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Twitter users insist Rihanna should be named QUEEN of Barbados

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twitter users insist rihanna should be named queen of barbados

As Barbados announces plans to remove Queen Elizabeth II as its head of state by the end of next year, social media users are calling for Barbadian singer Rihanna to replace her on the throne.

On Wednesday, the Caribbean island’s government said that ‘the time has come to fully leave our colonial past behind,’ and that includes removing the Queen as head of state and becoming a republic by November 2021.

In response, dozens of social media users have taken to Twitter to proclaim that Rihanna — who was born in Saint Michael and raised in Bridgetown — should be named queen. 

Royal: After it was announced that Barbados plans to remove Queen Elizabeth II as head of state, dozens of people took to Twitter to say Barbadian singer Rihanna should be queen

Royal: After it was announced that Barbados plans to remove Queen Elizabeth II as head of state, dozens of people took to Twitter to say Barbadian singer Rihanna should be queen

Moving on: On Wednesday, the Caribbean island's government announced plans to becoming a republic by November 2021. The Queen is pictured in Barbados in 1977

Moving on: On Wednesday, the Caribbean island’s government announced plans to becoming a republic by November 2021. The Queen is pictured in Barbados in 1977 

‘I’m calling it now. Rihanna for queen of Barbados!’ one fan tweeted, sharing a GIF of the pop star placing a crown on her head. 

‘Replace her with Rihanna, you cowards!’ another insisted, while someone else asked: ‘Can they replace her with Her Excellency Rihanna?’ 

‘All stand for the true Queen of Barbados, Rihanna,’ one fan commented. 

Many agreed that when it comes to queens, Rihanna is the only one the nation needs. 

‘Anyway. Barbados already has a Queen and her name is @rihanna,’ noted Simon Naitram, a lecturer at the University of the West Indies at Cave Hill, which is located on the island. 

Future head of state? Rihanna fans thought the singer would the perfect replacement for Queen Elizabeth

Future head of state? Rihanna fans thought the singer would the perfect replacement for Queen Elizabeth

Future head of state? Rihanna fans thought the singer would the perfect replacement for Queen Elizabeth 

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Fans: While Rihanna isn't technically queen, she is undisputedly the island's most famous resident, and she has been honored as such

Fans: While Rihanna isn’t technically queen, she is undisputedly the island’s most famous resident, and she has been honored as such

‘Why would Barbados want the queen as the head of state when they could have Rihanna?’ someone else asked.  

Rihanna, whose real name is Robyn Rihanna Fenty, was a teenager living in Bridgetown, the capital of Barbados, when she was discovered by an American record producer and launched to international fame.  

And while Rihanna isn’t technically queen, she is undisputedly the island’s most famous resident, and she has been honored as such. 

In 2018, the singer was named ‘Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiaryin’ for Barbados, a role that involves promoting education, tourism, and investment. 

In 2018, Rihanna was named 'Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiaryin' for her home country. She is pictured at the Kadooment Day parade in Barbados in 2019

In 2018, Rihanna was named ‘Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiaryin’ for her home country. She is pictured at the Kadooment Day parade in Barbados in 2019 

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Loved: Many agreed that when it comes to queens, Rihanna is the only one the nation needs

Loved: Many agreed that when it comes to queens, Rihanna is the only one the nation needs

When she accepted the new title, Rihanna said in a statement that she ‘couldn’t be more proud to take on such a prestigious title’ in her home country.

‘Every Barbadian is going to have to play their role in this current effort, and I’m ready and excited to take on the responsibility,’ she added. ‘I look forward to working with Prime Minister Mottley and her team to re-imagine Barbados.’

The superstar was also honored by having the street she grew up on renamed Rihanna Drive in her honor in 2017. 

On Wednesday, Barbados announced its intention to remove Queen Elizabeth as its head of state and become a republic by November 2021.

World colliding: Rihanna was in Barbados with Prince Harry in 2019

World colliding: Rihanna was in Barbados with Prince Harry in 2019 

Looking back: The Queen is pictured with Governor-General of Barbados Dame Sandra Mason at Windsor Castle in 2018

Looking The Queen is pictured with Governor-General of Barbados Dame Sandra Mason at Windsor Castle in 2018

A speech written by Prime Minister Mia Mottley and read by Governor-General Dame Sandra Mason said: ‘The time has come to fully leave our colonial past behind. Barbadians want a Barbadian Head of State.  

‘This is the ultimate statement of confidence in who we are and what we are capable of achieving. Hence, Barbados will take the next logical step toward full sovereignty and become a Republic by the time we celebrate our 55th Anniversary of Independence.’

Asked to comment on the Commonwealth country’s plans a palace spokesman said: ‘This is a matter for the government and people of Barbados.’ 

The Prime Minister’s Office also agreed that it was a ‘decision for Barbados and the government there,’ but added that Britain will continue to ‘enjoy a partnership’ with the Caribbean island nation as members of the Commonwealth. 

Visits: Queen Elizabeth ll is pictured smiling with a young girl in Barbados on November 1, 1977

Visits: Queen Elizabeth ll is pictured on a walkabout during a visit to Bridgetown

Visits: Queen Elizabeth ll is pictured smiling with a young girl in Barbados on November 1, 1977 (left) and on a walkabout during a visit to Bridgetown (right)

Memories: The Queen and Prince Philip are pictured driving through Barbados while waving to the crowds in February 1966

Memories: The Queen and Prince Philip are pictured driving through Barbados while waving to the crowds in February 1966 

A Number 10 spokesman said: ‘We obviously have a shared history and remain united with Barbados in terms of history, culture, and language, and we will continue to have and enjoy a partnership with them as members of the Commonwealth.’

The country gained its independence from Britain in 1966, though the Queen remains its constitutional monarch.

In 1998, a Barbados constitutional review commission recommended republican status, and in 2015 Prime Minister Freundel Stuart said, ‘We have to move from a monarchical system to a republican form of government in the very near future.’

Most Caribbean countries have kept formal links with the monarchy after achieving independence.

Barbados would join Trinidad and Tobago, Dominica, and Guyana if it proceeds with its plan to become a republic. 

Barbados: The country’s colonial history

The Sugar Revolution, the introduction of sugar cane from Dutch Brazil, in the 1640s was highly lucrative but came at great social cost

The Sugar Revolution, the introduction of sugar cane from Dutch Brazil, in the 1640s was highly lucrative but came at great social cost 

Barbados was one of the oldest English settlements in the West Indies, being surpassed only by Saint Kitts. 

The countries’ historical ties date back to the 17th century and involve settlement, post-colonialism and modern bilateral relations. 

Since Barbados gained its independence in 1966, the nations have continued to share ties through the Commonwealth, with the Queen as Monarch. 

The Barbadian Parliament is the third oldest in the entire Commonwealth and the island continues to practice the Westminster style of government.

Many of the historic Anglican churches and plantation houses across the island show the influence of English architecture. 

In 1627, 80 Englishmen aboard the William and John landed on the Caribbean island and founded Jamestown (close to today’s Holetown), in the name of King James I.

The early settlers struggled to develop a profitable export crop and faced difficulties in maintaining supplies from Europe.

However, the Sugar Revolution, the introduction of sugar cane from Dutch Brazil, in the 1640s was highly lucrative and over the next decade more than two thirds of English emigres to the Americas went to Barbados. 

But while this shift to sugar yielded huge profits, it came at a great social cost. Thousands of West African slaves were shipped across the Atlantic to work the plantations and workers suffered from low wages and minimal social services. 

It is estimated that between 1627 to 1807, some 387,000 Africans were shipped to the island against their will and the country shifted from having a majority white population to a majority black population. 

On 28th August 1833, the British Government passed the Slavery Abolition Act, and slaves across the British empire were granted emancipation. 

Barbados remained a British colony until internal autonomy was granted in 1961. 

The country became fully independent on November 30, 1966, during a time when the country’s economy was expanding and diversifying. 

Since then, the Barbadian Parliament has remained a constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy, which is modeled on the British Westminster system of government. 

In 2008, British exports to Barbados stood at £38 million, making it Britain’s fourth-largest export market in the region.  

In recent years a growing number of British nationals have been relocating to Barbados to live, with polls showing that British nationals make up 75–85 per cent of the Barbados second home market.

 

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More than 10 million people have downloaded the NHS Covid-19 app since it launched last week

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more than 10 million people have downloaded the nhs covid 19 app since it launched last week

More than 10 million people have downloaded the NHS Covid-19 app since it launched last week as pubs and restaurants turn away customers who don’t have it on their phones. 

 The app has been plagued with problems since it launched with the latest fiasco seeing up to 70,000 users blocked from logging their test results. 

Despite glitches that stopped thousands from logging their test results, pubs and restaurants are starting to turn customers away unless they’ve downloaded the app, with QR codes on display for punters to use. 

Government advice tells businesses they ‘must’ display the ‘official NHS QR poster’ and apply for a code to be connected to the app.  

One punter wrote on Twitter:’I have today been refused entry into two establishments {a cafe and a pub} because I haven’t downloaded the NHS track and trace app!! Is this right?’ 

Pubs and restaurants have started turning away customers who don't have the app

Pubs and restaurants have started turning away customers who don’t have the app

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Brits have encountered problems using the tracing app, while others who refuse to install it say they have been denied entry into pubs and restaurants

Brits have encountered problems using the tracing app, while others who refuse to install it say they have been denied entry into pubs and restaurants

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 Another one said: ‘Last night I was denied a meal because I didn’t have a Gvt phone app!!!!

‘You may think I’m being over dramatic but you must now get the point. What else are we soon going to be denied access to unless we have a government phone app. Please, please, please people wake up.’

One user, Chloe James, wrote: ‘I’m in a pub and apparently they’ve been told they can’t serve anyone unless they have the track and trace app.’ 

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Despite problems more than ten million people have downloaded the app

Despite problems more than ten million people have downloaded the app

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Do you REALLY need a track and trace app to get a drink? Your rights explained

The NHS track and trace app is quick and simple but it’s not obligatory to have it  

 Venues must have a system for those without the app to provide their contact details 

 Pubs and restaurants may refuse entry to customers who do not provide their name and contact details, or who have not scanned the NHS QR code

www.gov.uk

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 Matt Hancock said on social media it was an ‘absolutely fantastic’ response so far, and urged more people to download it. 

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said that six million people had downloaded the app the first day it launched, and this had since risen to 10 million by midday on Sunday.

More than 1.5 million venue check-ins were recorded on Saturday while more than 460,000 businesses have downloaded and printed QR code posters that can be scanned by the app to check-in to premises, it added.

These QR codes allow contact tracers to reach multiple people if an outbreak is identified in a venue.

Mr Hancock said: ‘The enthusiastic response of over 10m people downloading the app in just three days has been absolutely fantastic.

‘This is a strong start but we want even more people and businesses getting behind the app because the more of us who download it the more effective it will be.

‘If you haven’t downloaded it yet I recommend you join the growing numbers who have, to protect yourself and your loved ones.’ 

 His comments come a day after an issue preventing users of the NHS Covid-19 app in England logging a positive test result was resolved, but people who book a test outside the app still cannot log negative results.  

 

Have you been refused entry to a venue because you didn’t have the track and trace app? E-mail aliki.kraterou@mailonline.co.uk 

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 However NHS hospitals warn the test and trace systems in England isn’t ready for the demands of winter. 

 NHS Providers is calling for testing capacity to be quadrupled within three months, a dramatic improvement on turnaround times and a clear plan for regular testing of health workers, according to the BBC.  

 Concerns were expressed when it emerged people tested in NHS hospitals or Public Health England (PHE) labs, or those taking part in the Office for National Statistics infection survey, could not enter their results on the newly-launched app. 

 The app has been available for download across England and Wales since Thursday, but the problem existed only in England.

A tweet from the official app account on Friday confirmed that certain test results could not be recorded, after a user tweeted to say he was being asked for a code – which he did not have – in order to enter his result.

On Saturday evening, a spokeswoman said: ‘Everyone who receives a positive test result can log their result on the app.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Boxing bout in the Bull Ring: Moment Selfridges guard and shopper trade brutal blows

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boxing bout in the bull ring moment selfridges guard and shopper trade brutal blows

This is the shocking moment a security guard and a shopper brawled outside a Selfridges following a row about entering the store with rollerblades.

Violence was sparked between the security worker and irate customer at Birmingham‘s Bull Ring shopping centre on Saturday, as the pair traded blows in front of stunned onlookers by the entrance of the upmarket department store.

In the footage, obtained by website Birmz Is Grime, one man can be heard saying ‘chill man’ during the confrontation, which sees two men continue to throw punches.

Violence was sparked between the security worker and irate customer at Birmingham's Bull Ring shopping centre on Saturday, as the pair traded blows in front of stunned onlookers by the entrance of the upmarket department store

Violence was sparked between the security worker and irate customer at Birmingham’s Bull Ring shopping centre on Saturday, as the pair traded blows in front of stunned onlookers by the entrance of the upmarket department store

**Do you know those involved in the fight?** 

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Selfridges said police were called to the scene after trouble flared when the member of the public tried to enter the shop with rollerblades.

A Selfridges spokesperson said: ‘An altercation took place on the evening of Saturday 26th September at the front of our Birmingham store, between a man carrying rollerblades attempting to enter the store and a security guard.

‘The latter half of the incident was captured on a smart phone.

‘We take the safety and security of our staff and colleagues very seriously and we are fully investigating the situation.’

The clip, which was posted with the caption ‘security guard vs shopper at Selfridges, Welcome to brum’ has since gone viral after being uploaded to social media.

The security guard throws the first punch after being shoved by the bearded customer against the glass-fronted entrance of the store.

Selfridges said police were called to the scene after trouble flared when the member of the public tried to enter the shop with rollerblades

Selfridges said police were called to the scene after trouble flared when the member of the public tried to enter the shop with rollerblades

The shopper can be seen wearing no shoes with a pair of rollerblades discarded nearby as he scraps with the bouncer.

One web user wrote ‘toughest security guard I’ve seen in decades’.

Another added: ‘I hope he doesn’t lose his job for this.’

One person put: ‘At least there’s no weapons involved like we usually see these days. Old fashioned straightener.’

A third said: ‘Worst boxing match I’ve seen in ages but the security guard takes it on points for me. Still shocking scenes to see in a public place.’

**Do you know those involved in the fight? Email tips@dailymail.co.uk** 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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A QUARTER of panic-bought food ends up in the BIN: Hoarders warned stockpiling is a ‘false economy’ 

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a quarter of panic bought food ends up in the bin hoarders warned stockpiling is a false economy

One in four items bought by hoarders goes to waste as shoppers are warned stockpiling is a ‘false economy’ a study has revealed.

The study, carried out by Topcashback, found that Britons spent nearly £10 billion a year on stockpiling items that are lost, forgotten or thrown away, causing unnecessary food waste and greenhouse gas emissions. 

With one in four bulk buys going to waste, the report reveals that shoppers are continuing to subscribe to what the cashback shopping site describes as ‘a false economy’.

The study shows that 80 per cent of shoppers identified ‘saving money’ as the number one reason to bulk buy.

Conversely, almost a quarter also said they regretted stocking up at one point or another – with nearly half citing being worse off financially as the reason. 

It comes as panic buying across the UK has resumed amid fears of a second wave of coronavirus and another lockdown with shoppers reporting queuing for 20 minutes to enter shops before similar further delays at checkouts.

And online customers found it near-impossible to get delivery slots from Asda, Morrisons, Ocado, Sainsbury’s and Tesco – some didn’t have free slots for up to two weeks.

Pictures from a Tesco in west London show shoppers have emptied shelves this weekend despite study showing one in four items bought in bulk goes to waste as warning to stockpilers

Pictures from a Tesco in west London show shoppers have emptied shelves this weekend despite study showing one in four items bought in bulk goes to waste as warning to stockpilers

However, shops have insisted that bare shelves would be quickly restocked. Pictured: A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

However, shops have insisted that bare shelves would be quickly restocked. Pictured: A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

The toilet roll running out at Tesco in Ely, Cambridgeshire, on Thursday afternoon as the store ration it to one pack per customer after customers have started panic buying items again

The toilet roll running out at Tesco in Ely, Cambridgeshire, on Thursday afternoon as the store ration it to one pack per customer after customers have started panic buying items again

Restrictions on items which vanished most quickly during the country’s first lockdown, such as flour and eggs, have been put in place.

However, shops have insisted that bare shelves once filled with toilet paper and pasta will be quickly restocked.  

The research showed that a quarter of purchases are wasted, predominantly because the product is not used before its use-by date.

The study estimates that the average shopper spends £200 a year on bulk buys that they do not use and ends up being thrown away – this works out at about £9.6 billion annually across the country.

The most popular items that were bought in bulk were tinned items, toilet roll, pasta, rice, frozen food and soap. 

Adam Bullock, from Topcashback.co.uk, said: ‘Shoppers believe they are helping the environment by bulk buying.

‘However, by continually throwing away a percentage of their purchases, they are making a negative impact, and are harming their wallet at the same time.

‘Being savvy with savings doesn’t necessarily require stocking up in bulk.’

Supermarket bosses have been forced to implement restrictions on essentials as shoppers continue to try and stockpile amid fears of a second lockdown. 

The executive director of Waitrose, James Bailey, told The Sunday Times that there was ‘enough food to go round’. 

He added: ‘But if one person fills their house will all the packs of pasta they can get their hands on, it inevitably means somebody else will go without. They could be the most vulnerable or key workers.’ 

It comes after Tesco became the latest supermarket to impose rationing on food and household goods.

In a bid to avoid the bulk buying which left shop shelves across the UK almost bare in March, the supermarket giant will limit items such as flour, dried pasta, toilet roll and anti-bacterial wipes to three per customer. 

Morrisons on Thursday announced rationing would be introduced on certain items in its stores up and down the country.

It has been reported supermarkets are boosting security and have doubled number of delivery slots amid fears Covid-19 panic buying could return. Pictured: Tesco in south east London

It has been reported supermarkets are boosting security and have doubled number of delivery slots amid fears Covid-19 panic buying could return. Pictured: Tesco in south east London

The executive director of Waitrose has slammed panic buyers saying their actions 'inevitably means someone else will go without'. Pictured: Empty shelves at a Sainsbury's in Wandsworth

The executive director of Waitrose has slammed panic buyers saying their actions ‘inevitably means someone else will go without’. Pictured: Empty shelves at a Sainsbury’s in Wandsworth

And restrictions on items which vanished most quickly during the country's first lockdown, such as flour and eggs, have been put in place. Pictured: Asda in Barnes Hill, Birmingham

And restrictions on items which vanished most quickly during the country’s first lockdown, such as flour and eggs, have been put in place. Pictured: Asda in Barnes Hill, Birmingham

The restrictions come as supermarket chiefs look to avoid a over repeat of the stockpiling panic seen in stores at the start of the pandemic in March.

Pictures from supermarkets across the UK have already shown empty or rapidly emptying toilet roll shelves, just days after the government announced tighter restrictions in a bid to stave off a second coronavirus wave.

A shopper has pleaded for people not to be ‘selfish’ by stockpiling household items after shelves in an Asda store in County Durham were left completely empty.

Keith Jackson said shelves of toilet roll in Asda in Stanley had been entirely emptied on Saturday.

When the Covid-19 lockdown was first introduced earlier this year, Britain’s shelves were stripped bare with pasta and toilet paper hard to find.

And it seems with tighter restrictions put in place in the North East, people are reporting a second wave of panic buying.

After seeing the bare shelves in his local supermarket, Keith pleaded for people not to stockpile saying it ‘deprives the vulnerable’ of everyday products adding to their stress.

Keith said: ‘It was just the toilet roll for now, although it wouldn’t surprise me if the pasta and hand wash are next to be stockpiled if we have a repeat of six months ago.

‘I can’t stand stockpiling, I think it’s selfish and unnecessary. There’s enough product in storage to go around.

‘Stockpiling just puts undue strain on supply chains and deprives the vulnerable of everyday products, adding to their stress and anxiety.

A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

A sign limiting three items per customer is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester

‘This feels very much like it did the end of March when I had to go to petrol stations to buy toilet roll.

‘Sadly it feels some people have not learned anything in the last six months, their only concern is for themselves which is a shame.

‘It starts with a minority of people and then others start to panic and join in, for fear of not being able to get hold of the products they need.

‘Then it takes a month or two for the supermarkets to get their stock levels back to normal.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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