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Rock art: prints of a young ‘cavewoman’ and her older male companion found in Spanish paintings

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rock art prints of a young cavewoman and her older male companion found in spanish paintings

Painting Neolithic rock art was a social activity for both sexes and the young as well as the old, analysis of fingerprints on the wall of a Spanish rockshelter has hinted. 

The Los Machos shelter in the province of Granada sports 32 ochre-coloured daubs of circular, geometric and human-like designs that date to around 5,500–2,500 BC.

Analysis by experts from Spain and the UK has concluded that the finger-painted art was likely made by a young woman working together with an older man. 

Painting Neolithic rock art was a social activity for both sexes and the young as well as the old, analysis of fingerprints on the wall of a Spanish rockshelter, pictured, has hinted

Painting Neolithic rock art was a social activity for both sexes and the young as well as the old, analysis of fingerprints on the wall of a Spanish rockshelter, pictured, has hinted

 Painting Neolithic rock art was a social activity for both sexes and the young as well as the old, analysis of fingerprints on the wall of a Spanish rockshelter, pictured, has hinted

The Los Machos shelter in the province of Granada sports 32 ochre-coloured daubs of circular, geometric and human-like designs, pictured, that date to around 5,500–2,500 BC.

The Los Machos shelter in the province of Granada sports 32 ochre-coloured daubs of circular, geometric and human-like designs, pictured, that date to around 5,500–2,500 BC.

The Los Machos shelter in the province of Granada sports 32 ochre-coloured daubs of circular, geometric and human-like designs, pictured, that date to around 5,500–2,500 BC.

‘We looked at the number of fingerprint ridges and the distance between them and compared them with fingerprints from the present,’ paper author and prehistorian Francisco Martínez-Sevilla of the University of Granada told the Guardian.

‘Those ridges vary according to age and sex but settle by adulthood —and you can distinguish between those of men and women,’ he added.

‘You can also tell the age of the person from the ridges.’

According to the team, some of the prints left behind on the wall of the rockshelter belong to a man who was aged at 36, while the others belong to a younger artist — likely a woman under the age of 20, or possibly a male juvenile.

‘We don’t know if they were members of the same community,’ Dr Martínez-Sevilla told the Guardian.

‘From our point of view, if there are two people taking part in the creation of this pictorial panel, it means it must have been a social, rather than an individual, act, as we’d thought until now.’

‘It shows us that these manifestations of art were a social thing and not just done by one individual in the community, such as the shaman or whoever.’

Analysis by experts from Spain and the UK has concluded that the finger-painted art was likely made by a young woman working together with an older man. Pictured, the Los Machos rockshelter on the slopes of Cerro de Jabalcón. The highlighted area is shown below

Analysis by experts from Spain and the UK has concluded that the finger-painted art was likely made by a young woman working together with an older man. Pictured, the Los Machos rockshelter on the slopes of Cerro de Jabalcón. The highlighted area is shown below

Analysis by experts from Spain and the UK has concluded that the finger-painted art was likely made by a young woman working together with an older man. Pictured, the Los Machos rockshelter on the slopes of Cerro de Jabalcón. The highlighted area is shown below 

'We looked at the number of fingerprint ridges and the distance between them and compared them with fingerprints from the present,' paper author and prehistorian Francisco Martínez-Sevilla of the University of Granada told the Guardian. Pictured, the rock art

'We looked at the number of fingerprint ridges and the distance between them and compared them with fingerprints from the present,' paper author and prehistorian Francisco Martínez-Sevilla of the University of Granada told the Guardian. Pictured, the rock art

‘We looked at the number of fingerprint ridges and the distance between them and compared them with fingerprints from the present,’ paper author and prehistorian Francisco Martínez-Sevilla of the University of Granada told the Guardian. Pictured, the rock art

The ridges, Dr Martínez-Sevilla added, 'vary according to age and sex but settle by adulthood —and you can distinguish between those of men and women. You can also tell the age of the person from the ridges.' Pictured, a single fingerprint highlighted among the art

The ridges, Dr Martínez-Sevilla added, 'vary according to age and sex but settle by adulthood —and you can distinguish between those of men and women. You can also tell the age of the person from the ridges.' Pictured, a single fingerprint highlighted among the art

The ridges, Dr Martínez-Sevilla added, ‘vary according to age and sex but settle by adulthood —and you can distinguish between those of men and women. You can also tell the age of the person from the ridges.’ Pictured, a single fingerprint highlighted among the art

‘The area where they are and the fact that they haven’t been changed or painted over gives you the feeling that this was a very important place and must have had a really important symbolic value for this community,’ Dr Martínez-Sevilla continued.

“When I look at these pictures, there’s a bit of an emotional response,’ he added.

‘I see a person, many thousands of years ago, painting symbols or designs that would have meant something to them, or which would have been a way for them to express themselves, or identify the territory, or communicate socially.’

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Antiquity.

The Los Machos shelter in the province of Granada sports 32 ochre-coloured daubs of circular, geometric and human-like designs that date to around 5,500–2,500 BC

The Los Machos shelter in the province of Granada sports 32 ochre-coloured daubs of circular, geometric and human-like designs that date to around 5,500–2,500 BC

The Los Machos shelter in the province of Granada sports 32 ochre-coloured daubs of circular, geometric and human-like designs that date to around 5,500–2,500 BC

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THE STONE AGE?

The stone age is a period in human prehistory distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers more than 95 per cent of human technological prehistory.

It begins with the earliest known use of stone tools by hominins, ancient ancestors to humans, during the Old Stone Age – beginning around 3.3 million years ago.

Between roughly 400,000 and 200,000 years ago, the pace of innovation in stone technology began to accelerate very slightly, a period known as the Middle Stone Age.

By the beginning of this time, handaxes were made with exquisite craftsmanship. This eventually gave way to smaller, more diverse toolkits, with an emphasis on flake tools rather than larger core tools.

The stone age is a period in human prehistory distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers more than 95 per cent of human technological prehistory. This image shows neolithic jadeitite axes from the Museum of Toulouse

The stone age is a period in human prehistory distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers more than 95 per cent of human technological prehistory. This image shows neolithic jadeitite axes from the Museum of Toulouse

The stone age is a period in human prehistory distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers more than 95 per cent of human technological prehistory. This image shows neolithic jadeitite axes from the Museum of Toulouse

These toolkits were established by at least 285,000 years in some parts of Africa, and by 250,000 to 200,000 years in Europe and parts of western Asia. These toolkits last until at least 50,000 to 28,000 years ago.

During the Later Stone Age the pace of innovations rose and the level of craftsmanship increased.

Groups of Homo sapiens experimented with diverse raw materials, including bone, ivory, and antler, as well as stone.

The period, between 50,000 and 39,000 years ago, is also associated with the advent of modern human behaviour in Africa.

Different groups sought their own distinct cultural identity and adopted their own ways of making things.

Later Stone Age peoples and their technologies spread out of Africa over the next several thousand years.

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Two UK-built shoebox-sized supercomputer satellites set for lift-off

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two uk built shoebox sized supercomputer satellites set for lift off

Two shoebox-sized supercomputer satellites, built in Scotland to monitor shipping movements from low-Earth orbit, are due for launch this afternoon.

Each nanosatellite has an onboard supercomputer with machine learning algorithms that can provide ‘hyper-accurate predictions’ of the locations of boats.

The the so-called ‘Spire’ satellites will calculate their arrival times at ports to help businesses and authorities manage busy docks, the UK Space Agency said.

They will join a fleet of more than 100 objects in low Earth orbit that work together to track the whereabouts of ships and predict global ocean traffic. 

Two of the satellites will launch at lunchtime today and another couple will launch on an Indian PSLV rocket on November 1.

The machines will be transported into space on a Soyuz launcher from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Russia at 12.20pm UK time. 

Spire nanosat under construction. Each has an onboard supercomputer with machine learning algorithms that provide predictions of the locations of boats. Two will launch from Russia today

Spire nanosat under construction. Each has an onboard supercomputer with machine learning algorithms that provide predictions of the locations of boats. Two will launch from Russia today

‘Satellites are shrinking in size and growing in ambition,’ said Science Minister Amanda Solloway.

‘A satellite the size of a shoebox may sound like a gimmick, but these nanosatellites are driving a revolution in how we observe planet Earth – with each holding the power and intelligence of a regular satellite.

‘The government is ensuring the UK remains at the forefront of this revolution and the Spire nanosatellites we have backed will help us do just that.’

Spire received more than £6 million in funding from the UK Space Agency to build the nanosatellites. 

The devices are designed, built, tested, integrated and assembled by Spire Global staff at the firm’s headquarters in Glasgow. 

The spacecraft will join a fleet of more than 100 objects in low Earth orbit that work together to track the whereabouts of ships and predict global ocean traffic

The spacecraft will join a fleet of more than 100 objects in low Earth orbit that work together to track the whereabouts of ships and predict global ocean traffic

Despite being the size of a shoebox and weighing no more than standard cabin baggage, the nanosatellites have all the functionality of a conventional satellite. 

Graham Turnock, chief executive of the UK Space Agency, said nanosatellites are enormously powerful in what they can do.

The four being launched by Spire Global have been described as ‘supercomputers’ in space with more than a teraflop of processing power.  

‘These four Spire satellites are aimed at making trade hyper-accurate, with technology that makes business more cost effective and efficient,’ said Turnock.

‘Scotland’s space sector is booming. Our membership of ESA is benefiting companies across the UK, and we are committed to supporting the space economy in every region.’

Spire Global UK is a satellite-powered data company that provides predictive analysis of global shipping, aviation and weather forecasting.

The two satellites are made by Spire Global UK and are part of a set of four equipped with a machine learning algorithm to estimate the times vessels will arrive in ports

The two satellites are made by Spire Global UK and are part of a set of four equipped with a machine learning algorithm to estimate the times vessels will arrive in ports

Peter Platzer, chief executive and co-founder of Spire Global said their goal was to help companies and organisations predict ‘what’s next’ and make better decisions.

‘This month we are moving this forward by launching a true super-computer into orbit – 1-2 teraflops – so that we can analyse data right in orbit, using smart algorithms and machine learning,’ Platzer said.

‘This will allow us to get better, smarter and faster analytics to our customers for their business decisions.’ 

The services have been developed under a European Space Agency (ESA) Pioneer programme, which is a partnership project co-funded by the UK Space Agency.

Artist's impression of a UK spaceport. The UK Space Agency selected the first vertical launch site in Sutherland on the north coast of Scotland in 2018, which could be ready next year

Artist’s impression of a UK spaceport. The UK Space Agency selected the first vertical launch site in Sutherland on the north coast of Scotland in 2018, which could be ready next year

Elodie Viau, Director of Telecommunications and Integrated Applications at ESA, said this was a prime example of the benefits of the Pioneer programme.             

Meanwhile, the government is also supporting the development of spaceports across the country, which will allow satellites to be launched from the UK soil for the first time in the coming years.

It’s hoped future nanosatellites could be launched from Sutherland, on the north coast of Scotland, as early as next year, with further sites planned for Cornwall, Glasgow Prestwick and Snowdonia. 

Horizontal launch sites have potential in a future UK spaceflight market, which could attract companies from all over the world to invest in Britain. 

BRITAIN’S FIRST SPACEPORT WILL SUPPORT 12 ORBITAL LAUNCHES PER YEAR 

The UK Space Agency has selected Sutherland, on Scotland’s north coast, as the site for Britain’s first spaceport.

The site is being developed by US aerospace and defence behemoth Lockheed Martin.  

It will launch satellites and rockets into space as early as 2021.

The port will boost Scotland’s already burgeoning satellite industry.

Outside of the US, Scotland produces more satellites than any country.

It is hoped the UK will launch an estimated 2,000 satellites by 2030. 

The Sutherland project is under pressure from similar bids in Scandinavia.

The first Northern European site to offer commercial launches is set to hold a stake in the global space industry worth billions.

 

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Meteor that skimmed Earth may have brought life to Venus, Harvard study suggests

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Traces of phosphine gas was recently detected in the clouds of Venus, which suggests it could supports life – but a new study proposes the compounds may have originated from Earth.

Harvard researchers theorize that the biosignatures gas came to Venus from meteorites that grazed our planet’s atmosphere and crashed into the distant planet.

This notion was developed from a 2017 meteor that grazed Earth’s atmosphere over Australia for 90 seconds and then headed back on its journey to deep space.

The team believes this meteor could have collected up some 10,000 microbial colonies from our world and carried it to another.

The study notes that over the last 3.7 billion years, at least 600,000 space rocks that dipped into Earth’s atmosphere have a collided with Venus.

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Traces of phosphine gas was recently detected in the clouds of Venus, which suggests it could supports life - but a new study proposes the compounds may have originated from Earth

Traces of phosphine gas was recently detected in the clouds of Venus, which suggests it could supports life – but a new study proposes the compounds may have originated from Earth 

The 2017 meteor skimmed across Earth’s atmosphere for one and a half minutes at more than 35,000 miles per hour before returning to space.

Based on its trajectory as it skimmed the atmosphere, the team estimate that the rock was around 12 inches across and likely weighed at least 132 pounds.

‘Although the abundance of terrestrial life in the upper atmosphere is unknown, these planet-grazing shepherds could have potentially been capable of transferring microbial life between the atmospheres of Earth and Venus,’ the Harvard study reads.

‘As a result, the origin of possible Venusian life may be fundamentally indistinguishable from that of terrestrial life.’

Harvard researchers theorize that the biosignatures gas came to Venus from meteorites that grazed our planet's atmosphere and crashed into the distant planet

Harvard researchers theorize that the biosignatures gas came to Venus from meteorites that grazed our planet’s atmosphere and crashed into the distant planet

Previous research determined that life is found up to an altitude of 43 miles from the surface.

Earth-grazing asteroids can dip 52 miles without experiencing significant heating – another lower would kill any life it gathered from our planet.

‘Further work is needed to investigate the existence and abundance of microbial life in the upper atmosphere,’ reads the study.

The team also notes that if a meteor coming from Earth enters the atmosphere of another planet, hitchhiking microbes could be released in clouds before the rock disintegrates in the atmosphere.

‘A future probe that could sample the habitable cloud deck of Venus will potentially enable the direct discovery of microbial life outside of Earth, the team wrote.’

‘Specifically, the capability to either directly analyze microbes in situ or to return an atmospheric sample to Earth will be critical in the design of a successful mission. Finding exactly the same genomic material and helicity on Venus and Earth would constitute a smoking gun for panspermia.’

This notion was developed from a 2017 meteor that grazed Earth's atmosphere over Australia for 90 seconds and then headed back on its journey to deep space. The team believes this meteor could have collected up some 10,000 microbial colonies from our world and carried it to another

This notion was developed from a 2017 meteor that grazed Earth’s atmosphere over Australia for 90 seconds and then headed back on its journey to deep space. The team believes this meteor could have collected up some 10,000 microbial colonies from our world and carried it to another

Researchers detected a so-called spectral signature (pictured) that is unique to phosphine ¿ furthermore were able to estimated that the gas is present in Venus' clouds in an abundance of around 20 parts-per-billion. However, they were unable to determine the exactly source of the detected trace quantities of the gas

Researchers detected a so-called spectral signature (pictured) that is unique to phosphine — furthermore were able to estimated that the gas is present in Venus’ clouds in an abundance of around 20 parts-per-billion. However, they were unable to determine the exactly source of the detected trace quantities of the gas

On September 14, researchers announced Venus has traces of the biosignatures gas.

Astronomers at Wales’ Cardiff University and colleagues observed Venus using both the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at Hawaii’s Mauna Kea Observatory and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array in Chile.

They detected a so-called spectral signature that is unique to phosphine — and furthermore were able to estimated that the gas is present in Venus’ clouds in an abundance of around 20 parts-per-billion.

The team explored assorted ways that the gas could have been produced in this setting — including from sources on the surface of the planet, micrometeorites, lightning, or chemical processes happening within the clouds themselves.

However, they were unable to determine exactly what is the source of the detected trace quantities of the gas.

The researchers have cautioned that the detection of phosphine is not itself robust evidence for alien microbial life — and only indicates that potentially unknown geological or chemical processes are occurring on the planet.

Further observations and modelling will be needed, they added, to better explore the origin of the gas in the planet’s atmosphere.

KEY DISCOVERIES IN HUMANITY’S SEARCH FOR ALIEN LIFE

Discovery of pulsars

British astronomer Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell was the first person to discover a pulsar in 1967 when she spotted a radio pulsar.

Since then other types of pulsars that emit x-rays and gamma rays have also been spotted.

Pulsars are essentially rotating, highly magnatised neutron stars but when they were first discovered it was believed they could come from aliens.

‘Wow!’ radio signal

In 1977, an astronomer looking for alien life in the nigh sky above Ohio spotted a powerful radio signal so strong that he excitedly wrote ‘Wow!’ next to his data.

In 1977, an astronomer looking for alien life in the nigh sky above Ohio spotted a powerful radio signal so strong that he excitedly wrote 'Wow!' next to his data

In 1977, an astronomer looking for alien life in the nigh sky above Ohio spotted a powerful radio signal so strong that he excitedly wrote ‘Wow!’ next to his data

The 72-second blast, spotted by Dr Jerry Ehman through a radio telescope, came from Sagittarius but matched no known celestial object.

Conspiracy theorists have since claimed that the ‘Wow! signal’, which was 30 times stronger than background radiation, was a message from intelligent extraterrestrials.

Fossilised martian microbes

In 1996 Nasa and the White House made the explosive announcement that the rock contained traces of Martian bugs.

The meteorite, catalogued as Allen Hills (ALH) 84001, crashed onto the frozen wastes of Antarctica 13,000 years ago and was recovered in 1984. 

Photographs were released showing elongated segmented objects that appeared strikingly lifelike.

Photographs were released showing elongated segmented objects that appeared strikingly lifelike (pictured)

Photographs were released showing elongated segmented objects that appeared strikingly lifelike (pictured)

However, the excitement did not last long. Other scientists questioned whether the meteorite samples were contaminated. 

They also argued that heat generated when the rock was blasted into space may have created mineral structures that could be mistaken for microfossils. 

Behaviour of Tabby’s Star in 2005 

The star, otherwise known as KIC 8462852, is located 1,400 light years away and has baffled astonomers since being discovered in 2015.

It dims at a much faster rate than other stars, which some experts have suggested is a sign of aliens harnessing the energy of a star.

The star, otherwise known as KIC 8462852, is located 1,400 light years away and has baffled astonomers since being discovered in 2015 (artist's impression)

The star, otherwise known as KIC 8462852, is located 1,400 light years away and has baffled astonomers since being discovered in 2015 (artist’s impression)

Recent studies have ‘eliminated the possibility of an alien megastructure’, and instead, suggests that a ring of dust could be causing the strange signals.

Exoplanets in the Goldilocks zone in 2015 

In February this year astronomers announced they had spotted a star system with planets that could support life just 39 light years away.

Seven Earth-like planets were discovered orbiting nearby dwarf star ‘Trappist-1’, and all of them could have water at their surface, one of the key components of life.

Three of the planets have such good conditions, that scientists say life may have already evolved on them. 

Researchers claim that they will know whether or not there is life on any of the planets within a decade, and said ‘this is just the beginning.’ 

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Most Americans are recorded 238 TIMES a week by security cameras, study reveals 

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most americans are recorded 238 times a week by security cameras study reveals

The typical American is recorded by security cameras 238 times a week, according to a new report from Safety.com.

That figure includes surveillance video taken at work, on the road, in stores and in the home. 

The study found that Americans are filmed 160 times while driving, as there are about an average of 20 cameras on a span of 29 miles. 

And the average employee  has been spotted by surveillance cameras at 40 times a week.

However, for those who frequently travel or work in highly patrolled areas the number of times they are captured on film skyrockets to more than 1,000 times a week. 

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Security cameras record the average American 238 times a week, according to a new report, including 14 times a week by wireless doorbell cameras like Amazon's Ring device.

Security cameras record the average American 238 times a week, according to a new report, including 14 times a week by wireless doorbell cameras like Amazon's Ring device.

Security cameras record the average American 238 times a week, according to a new report, including 14 times a week by wireless doorbell cameras like Amazon’s Ring device.

Safety.com, an independent site that reviews safety products and technology, warns that it’s difficult to know how many traffic cameras are just passively filming or permanently storing footage.

Cameras are also frequently installed in stores, transportation hubs, nightclubs and elsewhere. 

The average employee is filmed 40 times a week at or around their job, though it can vary tremendously depending on the environment.

Retail employees might be filmed hundreds of times a week but in an office situation ‘there might be a single camera at the entrance, if at all,’ the researchers said.

The typical driver will pass more than 20 cameras every day, according to Safety.com. The site warns that it's hard to know how many traffic cameras are just passively filming or permanently storing footage

The typical driver will pass more than 20 cameras every day, according to Safety.com. The site warns that it's hard to know how many traffic cameras are just passively filming or permanently storing footage

The typical driver will pass more than 20 cameras every day, according to Safety.com. The site warns that it’s hard to know how many traffic cameras are just passively filming or permanently storing footage

‘We took this into account as best as possible to find the most accurate average.’

The team said people drastically underestimate how much they’re being recorded. A 2016 survey from the video-surveillance publication IPVM found that the majority of people assumed they were being recorded less than five times a day.

The publication put the number closer to 50, though it did not include street and traffic cameras.

The growing surveillance state has drawn concern from lawmakers and civil rights advocates alike.

By next year, there will be an estimated one billion security cameras around the globe, CNBC reports, with 10 percent to 18 percent of them in the US alone.

Sales of wireless doorbell cameras is expected to soar from 3.9 million units in 2019 to 5.6 million in 2023. A recent study showed criminals can determine if a homeowner is away just by analyzing the rate at which their camera uploaded data to the Internet

Sales of wireless doorbell cameras is expected to soar from 3.9 million units in 2019 to 5.6 million in 2023. A recent study showed criminals can determine if a homeowner is away just by analyzing the rate at which their camera uploaded data to the Internet

Sales of wireless doorbell cameras is expected to soar from 3.9 million units in 2019 to 5.6 million in 2023. A recent study showed criminals can determine if a homeowner is away just by analyzing the rate at which their camera uploaded data to the Internet

In 2019, there were 70 million security cameras in the US, or at least one for every 4.6 Americans.

That’s the second-highest ratio after China, which has a camera for every 4.1 people. 

‘We expect this number to continually increase and normalize the presence of security cameras as technology and facial recognition improves,’ Safety.com researchers said in a statement.  

Doorbell cameras are a fast-growing segment of surveillance technology, with 3.9 million in US homes owning them already, according to Statista, and 5.6 million expected to by 2023.

The average American is on film in their house or neighborhood 14 times a week. 

Not only do smart home security cameras raise privacy issues, they can actually put owners in jeopardy.

According to a recent study, criminals can determine if someone is home just by tracking data from their wireless cameras.

This was done without even watching the footage itself but by looking at the rate at which cameras uploaded data via the Internet.

Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Science and Queen Mary University of London found that future activity could be predicted based on past patterns.

‘Once considered a luxury item, these cameras are now commonplace in homes worldwide,’ said co-author Gareth Tyson, a computer science professor at Queen Mary University of London. ‘As they become more ubiquitous, it is important to continue to study their activities and potential privacy risks.’ 

 At its annual hardware event Thursday, Amazon unveiled The Ring Always Home Cam, which is stationed atop a flying drone.

Its camera streams a live view from inside in home to the user’s smartphone, based on a predetermined flight path, and can take footage from multiple viewpoints.

HOW DOES FACIAL RECOGNITION TECHNOLOGY WORK?

Facial recognition software works by matching real time images to a previous photograph of a person. 

Each face has approximately 80 unique nodal points across the eyes, nose, cheeks and mouth which distinguish one person from another. 

A digital video camera measures the distance between various points on the human face, such as the width of the nose, depth of the eye sockets, distance between the eyes and shape of the jawline.

A different smart surveillance system (pictured) can scan 2 billion faces within seconds has been revealed in China. The system connects to millions of CCTV cameras and uses artificial intelligence to pick out targets. The military is working on applying a similar version of this with AI to track people across the country 

A different smart surveillance system (pictured) can scan 2 billion faces within seconds has been revealed in China. The system connects to millions of CCTV cameras and uses artificial intelligence to pick out targets. The military is working on applying a similar version of this with AI to track people across the country 

A different smart surveillance system (pictured) can scan 2 billion faces within seconds has been revealed in China. The system connects to millions of CCTV cameras and uses artificial intelligence to pick out targets. The military is working on applying a similar version of this with AI to track people across the country 

This produces a unique numerical code that can then be linked with a matching code gleaned from a previous photograph.

A facial recognition system used by officials in China connects to millions of CCTV cameras and uses artificial intelligence to pick out targets.

Experts believe that facial recognition technology will soon overtake fingerprint technology as the most effective way to identify people. 

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