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Teen, 19, reveals he’s spent £10,000 trying to live like it’s the 1940s

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teen 19 reveals hes spent 10000 trying to live like its the 1940s

A teenager who’s fascinated with the 1940s has spent around £10,000 snapping up memorabilia from the war-time era – and spends his time dressing like a middle class man from the period. 

Charlie Roy, 19, from Milton Keynes, believes his love of all things vintage was sparked at the age of six, after listening to stories his nan told him from her time working in a powdered egg factory during the Second World War.  

Growing up, his obsession has continued and he’s now amassed over £6,500 worth of memorabilia from the 30s, 40s and 50s – and spent a further £3,500 on tweed jackets, Oxford ‘bag’ trousers and RAF military uniform.   

The time-warp teen says he was bullied as a youngster for being ‘different’ but that now his friends affectionately dub him a ‘vintage fruitcake.’  

Step back in time: Charlie Roy, 19, from Milton Keynes says 40s obsession began when he was six after listening to his nan's tales about working in a powdered egg factory

Step back in time: Charlie Roy, 19, from Milton Keynes says 40s obsession began when he was six after listening to his nan's tales about working in a powdered egg factory

Step back in time: Charlie Roy, 19, from Milton Keynes says 40s obsession began when he was six after listening to his nan’s tales about working in a powdered egg factory

Now 19, he's amassed a huge collection of memorabilia from the wartime period - including a vintage bike, which he rides around his home town

Now 19, he's amassed a huge collection of memorabilia from the wartime period - including a vintage bike, which he rides around his home town

Now 19, he’s amassed a huge collection of memorabilia from the wartime period – including a vintage bike, which he rides around his home town

Elegance: Charlie says the period seems more refined than the modern day and he aspires to dress like a middle class man from the 1940s

Elegance: Charlie says the period seems more refined than the modern day and he aspires to dress like a middle class man from the 1940s

Elegance: Charlie says the period seems more refined than the modern day and he aspires to dress like a middle class man from the 1940s

His great grandfather Ron, a WWII veteran is also a big inspiration and the teenager says his dream is to learn to drive in a classic Austin 7.

Charlie said: ‘I’ve been into all things vintage since I was six years old. My great nan Peggy used to work in a powdered egg factory in the 40s and my other great grandma Helen worked at the Handley Page Factory in Cricklewood, building Halifax Bombers during the height of the war.’

He explains that their stories left him captivated by the bygone era: ‘The world they described seemed like a completely different world to the one I had been born into’

‘Style was so much better back then and everything was far more elegant.

‘I remember my mum being pulled in by a primary school teacher who said I had lived before because I had been reciting bits of history from the period in class, in a way well above a seven-year-old’s intellect.’

Enough for a small museum: the teenager has amassed a huge collection of vintage items from the 30s, 40s and 50s

Enough for a small museum: the teenager has amassed a huge collection of vintage items from the 30s, 40s and 50s

Among his treasures are military badges, recipe books and a gramophone - and even a photo of himself made to look like its from the period

Among his treasures are military badges, recipe books and a gramophone - and even a photo of himself made to look like its from the period

Enough for a small museum: the teenager has amassed a huge collection of vintage items from the 30s, 40s and 50s…including military badges, recipe books and a gramophone

‘I mainly dress like I’m from the middle classes in the 40s. You can get away with it more than having to dress in your tuxedo every time you pop out for a meal. My dream is to get a vintage Austin 7 – but I need to learn to drive first. I’d like to learn to drive in one.’

And people seem to love his passion for the wartime period. 

‘I’ve got a vintage bike which I go out on dressed-up and it’s nice seeing people’s reactions, usually people of a certain age who remember the 40s,’ he says.

‘I’ve had people tell me they remind me of their dad or their uncle when I’m in my RAF ‘blues.’

Over the years Charlie has collected hundreds of vintage items, including typewriters, gramophones, projectors and RAF memorabilia – either buying them himself or being handed down them by family and friends.

Not your average driving lesson: Charlie hopes to one day own an Austin 7 from the period

Not your average driving lesson: Charlie hopes to one day own an Austin 7 from the period

Not your average driving lesson: Charlie hopes to one day own an Austin 7 from the period

His most valuable hand-me-down is a £500 gold pocket watch which was sent back to his family from the trenches after his Great Great Grandad died in the first world war.

 I’ve started exploring making my own clothes and I made my first two-piece suit the other week to a original 40s pattern
 Charlie Roy, 1940s enthusiast

Charlie used to get his suit jackets and Oxford ‘bags’ trousers handmade by taking photos of people from the 40s into his local tailors and asking them to replicate their clothes, but has recently taken to sewing his own clothes.

He said: ‘I would go into tailors with pictures of Edward VIII and ask them to whip up his original Oxford bags for me.

‘I’ve started exploring making my own clothes and I made my first two-piece suit the other week to a original 40s pattern. When I wear uniform, I try and make it a replica of my great grandad’s RAF uniform.

‘My Great Grandma gave me his Observer wings. They are now pride of place on my uniform.

‘I never met him, but I feel a connection with him through dressing like he would have.’

He says he’s not fixated on the weaponry of the period, it’s more the social history, and how the world has changed, that grips him.  

‘It’s not so much the military aspect that interests me. I’m not bothered about how much horsepower the Spitfire has. What interests me is how social conduct has changed between then and now.’

The history fan says he was bullied as a young boy but a move to Dubai, where he spent ten years, put a stop to it, as people were more welcoming of difference in the UAE

The history fan says he was bullied as a young boy but a move to Dubai, where he spent ten years, put a stop to it, as people were more welcoming of difference in the UAE

The history fan says he was bullied as a young boy but a move to Dubai, where he spent ten years, put a stop to it, as people were more welcoming of difference in the UAE

Charlie has had a replica WWII uniform made, which even has his great grandfather Ron's Observer wings on them

Charlie has had a replica WWII uniform made, which even has his great grandfather Ron's Observer wings on them

The vintage bicycle that's among his retro purchases

The vintage bicycle that's among his retro purchases

Charlie has had a replica WWII uniform made, which even has his great grandfather Ron’s Observer wings on them. Right: the vintage bicycle that’s among his retro purchases 

Ready for work: his mini museum boasts a telephone, crockery and furniture from the period

Ready for work: his mini museum boasts a telephone, crockery and furniture from the period

Ready for work: his mini museum boasts a telephone, crockery and furniture from the period

An original bakelite phone - worth around £400 - sits on his desk, alongside a working Remington Brand typewriter

An original bakelite phone - worth around £400 - sits on his desk, alongside a working Remington Brand typewriter

An original bakelite phone – worth around £400 – sits on his desk, alongside a working Remington Brand typewriter

Who needs an Iphone: Charlie has an enviable collection of vintage records to play on his gramophone

Who needs an Iphone: Charlie has an enviable collection of vintage records to play on his gramophone

Who needs an Iphone: Charlie has an enviable collection of vintage records to play on the gramophone

Charlie, who returned from living in Dubai for ten years last June, has plunged himself into the UK’s thriving vintage scene – winning runner-up for ‘Mr Vintage UK’ at vintage festival, Twinwood, last year.

And while his mum shares his enthusiasm for all things 40s, he says his dad doesn’t share their passion for all things vintage and would prefer living in an ultramodern house with white walls.

Charlie adds: ‘I got quite heavily bullied when I was younger, but when we moved to Dubai in 2010 that changed.

‘There are so many different nationalities there and people are more accepting of people who’re a little bit different. Nowadays all my friends refer to me as the ‘vintage fruitcake.’ 

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Paris faces new coronavirus restrictions

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paris faces new coronavirus restrictions

France is set to announce tougher lockdown measures in Paris today, including a ban on gathering of ten or more people to tackle a rise in coronavirus cases. 

The sale and consumption of alcohol in public places after 8pm is also expected to be banned by city officials, who could also reduce the maximum number of people at mass gatherings from 6,000 to 1,000 people.

The new rules mark a major step backwards for the French capital, but are more relaxed than those brought in by this week by the UK – which has banned gatherings larger than six across the country, and ordered all pubs to close by 10pm.

Paris is set to be hit with new lockdown measures today that will ban gatherings of more than 10 people, along with alcohol consumption in public places after 8pm

Paris is set to be hit with new lockdown measures today that will ban gatherings of more than 10 people, along with alcohol consumption in public places after 8pm

France, Spain and the UK are all seeing spiking Covid cases - but only the UK has imposed new national measures, while France and Spain have used more-relaxed local lockdowns

France, Spain and the UK are all seeing spiking Covid cases – but only the UK has imposed new national measures, while France and Spain have used more-relaxed local lockdowns

That is despite France having more than double the UK’s daily coronavirus cases, based on a seven-day rolling average.

France, Spain and the UK are bearing the brunt of a second wave of coronavirus cases in Europe, which comes after countries across the continent eased lockdown.

Until this week, all three countries had been dealing with problem using local lockdowns, targeted at areas where cases were rising fastest.

But on Tuesday the UK suddenly broke ranks with a raft of new nationwide measures, which Prime Minister Boris Johnson said will last for the next six months.

In addition to cutting the size of gatherings and closing pubs early, he also urged workers to return to working from home – despite an earlier drive to get people back into offices – and banned indoor team sports.

He also increased fines for rule-breakers, and made the army available to help police enforce the measures.

That is not the case in Spain or France, where both countries have resisted imposing new nation-wide measures on focused on local lockdowns.

Parts of Madrid have been plunged back into full lockdown as coroanvirus cases in Spain have soared, but most of the city is still allowed to move around freely

Parts of Madrid have been plunged back into full lockdown as coroanvirus cases in Spain have soared, but most of the city is still allowed to move around freely

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson insisted the new nationwide measures will need to remain in in place for the next six months to keep infections down over winter

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson insisted the new nationwide measures will need to remain in in place for the next six months to keep infections down over winter 

In Spain, parts of Madrid with rapidly rising infections have been thrown back into full lockdown, with authorities calling on the army to help enforce the rules.

The remaining 6.6million residents have been encouraged to say indoors, though are not required to do so – yet. New measures are due to be announced next week.

Meanwhile Catalonia, where Barcelona is located, has also announced bans on gatherings larger than six people.

Spain saw 11,300 new cases of coroanvirus on Tuesday this week, based on a rolling seven-day average. 

In France, the cities of Lyon, Marseille, Bordeaux, and Nice have all already been hit with tougher new lockdown measures, though country-wide restrictions have remained the same.

Measures include no drinking in public places after 8pm, all bars to close by midnight, and the size of gatherings cut.

Masks are already compulsory across France in all indoor spaces, though many cities have made them compulsory outdoors as well.

France reported 10,155 new coronavirus cases on Tuesday, based on a seven-day rolling average. The figure for the UK was 3,928.

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Prince William and Kate Middleton appoint Zeinab Badawi as Royal Foundation director

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prince william and kate middleton appoint zeinab badawi as royal foundation director

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have appointed BBC broadcaster Zeinab Badawi as a director for their Royal Foundation.

Prince William and Kate Middleton, both 38, selected the Sudanese-British broadcaster, 61, who is an Oxford University graduate and has spent years working for the BBC, to join the team heading up their organisation. 

Projects that Zeinab will likely oversee include the couple’s Royal Foundation Covid-19 Response Fund, which was launched in July 2020 and helps a range of projects, from ensuring all emergency workers have access to individual grief trauma from Hospice UK, to helping early years charity Best Beginnings support an extra 20,000 new mothers.   

According to the Court Circular, the presenter met with the Duchess yesterday at Kensington Palace, with royal reporter Rebecca English confirming news of the appointment on Twitter this afternoon.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, both 38, have appointed BBC broadcaster Zeinab Badawi as a director of their Royal Foundation

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, both 38, have appointed BBC broadcaster Zeinab Badawi as a director of their Royal Foundation

She studied Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Oxford University and obtained a Masters Degree (with distinction) in Middle East History and Anthropology from SOAS 

She has also been named several times in Powerlist as one of Britain’s top 100 most influential members of the black community and has been named as one of the Top 50 Most Influential Members of the African Diaspora.

The broadcaster is a trustee of BBC Media Action (the charitable broadcasting company’s charity), as well as the Chair of the Royal African Society, of which the Duke of Cambridge is patron.

She was the first presenter of the ITV Morning News, and co-presented Channel 4 News with Jon Snow from 1989 to 1998, before joining BBC News. 

The Sudanese-British broadcaster, who is an Oxford University graduate and has spent years working for the BBC, has been chosen by the royals to join the team heading up their organisation

The Sudanese-British broadcaster, who is an Oxford University graduate and has spent years working for the BBC, has been chosen by the royals to join the team heading up their organisation

The news comes as it emerged Simon Case, who was Prince William’s private secretary, has resigned as a trustee of the foundation. 

Simon spent almost two years working as Prince William’s right-hand man before temporarily moving to Downing Street earlier this year to assist with the coronavirus response. 

Earlier this month he was confirmed as the youngest head of the civil service in living memory. 

It comes as news emerged that Simon Case, who was Prince William's private secretary, has resigned as a trustee of the foundation

It comes as news emerged that Simon Case, who was Prince William’s private secretary, has resigned as a trustee of the foundation

The appointment of the 41-year-old, who officially started on September 9 and said he was ‘honoured’, represented the latest stage in the Government’s dramatic shake-up of Whitehall. 

Last July the Cambridges announced their former communications secretary Jason Knauf would become the chief executive of the organisation, when Lorraine Heggessey stood down in the autumn. 

The Royal Foundation became the ‘principle charitable vehicle for The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’ from October 1, after the Duke and Duchess of Sussex broke away from the foundation last year.  

The Royal Foundation was set up by William and Harry in 2009 to run all their charitable campaigns and ventures, with Kate joining in 2011 and Meghan joining in 2018, before she and Prince Harry split last year

The Royal Foundation was set up by William and Harry in 2009 to run all their charitable campaigns and ventures, with Kate joining in 2011 and Meghan joining in 2018, before she and Prince Harry split last year 

The Foundation had an income of £7.83million in 2018, on top of £9million in 2017.

The Royal Foundation was set up by William and Harry in 2009 to run all their charitable campaigns and ventures, and joined by Kate when she became Duchess of Cambridge in 2011.

The Foundation focuses on issues such as helping young people, wildlife conservation, cyberbullying and supporting the military. 

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Footballer knocks 18-year-old off fence with accidental stray ball as she poses for photo

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footballer knocks 18 year old off fence with accidental stray ball as she poses for photo

A Northern Irish teen chose a beautiful spot to pose for a picture – but didn’t study her backdrop close enough to notice the football game going on behind her.

Aimee McFadden, 18, and her friend Mia Scullion decided to stop to for a sunset photoshoot in Lurgan, Northern Ireland one evening.

They set up their camera and balanced themselves on a fence, without considering the football pitch behind them.

The pair strike a pose, balancing precariously with one foot in the air, and smiling for the camera. 

Aimee McFadden, 18, (right) and her friend Mia balance precariously with one foot in the air during a sunset photoshoot - without considering the football pitch behind them

Aimee McFadden, 18, (right) and her friend Mia balance precariously with one foot in the air during a sunset photoshoot – without considering the football pitch behind them

Behind them, the footballers kick a ball around, until a poor kick sends an accidental stray ball flying towards Aimee. 

It hits her full force and boots her right off balance, legs flailing in the air, as she desperately tries to cling onto the fence with one arm.

She falls to the ground but seems unharmed and bursts out laughing along with her friend Mia.

The hilariously fail was caught on camera as the embarrassed footballers hung their heads in shame.

An accidental stray ball comes flying towards Aimee and hits her full force, knocking her off the fence

An accidental stray ball comes flying towards Aimee and hits her full force, knocking her off the fence

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