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What it costs to rent a home near you: Average UK prices revealed

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what it costs to rent a home near you average uk prices revealed

A two-speed rental market has emerged amid the coronavirus pandemic with rents falling in London but rising elsewhere in the UK, it has been revealed. 

New data published by Zoopla showed rents in inner and outer London have dropped 3 per cent since the beginning of the year, and are down 1.4 per cent in the past 12 months.

It compares with a significantly smaller drop of 1 per cent since January 1 and an increase of 2.2 per cent in the past 12 months for the rest of the country excluding London. 

London rental: This two-bed flat in Marsham Street, south-west London is available to rent for £1,950 a month via letting agent Vesper

London rental: This two-bed flat in Marsham Street, south-west London is available to rent for £1,950 a month via letting agent Vesper

Reduced international travel and tourism, along with an increase in working from home, is to blame for the more recent sharp decline in London rents, according to the property website.

Zoopla said Scotland’s financial centre Edinburgh had been affected by the pandemic for similar reasons, with rental growth slowing to 0.2 per cent in the past year.

As well as a reduction in tourism due to the pandemic, Scotland has also seen new policies affecting landlords and the supply of property.

These include discussions about bringing back the ban on AirBnBs in shared staircase buildings, which would affect some parts of Edinburgh.

Zoopla said the rental markets in London and Edinburgh stand apart from other cities in Britain due to a rise in supply in these markets, which is increasing choice for tenants.

This is not being matched by similar levels of demand, leading to downward pressure on rents and the rate of rental growth.

It explained that the decline in international travel and tourism has seen landlords in the capital, especially in central London, shifting away from short lets, thereby increasing supply in the long-let market.

Weaker demand means that as tenancies end, they are being absorbed more slowly, compounding the growth in supply.

It added that the rise of homeworking at many companies, with a slow return to offices over the rest of the year, signal that demand for rental property is likely to remain subdued, especially if unemployment starts to rise.

Commuting data shows that working patterns in London are still far from returning to levels seen back in March.

In addition, the student influx expected as part of the usual seasonal busy period in late summer may not be as large this year as universities migrate towards more online learning, Zoopla said.

Escape to the Cotswolds! This eight-bed house in Chipping Norton is available to rent for £10,833 a month via letting agents ATPS

Escape to the Cotswolds! This eight-bed house in Chipping Norton is available to rent for £10,833 a month via letting agents ATPS

Zoopla suggested that tenants, like homeowners, may have used lockdown as a chance to reassess how and where they are living, further boosting rental market activity.

At the same time, the number of homes for rent has increased since lockdown ended – and is slightly ahead of seasonal trends, with the volume of homes for rent nationally up 7 per cent on this time last year. 

By contrast, across much of the rest of Britain, demand for rental homes is still outpacing supply.

Cities such as Rochdale, Sunderland, Bristol, Preston, York and Leicester are all recording annual rental growth of more than 4 per cent.

Zoopla explained how demand has been driven in part by renters reassessing what they want and need from their home during lockdown – and having the flexibility to act on this and move more easily than homeowners.

While some might have decided that they need more space or a garden, others have elected to move location – in some cases moving further away from the office and embracing a longer commute amid more flexible working patterns in the future, it said.

Rent in Bath: This seven-bed house to rent in Bath's Gay Street is available for £3,500 a month via Bath City Lets

Rent in Bath: This seven-bed house to rent in Bath’s Gay Street is available for £3,500 a month via Bath City Lets

Levels of affordability for tenants have remained largely unchanged in recent years, with the exception of London, which has become cheaper although rents still eat up almost half of income.

In the capital, the proportion of income needed to cover average monthly rent has fallen to 45 per cent from 54 per cent in September 2014 – although it still remains the most expensive region to rent a home in Britain.

Gráinne Gilmore, of Zoopla, explained how the future path of annual rental growth will be determined largely by the economic outlook, especially the rise in unemployment and the future path of average earnings.

She added: ‘As new rental supply continues to catch up with demand levels, we could see further softening of headline rental growth by the end of the year, although there will be some areas of outperformance.

‘Uncertainty continues over how any further outbreaks of Covid will impact the resumption of office life, student life and tourism, and this uncertainty will impact demand in some markets during the rest of the year.’

A two-bed flat in Glencairn Crescent, in Edinburgh's fashionable West End, is currently available to rent for £1,395 a month via DJ Alexander Lettings

A two-bed flat in Glencairn Crescent, in Edinburgh’s fashionable West End, is currently available to rent for £1,395 a month via DJ Alexander Lettings

RENTS IN BRITISH TOWNS AND CITIES IN JUNE 2020
 Average rent £pcm Annual change Annual change 12m ago 3-year average change Affordability single earner Time to rent(days)
Aberdeen £594 -2.3% -3.7% -3.3% 25% 28
Aldershot £1,019 0.6% -1.7% 0.4% 41% 24
Barnsley £478 3.1% 2.2% 2.2% 22% 21
Belfast £597 1.3% 1.7% 2.2% 27% 16
Birkenhead £552 3.8% 0.6% 1.7% 26% 28
Birmingham £668 1.2% 0.4% 1.3% 28% 23
Blackburn £496 2.7% 1.8% 2.2% 21% 22
Blackpool £555 2.8% 0.6% 1.3% 25% 27
Bolton £559 3.6% 2.5% 2.8% 24% 21
Bournemouth £953 1.6% 1.4% 1.4% 41% 20
Bradford £496 1.2% 1.7% 0.9% 22% 21
Brighton £1,280 0.9% 2.5% 2.3% 45% 23
Bristol £996 4.6% 3.1% 3.3% 42% 16
Burnley £424 3.3% -0.4% 1.3% 20% 25
Cambridge £1.204 1.1% 1.7% 1.8% 46% 16
Cardiff £805 3.0% 1.2% 2.3% 36% 25
Coventry £801 -0.4% -0.7% 0.0% 31% 16
Crawley £1,100 1.9% 1.1% 1.4% 43% 19
Derby £585 2.6% 1.6% 1.8% 25% 19
Doncaster £522 3.6% 1.7% 2.4% 23% 22
Dundee £576 1.6% 4.0% 2.9% 23% 19
Edinburgh £913 0.2% 4.0% 3.2% 36% 17
Glasgow £636 2.2% 2.3% 2.7% 25% 21
Gloucester £694 3.8% 2.2% 2.1% 30% 21
Grimsby £476 1.1% 0.8% 0.8% 22% 27
Hastings £766 3.4% 2.2% 3.1% 28% 17
Huddersfield £532 3.5% 0.9% 1.7% 24% 21
Hull £474 3.1% 1.1% 1.7% 20% 26
Ipswich £679 1.5% 0.9% 1.7% 26% 21
Leeds £727 3.5% 3.0% 2.9% 30% 22
Leicester £713 4.3% 3.7% 3.7% 30% 24
Liverpool £587 2.9% 1.5% 2.1% 25% 18
London* £1,560 -1.3% 2.0% 0.4% 44% 16
Luton £841 1.4% 0.6% -0.7% 32% 24
Manchester £743 1.4% 2.6% 1.7% 30% 20
Mansfield £529 2.6% 4.0% 2.5% 24% 19
Medway £851 2.7% 0.7% 1.4% 31% 21
Middlesbrough £471 -0.7% 0.4% -0.6% 22% 29
Milton Keynes £915 0.5% -0.1% 0.4% 33% 22
Newcastle £587 3.4% 0.8% 1.4% 25% 23
Newport £623 3.1% 2.9% 3.2% 29% 21
Northampton £744 -0.8% 2.1% 1.0% 32% 21
Norwich £763 1.6% 2.8% 2.1% 29% 23
Nottingham £679 2.7% 4.4% 3.6% 27% 17
Oxford £1,346 1.4% 1.6% 1.3% 46% 26
Peterborough £693 2.4% 0.4% 1.2% 27% 23
Plymouth £670 3.4% 1.0% 1.7% 29% 19
Portsmouth £861 2.9% 2.1% 1.5% 31% 20
Preston £577 4.6% -1.0% 1.6% 26% 21
Reading £1,046 0.3% 2.0% 1.1% 40% 22
Rochdale £541 5.1% 1.9% 2.9% 24% 17
Sheffield £589 2.2% 2.7% 1.7% 25% 23
Southampton £874 1.4% 1.0% 0.9% 30% 25
Southend £909 2.4% -0.2% 1.3% 38% 23
Stoke £520 3.0% 2.3% 2.3% 22% 26
Sunderland £479 4.9% -2.0% 1.5% 22% 18
Swansea £600 1.3% -0.6% 0.8% 27% 30
Swindon £737 -0.1% 1.8% 0.2% 32% 22
Telford £598 2.0% 1.3% 1.3% 26% 24
Wakefield £543 3.3% 0.2% 1.9% 24% 22
Warrington £620 1.8% 2.0% 1.2% 29% 23
Wigan £520 2.9% 3.4% 2.2% 23% 23
Worthing £891 2.3% 1.3% 2.0% 35% 18
York £830 4.5% 3.3% 3.3% 35% 18
*London plus surrounding commuting area
Source: Zoopla

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Controversial ‘self-identity’ gender plan set to be axed after government U-turn on policy  

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controversial self identity gender plan set to be axed after government u turn on policy

Plans to allow people to ‘self-identify’ as a different gender will be formally dropped this week after they sparked controversy.

Ministers have decided to scrap proposals to permit gender on birth certificates being changed without a medical diagnosis.

Instead, it is believed the cost of changing gender as it currently stands will be made cheaper. 

Equalities Minister Liz Truss, pictured, will this week publish the Government’s new stance on the 2004 Gender Recognition Act. Proposals to alter the legislation were sent out for consultation in 2018. But plans to allow people to change the gender on their birth certificate without a medical diagnosis have been dropped. The Government says it believes the current legislation is 'sufficient' to support people's right to change their sex.

Equalities Minister Liz Truss, pictured, will this week publish the Government’s new stance on the 2004 Gender Recognition Act. Proposals to alter the legislation were sent out for consultation in 2018. But plans to allow people to change the gender on their birth certificate without a medical diagnosis have been dropped. The Government says it believes the current legislation is ‘sufficient’ to support people’s right to change their sex.

The proposals to alter the 2004 Gender Recognition Act were sent out for consultation in 2018. 

Liz Truss, the equalities minister, will this week publish the Government’s new stance on the policy.

But a Government source told the Sunday Times: ‘We think that the current legislation, which supports people’s rights to change their sex, is sufficient.’

At the moment, those wishing to change sex have to pay £140 and apply to a panel for a gender recognition certificate.

Harry Potter author JK Rowling is in the spotlight again because her new book, Troubled Blood, features a 'transvestite serial killer'. Rowling has come under fire in the past for making transphobic remarks on Twitter. Transgender activists have described Rowling as a 'TERF', a derisive acronym for 'trans-exclusionary radical feminist'.

Harry Potter author JK Rowling is in the spotlight again because her new book, Troubled Blood, features a ‘transvestite serial killer’. Rowling has come under fire in the past for making transphobic remarks on Twitter. Transgender activists have described Rowling as a ‘TERF’, a derisive acronym for ‘trans-exclusionary radical feminist’.

They have to supply two reports stating they have suffered from gender dysphoria, which normally come from their GP and another doctor or psychologist. 

Tory MPs claimed Boris Johnson developed cold feet about scrapping the reforms after being influenced by his fiancée Carrie Symonds.

Trans rights activists have said failing to liberalise the law would be a ‘Section 28 moment’, referring to a 1988 ban on councils and schools ‘promoting homosexuality’. 

It comes after author JK Rowling was accused of transphobia after tweeting her opinions about the importance of biological sex. 

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ANDREW PIERCE: How Tory jail cuts hacked off David Cameron’s top aide

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andrew pierce how tory jail cuts hacked off david camerons top aide

Few Tory luminaries, it appears, had more harrowing personal experiences of the coalition government’s austerity measures than David Cameron‘s former Downing Street communications director Andy Coulson.

The ex-News of the World editor, who was jailed for 18 months in 2014 for presiding over an epidemic of phone hacking at his newspaper a decade earlier, has discussed the experience in an interview with the Crisis What Crisis? podcast, which he usually presents.

He described his grim journey in a prison van from the Old Bailey to the Category A Belmarsh jail in South-East London: ‘The building is out of central casting: enormous American-style prison walls, massive gates, you’re in no doubt you’re going to prison.’ 

Coulson, 52, who now runs a crisis management firm, added that he spent most of the time in his cell. ‘You would be allowed out for an hour and then do another 23 hours.’

Andy Coulson, the ex-News of the World editor, has discussed the experience in an interview with the Crisis What Crisis? podcast

Andy Coulson, the ex-News of the World editor, has discussed the experience in an interview with the Crisis What Crisis? podcast

But the most poignant recollection came when Coulson asked why he was not in an open prison, the normal category for someone convicted of his type of crime. A warder replied: ‘Tory cuts, Andy.’

 Bojo as PM is ‘stranger than fiction’

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One-time New Labour cheerleader Robert Harris — author of best-selling thrillers such as Fatherland and Enigma — also wrote a thinly disguised attack on Tony Blair entitled The Ghost, which was turned into a film starring Pierce Brosnan.

Asked by the New Statesman if he would subject Boris Johnson to the same literary treatment, Harris said: ‘It’s a cliche but when the politicians have become such extraordinary figures, fiction withers and dies in the face of them . . . 

‘If I tried to write a novel in which Donald Trump became president, and carried on the way he has, or where Johnson would be PM, everyone would say, ‘No. This doesn’t obey plausible rules.’ ‘

 KINNOCK kicks the loony left

That hammer of the Left Lord Kinnock can’t believe the Militant tendency returned to hijack Labour under Jeremy Corbyn in the form of Momentum. ‘I thought I’d killed them off,’ says the former Labour leader. ‘They did go away for 30 years and came back not one bloody millisecond wiser.’ Which aspect of the Trot revival does he have most contempt for? ‘The superficiality and use of slogans in place of real policies. The manifesto was packed with promises . . . People still believe in the spirit of Christmas but not in the Tooth Fairy.’ For once he’s right. 

 Impressionist Rory Bremner has the measure of Downing Street. ‘Like storms,

Government U-turns are now so frequent we’re going to have to give them names,’ he says. Should the first one be Boris?

When Sir Keir Starmer closes Labour’s virtual three-day party conference tomorrow, organisers may reflect on their wisdom in choosing Babl Cloud to handle the tech. Its boss is Brexiteer Jonathan Grant, who once retweeted this by the Bruges Group: ‘The cold hard truth is that it’s Boris’s Brexit or not at all.’ A bit embarrassing for Starmer, who once pledged to put Brexit to a second referendum.

 Veteran singer-songwriter Van Morrison has released three absurd anti-lockdown protest songs. They bring to mind broadcaster Mark Ellen’s telling observation about the irascible singer: ‘There are two types of people in this world. Those who love Van Morrison. And those who’ve met Van Morrison.’

 If ‘frivolous’ demands for Covid tests really are responsible for the capacity shortfall, as one minister has suggested, the Government only has itself to blame. Its adverts are running with the message: ‘At the first sign of a cough, stay at home and get tested.’

 Former Chancellor Ken Clarke, 80, was showered with compliments when he took his seat in the House of Lords last week, but Tory MP Damian Green points out: ‘The great thing about all these (justified) Twitter tributes to Ken is that you absolutely know he won’t see any of them.’ Clarke famously never looks at social media.

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Former head of the Supreme Court Baroness Hale says Parliament ‘surrendered’ its powers

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The supreme court’s first female president has said Parliament ‘surrendered’ its powers over to the Government amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Baroness Brenda Hale, who served as president at the UK’s highest court from 2017- 2020, criticised the draconian measures and ‘sweeping’ powers being enforced on the British public without the scrutiny of Parliament. 

Her comments come as the Government seeks to extend the emergency coronavirus powers for a further six months in an effort to control a second devastating wave of coronavirus.

Baroness Brenda Hale, who served as president at the UK's highest court from 2017- 2020, criticised 'sweeping' powers being enforced on the public without the scrutiny of Parliament

Baroness Brenda Hale, who served as president at the UK’s highest court from 2017- 2020, criticised ‘sweeping’ powers being enforced on the public without the scrutiny of Parliament

In an essay seen by The Guardian, the baroness wrote: ‘It is not surprising the police were as confused as the public as to what was law and what was not.’

Referencing the Prime Minister’s chief advisor Dominic Cummings, the former judge went on to describe how there was confusion among Government ministers themselves as to what the rules were. 

She continued: ‘A certain government adviser obviously did know what the regulations were and what they said.’

Baroness Hale also explained that Parliament ‘did surrender control to the government at a crucial time’ and urged ministers to now restore a ‘properly functioning constitution’.

She added: ‘My plea is that we get back to a properly functioning constitution as soon as we possibly can.’ 

The baroness’ calls come as senior Tories plan a parliamentary lock to prevent Boris Johnson having the final say on new lockdown measures after restrictions on the public’s freedom, such as the Rule of Six, were introduced without a debate in the Commons. 

Sir Graham Brady, the chairman of the Conservative backbench 1922 Committee, is planning to table an amendment that would force ministers to put any new measures to a vote first. 

This week it was revealed that Tories plan a parliamentary lock to prevent Boris Johnson having the final say on new lockdown measures

This week it was revealed that Tories plan a parliamentary lock to prevent Boris Johnson having the final say on new lockdown measures

Sir Graham Brady (pictured) is looking to force a vote by MPs on emergency coronavirus measures

Sir Graham Brady (pictured) is looking to force a vote by MPs on emergency coronavirus measures

The move comes as Boris Johnson announced that anyone in England who refuses to obey an order to self-isolate could face a fine of up to £10,000.

The Altrincham and Sale West MP told The Sunday Telegraph that he would take the opportunity to seek to amend the legislation when the Government comes to renew the emergency powers in the Coronavirus Act 2020.

The move is likely to attract significant support from Conservative MPs unhappy at the extensive powers taken by ministers with little or no parliamentary scrutiny.

Sir Graham told the Telegraph: ‘In March, Parliament gave the Government sweeping emergency powers at a time when Parliament was about to go into recess and there was realistic concern that NHS care capacity might be overwhelmed by Covid-19.

‘We now know that the NHS coped well with the challenge of the virus and Parliament has been sitting largely since April. 

‘There is now no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes.’ 

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