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Crash Bandicoot for iPhone and Android to ‘arrive in spring 2021’

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crash bandicoot for iphone and android to arrive in spring 2021

The hugely popular video game Crash Bandicoot, first released in 1996 for the original PlayStation, is set to launch for iOS and Android devices next spring. 

The new installment, Crash Bandicoot: On the Run!, which users will be able to download as an app on their smartphones, is being made by video game developers King, the company behind the hugely successful mobile game Candy Crush Saga.

Gamers will be able to simply tap the screen to control the Crash Bandicoot avatar through the fictional Wumpa Island in his quest to save the multiverse and avoid the clutches of the evil antagonist, Dr. Neo Cortex.

The free game is an endless runner, meaning players don’t have to control the mutant bandicoot’s forward momentum and instead focus on jumping over obstacles. 

King says the game will feature fan favourite characters from the series’ quarter-century history, including Dr. Cortex and Fake Crash, Crash Bandicoot’s dimwitted doppelganger. 

The game doesn’t have an officially confirmed launch date at the moment, although it’s listed on the Apple Store as being available from March 25. 

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Crash Bandicoot: On the Run! is set to launch on mobile in Spring 2021. Fans can look forward to classic Crash gameplay for mobile, according to developers King. Pictured from left, Crash Bandicoot, his sister Coco Bandicoot and Fake Crash

Crash Bandicoot: On the Run! is set to launch on mobile in Spring 2021. Fans can look forward to classic Crash gameplay for mobile, according to developers King. Pictured from left, Crash Bandicoot, his sister Coco Bandicoot and Fake Crash

Crash Bandicoot: On the Run! is set to launch on mobile in Spring 2021. Fans can look forward to classic Crash gameplay for mobile, according to developers King. Pictured from left, Crash Bandicoot, his sister Coco Bandicoot and Fake Crash

‘Crash Bandicoot is back, but this time he’s on the run and on mobile!’ reads the game’s official blurb on Google Play and Apple Store. 

‘That means high-speed battle runs across Wumpa Island to save the multiverse from the evil Dr. Neo Cortex, smash crates, avoid obstacles and run into your favourite characters.’

In Crash Bandicoot: On the Run!, players will have to avoid energy blasts and mutated blobs while smashing crates and collecting wumpa fruit – a cross between an apple and a mango – on the fictional archipelago near Tasmania, Australia. 

Crash Bandicoot

Crash Bandicoot

Crash Bandicoot: On the Run! is an endless runner, meaning players don’t have to control the mutant bandicoot’s forward momentum and have to tap the screen to make him jump

Crash inside the evil Dr Cortex's lab as he collects wumpa fruit - a colourful cross between an apple and a mango

Crash inside the evil Dr Cortex's lab as he collects wumpa fruit - a colourful cross between an apple and a mango

Crash inside the evil Dr Cortex’s lab as he collects wumpa fruit – a colourful cross between an apple and a mango

Hidden paths will lead players to exclusive challenge runs that are full of additional dangers, small enemies and Dr. Cortex’s minions, including mini-blobs, ant drones and giant oxide spiders. 

All the while, players will be battling their favourite bosses, earning rewards and building weapons and bases.  

Gamers will be able to play on one of the most infamous levels from the original Crash Bandicoot game and N. Sane Trilogy, which was released in 2017 for consoles. 

Dr. Neo Cortex (pictured here in the new game) originally created Crash Bandicoot in the lab, and after nearly 25 years still wants him dead

Dr. Neo Cortex (pictured here in the new game) originally created Crash Bandicoot in the lab, and after nearly 25 years still wants him dead

Dr. Neo Cortex (pictured here in the new game) originally created Crash Bandicoot in the lab, and after nearly 25 years still wants him dead

Shot of Fake Crash for the 2021 game, who has appeared as an unlockable playable character and boss through the history of the franchise

Shot of Fake Crash for the 2021 game, who has appeared as an unlockable playable character and boss through the history of the franchise

Shot of Fake Crash for the 2021 game, who has appeared as an unlockable playable character and boss through the history of the franchise

In ‘The Lab’, Crash Bandicoot will aim to defeat Dr. Cortex, who himself genetically engineered the mutant bandicoot before his escape. 

Players will also have to navigate Fake Crash – the protagonist’s clueless doppelganger who tends to show up unexpectedly during the series, usually without much explanation.  

As Crash, players will also get to team up with his highly intelligent younger sister Coco Bandicoot and spot enemies across the island. 

They’ll also get to customise the Crash avatar, join friends on multiplayer mode, building their own unique bandicoot crew. 

Crash Bandicoot: On the Run! is now available for pre-registration on Android and iOS-registration. 

Crash Bandicoot: On the Run! is available for pre-registration on Android and now on iOS. Any player that pre-registers will receive an exclusive mobile Blue Hyena Skin on launch day, which fans may remember from 2019's Crash Team Racing: Nitro Fueled

Crash Bandicoot: On the Run! is available for pre-registration on Android and now on iOS. Any player that pre-registers will receive an exclusive mobile Blue Hyena Skin on launch day, which fans may remember from 2019's Crash Team Racing: Nitro Fueled

Crash Bandicoot: On the Run! is available for pre-registration on Android and now on iOS. Any player that pre-registers will receive an exclusive mobile Blue Hyena Skin on launch day, which fans may remember from 2019’s Crash Team Racing: Nitro Fueled

Users who have pre-registered games will receive a push notification letting them know the app or game is available for their device. 

Eligible devices will have the app or game automatically downloaded and installed. 

All players who pre-register will receive a Blue Hyena Skin, from last year’s Crash Bandicoot racing game, Crash Team Racing: Nitro Fueled, which turns Crash blue. 

King said the game will be completely free to play but some optional in-game items will require payment. 

Cover of the original Crash Bandicoot game from 1996 - one of the original PlayStation's most successful games

Cover of the original Crash Bandicoot game from 1996 - one of the original PlayStation's most successful games

Cover of the original Crash Bandicoot game from 1996 – one of the original PlayStation’s most successful games

The first Crash Bandicoot computer game was originally developed by US firm Naughty Dog as an exclusive for Sony’s PlayStation console.

It went on to sell 6.8 million units and became the eighth-best selling game for the PlayStation, behind the likes of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, Final Fantasy VII and top ranking seller, 1997’s Gran Turismo.  

Follow-ups were developed for the PlayStation 2, Nintendo’s GameCube and handheld DS and Microsoft’s Xbox until 2010, when the series went on a seven-year hiatus.

Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy, which compiled reboots of the first three games in the series – Crash Bandicoot (1996), Cortex Strikes Back (1997), and Warped (1998) – marked the a reboot in 2017. 

A recent report said N. Sane Trilogy helped kicks-tart a ‘huge appetite for nostalgic gameplay’ in the UK, partly driven by adults who enjoyed the original as a kid in the 1990s. 

REMAKES ARE DRIVING THE UK’S GAMING ECONOMY: REPORT

Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy (pictured) was released for the PS$ in June 2017 and the Switch the following year. Reboots of old games are proving popular among those who spent their childhood in the 1990s playing games

Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy (pictured) was released for the PS$ in June 2017 and the Switch the following year. Reboots of old games are proving popular among those who spent their childhood in the 1990s playing games

Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy (pictured) was released for the PS$ in June 2017 and the Switch the following year. Reboots of old games are proving popular among those who spent their childhood in the 1990s playing games

The trend for remastered games is playing a significant role in the growth of the gaming industry in the UK, according to Mobiles.co.uk.

The new UKIE UK Top Selling Games List for 2019 revealed that remakes and remastered games including Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy, Resident Evil 2 and The Legend of Zelda Link’s Awakening were amongst the top 100 best selling boxed games sold in 2019.

While the more recent Final Fantasy VII remake quickly became one of the PS4’s best selling game to date.

Still remaining in the top 20 for the UK’s best-selling games of 2019 two years after its release, Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy receives around 6,600 unique searches every month.

Its continuing popularity indicates that British gamers are becoming increasingly nostalgic when it comes to their gaming choices. 

Crash Bandicoot also features at number 21 in the 2019 list. 

The remaster spiked the interest of gamers in the UK with a 49 per cent increase in search volume over the past 12 months alone. 

With an average of 27,100 monthly searches, the franchise’s decision to reboot this classic was certainly welcomed by the industry, indicating there is a huge appetite for nostalgic gameplay.

The final remaster included in the list of the top-selling games is The Legend of Zelda Link’s Awakening. 

Screenshoot from the update of The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening, released September 2019

Screenshoot from the update of The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening, released September 2019

Screenshoot from the update of The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening, released September 2019

Originally launched on the Game Boy in 1993, the remake was designed for the Nintendo Switch. 

As of March 2020, the new Link’s Awakening had sold more than four million copies globally6, and it’s one of the best-selling games of all time for the Nintendo Switch.

90s teens are 69 per cent more likely than the national average to spend between 21 and 28 hours gaming every week, Mobiles.co.uk claims. 

In 2019, the entire UK video game industry generated a huge £5.35 billion in revenue, with £3.77 billion of that total generated from video game software sales. There are 37.3 million gamers in the UK alone.  

Lee Chambers, Psychologist and gaming expert, commented on the research: ‘Gaming and nostalgia are heavily interconnected, to the point where it fuels trends and shapes the industry direction. 

‘Video games are incredible triggers for nostalgia, anchoring us back to an often carefree time, when we had fewer responsibilities and gaming became a social construct as groups of children all sat around in a bedroom socialising while playing.’

‘The reality of the industry is that nostalgic gamers are now the ones with purchasing power to relive past glories fighting dragons of their youth, while being decision-makers for buying games as presents for their children.

‘Your average early millennial is approaching 40. They don’t have the time they did as a child to form an emotional bond to a game’s story with life’s distractions, but a remake removes that barrier, making it all the more attractive.’   

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Climate change could bring the start of Autumn forward by almost a week

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climate change could bring the start of autumn forward by almost a week

The start of autumn could begin a week sooner in the future due to climate change causing trees to capture more carbon and drop their leaves earlier in the year. 

For decades scientists expected temperate trees would shed their leaves gradually later in the year – making autumn later as average temperatures rise worldwide.

Early observations seem to show this was happening over the past few decades – driving a longer growing season that could held slow the rate of climate change. 

However, a new, large-scale study of European trees by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has found this trend has started to reverse and leaves are falling earlier.  

The new discovery means instead of autumn starting up to three weeks later, it will start between three and six days earlier over the course of the century.

Early observations seem to show this was happening over the past few decades - driving a longer growing season that could held slow the rate of climate change.

Early observations seem to show this was happening over the past few decades - driving a longer growing season that could held slow the rate of climate change.

Early observations seem to show this was happening over the past few decades – driving a longer growing season that could held slow the rate of climate change.

The presence of leaves on deciduous trees marks the changing of the seasons – and the period of time in which trees store carbon from the air.

Warning winters cause spring leaves to emerge earlier and it a widespread example of a climate-change impact, according to the team behind the study. 

The timing of when the leaves fall is harder to spot. There might be limits to how much greenhouse gas a tree can use or store in a single year, explained Dr Zani.

If all carbon needs are met, leaves might fall earlier rather than later in the autumn. 

Changes in the growing-season of trees greatly affect global carbon balance, Zani explained, but it is difficult to predict future patterns.

This is due to the fact that the environmental drivers of leaf ageing aren’t well understood by scientists. 

Autumn shedding in temperate regions like the UK is an adaptation to stressors – such as cold weather and a common assumption is that if you warm the air up this would allow leaves to persist for longer and fix more atmospheric carbon. 

Dr Zani and colleagues used long-term observations from dominant Central European tree species from 1948 to 2015 and experiments designed to modify carbon uptake to evaluate the related impacts. 

The study showed an increased growing-season in spring and summer due to more CO2, light and higher temperatures will lead to earlier leaf shedding – not later.

This is likely because roots and wood cease to use or store leaf-captured carbon at a point – making leaves costly to keep.

The researchers used the data to build a model to improve autumn prediction under a business-as-usual climate scenario – that is one where no efforts are made to slow the rate of climate change by keeping global average temperature from rising.

The model forecasts the possibility of autumn leaf-dropping dates becoming earlier over the rest of the century rather than later – as previously assumed.

However, a new, large-scale study of European trees by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has found this trend has started to reverse and leaves are falling earlier

However, a new, large-scale study of European trees by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has found this trend has started to reverse and leaves are falling earlier

However, a new, large-scale study of European trees by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has found this trend has started to reverse and leaves are falling earlier

Dr Zani said: ‘Changes in the growing-season lengths of temperate trees greatly affect biotic interactions and global carbon balance.

‘Yet future growing-season trajectories remain highly uncertain because the environmental drivers of autumn leaf deterioration are poorly understood.’

Accounting for increases in spring and summer productivity due to rising carbon uptake improved the accuracy of predictions by up to 42 per cent.

‘These findings demonstrate the critical role of sink limitation in governing the end of seasonal activity and reveal important constraints on future growing-season lengths and carbon uptake of trees,’ said Zani.

The results ‘substantially lower our expectations of the extent to which longer growing seasons will increase seasonal carbon uptake in forests,’ she added.

 

The presence of leaves on deciduous trees marks the changing of the seasons - and the period of time in which trees store carbon from the air.

The presence of leaves on deciduous trees marks the changing of the seasons - and the period of time in which trees store carbon from the air.

The presence of leaves on deciduous trees marks the changing of the seasons – and the period of time in which trees store carbon from the air.

The researchers pointed out the universality of this pattern in other forest types remains unknown – they can only say for certain it applies to temperate regions.

They note an important next avenue of research is implementing such growing-season length constraints across a wider range of systems. 

Dr Christine Rollinson, a tree scientist at The Morton Arboretum in Illinois, who was not involved in the study, said it shows the forest is not a bottomless carbon sink.

‘Thus, whereas trees and forests remain one solution for mitigating the impacts of climate change, they cannot be the sole means of response.

‘A diverse portfolio of actions that include emissions reductions and tree conservation and planting is essential to mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions and climate change.’

The findings have been published in the journal Science

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Climate change could bring the start of Autumn forward by almost a week

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on

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climate change could bring the start of autumn forward by almost a week

The start of autumn could begin a week sooner in the future due to climate change causing trees to capture more carbon and drop their leaves earlier in the year. 

For decades scientists expected temperate trees would shed their leaves gradually later in the year – making autumn later as average temperatures rise worldwide.

Early observations seem to show this was happening over the past few decades – driving a longer growing season that could held slow the rate of climate change. 

However, a new, large-scale study of European trees by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has found this trend has started to reverse and leaves are falling earlier.  

The new discovery means instead of autumn starting up to three weeks later, it will start between three and six days earlier over the course of the century.

Early observations seem to show this was happening over the past few decades - driving a longer growing season that could held slow the rate of climate change.

Early observations seem to show this was happening over the past few decades - driving a longer growing season that could held slow the rate of climate change.

Early observations seem to show this was happening over the past few decades – driving a longer growing season that could held slow the rate of climate change.

The presence of leaves on deciduous trees marks the changing of the seasons – and the period of time in which trees store carbon from the air.

Warning winters cause spring leaves to emerge earlier and it a widespread example of a climate-change impact, according to the team behind the study. 

The timing of when the leaves fall is harder to spot. There might be limits to how much greenhouse gas a tree can use or store in a single year, explained Dr Zani.

If all carbon needs are met, leaves might fall earlier rather than later in the autumn. 

Changes in the growing-season of trees greatly affect global carbon balance, Zani explained, but it is difficult to predict future patterns.

This is due to the fact that the environmental drivers of leaf ageing aren’t well understood by scientists. 

Autumn shedding in temperate regions like the UK is an adaptation to stressors – such as cold weather and a common assumption is that if you warm the air up this would allow leaves to persist for longer and fix more atmospheric carbon. 

Dr Zani and colleagues used long-term observations from dominant Central European tree species from 1948 to 2015 and experiments designed to modify carbon uptake to evaluate the related impacts. 

The study showed an increased growing-season in spring and summer due to more CO2, light and higher temperatures will lead to earlier leaf shedding – not later.

This is likely because roots and wood cease to use or store leaf-captured carbon at a point – making leaves costly to keep.

The researchers used the data to build a model to improve autumn prediction under a business-as-usual climate scenario – that is one where no efforts are made to slow the rate of climate change by keeping global average temperature from rising.

The model forecasts the possibility of autumn leaf-dropping dates becoming earlier over the rest of the century rather than later – as previously assumed.

However, a new, large-scale study of European trees by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has found this trend has started to reverse and leaves are falling earlier

However, a new, large-scale study of European trees by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has found this trend has started to reverse and leaves are falling earlier

However, a new, large-scale study of European trees by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has found this trend has started to reverse and leaves are falling earlier

Dr Zani said: ‘Changes in the growing-season lengths of temperate trees greatly affect biotic interactions and global carbon balance.

‘Yet future growing-season trajectories remain highly uncertain because the environmental drivers of autumn leaf deterioration are poorly understood.’

Accounting for increases in spring and summer productivity due to rising carbon uptake improved the accuracy of predictions by up to 42 per cent.

‘These findings demonstrate the critical role of sink limitation in governing the end of seasonal activity and reveal important constraints on future growing-season lengths and carbon uptake of trees,’ said Zani.

The results ‘substantially lower our expectations of the extent to which longer growing seasons will increase seasonal carbon uptake in forests,’ she added.

 

The presence of leaves on deciduous trees marks the changing of the seasons - and the period of time in which trees store carbon from the air.

The presence of leaves on deciduous trees marks the changing of the seasons - and the period of time in which trees store carbon from the air.

The presence of leaves on deciduous trees marks the changing of the seasons – and the period of time in which trees store carbon from the air.

The researchers pointed out the universality of this pattern in other forest types remains unknown – they can only say for certain it applies to temperate regions.

They note an important next avenue of research is implementing such growing-season length constraints across a wider range of systems. 

Dr Christine Rollinson, a tree scientist at The Morton Arboretum in Illinois, who was not involved in the study, said it shows the forest is not a bottomless carbon sink.

‘Thus, whereas trees and forests remain one solution for mitigating the impacts of climate change, they cannot be the sole means of response.

‘A diverse portfolio of actions that include emissions reductions and tree conservation and planting is essential to mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions and climate change.’

The findings have been published in the journal Science

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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SpaceX launches reusable Falcon 9 rocket booster for SEVENTH time

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spacex launches reusable falcon 9 rocket booster for seventh time

SpaceX has reused a Falcon 9 rocket for a record breaking seventh time during its most recent mission to put another 60 Starlink satellites into orbit.

It comes as the Elon Musk-owned space launch firm is preparing for the first high altitude test flight of its mammoth Starship prototype spaceship – dubbed SN8. 

Launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida at 02:13 GMT this morning, the Falcon 9 flight was the seventh time that particular first stage booster had been used.

This beat the previous record for a booster of six trips and helps Musk in his mission to bring down the cost of launching payloads from the Earth by reusing equipment.

The Falcon 9 launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in the early hours of this morning carrying the 16th batch of Starlink satellites

The Falcon 9 launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in the early hours of this morning carrying the 16th batch of Starlink satellites

The Falcon 9 launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in the early hours of this morning carrying the 16th batch of Starlink satellites

SpaceX was able to recover the booster from the Atlantic Ocean using a drone flight – which means it may be able to fly for an eighth time in the future.

The booster wasn’t the only part of the Falcon 9 to be reused during this flight – that brings the total of small Starlink internet satellites up to nearly 1,000.

The fairing cover used to protect the payload had also been used before – half on one other trip and another on two different trips before this one, SpaceX confirmed.

Every time SpaceX is able to reuse a component it reduces the cost of getting material into low Earth orbit compared to using parts for the first time.

Research by the Center for Strategic and International Studies found that the average cost of putting 1kg of material in orbit on a SpaceX launch is $2,600.

In comparison, the average cost to put a 1kg object in orbit from a Russian Soyuz was $17,900 and the United Launch Alliance Delta E came in at $177,900 per kg. 

Musk is working to bring that cost down even further with each element of the Falcon 9 they are able to reuse.

Part of that drive to reuse is pushing development of the massive Starship two-stage-to-orbit fully-reusable heavy lift vehicle.

It has been under development since 2012 and is designed to bring the cost of each launch downs significantly by being fully reusable.

A single Falcon 9 launch costs about $51 million if it is reusing components that have flown before – Musk hopes to get the Spaceship launch in at $2 million per trip.

That reality could soon be a step closer as the firm is preparing to send up the latest prototype Starship SN8 on a high altitude test flight.

Musk tweeted that it has already undergone a successful static fire test and that in the next week or so it would fly up to about nine miles into the sky.

This beat the previous record for a booster of six trips and helps Musk in his mission to bring down the cost of launching payloads from the Earth by reusing equipment

This beat the previous record for a booster of six trips and helps Musk in his mission to bring down the cost of launching payloads from the Earth by reusing equipment

 This beat the previous record for a booster of six trips and helps Musk in his mission to bring down the cost of launching payloads from the Earth by reusing equipment

Space X performed the third over all static fire on Starship SN8 Thursday November 12 at its Boca Chica facility in Texas. The next stage is a high altitude test

Space X performed the third over all static fire on Starship SN8 Thursday November 12 at its Boca Chica facility in Texas. The next stage is a high altitude test

Space X performed the third over all static fire on Starship SN8 Thursday November 12 at its Boca Chica facility in Texas. The next stage is a high altitude test

The edge of space is agreed by NASA and others to be 50 miles above sea level but to go into orbit you need to get to at least 100 miles above sea level.

If this latest flight test – that will see the triple Raptor engine fire and lift the 400ft spaceship into the air – is successful, then further, higher tests will likely follow.

November 30 has been provisionally set aside as the date of the high altitude test that will see the spaceship reach the highest it has ever flown.

Musk tweeted: ‘Good Starship SN8 static fire! Aiming for first 15km / ~50k ft altitude flight next week. Goals are to test 3 engine ascent, body flaps, transition from main to header tanks & landing flip.’

The landing is one of the most important aspects – as it needs to be fully reusable to achieve the goals and price per flight set out by the SpaceX team. 

WHAT IS ELON MUSK’S ‘BFR’?

The BFR (Big F***ing Rocket), now known as Starship, will complete all missions and is smaller than the ones Musk announced in 2016.

The SpaceX CEO said the rocket would take its first trip to the red planet in 2022, carrying only cargo, followed by a manned mission in 2024 and claimed other SpaceX’s products would be ‘cannibalised’ to pay for it.

The rocket would be partially reusable and capable of flight directly from Earth to Mars.

Once built, Musk believes the rocket could be used for travel on Earth – saying that passengers would be able to get anywhere in under an hour.

44DFD4DC00000578 4933944 image a 77 1506734013996

44DFD4DC00000578 4933944 image a 77 1506734013996

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