area is known for its various relaxing Nordic spas which offer privacy indoors or the option of outdoor views

People enjoy the camping sites of l'Ouiseau Blu which has a golf course and lake swimming

People enjoy the camping sites of l’Ouiseau Blu which has a golf course and lake swimming

It was expected that the name changing process would cost around $100,000.

‘There is really a negative perception around asbestos,’ Mayor Hugues Grimard told CBC.

‘We have lost businesses that don’t want to establish themselves here because of the name.’

According to the town’s website, residents are known for being ‘transparent’ and this personality trait is even represented in its Azalea logo which features heart-shaped petals overlapping each other to portray this.

The various colors of the petals represent the diversity of people, services, activities offered and economic sectors.

Asbestos is said to be oriented towards sustainable development, offering services adapted to the needs of its citizens. 

Approximately half of the town's 6,800 residents (2,796) turned out for a parking lot-based car vote

Approximately half of the town’s 6,800 residents (2,796) turned out for a parking lot-based car vote

The results were announced Monday by Mayor Hugues Grimard with the winning name garnering 51.5 percent of the votes

The results were announced Monday by Mayor Hugues Grimard with the winning name garnering 51.5 percent of the votes

This October 7, 2011 image shows a piece of extracted serpentine, which contains Chrysotile Asbestos fibers. Quebec once produced half of the world's asbestos and offered the highest-paying mining jobs in Canada before concern about cancer led to the fire-resistant fiber being banned in more than 50 countries, with the mine finally shutting down in 2012

This October 7, 2011 image shows a piece of extracted serpentine, which contains Chrysotile Asbestos fibers. Quebec once produced half of the world’s asbestos and offered the highest-paying mining jobs in Canada before concern about cancer led to the fire-resistant fiber being banned in more than 50 countries, with the mine finally shutting down in 2012

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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