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Tab gets canned: Coca-Cola will cull its diet soda that became a 1970s icon

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tab gets canned coca cola will cull its diet soda that became a 1970s icon

Coca-Cola is bidding farewell to Tab, the company’s first-ever diet soda that became a cult favorite in the 1970s, after sales in the US fizzled. 

The soft drink giant on Friday announced it will phase out the soda as well as other under-performing products by the end of 2020 as it works to streamline its beverage lineup amid a challenging year.

‘We’re forever grateful to Tab for paving the way for the diets and lights category, and to the legion of Tab lovers who have embraced the brand for nearly six decades,’ Coke group director Kerri Kopp said in a statement. 

‘If not for Tab, we wouldn’t have Diet Coke or Coke Zero Sugar. TaB did its job.’

Coca-cola is discontinuing Tab, its diet soda pioneer that was first introduced in 1963. Pictured: An ad for Tab and sugar-free Tab from 1979

Coca-cola is discontinuing Tab, its diet soda pioneer that was first introduced in 1963. Pictured: An ad for Tab and sugar-free Tab from 1979 

Tab became a cultural icon in the 1970s and 80s before fizzling out after the company released Diet Coke in 1982

Tab became a cultural icon in the 1970s and 80s before fizzling out after the company released Diet Coke in 1982

Fergie at the Tab energy drink launch party in 2006

Kristin Chenoweth drinking Tab energy in 2006

It made a brief comeback in 2006 when Coca-Cola released a Tab energy drink. Pictured above are Fergie and Kristin Chenoweth posing with the soft drink 

Coca-Cola said the move is part of a wider initiative to transform into a ‘total beverage company’ which involves identifying and scrapping products that have lost relevance. 

Among the soft drink products that have also gone flat are ZICO Coconut Water, Coca-Cola Life and Diet Coke Feisty Cherry, as well as certain international brands, which will also disappear by the end of the year. 

Tab developed a fan following after it was introduced to the market in 1963 as the company’s first-ever diet drink.  

The saccharine-sweetened, zero-calorie soda paved the way for other artificially-sweetened soft drinks that remain popular today. 

It was initially marketed to women and as a drink for people who wanted to ‘keep tabs’ on their weight. 

Tab reached cultural icon status in the 1980s before slowly losing steam after the release of Diet Coke in 1982. 

Coca-Cola produced several Tab variations over the years including root beer and ginger-ale flavors, and the drink briefly made a comeback in 2006 with the release of Tab energy drink.

Coca-cola produced several Tab variations over the years including root beer and ginger-ale flavors

Coca-cola produced several Tab variations over the years including root beer and ginger-ale flavors 

Gone flat: Coca-cola will also phase out its ZICO coconut water and Diet Coke Feisty Cherry (right) as well as certain international brands

Diet Coke feisty cherry will no longer be available after this year

Gone flat: Coca-cola will also phase out its ZICO coconut water and Diet Coke Feisty Cherry (right) as well as certain international brands

Over the last few decades, the soda had maintained a small but loyal following primarily among fans dubbed ‘Tabaholics’ who grew up with the beloved brand but became harder to find in stores in recent years. 

The company said plans to streamline its beverage lineup had been in the works before the coronavirus outbreak, however supply chain challenges brought by the pandemic have accelerated those moves. 

Chairman and CEO James Quincey called it a ‘golden opportunity’ to act on an ‘ongoing need’ and meet the company’s goal in a shorter timeframe. 

‘We believe it will set us up with more momentum behind stronger brands as we come out of this crisis’, Quincey said.  

Tab became more difficult to find in stores in recent years, but maintained a small but loyal following over the last few decades, primarily among fans who grew up with the beloved brand

Tab became more difficult to find in stores in recent years, but maintained a small but loyal following over the last few decades, primarily among fans who grew up with the beloved brand

Earlier this year, chairman and CEO James Quincey said the pandemic has accelerated Coke’s plans to cut slow-selling ‘zombie brands’ like Odwalla juice, which it stopped producing in July.

An ad for Tab 'clear'

An ad for Tab ‘clear’ 

Coke has 400 brands, more than half of which are single-country brands that make up less than 2 per cent of revenue, Quincey said. 

Going forward, he said, Coke will prune some of those brands and invest in bigger or more promising brands like Aha sparking water.

Coke said sales of water and sports drinks dropped 24 per cent in the second quarter, while coffee and tea sales plunged 31 per cent as the company temporarily closed its Costa coffee stores in Europe. 

Soft drink sales fared better, falling 12 per cent globally. Coca-Cola Zero Sugar sales fell just four per cent. 

The sales volume of Coke based on the number of unit cases declined 25 per cent in April compared to the previous year. 

By June, that decline stood at 10 per cent. In China, case volumes actually rose for the quarter.

Closures of movie theaters and other entertainment venues have also affected Coca-Cola’s sales – half of which come from stadiums and other places where people gather in large numbers. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Mother slashed weekly food bill from £60 to £10 by only purchasing discounted products

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mother slashed weekly food bill from 60 to 10 by only purchasing discounted products

A savvy shopper has revealed how she cut her weekly shop from £60 down to as little as £10 by purchasing yellow-sticker items.

Kelly Costa, 40, from Essex, was used to buying whatever grabbed her fancy in the supermarket, but after having to leave her job, she started taking greater care about the things she was putting in her trolley. 

Having successfully cut down her food spending, the mother has now shared her top shopping tactics on Instagram.  

‘Before becoming a mum to Isabella, now eight, I shopped haphazardly with no regard for what I chucked in my supermarket basket,’ said Kelly, speaking to LatestDeals.co.uk. ‘If I fancied wine, it went in.’

Kelly Costa, 40, from Essex, has saved money after she started buying yellow-ticketed items from supermarkets. Pictured, some of the bargain treats she bought

Kelly Costa, 40, from Essex, has saved money after she started buying yellow-ticketed items from supermarkets. Pictured, some of the bargain treats she bought

By knowing the time that supermarkets update their yellow-ticketed items, Kelly is able to swoop in and bag herself some bargains. Pictured, a selection of Kelly's shopping

By knowing the time that supermarkets update their yellow-ticketed items, Kelly is able to swoop in and bag herself some bargains. Pictured, a selection of Kelly’s shopping

Kelly (left) cares for her daughter Isabella, eight, (pictured right) and had to leave her job to look after her properly

Kelly (left) cares for her daughter Isabella, eight, (pictured right) and had to leave her job to look after her properly

‘I was a successful contract manager on a salary of £32,000 which was plenty for me and my boy Raphael, now 18 and a college student.

‘But then Isabella arrived and at two months doctors realised there was something wrong with her.

‘It emerged she had fluid on the brain and was subsequently diagnosed with macrocephaly, and developmental delays.

‘I continued working for two years but it was too much. The childminder couldn’t deal with Isabella’s extensive needs so I had to leave my job. 

By purchasing only discounted products, Kelly was able to cut her weekly food bill down from £60 to £10 (pictured)

By purchasing only discounted products, Kelly was able to cut her weekly food bill down from £60 to £10 (pictured)

Kelly didn't want her restricted finances to prevent her providing healthy meals for her children. Pictured, some of the bargain items Kelly has bagged

Kelly didn’t want her restricted finances to prevent her providing healthy meals for her children. Pictured, some of the bargain items Kelly has bagged

Having grown up near Lisbon in Portugal, Kelly wanted her children to eat dishes traditional to the area she grew up in. Pictured, some of the yellow-sticker items

Having grown up near Lisbon in Portugal, Kelly wanted her children to eat dishes traditional to the area she grew up in. Pictured, some of the yellow-sticker items

‘Overnight I went from having plenty of cash to virtually none, surviving on her disability benefit, carer’s allowance and universal credit. Her dad isn’t in the picture and money was really tight.’

However, having grown up near Lisbon, Portugal, Kelly was determined to continue providing healthy traditional meals for her children.  

She told a friend that she wasn’t prepared to let her children suffer because times were tough for her. 

‘So I looked into how I could buy good food cheaply – and became a yellow sticker shopper,’ explained Kelly. ‘That’s when supermarkets stick yellow stickers on goods as they approach the end of their best before dates.

‘You can knock 75 per cent off – there are amazing discounts. The best I’ve got off is £52.61.

‘I know what time the supermarkets knock down the prices and head there then, going straight to the reduced aisle. In the past, I’ve got chicken for £1, lamb steaks for 60p, chicken chipolatas for 60p and a smoked steak salmon for £1.

One of Kelly's bargains was a two-for-one Indian takeaway deal (pictured) which was originally £8 but she managed to grab for just £2

One of Kelly’s bargains was a two-for-one Indian takeaway deal (pictured) which was originally £8 but she managed to grab for just £2

She didn't want her children to have to suffer just because her income had become more restricted. Pictured, curry

She didn’t want her children to have to suffer just because her income had become more restricted. Pictured, curry

‘I’ve got a two for one Indian takeaway down from £8 to £2 too. Raphael and I enjoyed that.

‘I’ll look for fruit and veg too and have picked up raspberries for 33p, down from around £2, choccie puddings for 13p down from £2.50 and slaw 5p down from £1.’

Kelly doesn’t just stick to one supermarket though and will often travel to the various shops in her area to bag the bargains.  

She also isn’t afraid to take any and all yellow-ticket items because she eats everything she picks up, either on the day or over the following couple of days. 

‘Some of it I freeze, but most I eat the same day or over the next few days,’ she said. ‘In total, I spend about £10 a week on food, whereas before I spent about £60.  

Yellow-sticker items (pictured) are products that supermarkets have marked down at a discount, often knocking up to 75 per cent off the original price

Yellow-sticker items (pictured) are products that supermarkets have marked down at a discount, often knocking up to 75 per cent off the original price

In the past, Kelly has managed to pick up chicken for £1, lamb steaks for 60p and smoked salmon steaks for £1 (pictured)

In the past, Kelly has managed to pick up chicken for £1, lamb steaks for 60p and smoked salmon steaks for £1 (pictured)

‘I always advise to shop around, speak to supermarket workers to find out best times, always go to the last reduced section as it’s the biggest and arrive early so you can have a look around before they are repriced down.

‘I’d also advise people to cook from scratch. Instead of takeaways make your own fakeaways and get kids involved so they learn from an early age to be sensible.’

Kelly’s bargain hunting stretches beyond supermarkets though, as she now scours for freebies on apps such as Facebook and Olio – having bagged her two sofas for free.

Tom Church, co-founder of LatestDeals, commented: ‘Kelly’s amazing savings speak for themselves – getting her weekly shop down from £60 to £10 is seriously impressive.

‘I’d echo all her tips: chat to supermarket workers to find out what time your local stores reduce their prices and freeze anything you don’t immediately eat so nothing goes to waste. It’s good for your bank balance – and for the environment too!’

Kelly's watchful eye scours every type of product in the supermarket, often picking up fruit whenever she can find it on offer

Kelly’s watchful eye scours every type of product in the supermarket, often picking up fruit whenever she can find it on offer

She isn't ashamed about taking all the yellow-ticket items in a supermarket because she says she always eats everything, either on the day or over the course of the next couple

She isn’t ashamed about taking all the yellow-ticket items in a supermarket because she says she always eats everything, either on the day or over the course of the next couple

Kelly has also taken to freezing some of her bargains so that she can defrost and enjoy them at a later date

Kelly has also taken to freezing some of her bargains so that she can defrost and enjoy them at a later date

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Stamp duty cut should be extended warns housing industry

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stamp duty cut should be extended warns housing industry

Thousands of house sales could fall off a cliff as the stamp duty holiday comes to an end, experts have warned.

A rush of buyers created by the stamp duty cut is clogging the purchases pipeline and causing delays.

It means some buyers may miss the stamp duty holiday deadline of 31 March next year if they don’t press ahead with their deals, especially given the festive period in between. 

This three-bed terrace house in London's Abbey Wood had a guide price of £175,000 and is sold subject to contract

This three-bed terrace house in London’s Abbey Wood had a guide price of £175,000 and is sold subject to contract

The stamp duty holiday was brought in for six months to stimulate the housing market following lockdown, with the removal of the standard rate of tax up to £500,000.  

The measure has been successful in boosting the market amid the pandemic, creating a surge in demand.

But a backlog of purchases has built up due to pent-up demand from lockdown being unleashed. 

In a letter to the Chancellor Rishi Sunak, industry bodies have called for the stamp duty to be extended to allow them time to deal with the pent-up demand.

In the letter, they explained: ‘Failure to complete those transactions could see the breakdown of chains with consumers potentially financially unable to continue with the purchase, as they would have to find funds to pay stamp duty.’

It is calling on the Government to announce before Christmas an extension to the stamp duty holiday.

It also wants the Government to introduce a way of smoothing the end of an extended stamp duty holiday to prevent another cliff edge further down the line.

This four-bed detached house in Erdington, Birmingham, had a guide price of £195,000 and is now sold subject to contract

This four-bed detached house in Erdington, Birmingham, had a guide price of £195,000 and is now sold subject to contract

It said: ‘By acting now, the Government can release the pressure in the system to allow transactions to complete and avoid a disorderly and distressing period for movers and businesses throughout the market.

‘Any extension or gradual phasing of stamp duty would also help mitigate sharp reductions in consumer demand.

‘More widely, a buoyant housing market drives consumer confidence in the wider economy whereas constrictions on lending and falling house prices lead to reduced consumer confidence and a material reduction in economic activity.’

The industry bodies that came together to endorse the letter included estate agents, mortgage brokers, solicitors and removal firms.

This four-bed detached house in Kirkcaldy, Fife, was on the market for offers over £309,995 and is now sold subject to contract

This four-bed detached house in Kirkcaldy, Fife, was on the market for offers over £309,995 and is now sold subject to contract

Mark Hayward, chief executive of NAEA Propertymark, said: ‘The joint letter sent to the chancellor is an important step in protecting those in the process of buying or selling a house that might miss out on the March 31 stamp duty deadline.

‘They miss out because of increased pressure on service providers within the industry which is causing delays for buyers and sellers in the sector.

‘The boom, caused by the stamp duty holiday, has been hugely beneficial for the housing market.

But he went on to warn: ‘The stamp duty cliff edge on March 31 could cause thousands of sales to fall at the final hurdle and have a knock on and drastic effect on the housing market which has recovered well from the Covid slump.

‘We are calling on Government to rethink these timings, so pressure on the system can be released to allow transactions to complete and avoid a disorderly and distressing period for movers and businesses throughout the market.’

This three-bed semi-detached house in St Albans, Hertfordshire, was on the market with a guide price of £300,000 and is now sold subject to contract

This three-bed semi-detached house in St Albans, Hertfordshire, was on the market with a guide price of £300,000 and is now sold subject to contract

It comes after property website Zoopla revealed this week that  50 per cent more home sales than usual are waiting to be completed.

Record high sales agreed post-lockdown has led to some 140,000 more homes currently progressing through the system than at this time last year, taking the total of unfinished transactions to 180,000.

Zoopla said sales agreed peaked in August, rising 62 per cent, and were up 40 to 60 per cent between July and October compared to the same period last year – but demand has now slowed back to pre-Covid levels of early March.

With an average 100 days to complete an agreed sale those looking to beat the stamp duty deadline need to agree a sale before mid-December.
Richard Donnell – Zoopla 

The high volume of business means it may take longer than the typical 100 days for transactions to complete – and prospective home buyers need to agree a sale before mid-December if they want to avoid missing out on a saving from the stamp duty holiday, Zoopla said.

Richard Donnell, research and insight director at Zoopla, said: ‘There is a large pipeline of sales to complete by Christmas and the 31 March 2020 – with an average 100 days to complete an agreed sale those looking to beat the stamp duty deadline need to agree a sale before mid-December.’

Paresh Raja, of bridging finance provider Market Financial Solutions, said: ‘There could be a backlog of sales that could result in many buyers missing out on the holiday due to the fact that lenders are simply not able to release the volume of loans needed.

‘The Government has two choices. The first is to extend the SDLT holiday beyond the current deadline. 

‘The second is to put into place arrangements to ensure that buyers who have agreed to a sale prior to the deadline still qualify for the tax relief should the sale occur after 31st March 2021.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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How POSH is your nosh? From your marmalade brand to your loaf, what you eat still defines your class

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how posh is your nosh from your marmalade brand to your loaf what you eat still defines your class

SOCIAL HISTORY

SCOFF  

by Pen Vogler (Atlantic £20, 480 pp)

How do you pick up your peas from the plate? I ask because the humble little legume turns out to be the ultimate challenge when it comes to polite eating, the Mount Everest of etiquette.

Debrett’s, the bible of good manners, is firm on the matter. ‘It may be necessary to use mashed potato to make peas stick to the fork, but it is incorrect to turn the fork over and scoop.’

The notion of using a spoon — clearly the most practical tool for the job — or the underside of the fork is anathema, leaving polite folk prodding away with their forks, one pea per tine, or squashing lots of them on to the back of their fork, then seeing the whole dollop drop on to the table en route to the mouth. Ridiculous.

Pen Vogler explores the conventions surrounding food and its relationship to our social class in her new book Scoff (file image)

Pen Vogler explores the conventions surrounding food and its relationship to our social class in her new book Scoff (file image) 

But here is just one of a myriad conventions that turn eating into a minefield of social embarrassment —highlighted in a new book by food historian Pen Vogler.

What and how we eat, what we call our meals — tea, dinner, supper? — and where we take them — at a table, in front of the telly? — are indicators of where we stand (or, better still, sit) in the social order.

Food and class are inextricably mixed as much today in the supposedly democratic 21st century as they were when medieval barons dined ‘above the salt’, putting the lower orders in their place.

Vogler calls her book Scoff, which sums up her thesis because the word has two dictionary meanings. One is to eat food, the other ‘to speak to someone in a scornfully derisive or mocking way’ (OED). With every mouthful, we are identifying our own aloof position on the social ladder while looking down on others.

Food, then, is much more than mere sustenance. It’s a marker and a weapon. As the 19th-century French gastronome Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin pithily put it, you are what you eat.

In the ever-flourishing British class system, shopping baskets are an open recipe book, revealing who we are. Typhoo or Earl Grey, Kingsmill or sourdough, stir-fry or Pot Noodle, battery or free-range, Golden Shred or Oxford Marmalade, salad cream or mayonnaise? Your preference points to where you come from and where you’re going (or think you’re going).

And what is U and non-U, to use Nancy Mitford’s damning definition, changes with such speed and irrationality that it is all too easy to be caught out, left behind, ridiculed.

Today’s crushed avocado cult may yet backfire — excised from the must-have shopping list because of its impact on the environment — and you don’t want to be caught with guacamole on your face.

Victorian invention the fish knife, has been branded unacceptable by etiquette experts despite being elegant (file image)

Victorian invention the fish knife, has been branded unacceptable by etiquette experts despite being elegant (file image)

Take the fish knife, a Victorian invention, with its unique curvature and elaborate decoration.

Now, it is to be found in unsold bundles in antique shops or tucked away at the back of cutlery drawers, but never, darling, never, to be seen on a dining room table. Perish the thought.

It’s decades since John Betjeman cast them into the outer darkness with his sneering ‘Phone for the fish knives, Norman’ in How To Get On In Society, a poem about social climbing in which he also ridiculed the dear old doily and the serviette.

A few years ago, Tatler magazine decreed that the once-shunned ‘pardon’ was now socially acceptable again, but there was no such reprieve for the fish knife. ‘Fish knives,’ it ordained, ‘will never be fine.’

Though why remains a mystery. As Vogler points out, they are not only elegant and pretty but perfectly shaped for the job of pulling the delicate flesh of fish away from the bones.

Once upon a time it was de rigueur to have different cutlery for different purposes. Posh Victorians had forks for everything — terrapin, lobster, snail, sardines, pastry, dessert, even bread — with dinner guests faced by an armoury of weapons when they sat down.

Pen claims we put more time and energy into judging people on what we eat and the way we eat it, than the quality of the food itself (file image)

Pen claims we put more time and energy into judging people on what we eat and the way we eat it, than the quality of the food itself (file image)

Each was supposedly identified by the size, the number of tines (three to five), the length of the tine, the curve and whether there was a wide and sharpened edge for cutting pastry.

Knowing which to pick up for which dish was the trick, and a way for the upper-class host to ward off (and, better still, confuse and humiliate) the ungenteel.

Such pretension has now gone. One-size fork fits all, and we’re probably the better for it. But possibly not for long, as we head towards a forkless society with fast food of fried chicken, burgers, pizza and sandwiches taking over.

Fingers are now perfectly acceptable for much of our eating, as they were centuries ago, before etiquette (and cutlery) intervened.

Napkins, and how you wield them, are another key social indicator, though utterly illogical.

The best way to ensure a napkin does its job of protecting the eater’s clothes is obviously to tuck it under the collar and let it drop down in front of you. Except that is so working class! So polite people hide them on their laps, and dribble gravy and red wine down their shirt fronts, putting class before common sense.

But that’s the British way. According to Vogler, we traditionally put more time and energy into judging people on what we eat and the way we eat it, or worrying about what people think of us, than the quality of the food itself.

Pen said the words we use to describe various meals throughout the day tell us about the class divide (file image)

Pen said the words we use to describe various meals throughout the day tell us about the class divide (file image)

She writes: ‘In a country where even letters are first or second class, eating, with its innate social function and attendant rituals, is a way of firing up rivalry, envy and social unease.’

Or as the Hungarian-born humorist George Mikes put it: ‘On the Continent people have good food; in England they have good table manners.’

Nothing tells us more about the class divide over food than the words we use for the various meals throughout the day. Any British antennae will pick up something about your background if you have ‘dinner’ at midday and ‘tea’ in the early evening.

From the age of the diarist Samuel Pepys, ‘dinner’ has been pushed back by about eight hours, as the toffs chose to eat later and later to distance themselves from the annoying, encroaching middles — and the middles moved later and later to emulate them.

During the 17th century, ‘dinner’ was around midday; it was mid-afternoon in the 18th century. Most working people had a communal main meal — dinner — in the middle of the day.

SCOFF by Pen Vogler (Atlantic £20, 480 pp)

SCOFF by Pen Vogler (Atlantic £20, 480 pp)

For farm workers this was usually made by the women of the farmer’s household and eaten together around the kitchen table, or in the fields.

Those working in mills in Manchester and Leeds, in the factories of the Midlands and the mines of Wales, Newcastle and the Midlands worked from 6am to 7.30pm, with 40 minutes to eat their dinner in the middle. It’s a distinction that survives to this day. Northerners, particularly the working classes, still have ‘dinner’ between noon and 2pm and ‘tea’ in the early evening. Southerners (and swanky Northerners) just have ‘lunch’ and ‘dinner’.

Lunch — or ‘noonshine’, as Jane Austen called it — was born because fashionable society kept on dining later and later to put some clear blue hours between them and the mercantile and professional classes.

This can cause confusion even today. Vogler cites writer Helen Fielding, who grew up in Yorkshire and was invited to her tutor’s house for dinner in her first week at Oxford.

‘We duly turned up in the middle of the day to be greeted by kindly astonishment and a gracious attempt to explain how things worked in the sophisticated world we were about to enter.’

This excellent history is full of fascinating facts about the food we eat. I never realised that sandwiches and desks were invented at the same point in history. Nor that the English were cooking and eating macaroni pasta way back in 1390.

More tellingly, it pricks the pomposity of many of our social conventions surrounding eating. So I say feel free to gobble down your peas in any way you like — ideally on a fish knife, of course!

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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