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TikTok video showing two adorable Labradors goes viral

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tiktok video showing two adorable labradors goes viral

A viral TikTok video shows a Labrador Retriever headbutting his buddy after being snitched on to their owner. 

The clip – which has been viewed more than 22 million times since it was uploaded on Wednesday – begins with the owner aggressively questioning the canines about a mess found on the floor. 

‘Who did this, huh?’ the owner asks the two innocent looking pups. 

One of the Labradors then humorously paws his pal, appearing to implicate him in the crime

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'Who did this, huh?' Video showing a Labrador Retriever sell out his pal has gone viral on TikTok

‘Who did this, huh?’ Video showing a Labrador Retriever sell out his pal has gone viral on TikTok

But the other animal is less than impressed at being snitched on, proceeding to headbutt his buddy as payback. 

The clip has been seen viewed around the world, and elicited thousands of hilarious comments from TikTok users. 

‘If ya’ll have siblings then you understand!’ one remarked. 

‘This is me and my younger brother!’ another chimed in. 

‘Crazy how all dogs can understand all languages,’ a third person joked, adding several crying-with-laughter emojis. 

The two adorable pups are famous on TikTok, frequently appearing on the popular @petsbaby account. 

One of the Labradors humorously paws his pal, appearing to implicate him in the crime

One of the Labradors humorously paws his pal, appearing to implicate him in the crime

Payback! The other Labrador then headbutts his pal as an act of retribution

Payback! The other Labrador then headbutts his pal as an act of retribution 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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SHRUTI ADVANI describes tackling her trolls after writing about Harrods food hall shutting

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shruti advani describes tackling her trolls after writing about harrods food hall shutting
Shruti Advani was pilloried for being out of touch with the public mood after she wrote a personal ‘luxury lockdown diary’ of surviving the pandemic in her opulent London apartment

Shruti Advani was pilloried for being out of touch with the public mood after she wrote a personal ‘luxury lockdown diary’ of surviving the pandemic in her opulent London apartment

Banker’s wife Shruti Advani was pilloried for being out of touch with the public mood after she wrote a personal ‘luxury lockdown diary’ of surviving the pandemic in her opulent London apartment.

Her tongue-in-cheek article for the FT Wealth website told how she was paying £95 an hour for her children’s online chess tutor, how she was suffering because the Harrods food hall was closed, and revealed her angst after her Ocado deliveries had been ‘whittled down to just one a week’.

The 43-year-old mother-of-two, who described herself as ‘blessed with an inheritance as well as a venture-capitalist husband’, added that ‘with the advantages of wealth, I was insulated from many of the pandemic’s challenges’.

She wrote that she had bought designer Olivia von Halle silk pyjamas to brighten up her Zoom calls and had to triple her order for home-delivered flowers.

Inevitably, she became the victim of vicious trolling and was branded a ‘trophy wife’ and a ‘modern-day Marie Antoinette’.

Others were convinced her article for the website in June was a work of satire or parody. Here, the London-based writer on private banking tells how she faced a torrent of abuse, culminating in a death threat outside her children’s school…

From describing cups of artisanal coffee delivered to my door, to my order of fresh flowers being trebled and having to organise £95-an-hour online tutoring for my children, I had meant the article to be tongue-in-cheek. 

It was an exaggerated personal account for a well-heeled audience about what might have kept us wealthy London mums motivated during the start of lockdown. 

But as soon as the piece appeared on the FT Wealth website – a subscription service for a specific group of FT readers (many of them extremely wealthy, by the way) – it quickly became clear that I had missed the mark.

It seemed to anger rather than amuse many readers, who posted comments accusing me of being tone deaf to the struggles other families were going through.

As soon as I began to browse news websites for reaction, I found my name plastered across the internet. 

Critics were questioning whether my column was really a parody, or if I was merely an out-of-touch, self-indulgent ‘wife of an expatriate banker’ (my column mentioned that I am in the very fortunate position of having a venture capitalist husband as well as an inheritance).

Her tongue-in-cheek article for the FT Wealth website told how she was paying £95 an hour for her children’s online chess tutor [File photo]

Her tongue-in-cheek article for the FT Wealth website told how she was paying £95 an hour for her children’s online chess tutor [File photo]

Emails, tweets and other messages poured in faster than I could read them.

At first, I diligently tried to respond. For example, I told the gentleman who said he didn’t particularly like me, but who thought I was ‘shaggable’ anyway, that it was generally better to go to bed with people we actually like.

But by the time I got to the reader who wrote to say he liked his ‘Indians more amenable’ – I had written that my mother was in her late 70s and isolating in India – or to the man who suggested that I ‘stay in my lane’ if English was a ‘foreign language’, I was running out of ripostes.

One email, in particular, pierced my armour. Its writer said my mother was better off dying from the virus than having to live down the ignominy of being my parent.

As awful as it was to be denigrated for what I wrote – and it was excruciating – I now want to show that when the bruises fade, we can bounce back sharper and wiser from adversity.

Also, I want to highlight how such online abuse in general has become a gateway drug to something more sinister.

Thanks to the anonymity on offer to abusers, it merely serves to encourage capriciousness and escalate aggression – even, as it turns out, in the middle of a quiet street in West London.

One morning shortly after my column was published, a man who lives on the street in Earl’s Court where my children go to school walked up to me after drop-off and called me a ‘rich bitch’.

He proceeded to describe how much pleasure he would take in slitting my throat with a knife and watching me bleed to death. After his five-minute diatribe, I reported him to the police.

Plenty of men write opinion columns where the argument is flawed, unconvincing or even downright despicable. But I haven’t seen much discussion around their gender, ethnicity or physical attributes. Which, of course, is exactly how it should be.

Yet one reader wrote to me alleging that self-hate had driven me to have surgery to look more Caucasian. I deeply resent the implication – not so much that I had surgery, but that looking anything other than Caucasian would prompt ‘self-hate’.

Meanwhile, in the FT comments section, others readers picked on my Indian heritage.

One scornfully suggested I can’t make ‘round rotis’ – the simple flatbread made every day in Indian households. 

And another wrote sarcastically: ‘I am always interested in hearing how the oppressed survivors of our Imperial rule are faring.’

Those comments haven’t been taken down, and while they may not have offended the FT’s online editors, to me they are a cruel reminder of how naive I could once afford to be.

From describing cups of artisanal coffee delivered to my door, to my order of fresh flowers being trebled and having to organise £95-an-hour online tutoring for my children, I had meant the article to be tongue-in-cheek [File photo]

From describing cups of artisanal coffee delivered to my door, to my order of fresh flowers being trebled and having to organise £95-an-hour online tutoring for my children, I had meant the article to be tongue-in-cheek [File photo]

When I wrote in jest about trebling my flower deliveries and expensive online tutoring for my children, it seemed frivolous at worst.

But such was the prevailing national mood that my piece was latched on to and held up as an emblem of the broken moral compass that so many have accused each other of in this pandemic.

Having read my explanation, you may be sceptical about a writer who has been decried claiming to have been misunderstood. You have every right to be.

Writers accept that if we fail to entertain, then we must swallow the resulting criticism, rejection and even ridicule.

But using someone’s ethnicity, gender or appearance to attack their work should never be part of the deal.

For my part, I had believed that gently poking fun at your posh life had been a British literary tradition since at least the days of P G Wodehouse.

I absolutely did not intend to make what was a difficult time for all of us any more difficult, and if, indeed, I did, I am very sorry.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Mairead Philpott to be released from prison less than half way through her 17-year jail term

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mairead philpott to be released from prison less than half way through her 17 year jail term
Mairead Philpott (pictured with husband Mick) is set to be released next month after serving just half of her 17-year jail term

Mairead Philpott (pictured with husband Mick) is set to be released next month after serving just half of her 17-year jail term

Mairead Philpott is set to be released from prison next month after serving just half of her 17-year jail term. 

The 38-year-old, who killed her six children after burning down the family home in Derby in 2012, is ‘delighted’ at being given her earliest possible release date.

But the move has been slammed by the Centre For Crime Prevention think-tank which said: ‘This is not justice.’ 

Philpott, along with husband Mick and friend Paul Mosley, burnt down the family’s three-bedroom council house in 2012 in a bid to get a bigger home.

But the couple’s six children – Duwayne, 13, Jade, 10, John, nine, Jack, seven, Jesse, six, and Jayden, five – died from smoke inhalation as a result of the blaze. 

She is now due to be released from HMP Downview, Surrey, within weeks.

The taxpayer will cover thousands of pounds worth of costs for Philpott to stay in a hostel with a new identity.

The couple's six children - Duwayne, 13, Jade, 10, John, nine, Jack, seven, Jesse, six, and Jayden, five - died from smoke inhalation as a result of the blaze

The couple’s six children – Duwayne, 13, Jade, 10, John, nine, Jack, seven, Jesse, six, and Jayden, five – died from smoke inhalation as a result of the blaze

Philpott, along with husband Mick and friend Paul Mosley, burnt down the family's three-bedroom council house in 2012 in a bid to get a bigger home

Philpott, along with husband Mick and friend Paul Mosley, burnt down the family’s three-bedroom council house in 2012 in a bid to get a bigger home

David Spencer at the Centre for Crime Prevention told The Sun: ‘The case shocked the country and it will be nothing less than abhorrent that the children’s mother is being released after 8 and a half years. This is not justice.’ 

A source also told the publication: ‘Mairead is pleased as punch. She is not popular. 

‘She now calls herself Louise Dunn and the other inmates nicknamed her “Dunn a turn”.’  

The Philpott’s devious plan to frame an ex for killing their kids

The Philpotts married in 2003 and shared a cramped three-bedroom council house in Derby with his lover Lisa Willis and their children.

Philpott led his wife and accomplice Mosley into a scheme to get a bigger council house by burning down his home and framing Ms Willis for the crime after she walked out on him.

He also hoped to win back custody of his five children who had recently moved out of the home.

His intention was to rescue the sleeping children through an upstairs window but the plan went disastrously wrong after too much petrol was used and the fire burned out of control.

The blaze claimed the lives of Duwayne, 13, Jade, 10, John, nine, Jack, eight, Jesse, six and Jayden, five.

Philpott, who had previously been jailed for stabbing his schoolgirl lover 27 times, wove a web of lies trying to get away with the crime and even plotted to ‘get rich quick’ off generous donations from the local community meant to pay for the funerals of his children.

Callous: The couple wept at a press conference as they appealed for help to find the killer or killers. Pictured: The coffins bearing the bodies of six children who died in the fire they started

Callous: The couple wept at a press conference as they appealed for help to find the killer or killers. Pictured: The coffins bearing the bodies of six children who died in the fire they started

In the days that followed the fire, Philpott began his elaborate ruse to appear blameless and even appeared at a press conference appealing for information.

During a fortnight of surveillance at the hotel where they were put up by police in May after the fire, the couple were heard whispering about the case, with Philpott recorded telling his wife to ‘stick to your story’.

They were charged by police on May 30 in connection with the deaths and Mosley was arrested in the months afterwards, having told a friend the plan had been for him to rescue the children.

Police initially charged the trio with murder but downgraded this to manslaughter because while their actions were sickeningly reckless, the defendants had not intended to kill the six.

However, he was found guilty of the horrific crime at a trial in April and sentenced to life behind bars.

The judge described the plot as ‘a wicked and dangerous plan’ that was ‘outside the comprehension of any right-thinking person’. 

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Remains of The Unknown Warrior likely to be those of a white man because of ‘racial bias’

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remains of the unknown warrior likely to be those of a white man because of racial bias

The remains of a British soldier in Westminster Abbey’s grave of the Unknown Warrior are likely to be those of a white man because of ‘racial bias’, research has suggested.

The mystery troop’s body was brought from France and buried in the church on November 11, 1920.

The idea is believed to have come from Reverend David Railton, who had been a chaplain on the Western Front.

Some 1.2million people visited the Abbey during the week after the burial, and the site is one of the world’s most visited war graves.

Now the National Army Museum has suggested ‘unconscious bias’ may have influenced selection of the body, believed to be that of a white Brit of low rank.

The commemorative grave of the Unknown Warrior inside Westminster Abbey in London

The commemorative grave of the Unknown Warrior inside Westminster Abbey in London 

The identity of the Unknown Warrior has never and can never be revealed due to the selection

The identity of the Unknown Warrior has never and can never be revealed due to the selection

STORY OF THE UNKNOWN WARRIOR

The Unknown Warrior’s body was brought from France and buried on November 11, 1920.

The idea is believed to have come from Reverend David Railton, who had been a chaplain on the Western Front.

Some 1.2million people visited the Abbey during the week after the burial, and the site is one of the world’s most visited war graves.

In 2011, the Duchess of Cambridge followed the poignant royal tradition of having her wedding bouquet left at the grave.

The late Queen Mother began this when her posy was left at the grave in 1923 after her wedding to the Duke of York, later George VI.

She laid the bouquet in tribute to her older brother Fergus Bowes-Lyon who was killed at the Battle of Loos in 1915 aged 26. His burial place was only found after her death in 2002.

The biblical text on the tomb is taken from 2 Chronicles 24:16, which says: ‘They buried him among the kings, because he had done good toward God and toward his house’.

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The Unknown Warrior’s grave was created at the end of the First World War as a collective memorial.

Many bodies were unable to be identified and there were rows over whether soldiers should be repatriated.

The Army commander in France was ordered to select an anonymous body to be brought to the UK for burial but research by curator Justin Saddington has found that meeting minutes of the Memorial Committee tasked with creating the tomb show no mention of Indian and other soldiers.

Ingrained biases over race at the time may have influenced ways of commemorating the dead, it is claimed.

Mr Saddington told The Daily Telegraph: ‘That should be taken as evidence of unconscious bias really, that fact that they’re not discussed.

‘This is a time 100 years ago when racism was much more ingrained, there was in fact a colour bar for black officers.

‘There are wider issues with race, and this boils over into commemoration as well.’

He added that he doesn’t believe outright racism played a part but that those involved in choosing the unidentifiable body may have been influenced by demands for ‘British’ remains. 

A ticket to Westminster Abbey for the funeral service for the Unknown Warrior in London

A ticket to Westminster Abbey for the funeral service for the Unknown Warrior in London

The parade alongside the Cenotaph in London to lay the Unknown Solider to rest

The parade alongside the Cenotaph in London to lay the Unknown Solider to rest

It is the latest in a series of recent ‘woke’ rows, after it emerged last night the charity regulator has warned the National Trust it could face an investigation over its ‘purpose’, amid claims it has strayed too far from its remit of preserving historical buildings and treasures.

The Trust sparked controversy earlier this year after tweeting details about artefacts and buildings’ links to slavery – as dozens vowed to cancel their membership because of ‘virtue signalling’.

It also previously forced its volunteers to wear gay pride badges on rainbow lanyards to mark 50 years since the decriminalisation of homosexuality.

Twitter users blasted the UK-based charity for ‘lecturing’, ’emotional blackmail’ and ‘jumping on the bandwagon’ as some claimed the set of tweets ruined any enjoyment they once had for visiting its country estates.  

Similarly, Commons Leader Jacob Rees-Mogg said earlier this month a review of Parliament’s art collection should not be ‘overwhelmed by wokeism’.

Former prime ministers including William Gladstone, Robert Peel and Lord Liverpool could soon be accompanied by plaques detailing their links to slavery after a review was prompted by the Black Lives Matter movement. 

More than 230 works of art in the Parliamentary art collection have been found to have links to the transatlantic slave trade, while 189 of the pieces listed in the study by the Speaker’s Advisory Committee on Works of Art depict 24 people who had ties to the slave trade. Forty pieces depict 14 people who were abolitionists.

Among those listed as having ‘financial or family interests in the slave trade’ are prime ministers Robert Peel, who served two terms between 1834-35 and 1841-1846, Lord Liverpool, who served from 1812-1827, and William Gladstone, who served as prime minister for 12 years over four terms between 1868 and 1894.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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