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HONOR GS Pro watch review

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honor gs pro watch review

Do you enjoy outdoor activities and extreme sports? If so, you’re probably in need of a smartwatch that keeps up with your active lifestyle.

While most smart watches cater for general exercise and sports, the HONOR GS Pro is the brand’s first rugged smart watch. The watch is more durable, rugged and practical than any of their watches before. From skiing to mountain climbing, it can withstand even the toughest of elements.

Offering a 25-day prolonged battery, as well as a powerful set of sensors and trackers to help track your daily fitness, the £249.99 (reduced from £339.98) GS Pro is designed for ‘the urban adventurer in you’.

HONOR Watch GS PRO Marl White Beige

HONOR Watch GS PRO Marl White Beige

HONOR Watch GS PRO Charcoal Black

HONOR Watch GS PRO Charcoal Black

Boasting a 25-day battery life, the HONOR GS Pro is the brand’s first rugged smart watch

The actual watch itself is quite chunky, which I thought may be a problem during the night, but it surprisingly hasn’t caused any problems. It features a water resistance rating of 50m, and has passed the 14 MIL-STD-810G drop test (a military-grade drop test designed to determine the ‘environmental worthiness and overall durability of material system design’).

The watch strap is a Charcoal Black fluororubber, which is great quality and feels super-comfortable. Compared to most smartwatch straps that can be quite basic, this one feels secure to my wrist.

The stainless-steel bezel ring and dial complement the overall rugged and handsome design. The GS Pro is available in three different colours to express your style: Charcoal Black, Marl White and Camo Blue.

The GS Pro’s top feature is probably its built-in GPS and GLONASS tracking system. This features a Route Back function with breadcrumb navigation, so you will always know your way back.

The smart watch supports more than 100 workout modes, including traditional workouts such as indoor and outdoor running and cycling, plus more adventurous sports such as hiking, mountain climbing and open water swimming. The watch can also automatically detect and record your workout.

The GS Pro’s top feature is probably its built-in GPS and GLONASS tracking system

The GS Pro’s top feature is probably its built-in GPS and GLONASS tracking system

The GS Pro’s top feature is probably its built-in GPS and GLONASS tracking system

Its newly-launched skiing mode is also set to impress as it can automatically track your skiing exercise in real-time and can even track snowboarding and cross-country skiing. Its altitude barometer is also designed for mountaineering. You can set alerts for severe weather changes so you can avoid harsh elements.

Daily activities such as step count and calories burnt can also be tracked and monitored. Additionally, you can manage your phone calls via Bluetooth, store up to 500 songs in the watch, and control music playback.

The health monitoring technology is similar to most HONOR smart watches, including a 24/7 heart rate monitor, an spO2 monitor to track your blood oxygen saturation level, a sleep monitor to assess your sleep quality, and a stress monitor to help you improve your wellbeing. 

The newly-launched skiing mode is also set to impress as it can automatically track your skiing exercise in real-time and can even track snowboarding and cross-country skiing

The newly-launched skiing mode is also set to impress as it can automatically track your skiing exercise in real-time and can even track snowboarding and cross-country skiing

The newly-launched skiing mode is also set to impress as it can automatically track your skiing exercise in real-time and can even track snowboarding and cross-country skiing

The battery life is an impressive 25 days on a single full charge, although this is using the bare minimum of the features, so it will be less if you’re using the features frequently. It also has up to 48 hours of battery life when GPS is enabled.

The GS Pro can be fully charged in less than two hours, which is a little longer than other HONOR smart watches, but this is probably down to the GS Pro’s large battery capacity.

Overall, the HONOR GS Pro is a thoroughly impressive smartwatch, particularly if you want to track extreme sports or if you lead an incredibly active lifestyle.

The HONOR GS Pro is a thoroughly impressive smart watch, particularly if you want to track extreme sports or if you lead an incredibly active lifestyle

The HONOR GS Pro is a thoroughly impressive smart watch, particularly if you want to track extreme sports or if you lead an incredibly active lifestyle

The HONOR GS Pro is a thoroughly impressive smart watch, particularly if you want to track extreme sports or if you lead an incredibly active lifestyle

The dashboard is easy to use, and the device is easy to pair with your smartphone. I like the robust design, built-in GPS, and Find my Phone feature. The auto-detect can be a bit of a nuisance as it is not always necessary, and it often alerts you when you’re simply walking at a faster pace or running for a bus.

If you need a watch to cover more general workouts such as running, swimming and cycling, I’d recommend checking out the HONOR Magic Watch 2 46mm, as it has a more affordable price point and offers a lot of the same features, such as fitness tracking and health monitoring. It is still waterproof (50m water resistance) and still boasts a rugged, masculine design.

The GS Pro is ideal for an outdoorsy person who is always off exploring, adventuring and partaking in outdoor sports. So if you tick all of these boxes, this is the smartwatch for you.

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Nature: Bisexual female bonobos make lengthy eye contact during sex to form intimate social bonds

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nature bisexual female bonobos make lengthy eye contact during sex to form intimate social bonds

To help forge social bonds with other females, bisexual female bonobos make lengthy eye contact when engaging in sexual acts, a study has reported.

Researchers studied the role of eye-to-eye contact in the socio-sexual behaviour of 17 bonobos at the Wilhelma zoo in Stuttgart, in southwest Germany.

They found that the less two female bonobos know each other, the more they will try to make eye contact during sex — shining a light on how these primates bond.

Female bonobos develop bonds with each other in order to build up social power, which they use to assert themselves against the males of the species.

Bonobo apes are our closest animal relatives — with a 98 per cent genetic match — and are frequently used in research into how we evolved as a species.

Sex among bonobos is not sex-specific — experts believe that almost all of the apes are bisexual and that as much of 75 per cent of their sex is non-reproductive.

To help forge social bonds with other females, bisexual female bonobos make lengthy eye contact when engaging in sexual acts, a study has reported

To help forge social bonds with other females, bisexual female bonobos make lengthy eye contact when engaging in sexual acts, a study has reported

To help forge social bonds with other females, bisexual female bonobos make lengthy eye contact when engaging in sexual acts, a study has reported

The study was undertaken by biologist Giulia Annicchiarico of the University of Pisa, Italy, and her colleagues.

‘Female [bonobos] engage in homosexual ventro-ventral, genito-genital rubbing during which they embrace each other while rubbing part of their vulvae and, sometimes, clitoris,’ the team wrote in their paper.

Face-to-face — or ‘ventro-ventral’ — sex positions were long thought to be exclusive to human sex, but are enjoyed by bonobos of both sexes, whether in female–female, female–male or male–male pairings.

‘Ventro-ventral, genito-genital rubbing facilitates conflict resolution, anxiety reduction and social bonding.’

Ms Annicchiarico added: ‘We found that EEC was negatively affected by female bonding — the more the eye contact, the weaker the social relationship.’

‘My scientific interests mainly concern that sphere of behaviour that was thought to be exclusively human — emotions, empathy and altruistic behaviour as well as non-verbal communication,’ she continued.

Research like this can shed light on similarities between human and ape behaviour — and how eye contact affects similar interactions in human social dynamics as well.

Researchers studied the role of eye-to-eye contact in the socio-sexual behaviour, pictured, of 17 bonobos at the Wilhelma zoo in Stuttgart, in southwest Germany

Researchers studied the role of eye-to-eye contact in the socio-sexual behaviour, pictured, of 17 bonobos at the Wilhelma zoo in Stuttgart, in southwest Germany

Researchers studied the role of eye-to-eye contact in the socio-sexual behaviour, pictured, of 17 bonobos at the Wilhelma zoo in Stuttgart, in southwest Germany

They found that the less two female bonobos know each other, the more they will try to make eye contact during sex — shining a light on how these primates, pictured, bond

They found that the less two female bonobos know each other, the more they will try to make eye contact during sex — shining a light on how these primates, pictured, bond

They found that the less two female bonobos know each other, the more they will try to make eye contact during sex — shining a light on how these primates, pictured, bond

‘The great apes, in my opinion, can tell us a lot about why we are what we are, why we act in a certain way and could also suggest different behavioural strategies,’ Ms Annicchiarico commented.

While a lot of work has been done on eye contact between primates, it has traditionally been more focussed on interactions between parents and their infants.

The researchers found that eye contact has a positive influence on the success of ‘performance’, and was key to successful long term relationships — with its importance becoming less so as a given relationship grows.

Female bonobos develop bonds with each other in order to build up social power, which they use to assert themselves against the males of the species

Female bonobos develop bonds with each other in order to build up social power, which they use to assert themselves against the males of the species

Female bonobos develop bonds with each other in order to build up social power, which they use to assert themselves against the males of the species

Bonobo’s use sex across all ages and combinations since the need for peaceful coexistence is not limited only to heterosexual adult couples.

Researchers found that female homosexual behaviour is particularly frequent and happens very frequently — in fact, many times a day.

Sexual acts serve to reduce social tension between individual apes and is most frequently seen in times of high stress, such as before and during competition for food and after conflict, as a reconciliation behaviour.

Some bonobos have even been seen to appear to provoke each other in order to initiate sex in response.

According to Ms Annicchiarico, there is no linear hierarchy in bonobo society — which is matriarchal — so they rely on flexible patterns of dominance, in which social power is dispersed within the group.

Eye contact is an evolutionary trait that has been positively selected for to allow cohesion among females, who acquire social bonds and power through sexual contact, the team have concluded.

Social power among bonobos is held by those who form the strongest coalitions, something that likely evolved as a strategy to resist attacks by males, who tend to be more isolationist.

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Behaviour.

HOMOSEXUALITY IN ANIMALS

Homosexuality in nature appears counter-intuitive but is observed in a range of species around the world. 

There has yet to be an accepted explanation based on neurological, chemical or behavioural factors to explain why some animals are homosexual and some or heterosexual. 

Some scientists say it may be due to exposure to testosterone levels in the womb, although this remains a hotly debated topic which has yet to be proved. 

In a book titled: ‘Homosexual Behaviour in Animals: An Evolutionary Perspective’, the author, UCL professor Dr Volker Sommer, writes: ‘Within a select number of species, homosexual activity is widespread and occurs at levels that approach or sometimes even surpass heterosexual activity.’

Homosexual behaviour has been observed in many animals, including: macaques, dwarf chimpanzees, dolphins, orcas and humans. 

Some studies claim homosexuality may be a common as being found in up to 95 per cent of all animal species. 

There are two principle schools of thought when it comes to the prevalence of homosexuality in nature.  

One theory states that homosexuality in animals doesn’t need an explanation, with animals being homosexual just as naturally as they are heterosexual. 

It appears irrational for it to survive as a trait as it hinders the ability to procreate directly, but many speculate it allows individuals to ensure their genetic material is passed down the generations indirectly as they are able to look after members of their family with offspring.   

For example, helping nurture the offspring of a sister.   

Similar behaviour dedicated to the ‘greater good’ of a large group have been seen in various species. 

For example, in familial wolf packs only one pair of animals breeds – the alpha and the beta. The other animals ensure the protection, feeding and nurturing of the litter.

This allows their genetic material to pass indirectly to the next generation through their sister, brother, mother etc or whatever the relationship may be. 

The same school of though applies to animals which have exceeded their reproductive age. 

For example, female elephants which are now too old to have offspring. 

They still play a crucial role in the protection of the young a the matriarch leads the group to spots of food, water and chases of would-be predators.

These actions ensure the survival of the young and vulnerable members of her family, again helping ensure her genetic material is passed down through the generations indirectly.  

A similar concept can be applied to homosexuality, some experts claim. 

Without the ability to reproduce directly, they are able to expend energy looking after the offspring of their family members. 

Another theory states that homosexual behaviours aid in the successful passing on of genes in the long-term as young animals ‘practice’ mating techniques and ways of attracting a member of the opposite sex.

Rates of homosexuality in different species continues to be unknown, as ongoing research finds more nuances to homosexuality in nature. 

It continues to be found in more species but the level of homosexuality in individual species is not well enough studied to be able to determine if homosexuality is becoming increasingly common.  

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Commuter towns have become ‘home working hubs’ as millions work from home

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commuter towns have become home working hubs as millions work from home

Commuter-belt towns are the places in the UK which have seen the biggest surge in internet use due to the coronavirus lockdown, TalkTalk data reveals. 

The internet provider has released statistics on how usage of its network changed following the shift to remote working.

It reveals commuter towns have become ‘home working hubs’ for millions and only one major city, Leeds, is in the top 20 of places with the highest increase in usage. 

The places with the biggest spike in usage are towns on the periphery of major towns, such as Milton Keynes, Dudley and Stevenage.  

Broadband use in commuter-belt towns have seen the biggest surge in internet use since the start of lockdown in March, TalkTalk data reveals

Broadband use in commuter-belt towns have seen the biggest surge in internet use since the start of lockdown in March, TalkTalk data reveals

Broadband use in commuter-belt towns have seen the biggest surge in internet use since the start of lockdown in March, TalkTalk data reveals

Huddersfield saw the biggest percentage increase when accounting for uploads and downloads with an increase of 37 per cent, TalkTalk found. 

Downloads involve receiving something from the internet on a device, whereas uploads are the reverse, sending data from a computer to the internet. 

An example of uploads would be sending emails and video calls.  

Halifax (36 per cent) and Dudley (35 per cent) were second and third place, respectively. 

Towns within a train ride of London populated the top-20, with Kingston, Bromley and Sutton featuring. 

Hemel, Reading and Stevenage also made the top ten. 

Tristia Harrison, Chief Executive Officer at TalkTalk, said: ‘This data shows us just how much lockdown has changed work life patterns. 

‘With a fast, reliable broadband connection, homeworkers can be just as productive as they were in the office. The new hybrid home office working life is here to stay.’

Huddersfield (pictured) saw the biggest percentage increase when accounting for uploads and downloads with an increase of 37 per cent, TalkTalk found. Halifax (36 per cent) and Dudley (35 per cent) were second and third place, respectively

Huddersfield (pictured) saw the biggest percentage increase when accounting for uploads and downloads with an increase of 37 per cent, TalkTalk found. Halifax (36 per cent) and Dudley (35 per cent) were second and third place, respectively

Huddersfield (pictured) saw the biggest percentage increase when accounting for uploads and downloads with an increase of 37 per cent, TalkTalk found. Halifax (36 per cent) and Dudley (35 per cent) were second and third place, respectively

On June 30, during the lockdown, Openreach recorded its biggest ever day for internet consumption. 

June 30 saw more than 189 petabytes of data consumed by customers via Openreach in the UK, smashing the previous record of 184 PB set on June 11.  

An overall increase in internet consumption has been driven by adults working from home and children doing online lessons during the coronavirus pandemic. 

Openreach says that in a pre-lockdown world, average weekly consumption was around 660 petabytes. At the start of June 2020, this soared to almost 1,000 PB. 

However, the record-breaking days on June 11 and now on June 30 were largely due to the mass downloading of enormous Call of Duty updates.    

Ms Harrison adds: ‘With so many towns at the centre of the UK’s home working revolution, it’s never been more important that people have affordable, reliable connectivity and that we invest in our broadband infrastructure outside major urban areas.

‘Our new Homeworker Package caters to those customers and businesses now working from home for the long term. 

‘With an additional business-grade line dedicated to home working, customers in busy households can rest assured that their broadband meets their connectivity needs.’

Places with the biggest increase in internet usage since lockdown

  1. Huddersfield 37%
  2. Halifax 36%
  3. Dudley 35%
  4. Reading 35%
  5. Shrewsbury 34%
  6. Truro 34%
  7. Dorchester 34%
  8. Stevenage 33%
  9. Torquay 33%
  10. Hemel 33%
  11. Kingston 33%
  12. Bromley 32%
  13. Harrogate 32%
  14. Milton Keynes 32%
  15. Leeds 32%
  16. Stockport 32%
  17. Sutton 32%
  18. Chelmsford 32%
  19. Telford 32%
  20. Crewe 32%
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Antiques: Roman gold coin commemorating the assassination of Caesar sells for a record £3.24 MILLION

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antiques roman gold coin commemorating the assassination of caesar sells for a record 3 24 million

A rare gold coin which commemorates the assassination of the Roman general Julius Caesar sold at auction for a record £3.24 million — including premium — yesterday.

Over two millennia old, the token is one of three of the same design known to have been cast in gold, making it the ‘holy grail’ for ancient coin collectors, experts said.

Previously held in a private collection in Europe, the mint-condition gold coin was sold at auction by London-based Roma Numismatics on October 29, 2020.

The name of the winning bidder has not been revealed by the auctioneers. 

The minting of the coin has been described as a ‘naked and shameless celebration’ of Caesar’s murder two years previously in 44 BC.

The assassination was prompted by concern among the Roman senate that Caesar — having recently been named ‘dictator in perpetuity’ — would name himself king.  

Fear of this tyranny fostered a conspiracy of 60 senators who ended up stabbing the statesman 23 times, according to history’s first recorded autopsy.

Caesar had, however, been popular with the lower and middle classes — and the uproar in the wake of his assassination helped set in motion the fall of the Republic.

A rare gold coin which commemorates the assassination of the Roman general Julius Caesar (pictured) sold at auction for a record £3.24 million yesterday

A rare gold coin which commemorates the assassination of the Roman general Julius Caesar (pictured) sold at auction for a record £3.24 million yesterday

 A rare gold coin which commemorates the assassination of the Roman general Julius Caesar (pictured) sold at auction for a record £3.24 million yesterday

‘I’m not surprised it set a world record as the most valuable ancient coin ever sold,’ said Mark Salzberg, the chairman of the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation, which confirmed the authenticity of the coin.

‘It’s a masterpiece of artistry and rarity, still in mint condition after 2,000 years, and only the third known example made in gold. Many of us believed it would sell for millions, and it did,’ he added.

The coin ‘was made in 42 BC, two years after the famous assassination,’ Mr Salzberg told Fox News back in October.

‘The front has a portrait of Marcus Junius Brutus — one of Caesar’s assassins — and the other side dramatically has two daggers and the words EID MAR, a Latin abbreviation for Ides of March,’ he added.

It also features a ‘cap of liberty’, signifying the motivations behind the murder — and on the other face, the date of the deed. 

The item, Mr Salzberg explained, is ‘one of the most important and valuable coins of the ancient world.’

Nearly 100 of such ‘Ides of March’ coins are known, according to the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation — however, most are cast in silver, and even these are considered essentially unobtainable by aficionados.

Only two others in gold are known to exist — one of which is on display in the British Museum, while the other resides in the permanent collection of the Deutsche Bundesbank, the central bank of the Federal Republic of Germany.

‘There were rumours of a third example and Numismatic Guaranty Corporation authenticators were excited when this coin was submitted at our London office and sent for evaluation at our headquarters in Sarasota, Florida,’ said Mr Salzberg.

‘The coin is only about the size of modern United States five-cent and United Kingdom five-pence denomination coins, but it’s an historic treasure worth far more than its weight in gold.’

'There were rumours of a third example and Numismatic Guaranty Corporation authenticators were excited when this coin was submitted at our London office and sent for evaluation at our headquarters in Sarasota, Florida,' said Mr Salzberg. 'The coin is only about the size of modern United States five-cent and United Kingdom five-pence denomination coins, but it’s an historic treasure worth far more than its weight in gold'

'There were rumours of a third example and Numismatic Guaranty Corporation authenticators were excited when this coin was submitted at our London office and sent for evaluation at our headquarters in Sarasota, Florida,' said Mr Salzberg. 'The coin is only about the size of modern United States five-cent and United Kingdom five-pence denomination coins, but it’s an historic treasure worth far more than its weight in gold'

‘There were rumours of a third example and Numismatic Guaranty Corporation authenticators were excited when this coin was submitted at our London office and sent for evaluation at our headquarters in Sarasota, Florida,’ said Mr Salzberg. ‘The coin is only about the size of modern United States five-cent and United Kingdom five-pence denomination coins, but it’s an historic treasure worth far more than its weight in gold’

The minting of the coin has been described as a 'naked and shameless celebration' of Caesar's murder two years previously in 44 BC, as depicted. The assassination was prompted by concern among the senate that Caesar — having recently been named 'dictator in perpetuity' — would name himself king. Fear of this tyranny fostered a conspiracy of 60 senators who ended up stabbing the statesman 23 times, according to history's first recorded autopsy

The minting of the coin has been described as a 'naked and shameless celebration' of Caesar's murder two years previously in 44 BC, as depicted. The assassination was prompted by concern among the senate that Caesar — having recently been named 'dictator in perpetuity' — would name himself king. Fear of this tyranny fostered a conspiracy of 60 senators who ended up stabbing the statesman 23 times, according to history's first recorded autopsy

The minting of the coin has been described as a ‘naked and shameless celebration’ of Caesar’s murder two years previously in 44 BC, as depicted. The assassination was prompted by concern among the senate that Caesar — having recently been named ‘dictator in perpetuity’ — would name himself king. Fear of this tyranny fostered a conspiracy of 60 senators who ended up stabbing the statesman 23 times, according to history’s first recorded autopsy

Roma Numismatics’ director Richard Beale said that they were ‘extremely privileged to bring this coin to auction with the invaluable assistance of Numismatic Guaranty Corporation, whose expert specialists have assisted in authenticating it.’

‘Considering the coin’s rarity, artistry and fabled place in history, I would not be surprised if it sold for several million,’ Mr Salzberg had told Fox News prior to the auction of the commemorative gold token.

The coin had been given a conservative pre-sale estimate of £500,000 — but its ultimate value at auction (with a hammer price, before fees, of £2.7 million) makes it peerless among ancient coin trades.

Among Roman coins, the previous record-holder — a bronze sestertius of the emperor Hadrian — sold for 2.3 million CHF (then around £1.7 million) in 2008.

Until yesterday, the title of most expensive coin belonged to a Greek gold stater from  the city of Panticapaeum, which sold for $3.25 million (equivalent to around £2 million) back in 2012. 

How England spent almost half a millennium under Roman rule

55BC – Julius Caesar crossed the channel with around 10,000 soldiers. They landed at a Pegwell Bay on the Isle of Thanet and were met by a force of Britons. Caesar was forced to withdraw.

54BC – Caesar crossed the channel again in his second attempt to conquer Britain. He came with with 27,000 infantry and cavalry and landed at Deal but were unopposed. They marched inland and after hard battles they defeated the Britons and key tribal leaders surrendered.

However, later that year, Caesar was forced to return to Gaul to deal with problems there and the Romans left.

54BC – 43BC – Although there were no Romans present in Britain during these years, their influence increased due to trade links.

43AD – A Roman force of 40,000 led by Aulus Plautius landed in Kent and took the south east. The emperor Claudius appointed Plautius as Governor of Britain and returned to Rome.

47AD – Londinium (London) was founded and Britain was declared part of the Roman empire. Networks of roads were built across the country.

50AD – Romans arrived in the southwest and made their mark in the form of a wooden fort on a hill near the river Exe.  A town was created at the site of the fort decades later and names Isca. 

When Romans let and Saxons ruled, all ex-Roman towns were called a ‘ceaster’. this was called ‘Exe ceaster’ and a merger of this eventually gave rise to Exeter.   

75 – 77AD – Romans defeated the last resistant tribes, making all Britain Roman. Many Britons started adopting Roman customs and law.

122AD – Emperor Hadrian ordered that a wall be built between England and Scotland to keep Scottish tribes out.

312AD – Emperor Constantine made Christianity legal throughout the Roman empire.

228AD – The Romans were being attacked by barbarian tribes and soldiers stationed in the country started to be recalled to Rome.

410AD – All Romans were recalled to Rome and Emperor Honorious told Britons they no longer had a connection to Rome.

Source: History on the net

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