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Why migraine sufferers get the debilitating condition, and the foods you can eat to beat the pain 

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why migraine sufferers get the debilitating condition and the foods you can eat to beat the pain
Lyn Griffiths is a health researcher at the Queensland University of Technology

Lyn Griffiths is a health researcher at the Queensland University of Technology

Lyn Griffiths is a health researcher at the Queensland University of Technology

People who suffer from migraines may be able to manage their symptoms by eating greens, as researchers edge closer to finding a ‘cure’ for the painful condition.

Migraine is the world’s most frequently diagnosed neurological problem, with symptoms ranging from a mild headache to vomiting, sensitivity to light, fainting, temporary loss of vision and even paralysis.

While scientists know there are more than 50 genes that relate to migraine, the factors that bring on an attack are largely unknown. 

But researchers do know that the condition, which affects six per cent of men and 18 per cent of women, is partly attributed to female hormones – which explains why it often emerges during puberty, menopause and childbirth.

Lyn Griffiths, a health researcher at the Queensland University of Technology, told the ABC that the reason women are far more likely than men to suffer migraines is that gene mutations responsible are passed on through the X chromosome, which women have twice as many of as men.

The condition affects six per cent of men and 18 per cent of women and is linked to the X chromosome (stock image)

The condition affects six per cent of men and 18 per cent of women and is linked to the X chromosome (stock image)

The condition affects six per cent of men and 18 per cent of women and is linked to the X chromosome (stock image) 

While only 0.07 per cent of medical funding is directed to migraine research and life-changing medication Aimovig can cost upwards of $800 a month, researchers say the one of the most affordable ways to control the condition was eating leafy green vegetables to alleviate symptoms.

Ms Griffiths said folate – a B group vitamin found in dark green vegetables such as kale, spinach and silverbeet – is the most effective.

The same gene mutations that can make people more susceptible to migraines also make the carriers react to higher folate levels in the diet.

It was also important for migraine sufferers to know which foods triggered the condition.

Raphaella Crosby, 43, has been suffering since she was 22 and said some foods bring on her debilitating migraines which often result in loss of vision and paralysis.

The most prominent trigger is preservative 202 which is a potassium salt often added to dairy products and sparkling wine.

‘If I have even the slightest amount, I’m in all kinds of trouble,’ she said. 

Ms Crosby described her fist attack as though her body was ‘malfunctioning’. 

‘I couldn’t see, couldn’t speak, couldn’t lift my arms and parts of my body were numb.’

She was hospitalised for ten days after a severe attack in 2012 which was the beginning of a seven-year bout of back-to-back migraines.

The condition often rendered her completely paralysed, until she had no choice but to apply for the disability pension.

While she had access to Aimovig for free during the trial, she is now forced to fork out hundreds of dollars to continue the treatment that she says is her only shot at working again. 

Ms Crosby is the founder of patient advocacy group Migraine Australia and is campaigning to have the drug listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. 

What is migraine? 

 Migraines are caused by a complex neurological condition which can affect the whole body – causing crippling headaches, nausea, blackouts, vomiting and even paralysis.

Three quarters of sufferers are women, with attacks lasting between four and 72 hours.  

 Sufferers experience an average of 13 attacks each year, usually in clusters or episodes of a few days.

For people with ‘chronic migraines’, thr attacks come at least every other day.  

Migraines are the sixth most common cause of disability around the world, and are strongly linked to depression and work absenteeism. 

Some treatments which ward off attacks are all designed for other conditions – such as botox, epilepsy medicines and beta blockers for heart disease.

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Vile sex attacker, 32, who violently raped an 80-year-old woman is jailed for eight years

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vile sex attacker 32 who violently raped an 80 year old woman is jailed for eight years

A vile sex attacker who violently raped an 80-year-old woman in her own home has been locked up for eight years.

John Laming struck last Christmas Eve just 12 days after he had been freed from jail. The terrified victim yelled for help, but when no one heard, Laming taunted her: ‘Some neighbours you have got.’

The 32-year-old then sat swigging a can of juice after the attack and claimed the OAP was ‘strong like his granny’.

Laming fled, but was soon snared for the crime in Rutherglen, near Glasgow.

He was today sentenced having earlier pled guilty to a charge of assault and rape.

John Laming was today sentenced having earlier pled guilty to a charge of assault and rape

John Laming was today sentenced having earlier pled guilty to a charge of assault and rape

Lady Stacey said she had decided against imposing an Order for Lifelong Restriction.

But, she told Laming: ‘What you did was a terrible crime. You should be completely ashamed.

‘It must have been extremely frightening for the woman involved. She was in her own home minding her own business.’

The former heating engineer will also be supervised for a further four years on his release.

The High Court in Glasgow heard how Laming already had a criminal past including a four year prison term for robbery in 2015.

Prosecutor Kath Harper said he was released from jail last December 12.

The victim was in bed when she was awoken by smashing glass around midnight on Christmas Eve.

She got up and was confronted by Laming, who lived in Rutherglen, but was not known to her.

The OAP ordered him out before bravely tackling him.

Laming fled from the scene, but was soon snared for the crime in Rutherglen, near Glasgow (pictured)

Laming fled from the scene, but was soon snared for the crime in Rutherglen, near Glasgow (pictured)

Miss Harper: ‘She reached for a metal pole used to open her window. She tried to hit him with it.’

The woman also pressed her panic alarm, but it failed to work.

The prosecutor: ‘She was also screaming. Laming said ‘some neighbours you have got’ when no one heard.’

The victim ended up on her bed with Laming leaning over her.

She pleaded: ‘What are you doing this to an 80 year-old lady for?’

Laming branded her a ‘w***e’ before going on to rape her in the dining room.

After the attack, Laming helped the terrified woman onto a chair and told her to make a cup of tea.

Miss Harper: ‘He said she was ‘strong like his granny’. He asked if she had any alcohol.

‘The woman told him she did not, but there was some juice.

‘He took a can and told her she had a much nicer house than him.’

Laming left after clearing up broken glass – but returned to ask for his vape e-cigarette which he had dropped.

The victim called her daughter to say a man had ‘kicked her door in’.

Police also arrived before the distressed pensioner was taken to hospital.

As she was being examined, she burst into tears and told a medic: ‘I fought back.’

Her injuries included ‘multiple’ bruises on her neck and body.

Laming was snared near the house he shared with his mum late on Christmas Eve hiding in a garden.

His lawyer Ann Ogg said: ‘He did not think he was capable of such behaviour.’

Laming was also placed on the sex offenders list.

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Police are called to a funeral wake in a pub garden

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police are called to a funeral wake in a pub garden

Police were called to a funeral wake inside a pub garden after mourners were pictured appearing to break social distancing rules amid the Government’s ‘rule of six’.

Officers visited the Old Crown in Wigston, Leicestershire yesterday after a local resident called them to claim people were not following coronavirus guidelines. 

Police called the pub twice and spoke to the landlady Sue Humphries before turning up unannounced to check that the rules were being followed.  

A Leicestershire Police spokeswoman said: ‘Police received a call just after 1.30pm yesterday reporting concerns in relation to a number of people gathering at a premises in Moat Street, Wigston, and that Covid-19 guidelines were being breached.

‘Officers have engaged with staff and others at the concerned premises who co-operated with police to ensure guidelines were being followed.’

Officers visited the Old Crown in Wigston, Leicestershire yesterday after a local resident called them to claim people were not following coronavirus guidelines. Pictured: The wake

Officers visited the Old Crown in Wigston, Leicestershire yesterday after a local resident called them to claim people were not following coronavirus guidelines. Pictured: The wake

The resident who called the police took a video of people drinking outside at the back of the pub.

‘I was concerned at what I saw,’ she said. ‘There appeared to be a large group of people drinking outside the pub and they looked quite close to each other.

‘I felt I had to alert the police in case rules were being broken. I felt it was my public duty to report this and I would do the same again.’

Ms Humphries claimed she hosted a wake for 30 people on behalf of a local resident which started at 10.45am.

‘The police called me twice to check that my customers were following the coronavirus rules,’ she said.

‘I spoke to all of customers to remind them of the rules but we always ensure that the rules are being followed properly at all times. All our customers were in groups of six and spaced apart.

‘After the two calls the police just turned up at the pub. They asked us to move some people from the back of the pub to the front to help with social distancing so we did.

‘They left satisfied that no rules were being broken.

Police called the pub (pictured) twice and spoke to the landlady Sue Humphries then turned up unannounced to check that the rules were being followed

Police called the pub (pictured) twice and spoke to the landlady Sue Humphries then turned up unannounced to check that the rules were being followed

‘The last of the people from the wake left at about 5.30pm. We were a lot less busy after they left.’

Ms Humphries said she reopened the pub on August 1 after lockdown.

The incident came ahead of Oadby and Wigston today being urged to restrict their movements amid a new lockdown in the area. 

Tough new measures to control the spread of coronavirus were today announced across parts of the North West, Midlands and West Yorkshire. 

The latest measures, which include a 10pm curfew on pubs and bars, will affect Lancashire, Merseyside, Warrington, Halton, Wolverhampton, Oadby & Wigston, and parts of Bradford, Kirklees and Calderdale from Tuesday.

Residents in these areas are banned from socialising in homes or gardens with people outside their household or ‘bubble’ and food and drink venues are restricted to table service only. Restaurants, bars and pubs will have to close between 10pm and 5am. 

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Woman loses bid to sue police after getting so drunk officers had to change her vomit-soaked clothes

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woman loses bid to sue police after getting so drunk officers had to change her vomit soaked clothes

A woman who sued the police after becoming so drunk officers were forced to change her vomit-soaked clothes rather than leave her to ‘marinade overnight in her own bodily fluids’ has had her case thrown out by a High Court judge.

Cheryl Pile was arrested by Merseyside Police on April 22 2017 for being drunk and disorderly after a taxi driver rang 999 claiming she had started abusing him and ‘kicking off’.

She was described as being ‘covered in vomit’ by officers and taken to a Liverpool police station, where four female officers removed her outer clothes and gave her a clean, dry outfit.

In his ruling, the judge said that at the police station, Ms Pile's 'befuddled attempts to give her details, including her own name, reveal that she was incoherent with drink'. The judge found: 'The officers had used no more force than was strictly necessary to remove the claimant's clothing and she was too drunk to understand what was going on'

In his ruling, the judge said that at the police station, Ms Pile’s ‘befuddled attempts to give her details, including her own name, reveal that she was incoherent with drink’. The judge found: ‘The officers had used no more force than was strictly necessary to remove the claimant’s clothing and she was too drunk to understand what was going on’

Ms Pile – who later agreed to pay a £60 fine for being drunk and disorderly – brought a claim against the force, arguing they did not have the right to change her and had breached her human rights. 

In a ruling published on Friday, Mr Justice Turner dismissed Ms Pile’s appeal, which he said had been brought ‘to establish the liberty of inebriated English subjects to be allowed to lie undisturbed overnight in their own vomit-soaked clothing’. 

He said: ‘She had emptied the contents of her stomach all over herself and was too insensible with drink to have much idea of either where she was or what she was doing there (at the police station).

‘Rather than leave the vulnerable claimant to marinade overnight in her own bodily fluids, four female police officers removed her outer clothing and provided her with a clean dry outfit to wear.

‘The claimant was so drunk that she later had no recollection of these events.

‘It is against this colourful background that she brought a claim against the police in trespass to the person and assault alleging that they should have left her squalidly and unhygienically soaking in vomit.’

In his ruling, the judge said that at the police station, Ms Pile’s ‘befuddled attempts to give her details, including her own name, reveal that she was incoherent with drink’.

The judge found: ‘The officers had used no more force than was strictly necessary to remove the claimant’s clothing and she was too drunk to understand what was going on.’

Ms Pile also complained that officers breached her right to privacy by placing her in a cell monitored by a CCTV camera, which was rejected by the judge.

Cheryl Pile was arrested by Merseyside Police on April 22 2017 for being drunk and disorderly after a taxi driver rang 999 claiming she had started abusing him and 'kicking off' [File photo]

Cheryl Pile was arrested by Merseyside Police on April 22 2017 for being drunk and disorderly after a taxi driver rang 999 claiming she had started abusing him and ‘kicking off’ [File photo]

He said it was ‘fortunate’ that Ms Pile was being observed as, after she was left alone in the cell, she ‘lost her balance, fell over and banged her head on the cell floor’. 

She was taken to hospital and treated for her injuries.

He concluded: ‘The decision to monitor her cell and broadcast the footage to the custody suite was both lawful and necessary. Indeed, it subsequently equipped officers to see that she had fallen over and hurt herself so that she could be given prompt medical attention.’

Mr Justice Turner noted that ‘some members of the public may well have found it to have been a grotesque result if a woman who: has rendered herself insensible through drink; abused an innocent taxi driver; behaved aggressively to police officers trying to do their job and vomited all over herself should then be found to be entitled to compensation because those same officers, as an act of decency, had then changed her into clean and dry clothing at a time when she was too drunk to know or care.’

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