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Sabre-toothed cats were deadly long-distance hunters that attacked in packs

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sabre toothed cats were deadly long distance hunters that attacked in packs

Sabre-toothed cats had a specific strategy when hunting, they operated in packs, during the day and ran for so long their prey became exhausted. 

This was made possible by genetic traits which were actively selected for and enhanced its endurance and social skills, new research has found.  

The apex predators are, along with woolly mammoths, one of the most famous extinct animals to live during the last Ice Age.  

They weighed up to a ton and grew to more than ten feet long – equivalent to a male polar bear, the biggest living land predator. 

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Sabre-toothed cats (pictured, artist's impression) were genetically hardwired for endurance and team work. It allowed the animals to conduct long day time hunts and wear down their prey

Sabre-toothed cats (pictured, artist's impression) were genetically hardwired for endurance and team work. It allowed the animals to conduct long day time hunts and wear down their prey

Sabre-toothed cats (pictured, artist’s impression) were genetically hardwired for endurance and team work. It allowed the animals to conduct long day time hunts and wear down their prey 

A scimitar-toothed cat (Homotherium latidens) from the Canadian permafrost was dated as at least 47,500 years old and had its full genome mapped by scientists.  

It revealed dozens of positively selected genes which enhanced blood circulation, respiration and energy production as well as encouraging social behaviour.  

Co-first author Dr Michael Westbury from the University of Copenhagen, said: ‘Their genetic make-up hints towards scimitar-toothed cats being highly skilled hunters.

‘They likely had very good daytime vision and displayed complex social behaviours.

‘They had genetic adaptations for strong bones and cardiovascular and respiratory systems – meaning they were well suited for endurance running.

‘Based on this, we think they hunted in a pack until their prey reached exhaustion with an endurance-based hunting-style during the daylight hours.’

The analysis by the University of Copenhagen reveals the iconic beast would have brought down deer, buffalo, antelopes, camels, bison and ancient horses in groups.

Analysis by researchers at the University of Copenhagen revealed specific genetic traits that allow for enhanced blood circulation (SCTR, SDPR), energy production (AK3, ISCU), respiration (MMP12, TMEM45A) as well as pro-social genes (SCTR, NTF3)

Analysis by researchers at the University of Copenhagen revealed specific genetic traits that allow for enhanced blood circulation (SCTR, SDPR), energy production (AK3, ISCU), respiration (MMP12, TMEM45A) as well as pro-social genes (SCTR, NTF3)

Analysis by researchers at the University of Copenhagen revealed specific genetic traits that allow for enhanced blood circulation (SCTR, SDPR), energy production (AK3, ISCU), respiration (MMP12, TMEM45A) as well as pro-social genes (SCTR, NTF3)

A separate aspect of the study looked at its genetic similarity to modern big cats, such as tigers and lions, and revealed they are only very distantly related. 

The lineage which created the extant large felines split from the one of the sabre-tooth around 22.5 million years ago, making them more distant cousins than apes are to humans. 

Co-first author Dr Ross Barnett said: ‘This was an extremely successful family of cats. 

‘They were present on five continents and roamed the earth for millions of years before going extinct.

‘The current geological period is the first time in 40 million years that Earth has lacked sabre-tooth predators. We just missed them.’

They have fascinated scientists for over 200 years after the first ever specimen was found in the early 19th century. 

Since this initial discovery, in Alberta, Canada, examples of this group of carnivores have been discovered all around the globe, on every continent except for Australia and Antarctica.  

The study is published in the journal Current Biology

SABRE-TOOTH TIGERS DIDN’T GET THEIR FANGS UNTIL THEY WERE THREE 

The sabre-tooth tiger may have been capable of slaying mammoths and rhinos, but it only had relatively small teeth until the age of three.

Research suggests that the animal’s impressively long, dagger-shaped teeth developed later in life than modern cats do.

But once they emerged, they grew twice as quickly as the lion’s, for example.

The sabre-tooth tiger, now more accurately known as the sabre-toothed cat, Smilodon fatalis, lived in North and South America until it became extinct 10,000 years ago.

The big cats are famous for their protruding canines, which could grow up to seven inches (18 cm) long.

Although well-preserved fossils are available to researchers, very little is known about the ages at which the animals reached key developmental stages and grew teeth, for example.

Researchers from Clemson University in South Carolina examined specimens recovered from the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles

They used data from stable oxygen isotope analyses with X-rays and information from previous studies to calculate when the prehistoric cats’ permanent upper canines came through, as well as other growth events.

They believe that the cats got most of their teeth by 14 to 22 months, with the exception of their famous ‘fangs’.

The experts say the long teeth didn’t develop until the cats were around three years’ old, which is delayed in comparison to similar-sized living members of the cat family.

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A partially fossilized jaw from an adult Smilodon fatalis saber-toothed cat showing a fully erupted canine – which didn’t appear until later in life

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Water on the moon could support human colony, says NASA

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water on the moon could support human colony says nasa

NASA has today confirmed, for the first time, that there is water on the sunlit surface of the moon.

The revelation means it is possible water is easily accessible and not just in the deep, permanently shadowed craters of the south pole, as was previously thought. 

A separate piece of research found these so-called ‘cold traps’, which are always in shadow, may contain up to 15,000 square miles (40,000 square km) of water.  

The discovery means future missions to the moon could be prolonged by making use of these water molecules which are scattered across the moon.  

Astronauts could use the natural resource, which may have arrived via comets or solar winds, and turn it into oxygen or drinking water to sustain a future colony.

Scientists also say the water could be used to make rocket fuel, lightening missions and slashing mission costs to make interplanetary space travel easier and cheaper.    

Previously, researchers speculated water was only present in cold traps and were unable to prove it was water and not a similar molecule called hydroxyl, which is found in drain cleaner.  

NASA has today announced that there is up to 15,000 square miles of frozen water on the moon

NASA has today announced that there is up to 15,000 square miles of frozen water on the moon

NASA has today announced that there is up to 15,000 square miles of frozen water on the moon

The NASA-backed research used a converted Boeing 747 that cruises around Earth above the clouds at an altitude of around 41,000ft called Sofia

The NASA-backed research used a converted Boeing 747 that cruises around Earth above the clouds at an altitude of around 41,000ft called Sofia

The NASA-backed research used a converted Boeing 747 that cruises around Earth above the clouds at an altitude of around 41,000ft called Sofia

The NASA research used a converted Boeing 747 that cruises around Earth above the clouds at an altitude of more than 41,000ft called Sofia. 

It was tasked with clarifying findings published in 2009 which discovered molecular hydrogen and oxygen on the surface of the moon. 

However, due to the nature of the decade-old analysis, astronomers were unable to say whether or not it was water (H2O) or hydroxyl (OH) compounds, the chemical found in drain cleaner, due to the similarity in their chemical signature. 

Dr Nick Tothill, a physicist at Western Sydney University, who was not involved in the research, said: ‘The problem was that the water ice signature that was found before was really just telling us that there were oxygen and hydrogen atoms bound together. 

‘On the Earth, this is mainly water, but on the Moon, you can’t be so sure.’

The issue was a limitation of the equipment that used a wavelength of three micrometres, which is unable to tell apart hydroxyl minerals from water. 

Sofia, short for Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is equipped with a unique six micrometre sensor that detects ‘a fundamental vibration of molecular water’ that is completely unique to water. 

The Sofia study found the water molecules in Clavius Crater, one of the largest craters visible from Earth, located in the Moon’s southern hemisphere.  

By detecting this, it is conclusive and indubitable proof of water on the sunlit surface of the moon, NASA says. 

‘We had indications that H2O – the familiar water we know – might be present on the sunlit side of the Moon,’ said Paul Hertz, director of the Astrophysics Division in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. 

‘Now we know it is there. This discovery challenges our understanding of the lunar surface and raises intriguing questions about resources relevant for deep space exploration.’ 

NASA has now found molecular water on the surface of the moon in the Clavius Crater, one of the largest craters visible from Earth, located in the Moon's southern hemisphere using Sofia, a telescope inside an adapted Boeing 747

NASA has now found molecular water on the surface of the moon in the Clavius Crater, one of the largest craters visible from Earth, located in the Moon's southern hemisphere using Sofia, a telescope inside an adapted Boeing 747

NASA has now found molecular water on the surface of the moon in the Clavius Crater, one of the largest craters visible from Earth, located in the Moon’s southern hemisphere using Sofia, a telescope inside an adapted Boeing 747 

In the paper, the researchers, led by Dr Casey Honniball from the University of Hawaiʻi, say that water around the south pole of the moon is relatively abundant, at around 100 to 400 parts per million

In the paper, the researchers, led by Dr Casey Honniball from the University of Hawaiʻi, say that water around the south pole of the moon is relatively abundant, at around 100 to 400 parts per million

In the paper, the researchers, led by Dr Casey Honniball from the University of Hawaiʻi, say that water around the south pole of the moon is relatively abundant, at around 100 to 400 parts per million

First ever space ‘petrol station’ will be built in the UK and orbit the Moon 

The first ever space ‘petrol station’ will be built in the UK as part of a project to support upcoming NASA missions to the Moon.

Aerospace manufacturer Thales Alenia Space will construct the chemical refuelling station, which will be launched into space in 2027, at its three UK sites – in Bristol, Belfast and Oxfordshire. 

The station will refuel the Lunar Gateway – a space station that will orbit the Moon and serve as a communication hub and science laboratory – with xenon and other chemical propellants. 

The petrol station will be launched full of propellant to refuel the Lunar Gateway’s orbit control systems.

When the petrol station runs out of fuel, space tankers, launched from Earth, will replenish the station’s tanks.  

Each refilling of the tanks will allow enough fuel to keep the station orbiting the moon for several years, according to the UK Space Agency. 

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Dr Themiya Nanayakkara, an astronomer at Swinburne University of Technology, comments on the research.

‘Honniball and collaborators have now targeted a much higher wavelength feature at 6µm using data from the SOFIA observatory,’ he says.

He goes on to explain that Sofia is a modified Boeing 747 with a massive hole that fits in a 2.5-meter mirror. 

‘They find spectral signatures that can only be explained by molecular water on the Moon,’ he says. 

In the paper, published in the journal Nature Astronomy, the researchers say that water around the south pole of the moon is relatively abundant, at around 100 to 400 parts per million, equivalent to a 12-ounce (360ml) bottle of water – trapped in a cubic meter of soil. 

This is about 100 times drier than the Sahara desert, NASA says.  

‘We haven’t found a fountain or lake on the moon, the water density is very low, it is confined to the poles, and is likely trapped in glasses or rocks on the surface,’ warns Dr Ben Montet from the University of New South Wales.  

The second scientific paper released today looks at where water is most likely to be found on the moon’s surface. 

It adds to previous research which found that cold traps are well suited for preserving water ice. 

Also known as topographic depressions, they benefit from a quirk of the moon’s physics, which is also a feature of Mercury and the asteroid Ceres. 

All three are tilted on their axis and as a result the shadow created from their craters leaves some areas permanently in the shade. 

In these areas, temperatures can plummet as low as -163.15°C/-261.67°F due to the lack of sunlight, hence the frigid moniker assigned by astronomers.     

NASA will land the first woman and next man on the Moon in 2024 as part of the Artemis mission

Artemis was the twin sister of Apollo and goddess of the Moon in Greek mythology. 

NASA has chosen her to personify its path back to the Moon, which will see astronauts return to the lunar surface by 2024 –  including the first woman and the next man.

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars. 

Artemis 1 will be the first integrated flight test of NASA’s deep space exploration system: the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the ground systems at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.  

Artemis 1 will be an uncrewed flight that will provide a foundation for human deep space exploration, and demonstrate our commitment and capability to extend human existence to the Moon and beyond. 

During this flight, the spacecraft will launch on the most powerful rocket in the world and fly farther than any spacecraft built for humans has ever flown.

It will travel 280,000 miles (450,600 km) from Earth, thousands of miles beyond the Moon over the course of about a three-week mission. 

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars. This graphic explains the various stages of the mission

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars. This graphic explains the various stages of the mission

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars. This graphic explains the various stages of the mission

Orion will stay in space longer than any ship for astronauts has done without docking to a space station and return home faster and hotter than ever before. 

With this first exploration mission, NASA is leading the next steps of human exploration into deep space where astronauts will build and begin testing the systems near the Moon needed for lunar surface missions and exploration to other destinations farther from Earth, including Mars. 

The will take crew on a different trajectory and test Orion’s critical systems with humans aboard.

The SLS rocket will from an initial configuration capable of sending more than 26 metric tons to the Moon, to a final configuration that can send at least 45 metric tons. 

Together, Orion, SLS and the ground systems at Kennedy will be able to meet the most challenging crew and cargo mission needs in deep space.

Eventually NASA seeks to establish a sustainable human presence on the Moon by 2028 as a result of the Artemis mission.

The space agency hopes this colony will uncover new scientific discoveries, demonstrate new technological advancements and lay the foundation for private companies to build a lunar economy. 

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Future missions to the south pole of the moon could be refuelled at a base camp, as proposed by the NASA Artemis mission, using the moonwater. Pictured, NASA impression of Artemis astronauts on the surface of Moon

Future missions to the south pole of the moon could be refuelled at a base camp, as proposed by the NASA Artemis mission, using the moonwater. Pictured, NASA impression of Artemis astronauts on the surface of Moon

Future missions to the south pole of the moon could be refuelled at a base camp, as proposed by the NASA Artemis mission, using the moonwater. Pictured, NASA impression of Artemis astronauts on the surface of Moon

Dr Paul Hayne from the University of Colorado, Boulder led a project that tried to determine just how many of these there are and how much water they may contain. 

His team used theoretical modelling and data from the Lunar Renaissance Orbiter (LRO) to piece this puzzle together.  

They vary enormously in size, the researchers say, with some as large as one kilometre in diameter and some just one centimetre in width. 

Up to a fifth of all water ice believed to be trapped in these spots is thought to be in the tiniest of the craters, the researchers say. 

More than half (60 per cent) of the cold traps are in the south and the majority are at latitudes in excess of 80 degrees because ‘permanent shadows equatorward of 80° are typically too warm to support ice accumulation’, the researchers write. 

In total, they speculate up to 40,000 square kilometres of water ice exists in the cold traps, the same as twice the contents of Lake Ontario.  

Dr Tothill says: ‘Taken together, these papers tell us that there really is water ice on the moon, and it’s probably widespread over both polar regions – with a bit more in the south. 

Tardigrades were left on the MOON by Israel’s Beresheet probe crash 

Tardigrades are regraded as Earth’s hardiest animal and can withstand the most brutal conditions known to man – and now thousands of them are the moon.

Experts say it is impossible to know if the durable animals — often dubbed ‘moss piglets’ or ‘water bears’ — will be able to withstand the barren landscape and harsh conditions of the lunar surface.  

Israel’s Beresheet mission hoped to send a host of scientific instruments to the lunar surface and alongside them, safely packed away, was a treasure trove of information and a smattering of the ‘water bears’.

They formed part of the ‘Lunar Library’ project masterminded by serial entrepreneur Nova Spivack.

It hoped to use the Beresheet mission as the first step towards creating a ‘Earth back-up’ composed of all of mankind’s knowledge.

As part of this quest, Spivack sent human DNA, 30 million pages of information and a host of tardigrades along on the doomed craft.

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‘This in turn tells us how and where to look for water on the moon, with either robot or human explorers.’ 

While this research confirms long-held theories, astronomers have been acting on these suspicions for a long time. 

NASA, for example, banked on finding water and plans to build a base camp at the moon’s south pole. Israel’s failed Beresheet mission also had a similar thought process.

Before a crash landing, it had intended to touch down in the lowland area of Mare Serenitatis. This area gave off a distinct signal indicating water is present there. 

Thousands of dried tardigrades were secretly sent on this mission and these creatures are known as being the hardiest creatures in the world. 

They can be revived by water, survive UV rays and Israel hoped to see if they would survive on the moon. 

‘But we don’t have to worry that tardigrades are now running around the Moon,’ says Alice Gorman of Flinders University, a leading space archaeologist. 

‘They’re encased in resin, and the water is most likely trapped inside glasses formed by micrometeorite impacts.’  

The discovery, which was tantalisingly teased by NASA last week, has significant implications for future space missions to our natural satellite. 

Dr Jonti Horner from the University of Southern Queensland calls the research ‘definitely exciting’. 

He says future missions to the south pole of the moon could be refuelled at a base camp, as proposed by the NASA Artemis mission, using the moonwater.    

But the implications are far more significant than that, experts say. 

Instead of simply refuelling and returning to Earth, the presence of moonwater , and therefore lower costs for return trips, also open the door for interplanetary missions.

‘To launch a litre bottle of water from Earth to the Moon costs $35,000 – almost the same cost as if we just made that bottle solid gold, says Professor Alan Duffy, lead scientist of The Royal Institution of Australia.

‘But by accessing it directly from the Moon itself we turn our celestial neighbour into a resupply as well as a refuelling station.

‘Water can directly support astronauts on a planned Moon-base, used to grow food on long-duration missions to Mars, and even split into literal rocket fuel for powering our satellites and rockets across the Solar System. ‘

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Fish living in microplastic infected waters are SIX times more likely to die

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fish living in microplastic infected waters are six times more likely to die

Fish that accidentally eat microplastics are six times more likely to die than those which don’t, a study has revealed.

Scientists have found that fish raised in waters polluted with the tiny pieces of plastic are bolder, more active and have lower survival rates than fish that live in normal water.

The effects are so pronounced that fcScroll down for video  

Researchers raised damselfish (pictured) in microplastic polluted waters then placed them on live or dead-degraded coral patches. They found those reared on microplastics or released into dead corals were bolder, more active, and had lower survival than controls

Researchers raised damselfish (pictured) in microplastic polluted waters then placed them on live or dead-degraded coral patches. They found those reared on microplastics or released into dead corals were bolder, more active, and had lower survival than controls

Researchers raised damselfish (pictured) in microplastic polluted waters then placed them on live or dead-degraded coral patches. They found those reared on microplastics or released into dead corals were bolder, more active, and had lower survival than controls

Previous studies had established that microplastic particles, pictured, can be ingested by humans and animals ¿ such as via drinking water ¿ and pass through the gastrointestinal tract

Previous studies had established that microplastic particles, pictured, can be ingested by humans and animals ¿ such as via drinking water ¿ and pass through the gastrointestinal tract

Previous studies had established that microplastic particles, pictured, can be ingested by humans and animals — such as via drinking water — and pass through the gastrointestinal tract

Researchers say they don’t believe this is due to any toxic effects the plastic has on the fish.

But it could be that the microplastics make them hungrier, and this ‘nutritional stress’ makes them more likely to take risks going out to find food.

As a result of this more risky behaviour, they are more likely to be eaten by predators.

Bottle-fed babies swallow MILLIONS of microplastic particles every day from their bottles  

Babies around the world are exposed to millions of microplastic particles a day which are produced during the preparation of formula milk, a study has found. 

British babies swallow more than infants in other parts of the world, with around three million fibres released from a bottle every day.  

Researchers from Trinity College Dublin found that polypropylene bottles release these fibres when exposed to extreme heat, such as from boiling water. 

Shaking the bottle to mix formula milk worsens the microplastic shedding, the research found. 

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34577696 0 image a 26 1603818797174

By the age of six months British infants fed on formula using bottles with polypropylene are exposed to an estimated three million microplastic particles every day

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The team from James Cook University in Australia predicted that microplastic consumption might produce a ‘starvation’ effect within the affected fish.

During their study, they captured juvenile fish from the Great Barrier Reef and pulse-fed some of them polystyrene microplastics for four days before releasing them back into their natural habitat.

Their behaviour was monitored for three days, to see if the microplastics had any effect.

Results, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, reveal that the fish who had been exposed to the microplastics became more risk-prone and strayed further from shelter than the normal fish.

The analysis also revealed that 90 per cent of the fish that had been exposed to microplastics died during the three-day monitoring period after they had been re-released into the wild.

The study reads: ‘Fish that had a history of exposure to microplastics exhibited six times lower survival than those that had not been exposed to microplastics.

‘Fish exposed to microplastics moved further from shelter and took more risks, exposing themselves to the predators that have high feeding rates and are highly selective for junior fish that stray from shelter.

‘Exposure to microplastics for a relatively short duration is enough to alter their behaviour and survival.’ The authors add that the consumption of microplastics had as much of a detrimental impact on fish as living on a dead coral reef would.

Another recent study revealed that microplastics have been found in human organs after they die, which experts believe may get into our system after eating fish and drinking water from bottles.

The Daily Mails Turn the Tide on Plastic campaign is calling for more action to tackle the crisis.

WHAT CAN MICROPLASTICS DO TO THE HUMAN BODY IF THEY END UP IN OUR FOOD SUPPLY?

According to an article published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, our understanding of the potential human health effects from exposure to microplastics ‘constitutes major knowledge gaps.’ 

Humans can be exposed to plastic particles via consumption of seafood and terrestrial food products, drinking water and via the air. 

However, the level of human exposure, chronic toxic effect concentrations and underlying mechanisms by which microplastics elicit effects are still not well understood enough in order to make a full assessment of the risks to humans.

According to Rachel Adams, a senior lecturer in Biomedical Science at Cardiff Metropolitan University, ingesting microplastics could cause a number of potentially harmful effects, such as: 

  • Inflammation: when inflammation occurs, the body’s white blood cells and the substances they produce protect us from infection. This normally protective immune system can cause damage to tissues. 
  • An immune response to anything recognised as ‘foreign’ to the body: immune responses such as these can cause damage to the body. 
  • Becoming carriers for other toxins that enter the body: microplastics generally repel water and will bind to toxins that don’t dissolve, so microplastics can bind to compounds containing toxic metals such as mercury, and organic pollutants such as some pesticides and chemicals called dioxins, which are known to causes cancer, as well as reproductive and developmental problems. If these microplastics enter the body, toxins can accumulate in fatty tissues. 
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SpaceX launching Starlink $600 ‘Better Than Nothing Beta’ service

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spacex launching starlink 600 better than nothing beta service

It has been more than one year in the making, but SpaceX is finally gearing up to unleash its Starlink internet to the world.

An email sent to those who pre-signed up has surfaced online, revealing details of the ‘Better Than Nothing Beta’ test.

Customers will have to pay nearly $600 upfront to receive access, which includes the $99 monthly fee plus $499 to order the Starlink Kit that includes the ‘UFO on a stick’ terminal, mounting tripod and WiFi router.

The email, which states it is ‘trying to lower your initial expectations,’ shows the service has data speeds varying from 50Mb/s to 150Mb/s and latency from 20ms to 40ms – but warns there may be ‘be brief periods of no connectivity at all.’

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It has been more than one year in the making, but SpaceX is finally gearing up to unleash its Starlink internet to the world. An email sent to those who pre-signed up has surfaced online, revealing details of the ¿Better Than Nothing Beta¿ test

It has been more than one year in the making, but SpaceX is finally gearing up to unleash its Starlink internet to the world. An email sent to those who pre-signed up has surfaced online, revealing details of the ¿Better Than Nothing Beta¿ test

It has been more than one year in the making, but SpaceX is finally gearing up to unleash its Starlink internet to the world. An email sent to those who pre-signed up has surfaced online, revealing details of the ‘Better Than Nothing Beta’ test

SpaceX launched the first batch of 60 Starlink satellites on May 23, 2019 and today, the constellation includes 835 devices.

It plans to launch at least 2,200 satellites over the next five years in order to offer a global broadband service covering even the most remote areas of the world.

The public received invites in June to use the public service and the email marks the launch of the beta service dubbed ‘Better Than Nothing Beta.’

‘As we launch more satellite, install more ground stations and improve our networking software, data speed, latency and uptime will improve dramatically,’ reads the email.

Customers will have to pay nearly $600 upfront to receive access, which includes the $99 monthly fee plus $499 to order the Starlink Kit that includes the ¿UFO on a stick¿ terminal (pictured), mounting tripod and WiFi router

Customers will have to pay nearly $600 upfront to receive access, which includes the $99 monthly fee plus $499 to order the Starlink Kit that includes the ¿UFO on a stick¿ terminal (pictured), mounting tripod and WiFi router

Customers will have to pay nearly $600 upfront to receive access, which includes the $99 monthly fee plus $499 to order the Starlink Kit that includes the ‘UFO on a stick’ terminal (pictured), mounting tripod and WiFi router

SpaceX launched the first batch of 60 Starlink satellites on May 23, 2019 and today, the constellation includes 835 devices. It plans to launch at least 2,200 satellites over the next five years. Pictured is a Starlink launch that took place on Oct. 6

SpaceX launched the first batch of 60 Starlink satellites on May 23, 2019 and today, the constellation includes 835 devices. It plans to launch at least 2,200 satellites over the next five years. Pictured is a Starlink launch that took place on Oct. 6

SpaceX launched the first batch of 60 Starlink satellites on May 23, 2019 and today, the constellation includes 835 devices. It plans to launch at least 2,200 satellites over the next five years. Pictured is a Starlink launch that took place on Oct. 6

However, once SpaceX makes these improvements, customers can expect 16ms to 19ms by summer of 2021.’

At the end of the invite is text that reads: ‘If this sounds good to you, then order here.’

CEO Elon Musk had previously stated that SpaceX could rollout a beta service once it had about 800 satellites floating in low orbit.

Earlier this month, the firm provided access to the space internet to first responders battling wildfires in Washington state.

However, once SpaceX makes improvements, customers can expect 16ms to 19ms by summer of 2021'

However, once SpaceX makes improvements, customers can expect 16ms to 19ms by summer of 2021'

However, once SpaceX makes improvements, customers can expect 16ms to 19ms by summer of 2021′

Officials said the satellites doubled the bandwidth and produced more than 150 percent decrease in latency.

Richard Hall, the emergency telecommunications leader of the Washington State Military Department’s IT division, told CNBC: ‘I have never set up any tactical satellite equipment that has been as quick to set up, and anywhere near as reliable.’

He also shared that Starlink doubles the bandwidth compared to traditional internet satellites and there is more than 150 percent decreases in latency.

Traditional services can take anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour to establish a connection, but Hall told CNBC that Starlink was working in just 10 minutes.

ELON MUSK’S SPACEX SET TO BRING BROADBAND INTERNET TO THE WORLD WITH ITS STARLINK CONSTELLATION OF SATELLITES

Elon Musk’s SpaceX has launched the fifth batch of its ‘Starlink’ space internet satellites – taking the total to 300.

They form a constellation of thousands of satellites, designed to provide low-cost broadband internet service from low Earth orbit.

The constellation, informally known as Starlink, and under development at SpaceX’s facilities in Redmond, Washington.

Its goal is to beam superfast internet into your home from space.

While satellite internet has been around for a while, it has suffered from high latency and unreliable connections.

Starlink is different. SpaceX says putting a ‘constellation’ of satellites in low earth orbit would provide high-speed, cable-like internet all over the world.

The billionaire’s company wants to create the global system to help it generate more cash.

Musk has previously said the venture could give three billion people who currently do not have access to the internet a cheap way of getting online.

It could also help fund a future city on Mars.

Helping humanity reach the red planet is one of Musk’s long-stated aims and was what inspired him to start SpaceX.

The company recently filed plans with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to launch 4,425 satellites into orbit above the Earth – three times as many that are currently in operation.

‘Once fully deployed, the SpaceX system will pass over virtually all parts of the Earth’s surface and therefore, in principle, have the ability to provide ubiquitous global service,’ the firm said.

‘Every point on the Earth’s surface will see, at all times, a SpaceX satellite.’

The network will provide internet access to the US and the rest of the world, it added.

It is expected to take more than five years and $9.8 billion (£7.1bn) of investment, although satellite internet has proved an expensive market in the past and analysts expect the final bill will be higher.

Musk compared the project to ‘rebuilding the internet in space’, as it would reduce reliance on the existing network of undersea fibre-optic cables which criss-cross the planet.

In the US, the FCC welcomed the scheme as a way to provide internet connections to more people.

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