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Jack Charlton’s brother Tommy calls for England 1966 World Cup winner to get a posthumous knighthood

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jack charltons brother tommy calls for england 1966 world cup winner to get a posthumous knighthood

Calls to posthumously honour Jack Charlton have grown with one of his younger siblings, Tommy, urging that he is knighted.

The England 1966 World Cup hero died on Friday at the age of 85.

The former defender passed away at his Northumberland home on after suffering from dementia and lymphoma.

Jack Charlton (centre) should receive a posthumous knighthood, believes his brother Tommy

Jack Charlton (centre) should receive a posthumous knighthood, believes his brother Tommy

Jack Charlton (centre) should receive a posthumous knighthood, believes his brother Tommy 

The former defender was part of the England team that won the 1966 World Cup on home soil

The former defender was part of the England team that won the 1966 World Cup on home soil

The former defender was part of the England team that won the 1966 World Cup on home soil 

Charlton, who played for Leeds United with distinction for 21 years and later managed the Republic of Ireland, was the brother of fellow England great Bobby, now 82. The pair both played in the side which won the World Cup.

And their younger brother Tommy, 74, wants his big brother’s achievements recognised in what would be a ‘fitting tribute’.

‘He was a well-respected, well-loved Englishman. I think a knighthood would be a fitting tribute to him after all he achieved,’ Tommy Charlton told the Mirror.

‘It would be the finishing touch to his life wouldn’t it?

‘I think that Jack is every bit as good as one or two of those who have been knighted recently. He was loved ­wherever he went.

‘But to me, he was simply our Jack, my big brother. I’ve heard some of the tributes, and it has been hard at times.’

Charlton, pictured last year, died on Friday aged 85 after battling lymphoma and dementia

Charlton, pictured last year, died on Friday aged 85 after battling lymphoma and dementia

Charlton, pictured last year, died on Friday aged 85 after battling lymphoma and dementia

MPs, celebs and figures in the game have already expressed their desire for Charlton to become Sir Jack Charlton too. For him to receive a posthumous knighthood, the rules would have to be changed to allow it. All the members of that 1966 World Cup team were awarded MBEs, with Bobby Charlton and Geoff Hurst later knighted. Manager Alf Ramsey was also awarded a knighthood.

Charlton spent his entire 21-year playing career at Leeds, making a joint club-record 773 appearances, before retiring as a player in 1973 and going on to enjoy a successful and colourful career as a manager.

One of English football’s most popular and larger-than-life characters, he had spells in charge of Sheffield Wednesday, Middlesbrough, Newcastle and the Republic of Ireland, who he guided to their first major finals at Euro 88 and two more in the space of 10 years.

His death was announced on Saturday with a family statement that read: ‘Jack died peacefully on Friday, July 10 at the age of 85. He was at home in Northumberland, with his family by his side.

‘As well as a friend to many, he was a much-adored husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather.

Charlton is remembered with affection for his achievements managing Republic of Ireland

Charlton is remembered with affection for his achievements managing Republic of Ireland

Charlton is remembered with affection for his achievements managing Republic of Ireland

‘We cannot express how proud we are of the extraordinary life he led and the pleasure he brought to so many people in different countries and from all walks of life.

‘He was a thoroughly honest, kind, funny and genuine man who always had time for people.

‘His loss will leave a huge hole in all our lives but we are thankful for a lifetime of happy memories.’

Central defender Charlton, older brother of former England and Manchester United midfielder Bobby, made his debut for Leeds in the old Division Two in 1953 and went on to become the bedrock of the great Leeds side built by former manager Don Revie.

Charlton won the 1968-69 league title with Leeds, the FA Cup in 1972, the League Cup in 1968 and two UEFA Cups, in 1968 and 1971.

A delighted Charlton lifts the FA Cup at Wembley after Leeds United beat Arsenal in 1972

A delighted Charlton lifts the FA Cup at Wembley after Leeds United beat Arsenal in 1972

A delighted Charlton lifts the FA Cup at Wembley after Leeds United beat Arsenal in 1972

In action for Leeds against younger brother Bobby, of Manchester United, in January 1969

In action for Leeds against younger brother Bobby, of Manchester United, in January 1969

In action for Leeds against younger brother Bobby, of Manchester United, in January 1969

His golden moment as a player came at Wembley in 1966 when he and brother Bobby were team-mates in England’s World Cup win against West Germany after extra time.

Charlton did not win his first England cap until he was 29, in 1965, and played his 35th and final match for his country in the 1970 World Cup finals in Mexico in a group game against Czechoslovakia.

A towering, uncompromising centre-half, he won the Football Writers’ Association’s Footballer of the Year award in 1967.

He announced his retirement as a player aged 38 soon after missing out on Leeds’ 1973 FA Cup final defeat to Sunderland through injury and was made an OBE the year after for his services to football.

In his first job as manager, Charlton won promotion to the top flight with Middlesbrough in 1974 and narrowly missed out on repeating the feat at Sheffield Wednesday, who he had guided from the bottom of the third tier.

His defensive performances won Charlton the FWA Footballer of the Year award in 1967

His defensive performances won Charlton the FWA Footballer of the Year award in 1967

His defensive performances won Charlton the FWA Footballer of the Year award in 1967

Charlton’s spell in charge of Newcastle lasted one season before he resigned in 1985 and in December of that year he became the first non-Irish manager of the Republic of Ireland.

He steered the Republic to their first major finals at Euro 88 in West Germany and two years later led them to their first World Cup finals at Italia 90.

Charlton, already hugely popular for getting them there, won the hearts of a nation and the rest of the footballing world as his side reached the quarter-finals.

After leading the Republic to the 1994 World Cup finals in the USA – they lost to Holland in the last 16 – Charlton was awarded the Freedom of the City of Dublin. In 1996, he was awarded honorary Irish citizenship. 

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Chelsea boss Lampard gushes over Werner as he is set to face Liverpool who wanted to sign him

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chelsea boss lampard gushes over werner as he is set to face liverpool who wanted to sign him

Timo Werner was a transfer coup. Liverpool wanted him and Chelsea got him, and, as the teams prepared to meet on Sunday, Frank Lampard made it clear he could not be happier with the explosive start made by the man they call ‘Turbo’.

‘He’s incredibly talented,’ gushed Lampard. ‘He’s robust, so I’ve no doubt he can handle the Premier League and the size of the opposition, and he’s very low maintenance. He comes in, he trains, he works hard, he lives right and he wants to come here and be a success.’

Chelsea’s head coach recalled conversations with Werner ahead of his £54million move from RB Leipzig, and how he liked to delve into social media accounts of his transfer targets to check details about their personality.

Chelsea and Liverpool are set to renew rivalries on Sunday after their last very heated clash

Chelsea and Liverpool are set to renew rivalries on Sunday after their last very heated clash

Frank Lampard has a new weapon for Liverpool on Sunday in the form of Timo Werner

Frank Lampard has a new weapon for Liverpool on Sunday in the form of Timo Werner

When Werner spoke this week, he supported this image of sensible young professional, explaining how he was gripped by Lampard’s ‘outlook’ and inside info from Antonio Rudiger, his international team-mate now helping him navigate the complexities of London’s Congestion Charge.

‘Important help, otherwise I’d be getting a bill every day,’ noted Werner, before discussing his nickname, running 100m in 11.1 seconds in his mid-teens and surmising that he’s probably ‘a bit faster’ at 24.

Kai Havertz was talking, too, revealing how it was always his ‘dream’ to play for Chelsea and promising not to be weighed-down by a record £89m fee to sign him from Bayer Leverkusen.

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Werner is hungry to score his first Premier League goal on Sunday against Liverpool

As Liverpool confirmed the signing of Thiago Alcantara from Bayern Munich and made a move for Diogo Jota of Wolves, the Londoners were rolling out the firepower like a Soviet-style parade through Red Square.

Was it a symbolic if unusually subtle two-fingered salute from those at the Bridge? Or pure coincidence?

The relationship between the clubs has been prickly at times, even if both managers were at pains to stress no bitterness lingered from an angry touchline exchange at Anfield two months ago. ‘There’s nothing in it for me,’ said Lampard. ‘The competitive nature of the 90 minutes can always slightly boil over.

Chelsea snapped up Werner for £54m despite interest in the striker from Jurgen Klopp's side

Chelsea snapped up Werner for £54m despite interest in the striker from Jurgen Klopp’s side

‘What he’s done at Liverpool has been incredible. The respect I have for Jurgen Klopp will never change.’

Klopp, too, was keen to end any notion of a simmering personal feud. ‘I have no problems, none at all with Frank Lampard,’ he said.

‘He’s probably a nice guy, I don’t know because I don’t know him privately and he doesn’t know me.’

The Liverpool manager blamed the media for stoking his comments about the post- pandemic transfer activity of those clubs ‘owned by countries and oligarchs’.

Lampard’s response at the time was to feign amusement and reel off a list of Liverpool signings. Virgil van Dijk, Alisson Becker, Fabinho, Naby Keita, Sadio Mane and Mo Salah were ‘incredible players’, he said, and they came at ‘very high prices’.

All of which might have been interpreted differently had it not been for July, when Chelsea’s head coach launched an X-rated tirade at Klopp’s assistant Pep Lijnders because he was ‘smiling’ and ‘smirking’ and, in his view, breaking the ‘code’ of the touchline.

Chelsea have been very busy this summer with Kai Havertz becoming their record signing

Chelsea have been very busy this summer with Kai Havertz becoming their record signing

Lampard warned Liverpool about getting ‘too arrogant’ and Klopp responded with a patronising dressing down, about how ‘he has to learn’ not to take touchline disagreements into the public arena.

The flashpoint rekindled the spirit of a compelling rivalry, which emerged between the clubs in 2004-05 when Jose Mourinho and Rafa Benitez first locked in combat and Lampard was the goal threat at the heart of Chelsea’s midfield.

The teams met 24 times in five years, often for high stakes and with Mourinho stirring trouble and trying to lure Steven Gerrard to Stamford Bridge.

Klopp and Lampard have both made comments about the other team's high-priced signings

Klopp and Lampard have both made comments about the other team’s high-priced signings

‘As a player I felt the adrenalin for a game at this level,’ said Lampard. ‘A team like Liverpool would always put more on the game. Chelsea were competing to win the leagues and Liverpool not so much. In the Champions League, we drew each other a lot and those games were ultra- competitive and difficult for us.

‘In the last few years, Liverpool have been fighting at the top and last year they win it. We are trying to improve, trying to close the gap. Both squads, coaches and fan-bases are very driven to win. That’s what the Premier League is all about.’

Chelsea are in combat mode. They will resist the urge to say it but they will have sights on the top of the Premier League after their recruitment drive. Lampard will be keen to land an early blow on the champions and he will look to ‘Turbo’ to lead the charge.

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Andy Robertson insists Liverpool will relish the ‘fun’ of proving their doubters wrong

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andy robertson insists liverpool will relish the fun of proving their doubters wrong

Andy Robertson insists Liverpool will relish the ‘fun’ of proving doubters wrong to retain the Premier League title.

The Merseyside club landed their first top flight title in 30 years last season but some have suggested they will struggle to repeat the feat this campaign. 

The Reds made an emphatic statement of their intent to retain their crown on Friday after confirming the signing of Thiago from Bayern Munich as well as agreeing a fee with Wolves for Diogo Jota.

Andy Robertson insists Liverpool will relish the 'fun' of proving doubters wrong once again

Andy Robertson insists Liverpool will relish the ‘fun’ of proving doubters wrong once again

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The Merseyside made a statement of intent by securing signing of Thiago from Bayern Munich

The Scottish full-back — an integral part of the club’s recent success — says new arrivals are always welcome but he believes they already have a squad capable of fighting for all trophies available this season. 

‘If the club buys players it will be to improve the squad. That is always welcomed’, Robertson told the Guardian.

‘And if they don’t we have a squad that can compete on all fronts. That is what we believe. We have a squad with young lads who are getting better every day. Our squad can compete for the four trophies we are going for.’

Despite Liverpool’s exceptional last campaign, Manchester City are the popular choice of many to regain their Premier League crown once again this season.

But Robertson insisted Liverpool are at their best when they are proving doubters wrong. They secured the title a year after missing out on it by one point, while also winning the Champions League a year after losing the 2018 final. 

Scot says his side are best when they are questioned after winning the Premier League a year after missing out by one point while also winning Champions League year after losing the final

Scot says his side are best when they are questioned after winning the Premier League a year after missing out by one point while also winning Champions League year after losing the final

‘Every season we’ve been questioned. When we lost the Champions League final everyone thought: “Will they be back or was it a one-off season?” The next season we won the Champions League and just fell short in the Premier League. Even then people said: “If they didn’t beat Man City this season, they’re never going to beat them,” because of how well we’d done. The following season we went and proved it.

‘We’ve got doubters again, of course we do. We’ve got people that are backing different teams and that’s part of the fun of it. We’re not going to change the way we think or the way we go about our business. It’s worked quite successfully the last three seasons so why would we change our ways?’

Brazilian star Thiago is bound to add quality to an already high-performing midfield, while the imminent £41million signing of the talented Jota will add strength in depth to their ruthless front line.

Liverpool began their title defence with a narrow 4-3 victory against Leeds last week, while they travel to face a new-look Chelsea side on Sunday.

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Liverpool have agreed a deal to sign Wolves forward Diogo Jota as back-up for their front three

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IAN HERBERT: Spurs and Liverpool’s furloughing of staff was an unmitigated PR disaster

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ian herbert spurs and liverpools furloughing of staff was an unmitigated pr disaster

Premier League clubs’ decision to take public money to furlough their staff never was a good look, whatever nonsense being propagated by some in the depths of the first lockdown. 

The frenzied whirl of the transfer merry-go-round these past few days has only gone to prove the point.

The Tottenham MP David Lammy encapsulated it all in a couple of tweets. 

Gareth Bale was all smiles as he arrived at Tottenham's training ground ahead of his move

Gareth Bale was all smiles as he arrived at Tottenham’s training ground ahead of his move

Liverpool unveiled £20m new boy Thiago Alcantara after sealing deal with Bayern Munich

Liverpool unveiled £20m new boy Thiago Alcantara after sealing deal with Bayern Munich

He declared a few days ago that Universal Credit applications are up 120 per cent in the district of North London and declared himself ‘terrified’ by the effect on unemployment created by the end of the furlough scheme. 

On Friday, he tweeted a photo-shopped image of the Tottenham Hotspur stadium with golf bunkers imposed to encapsulate ‘the #GarethBale status for my constituents.’

The club reversed a furlough decision amid wholesale public indignation, then secured a £175m taxpayer-backed loan through the Covid Corporate Financing Facility (CCFF). Now they are paying out £200,000-a-week, give or take, on the player’s wages.

To be fair, Tottenham acted with more propriety than most, in the final reckoning. They eventually reimbursed their staff the 20 per cent of the salaries which were cut. The only officials at the club to have taken a reduction have been the directors.

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Liverpool moved decisively to seal the capture of midfielder Thiago on Friday afternoon

Liverpool moved decisively to seal the capture of midfielder Thiago on Friday afternoon

Bale is expected to be on £200,000-a-week when he completes his return to Spurs

Bale is expected to be on £200,000-a-week when he completes his return to Spurs

And where the ensuing transfer business is concerned, it may ultimately prove to be one-in, one-out: Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg for Kyle Walker Peters and Matt Doherty for Serge Aurier, should he leave for one of the clubs expressing firm interest: Bayer Leverkusen and AC Milan. 

Sergio Reguilon’s arrival may see Ryan Sessegnon leave on loan and Danny Rose will also be off the books. The transfer pay-out for Reguilon is, in fact, absolutely minimal in the first year. 

Bale, meanwhile, will be on no more than parity, and probably marginally less, than Tottenham’s £200,000-a-week top earner Harry Kane. This is less outlay than Manchester United would have had to pay for Bale, because of the extremely tight relationship his agent Jonathan Barnett and his Stellar group have with Daniel Levy.

With some justification, Spurs might point to other clubs, whose moves are more incongruous than their own. Arsenal laid off 55 staff and then secured Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang’s future on £250,000-a-week. 

Newcastle United furloughed their staff at tax-payers’ expense – to ‘safeguard the club’s future’, they claimed at the time – yet that existential crisis has not prevented them shelling out £20m for Callum Wilson and the best part of £15m for Jamal Lewis.

Another club forced into a furlough U-turn were Liverpool, who faced a tide of protest from their own fans among others. Yet they have been able to conclude the £20m acquisition of Thiago Alcantara.

Daniel Levy and Spurs were forced to go back on decision to furlough staff during lockdown

Daniel Levy and Spurs were forced to go back on decision to furlough staff during lockdown

Liverpool (pictured, owner John W Henry) also faced a tide of protest from their own fans

Liverpool (pictured, owner John W Henry) also faced a tide of protest from their own fans

They can point to the fact that they did not move for Timo Werner, who cost Chelsea £47.6m. But the new acquisition and wages, with Wolves’ £41m Diogo Jota in tow – put the choreography of last Spring in perspective.

Their own decision not to move for Werner is mirrored by Manchester United stepping back from any move to bring in Jack Grealish from Aston Villa. 

They have indicated they do not have the funds for a £70m acquisition, bearing out Ed Woodward’s declaration in April that ‘nobody should be under any illusions about the scale of the challenge’ because of the pandemic.

Clubs will argue until they are blue in the face that there is no correlation between the cash required to pay staff and to buy and fund players but the optics are terrible. From start to finish, furloughing was an unmitigated PR disaster.

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