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Three ducks escort deadly tiger snake back to shore form a lake in Whiteman Park, WA

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three ducks escort deadly tiger snake back to shore form a lake in whiteman park wa

A photographer has snapped the incredible moment three ducks escorted a highly venomous tiger snake that had been swimming in their lake back to the shore.

Tim Kemp was in Whiteman Park north of Perth this week when he spotted the snake making its way to a patch of floating vegetation where the ducks had been sitting.

He immediately braced for the worst, expecting the ducks to become the snake’s next meal only to then see them calmly lead the reptile back onto dry land. 

Mr Kemp told Daily Mail Australia he’d never seen anything like it in all his years as a wildlife photographer.

Nature photographer Tim Kemp witnessed the remarkable moment three ducks escorted a tiger snake back to shore in Whiteman Park near Perth this week

Nature photographer Tim Kemp witnessed the remarkable moment three ducks escorted a tiger snake back to shore in Whiteman Park near Perth this week

Mr Kemp said he initially thought the ducks were about to become the snake's next meal before seeing them lead the reptile back to shore

Mr Kemp said he initially thought the ducks were about to become the snake’s next meal before seeing them lead the reptile back to shore

‘As the minutes ticked by and there weren’t any feathers flying or wings splashing, I realised if the birds knew the snake was there, they didn’t care,’ he said.

‘I think the ducks knew they weren’t in any danger. None of them had a nest on the vegetation they were relaxing on. And they’re just too big for the tiger snake to fit in its gob.

‘Smaller birds and frogs would have been on the menu, had the snake been able to find them.’

After racing to snap a few photos of the remarkable encounter Mr Kemp watched as the snake slithered onto the shore and out of sight.

He was amazed the three ducks were all from different breeds but had come together to shoo away the snake – only to return to the swamp completely unfazed.

‘The ducks weren’t any worse for wear. Several breeding pairs swam off together. I watched a male Shelduck showing off to a female. A number of swans and ibises came gliding in for a cleaning and relaxation session on the little green island,’ he said.

Tiger snakes are extremely venomous to humans and can prey on small birds and mammals

Tiger snakes are extremely venomous to humans and can prey on small birds and mammals

Mr Kemp said the birds were unfazed by the tiger snake and were far too big to be eaten

Mr Kemp said the birds were unfazed by the tiger snake and were far too big to be eaten

The snake had swam towards a patch of vegetation where the ducks had been basking in the sunshine

The snake had swam towards a patch of vegetation where the ducks had been basking in the sunshine

‘I walked back to my car, thinking about how a bunch of different species of birds worked together to guide that Tiger snake away from their hangout. 

‘Don’t see that every day.’

Mr Kemp said he’d had run ins with snakes before but had never seen one take to the water.

On one occasion he credited a red-cheeked wattlebird from ‘saving’ him from a Tiger snake after he nearly walked right on top of it.

‘As usual, I wasn’t paying attention to the ground. The wattlebird’s calls became louder as I approached,’ he said.

Mr Kemp said the ducks didn't seem to care they were swimming next to an extremely deadly snake

Mr Kemp said the ducks didn’t seem to care they were swimming next to an extremely deadly snake

Tiger snakes can swim underwater for up to nine minutes as well as climbing trees

Tiger snakes can swim underwater for up to nine minutes as well as climbing trees

‘When I was about two metres from the bird, it dropped off its perch and swooped down in front of me – claws and scimitar-shaped beak flashing at the Tiger snake I’d not seen. “Phew! Thanks bird!”.’

Tiger snakes are highly venomous to humans and are responsible for the second highest number of snake bites in Australia.

Bites can be fatal if left untreated and in January this year a 79-year-old farmer in Tasmania died after he was bitten several times on his leg and hand.

WHAT IS A TIGER SNAKE?

Tiger snakes can grow up to two metres long and are extremely venomous to humans

They are found in south-east and south-western parts of Australia

Bites can be fatal if left untreated and their venom can also lead to kidney failure

Tiger snakes are able to swim and can climb as high as ten metres 

They feed on fish, frogs and tadpoles, lizards, birds and mammals

The venomous snakes can also stay underwater for nine minutes 

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More than 10 million people have downloaded the NHS Covid-19 app since it launched last week

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more than 10 million people have downloaded the nhs covid 19 app since it launched last week

More than 10 million people have downloaded the NHS Covid-19 app since it launched last week as pubs and restaurants turn away customers who don’t have it on their phones. 

 The app has been plagued with problems since it launched with the latest fiasco seeing up to 70,000 users blocked from logging their test results. 

Despite glitches that stopped thousands from logging their test results, pubs and restaurants are starting to turn customers away unless they’ve downloaded the app, with QR codes on display for punters to use. 

Government advice tells businesses they ‘must’ display the ‘official NHS QR poster’ and apply for a code to be connected to the app.  

One punter wrote on Twitter:’I have today been refused entry into two establishments {a cafe and a pub} because I haven’t downloaded the NHS track and trace app!! Is this right?’ 

Pubs and restaurants have started turning away customers who don't have the app

Pubs and restaurants have started turning away customers who don’t have the app

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Brits have encountered problems using the tracing app, while others who refuse to install it say they have been denied entry into pubs and restaurants

Brits have encountered problems using the tracing app, while others who refuse to install it say they have been denied entry into pubs and restaurants

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 Another one said: ‘Last night I was denied a meal because I didn’t have a Gvt phone app!!!!

‘You may think I’m being over dramatic but you must now get the point. What else are we soon going to be denied access to unless we have a government phone app. Please, please, please people wake up.’

One user, Chloe James, wrote: ‘I’m in a pub and apparently they’ve been told they can’t serve anyone unless they have the track and trace app.’ 

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Despite problems more than ten million people have downloaded the app

Despite problems more than ten million people have downloaded the app

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Do you REALLY need a track and trace app to get a drink? Your rights explained

The NHS track and trace app is quick and simple but it’s not obligatory to have it  

 Venues must have a system for those without the app to provide their contact details 

 Pubs and restaurants may refuse entry to customers who do not provide their name and contact details, or who have not scanned the NHS QR code

www.gov.uk

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 Matt Hancock said on social media it was an ‘absolutely fantastic’ response so far, and urged more people to download it. 

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said that six million people had downloaded the app the first day it launched, and this had since risen to 10 million by midday on Sunday.

More than 1.5 million venue check-ins were recorded on Saturday while more than 460,000 businesses have downloaded and printed QR code posters that can be scanned by the app to check-in to premises, it added.

These QR codes allow contact tracers to reach multiple people if an outbreak is identified in a venue.

Mr Hancock said: ‘The enthusiastic response of over 10m people downloading the app in just three days has been absolutely fantastic.

‘This is a strong start but we want even more people and businesses getting behind the app because the more of us who download it the more effective it will be.

‘If you haven’t downloaded it yet I recommend you join the growing numbers who have, to protect yourself and your loved ones.’ 

 His comments come a day after an issue preventing users of the NHS Covid-19 app in England logging a positive test result was resolved, but people who book a test outside the app still cannot log negative results.  

 

Have you been refused entry to a venue because you didn’t have the track and trace app? E-mail aliki.kraterou@mailonline.co.uk 

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 However NHS hospitals warn the test and trace systems in England isn’t ready for the demands of winter. 

 NHS Providers is calling for testing capacity to be quadrupled within three months, a dramatic improvement on turnaround times and a clear plan for regular testing of health workers, according to the BBC.  

 Concerns were expressed when it emerged people tested in NHS hospitals or Public Health England (PHE) labs, or those taking part in the Office for National Statistics infection survey, could not enter their results on the newly-launched app. 

 The app has been available for download across England and Wales since Thursday, but the problem existed only in England.

A tweet from the official app account on Friday confirmed that certain test results could not be recorded, after a user tweeted to say he was being asked for a code – which he did not have – in order to enter his result.

On Saturday evening, a spokeswoman said: ‘Everyone who receives a positive test result can log their result on the app.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Boxing bout in the Bull Ring: Moment Selfridges guard and shopper trade brutal blows

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boxing bout in the bull ring moment selfridges guard and shopper trade brutal blows

This is the shocking moment a security guard and a shopper brawled outside a Selfridges following a row about entering the store with rollerblades.

Violence was sparked between the security worker and irate customer at Birmingham‘s Bull Ring shopping centre on Saturday, as the pair traded blows in front of stunned onlookers by the entrance of the upmarket department store.

In the footage, obtained by website Birmz Is Grime, one man can be heard saying ‘chill man’ during the confrontation, which sees two men continue to throw punches.

Violence was sparked between the security worker and irate customer at Birmingham's Bull Ring shopping centre on Saturday, as the pair traded blows in front of stunned onlookers by the entrance of the upmarket department store

Violence was sparked between the security worker and irate customer at Birmingham’s Bull Ring shopping centre on Saturday, as the pair traded blows in front of stunned onlookers by the entrance of the upmarket department store

**Do you know those involved in the fight?** 

Email tips@dailymail.co.uk**

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Selfridges said police were called to the scene after trouble flared when the member of the public tried to enter the shop with rollerblades.

A Selfridges spokesperson said: ‘An altercation took place on the evening of Saturday 26th September at the front of our Birmingham store, between a man carrying rollerblades attempting to enter the store and a security guard.

‘The latter half of the incident was captured on a smart phone.

‘We take the safety and security of our staff and colleagues very seriously and we are fully investigating the situation.’

The clip, which was posted with the caption ‘security guard vs shopper at Selfridges, Welcome to brum’ has since gone viral after being uploaded to social media.

The security guard throws the first punch after being shoved by the bearded customer against the glass-fronted entrance of the store.

Selfridges said police were called to the scene after trouble flared when the member of the public tried to enter the shop with rollerblades

Selfridges said police were called to the scene after trouble flared when the member of the public tried to enter the shop with rollerblades

The shopper can be seen wearing no shoes with a pair of rollerblades discarded nearby as he scraps with the bouncer.

One web user wrote ‘toughest security guard I’ve seen in decades’.

Another added: ‘I hope he doesn’t lose his job for this.’

One person put: ‘At least there’s no weapons involved like we usually see these days. Old fashioned straightener.’

A third said: ‘Worst boxing match I’ve seen in ages but the security guard takes it on points for me. Still shocking scenes to see in a public place.’

**Do you know those involved in the fight? Email tips@dailymail.co.uk** 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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A QUARTER of panic-bought food ends up in the BIN: Hoarders warned stockpiling is a ‘false economy’ 

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a quarter of panic bought food ends up in the bin hoarders warned stockpiling is a false economy

One in four items bought by hoarders goes to waste as shoppers are warned stockpiling is a ‘false economy’ a study has revealed.

The study, carried out by Topcashback, found that Britons spent nearly £10 billion a year on stockpiling items that are lost, forgotten or thrown away, causing unnecessary food waste and greenhouse gas emissions. 

With one in four bulk buys going to waste, the report reveals that shoppers are continuing to subscribe to what the cashback shopping site describes as ‘a false economy’.

The study shows that 80 per cent of shoppers identified ‘saving money’ as the number one reason to bulk buy.

Conversely, almost a quarter also said they regretted stocking up at one point or another – with nearly half citing being worse off financially as the reason. 

It comes as panic buying across the UK has resumed amid fears of a second wave of coronavirus and another lockdown with shoppers reporting queuing for 20 minutes to enter shops before similar further delays at checkouts.

And online customers found it near-impossible to get delivery slots from Asda, Morrisons, Ocado, Sainsbury’s and Tesco – some didn’t have free slots for up to two weeks.

Pictures from a Tesco in west London show shoppers have emptied shelves this weekend despite study showing one in four items bought in bulk goes to waste as warning to stockpilers

Pictures from a Tesco in west London show shoppers have emptied shelves this weekend despite study showing one in four items bought in bulk goes to waste as warning to stockpilers

However, shops have insisted that bare shelves would be quickly restocked. Pictured: A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

However, shops have insisted that bare shelves would be quickly restocked. Pictured: A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

The toilet roll running out at Tesco in Ely, Cambridgeshire, on Thursday afternoon as the store ration it to one pack per customer after customers have started panic buying items again

The toilet roll running out at Tesco in Ely, Cambridgeshire, on Thursday afternoon as the store ration it to one pack per customer after customers have started panic buying items again

Restrictions on items which vanished most quickly during the country’s first lockdown, such as flour and eggs, have been put in place.

However, shops have insisted that bare shelves once filled with toilet paper and pasta will be quickly restocked.  

The research showed that a quarter of purchases are wasted, predominantly because the product is not used before its use-by date.

The study estimates that the average shopper spends £200 a year on bulk buys that they do not use and ends up being thrown away – this works out at about £9.6 billion annually across the country.

The most popular items that were bought in bulk were tinned items, toilet roll, pasta, rice, frozen food and soap. 

Adam Bullock, from Topcashback.co.uk, said: ‘Shoppers believe they are helping the environment by bulk buying.

‘However, by continually throwing away a percentage of their purchases, they are making a negative impact, and are harming their wallet at the same time.

‘Being savvy with savings doesn’t necessarily require stocking up in bulk.’

Supermarket bosses have been forced to implement restrictions on essentials as shoppers continue to try and stockpile amid fears of a second lockdown. 

The executive director of Waitrose, James Bailey, told The Sunday Times that there was ‘enough food to go round’. 

He added: ‘But if one person fills their house will all the packs of pasta they can get their hands on, it inevitably means somebody else will go without. They could be the most vulnerable or key workers.’ 

It comes after Tesco became the latest supermarket to impose rationing on food and household goods.

In a bid to avoid the bulk buying which left shop shelves across the UK almost bare in March, the supermarket giant will limit items such as flour, dried pasta, toilet roll and anti-bacterial wipes to three per customer. 

Morrisons on Thursday announced rationing would be introduced on certain items in its stores up and down the country.

It has been reported supermarkets are boosting security and have doubled number of delivery slots amid fears Covid-19 panic buying could return. Pictured: Tesco in south east London

It has been reported supermarkets are boosting security and have doubled number of delivery slots amid fears Covid-19 panic buying could return. Pictured: Tesco in south east London

The executive director of Waitrose has slammed panic buyers saying their actions 'inevitably means someone else will go without'. Pictured: Empty shelves at a Sainsbury's in Wandsworth

The executive director of Waitrose has slammed panic buyers saying their actions ‘inevitably means someone else will go without’. Pictured: Empty shelves at a Sainsbury’s in Wandsworth

And restrictions on items which vanished most quickly during the country's first lockdown, such as flour and eggs, have been put in place. Pictured: Asda in Barnes Hill, Birmingham

And restrictions on items which vanished most quickly during the country’s first lockdown, such as flour and eggs, have been put in place. Pictured: Asda in Barnes Hill, Birmingham

The restrictions come as supermarket chiefs look to avoid a over repeat of the stockpiling panic seen in stores at the start of the pandemic in March.

Pictures from supermarkets across the UK have already shown empty or rapidly emptying toilet roll shelves, just days after the government announced tighter restrictions in a bid to stave off a second coronavirus wave.

A shopper has pleaded for people not to be ‘selfish’ by stockpiling household items after shelves in an Asda store in County Durham were left completely empty.

Keith Jackson said shelves of toilet roll in Asda in Stanley had been entirely emptied on Saturday.

When the Covid-19 lockdown was first introduced earlier this year, Britain’s shelves were stripped bare with pasta and toilet paper hard to find.

And it seems with tighter restrictions put in place in the North East, people are reporting a second wave of panic buying.

After seeing the bare shelves in his local supermarket, Keith pleaded for people not to stockpile saying it ‘deprives the vulnerable’ of everyday products adding to their stress.

Keith said: ‘It was just the toilet roll for now, although it wouldn’t surprise me if the pasta and hand wash are next to be stockpiled if we have a repeat of six months ago.

‘I can’t stand stockpiling, I think it’s selfish and unnecessary. There’s enough product in storage to go around.

‘Stockpiling just puts undue strain on supply chains and deprives the vulnerable of everyday products, adding to their stress and anxiety.

A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

‘This feels very much like it did the end of March when I had to go to petrol stations to buy toilet roll.

‘Sadly it feels some people have not learned anything in the last six months, their only concern is for themselves which is a shame.

‘It starts with a minority of people and then others start to panic and join in, for fear of not being able to get hold of the products they need.

‘Then it takes a month or two for the supermarkets to get their stock levels back to normal.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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