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Apple set to release its new 5G iPhone 12 lineup in two stages

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apple set to release its new 5g iphone 12 lineup in two stages

Apple recently confirmed that the iPhone 12 release date would be delayed until at least October as a result of production delays, but a new report says the launch will be split in two stages.

The tech giant is set to roll out four smartphones this year and sources within the supply chain revealed the two 6.1-inch models will hit the market first.

Shipments for the device are reportedly under way, which will be followed by 6.7- and 5.4-inch devices in late August.

The delay is a result of the coronavirus pandemic that forced Apple to close its factories in China earlier this year, in a bid to limit spreading the virus.

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Apple recently confirmed that the iPhone 12 release date would be delayed until at least October as a result of production delays, but a new report says the launch will be split in two stages (Pictured are artist impression of the smartphone)

Apple recently confirmed that the iPhone 12 release date would be delayed until at least October as a result of production delays, but a new report says the launch will be split in two stages (Pictured are artist impression of the smartphone)

September has been the set month for when Apple releases its next-gen iPhone, but the ongoing health crisis and travel restrictions has forced the firm to shift plans.

Confirmation of the delay followed rumors circulated by tech leaker John Prosser last month that new iPhones and iPads would be released in October.

However, Apple confirmed the rumors to be true during its last earnings call at the end of July.

‘We believe we are going to have a strong back-to-school season,’ Apple CEO Tim Cook said on the conference call, Axios reported.

Confirmation of the delay followed rumors circulated by tech leaker John Prosser last month that new iPhones and iPads would be released in October. Apple confirmed the rumors to be true during its last earnings call at the end of July

Confirmation of the delay followed rumors circulated by tech leaker John Prosser last month that new iPhones and iPads would be released in October. Apple confirmed the rumors to be true during its last earnings call at the end of July

The news of two stages was shared by Digitimes, which revealed Apple’s supply chain plans on receiving orders for new iPhone components in the fourth quarter – a few weeks later than usual.

‘Apple may launch its 5G iPhones in two stages,’ reports Digitimes, ‘with two 6.1-inch models in the first and another 6.7- and 5.4-inch devices in the second.’ 

The publication’s unnamed sources within the supply chain reportedly say that their shipments for the 6.1-inch iPhone have already begun. These shipments are of the ‘SLP (Substrate-like PCB) mainboards’ and those for the remaining iPhones are now scheduled to begin in late August.

Overall, Digitimes says that the peak time for shipping all new iPhone SLPs is going to take place between two and four weeks later than Apple’s traditional timeline.

The present global health crisis also means that Apple will not be placing earnings targets, again, for the fourth quarter of 2020.

The Apple iPhone 12 is hotly anticipated and will support 5G wireless technology.

In locations where the necessary infrastructure is already established, these 5G enabled handsets will offer superior download speeds.

The development will see Apple catch up to its Android-based rivals, whose latest offerings have all featured 5G capable handsets.

These include the OnePlus 8 Pro, the Samsung Galaxy S20 and the soon-to-be-released Galaxy Note 20.

Rumors have also circulated online that, with the iPhone 12, Apple may cease bundling matching headphones and a charging adapter with handset sales.

iPHONE 12 RUMORS 

Respected leaker Jon Prosser revealed schematics of a drastically reduced camera 'notch' on the front, expected for the iPhone 12

Respected leaker Jon Prosser revealed schematics of a drastically reduced camera ‘notch’ on the front, expected for the iPhone 12

A pair of leaked schematics suggest that Apple’s upcoming iPhone 12 will fall just short of eliminating a camera ‘notch’ on the phone’s display.

The pictures, posted on Twitter by frequent phone leaker Jon Prosser, show what appear to be official Apple schematics for its next flagship iPhone – specifically a drastically reduced ‘notch’ that stores the device’s front-facing camera components.

According to the schematics the microphone will be moved to the top of the device’s display in order to compress the size of the camera notch.

Citing ‘people familiar with the plans,’ the report notes that Apple is set to release four new smartphones this year, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The devices will come in three different sizes, one will be 5.4 inches, two at 6.1 inches and another model is 6.7 inches – some of the handsets will support 5G.  

Apple’s iPhone 12 could also be completely wireless, meaning users will not receive a free pair of earbuds and be forced to purchase the firm’s $159 AirPods.

The news was revealed by well-known Apple product predictor Ming-Chi Kuo, who believes the tech giant may offer promotions or discounts on the AirPods this holiday season.

Kuo also noted that Apple is not expected to release new models of AirPods or AirPods Pro until 2021, 9to5Mac reports.

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Earth is set to capture a minimoon in October – but some experts it could be space junk

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earth is set to capture a minimoon in october but some experts it could be space junk

Astronomers have spotted an object with an incoming trajectory towards Earth that could become a temporary minimoon.

Dubbed 2020 SO, the entity has been on an Earth-like orbit for more than a year and is set to become trapped in our planet’s gravity starting in October and stay until May 2021. 

However, some experts have noticed it is moving much slower than a typical asteroid and suggest it could be man-made space junk.

A NASA scientist has speculated that it may be a discarded part of the Surveyor 2 Centaur rocket that launched in 1966.

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Astronomers have spotted an object with an incoming trajectory towards Earth that could become a temporary minimoon

Astronomers have spotted an object with an incoming trajectory towards Earth that could become a temporary minimoon

Astronomers have spotted an object with an incoming trajectory towards Earth that could become a temporary minimoon

DailyMail.com has contacted NASA for more information and has yet to receive a response. 

Tony Dunn, an astronomer, told DailyMail.com: ‘Further observations will reveal its density. If it is hollow like a rocket booster, solar radiation pressure will significantly alter its course.’

Earth has only had two minimoons on record – one in February 2020 and the other in 2006.

Unlike the other two, 2020 SO has yet to be confirmed as an asteroid, as some scientists believe it could be space junk hurling towards Earth.  

However, 2020 SO has been classified as an Apollo asteroid in NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Small-Body Database, which is a class of asteroids whose paths cross Earth’s orbit.

Dubbed 2020 SO, the entity has been on an Earth-like orbit for more than a year and is set to become trapped in our planet's gravity starting in October and stay until May 2021

Dubbed 2020 SO, the entity has been on an Earth-like orbit for more than a year and is set to become trapped in our planet's gravity starting in October and stay until May 2021

Dubbed 2020 SO, the entity has been on an Earth-like orbit for more than a year and is set to become trapped in our planet’s gravity starting in October and stay until May 2021

However, some experts have noticed it is moving much slower than a typical asteroid and suggest it could be man-made space junk. A NASA scientist has speculated that it may be a discarded part of the Surveyor 2 Centaur rocket that launched in 1966

However, some experts have noticed it is moving much slower than a typical asteroid and suggest it could be man-made space junk. A NASA scientist has speculated that it may be a discarded part of the Surveyor 2 Centaur rocket that launched in 1966

However, some experts have noticed it is moving much slower than a typical asteroid and suggest it could be man-made space junk. A NASA scientist has speculated that it may be a discarded part of the Surveyor 2 Centaur rocket that launched in 1966

NASA’s Center for Near Earth Object Studies Database shows the object is between 12 and 46 feet long, which also matches properties of the 1966 Centaur that measures 41.6 feet long.

Experts have also noted that 2020 SO’s velocity is much lower than that of an Apollo asteroid.

Space archaeologist Alice Gorman of Flinders University in Australia told ScienceAlert: ‘The velocity seems to be a big one.’

‘What I’m seeing is that it’s just moving too slowly, which reflects its initial velocity. That’s essentially a big giveaway.’

Paul Chodas with JPL identified this with the Surveyor 2 Centaur rocket body, launched on September 20, 1966.

‘The very low Earth encounter velocity (0.6 km/sec is even low for lunar ejecta, so it is unlikely it is a natural body, even lunar ejecta, more likely space junk,’ he wrote. 

NASA's Center for Near Earth Object Studies Database shows the object is between 12 and 46 feet long, which also matches properties of the 1966 Centaur that measures 41.6 feet long

NASA's Center for Near Earth Object Studies Database shows the object is between 12 and 46 feet long, which also matches properties of the 1966 Centaur that measures 41.6 feet long

NASA’s Center for Near Earth Object Studies Database shows the object is between 12 and 46 feet long, which also matches properties of the 1966 Centaur that measures 41.6 feet long

In February (pictured), NASA announced it had confirmed a new visitor in Earth's gravity. NASA-funded Catalina Sky Survey discovered a temporarily captured asteroid, called 2020 CD3, which has been orbiting our planet for three years

In February (pictured), NASA announced it had confirmed a new visitor in Earth's gravity. NASA-funded Catalina Sky Survey discovered a temporarily captured asteroid, called 2020 CD3, which has been orbiting our planet for three years

In February (pictured), NASA announced it had confirmed a new visitor in Earth’s gravity. NASA-funded Catalina Sky Survey discovered a temporarily captured asteroid, called 2020 CD3, which has been orbiting our planet for three years 

An animation of the object in question shows that it is in fact heading towards Earth and will make to close swoops when it arrives. 

In December,  2020 OS is expected to pass by Earth at a distance of around 31,000 miles and two months later, it will fly by at 136,701 miles. 

In February, NASA announced it had confirmed a new visitor in Earth’s gravity.

NASA-funded Catalina Sky Survey discovered a temporarily captured asteroid, called 2020 CD3, which has been orbiting our planet for three years.

The tiny cosmic object was estimated to be about six to 12 feet in diameter and had a surface brightness similar to C-type asteroids, which are carbon rich and very common.

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Tropical bird communicates with wing flutters and has ‘TWO accents’

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tropical bird communicates with wing flutters and has two accents

The Fork-tailed Flycatcher, a tiny bird that lives in the American tropics, uses the rustling of its wings to communicate and has different dialects, a study has found. 

The species is divided into two sub-species, one which spends the whole year in the northern part of South America and the other which breeds in the southern part of the continent but returns closer to the Equator in winter.

The study found the migratory sub-species makes a higher-pitched sound when flying, likely due to thinner feathers which evolved to help it fly long distances. 

As a result of the two sounds, which scientists liken to human accents, the birds may only be able to mate with individuals that ‘speak the same language’.  

This lack of communication and selective mating could soon result in the species splitting in two, scientists believe.   

A tropical bird in the American tropics, the diminutive Fork-tailed Flycatchers (pictured), uses the rustling noise of its wings to communicate, a study has revealed. There are two sub -species, one migratory and one non-migratory, and they have distinct accents

A tropical bird in the American tropics, the diminutive Fork-tailed Flycatchers (pictured), uses the rustling noise of its wings to communicate, a study has revealed. There are two sub -species, one migratory and one non-migratory, and they have distinct accents

A tropical bird in the American tropics, the diminutive Fork-tailed Flycatchers (pictured), uses the rustling noise of its wings to communicate, a study has revealed. There are two sub -species, one migratory and one non-migratory, and they have distinct accents 

‘We already knew from past genetic analysis that the two groups are becoming different species, so we wanted to know if there were any differences in the sounds that the males produce with their wings,’ says Valentina Gómez-Bahamón, a researcher at Chicago’s Field Museum.

‘We not only confirmed the way that these birds make sounds with their feathers, but that the sounds are different for the two subspecies.’ 

Weighing only an ounce, Fork-tailed Flycatchers are black-and-grey and look like tiny swallows – except for their foot-long, scissor-shaped tails.

Fork-tailed Flycatchers are very aggressive birds, so to lure them in, the researchers set up a taxidermy hawk (left) for the flycatchers to attack (right). The scientists took video and audio recordings of the birds' wing feathers to see how they produced their sounds

Fork-tailed Flycatchers are very aggressive birds, so to lure them in, the researchers set up a taxidermy hawk (left) for the flycatchers to attack (right). The scientists took video and audio recordings of the birds' wing feathers to see how they produced their sounds

Fork-tailed Flycatchers are very aggressive birds, so to lure them in, the researchers set up a taxidermy hawk (left) for the flycatchers to attack (right). The scientists took video and audio recordings of the birds’ wing feathers to see how they produced their sounds

Hummingbirds drop their body temperature below 4°C 

Hummingbirds can cool their bodies to less than 4°C (40°F) at night – the lowest temperature recorded in any bird – to save energy for use the daytime, researchers have found. 

This rare ability is called torpor, and is a brief hibernation-like state which slashes energy expenditure by 95 per cent in the diminutive birds. 

Hummingbirds have wings that beat more than ten times a second and during daylight they use their hovering ability to suck nectar from thousands of flowers.

To keep up, their tiny hearts beat around 1,000 times a minute, but this drops to just 50 during torpor.  

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They use those giant tail feathers to help attract mates – and spread them while hunting or fighting.  

But it’s the flight feathers in the male birds’ wings that make the sounds.

Ms Gomez-Bahamon, who is studying for a PhD at the University of Illinois, said: ‘They produce the sounds when they fly very fast, and they fly very fast when they are fighting each other. These birds fight a lot.

‘They are very feisty, they are not afraid of anything.’

The birds are territorial and fight off bigger birds that come near their nests – even hawks more than ten times their size.

During the mating season males fight, producing a high-pitched trilling sound. Ms Gomez-Bahamon and colleagues found it came from the fluttering of feathers.

They trapped live birds with mist nets – fine webbing stretched between two poles like a volleyball net.

After taking measurements, the researchers let them go and recorded audio and video of the birds as they flew away.

They also used the territorial nature of the birds to get a closer look by using a taxidermy hawk with a camera and microphone attached. 

By analysing the audio and video, the researchers proved the unique sound did come from the flight feathers.          

Ms Gomez-Bahamon says the birds make the noise in two scenarios, when fighting and win early morning, when it’s still dark, to display to females.

The findings are published in the journal Integrative and Comparative Biology. 

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The JUMKEET Laptop Stand is the bestselling laptop stand on Amazon

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the jumkeet laptop stand is the bestselling laptop stand on amazon

Working from home does have its perks, but you might have found that it’s playing havoc with your posture. 

That’s why Amazon shoppers highly recommend picking up this affordable laptop stand. Not only does the adjustable laptop stand relieve pressure on your neck and back, it’s also a great space saver. 

The JUMKEET Laptop Stand is currently the number one bestseller in ‘Laptop and Computer Stands’ on Amazon. With over 1,600 glowing reviews, it’s been described by one reviewer as ‘strong, sturdy and stable – perfect for working from home during a pandemic!’

The £15.99 JUMKEET Laptop Stand is the number one bestseller in laptop stands on Amazon

The £15.99 JUMKEET Laptop Stand is the number one bestseller in laptop stands on Amazon 

Using a laptop flat on the desk often means the screen is positioned too low, which can cause you to hunch your posture, putting strain on your neck, shoulders and lower back.

The JUMKEET Laptop Stand is an affordable and effective solution. Described by one customer as a ‘great little stand for working at home,’ it raises your screen to a comfortable eyeline, thereby aligning your spine and helping you to fix your posture.

In fact, it’s been such as success one delighted reviewer wrote: ‘Excellent Laptop Stand – One of best things I have bought in 2020! Great design, portable, light, strong and really functionally quite excellent!’ 

Although it’s simply designed, it’s surprisingly effective. The JUMKEET stand can hold any laptop or tablet between 7-17 inches, including Apple Macbook, Macbook Air, Macbook Pro and the iPad. 

It has six adjustable angles so you can move it around to the one that suits you. The mesh metal design helps to get better airflow while the laptop is running, meaning it won’t overheat. 

Many reviewers have even commented on how the stand actually saves them desk space.

One wrote: ‘This is much smaller than I thought but that has made it 10x’s better. Laptop has plenty of space to breath and it doesn’t take up too much desk space. An excellent buy.’

The laptop stand is a popular buy when working from home, with one customer writing 'investment in this laptop stand has helped improve my posture at the desk tremendously'

The laptop stand is a popular buy when working from home, with one customer writing ‘investment in this laptop stand has helped improve my posture at the desk tremendously’

This biggest benefit of the JUMKEET Laptop Stand is its ability to alleviate aches and pains. Hundreds of shoppers have raved about how it improves posture, actively taking pressure off the neck and back.

One shopper wrote: ‘What everyone should have if working with a laptop. This has considerably helped my daughter who is currently working from home. It was easy to use and has allowed her posture to improve.’

Another added: ‘Working from home with lots of time at my desk, my posture began to slack. Investment in this laptop stand has helped improve my posture at the desk tremendously.’

A third wrote: ‘It has raised my laptop screen height to eye level (I’m 163cm so might be too low for really tall people?) and my posture has definitely gotten better thanks to this. The laptop is held in place by the flap at the bottom of the stand which is, so far, nice and sturdy.’ 

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