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Samsung Galaxy Buds sale: Save £49 on these bestselling true wireless earbuds

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samsung galaxy buds sale save 49 on these bestselling true wireless earbuds

True wireless earbuds are all the rage and today there’s a great deal to be had on Samsung Galaxy Buds.

The bestselling earbuds from big-name brand Samsung, are just £89.60 (saving £49.40) right now over at Amazon – a fantastic deal if you’re on the hunt for the best wireless earbuds currently on the market.

In fact, this is the lowest price we’ve ever seen on the Samsung Galaxy Buds yet. Samsung Galaxy Buds+ are also reduced by 30 per cent.

Now £89.60 on Amazon, this is the lowest price we've ever seen on the Samsung Galaxy Buds

Now £89.60 on Amazon, this is the lowest price we've ever seen on the Samsung Galaxy Buds

Now £89.60 on Amazon, this is the lowest price we’ve ever seen on the Samsung Galaxy Buds 

The price drop on older Samsung true wireless earbuds comes as no surprise as the brand has just released the Samsung Galaxy Buds Live (now available to pre-order), which, unlike older earbuds, offer built-in noise reduction rivalling that of the Apple AirPods Pro.

However, this pair, in particular, has received plenty of great reviews. On Amazon alone, the Samsung Galaxy Buds has racked up over 3,500 reviews, with 72 per cent of users awarding the wireless earbuds a full five stars.

‘I have been using these new buds for a couple of months now, and I am really impressed with their sound quality and performance,’ wrote one customer in their five-star review. ‘The battery life is also great. I would definitely recommend them, especially for the price.’

Another agreed adding: ‘Lovely passive noise isolation with brilliant audio quality. I use one earphone for phone calls as this is sufficient in low sound environments.’

A third shopper wrote: ‘One of the best buds I’ve used. Sound quality is high and links to the Galaxy Wearable app without a problem. Worth buying at under £100.’

A fantastic deal if you're on the hunt for the best wireless earbuds currently on the market

A fantastic deal if you're on the hunt for the best wireless earbuds currently on the market

A fantastic deal if you’re on the hunt for the best wireless earbuds currently on the market

While these Samsung earbuds don’t have active noise cancelling, they’re sleek and feature-packed. Importantly they feel comfortable, and they’re compatible with all mobile devices offering a noise-isolating design that passively seals out the majority of ambient noise. They also have great battery life to boot too, offering up to six hours of listening time on a single charge.

As competition heats up, there are several other best rated cheap true wireless earbuds for sale over on Amazon, too. Today you can score Boltune Wireless Headphones for £25.35 – that’s a saving of 31 per cent. 

The Bluetooth enabled earbuds have amassed over 11,000 reviews with shoppers rating them highly for bass quality and battery life. Excellent value for less than £30.

These ENACFIRE E60 Wireless Headphones are also winning over thousands of reviewers on Amazon, and they’re now just £33.99 (save £66).

MailOnline may earn commission on sales from the links on this page. 

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Facebook users will be able to own their images and issue takedown notices

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facebook users will be able to own their images and issue takedown notices

Facebook is giving users more control over images they create, including the ability to issue takedown notices on Facebook and Instagram.

In an update on Monday, the social media firm unveiled Rights Manager, which allows creators and publishers to protect their work ‘at scale.’ 

Page administrators can submit an application for content they want protected by uploading a CSV file with all of the relevant metadata.

Once a file is accepted, Facebook’s algorithms will locate matching content on both Facebook and Instagram.

Admins can then access Facebook’s ‘fast and effective’ IP reporting system to issue takedown requests to violators. 

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An example of Facebook's new Rights Manager for Images program. Page admins can submit files they want to protect, then algorithms will find matching content on both Facebook and Instagram

An example of Facebook’s new Rights Manager for Images program. Page admins can submit files they want to protect, then algorithms will find matching content on both Facebook and Instagram

 ‘We want to ensure Facebook is a safe and valuable place for creators to share their content,’ wrote product manager Dave Axelgard.

‘That’s why we built tools like Rights Manager in Creator Studio to help creators and publishers who have a large or growing catalog of content better control when, how and where their content is shared across Facebook and Instagram.’ 

Settings can be adjusted so ownership can apply globally or only in certain territories.

Eventually all users will be able to control image rights, like they can music and video rights.

Once violators have been found, creators and publishers can choose to use Facebook's IP reporting system to issue takedown notices. The program can be made global or limited to certain territories

Once violators have been found, creators and publishers can choose to use Facebook’s IP reporting system to issue takedown notices. The program can be made global or limited to certain territories

‘We want to make sure that we understand the use case very, very well from that set of trusted partners before we expand it out because, as you can imagine, a tool like this is a pretty sensitive one and a pretty powerful one,’ Axelgard told The Verge.

‘We want to make sure that we have guardrails in place to ensure that people are able to use it safely and properly.’

Axelgard added that the company is starting small to ‘learn more and figure out the proper way to address specific use cases like memes.’

Copyright infringement has been a sensitive issue since the dawn of social media in the early 2000s.

Creatives fighting to control the use of their work have faced pushback from users claiming fair usage.

And easy access to photo-editing software raises questions about how much an image can be changed, say in a meme, before it’s no longer considered the copyrighted work.

‘Social media platforms, and the norms they have inspired, present a unique challenge to copyright law,’ intellectual property attorneys Dyan Finguerra-DuCharme and Felicity Kohn wrote last week in WWD.

‘As scholars have noted – and as any social media user can attest – social media platforms have shifted the consumption habits of today’s society from a market culture to a sharing culture by encouraging users to share freely both original and third-party content.’

And the rules about copyright and social media are hardly static.

In 2007, the Ninth Circuit ruled that embedding an image from its source did not violate the owner’s copyright because technically viewers were being directed to the website where the image was stored.

In April, a judge ruled that photographer Stephanie Sinclair didn’t have grounds to sue Mashable for embedding her photo.

But another court reversed that decision in June, holding that Instagram’s terms of service did not automatically convey the requisite ‘explicit consent’ to grant rights to a third party, according to The National Law Review.

That same month, Judge Katherine Failla refused Newsweek’s request to dismiss a copyright infringement lawsuit brought by photographer Elliot McGucken.

The legacy media company had requested McGucken’s permission to use his image of a lake in Death Valley.

When he declined, Newsweek embedded the image from McGucken’s Instagram.

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Thousands of starfish washed ashore on Florida beach after Hurricane Sally hit last week

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thousands of starfish washed ashore on florida beach after hurricane sally hit last week

Thousands of starfish washed ashore Navarre Beach after Hurricane Sally ripped through Florida last week.

Residents discovered the creatures Saturday morning, along with other animals like clams, worms and an oyster toadfish.

Biology experts say these marine animals live in the inner tidal zone of the ocean and the hurricane shifted currents that left them stranded on land.

The tropical storm hit September 16, sinking a number of boats and docks, along with releasing intense rain that flooded parts of Navarre with more than 10 feet of water.

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Thousands of starfish washed ashore Navarre Beach after Hurricane Sally ripped through Florida last week. Residents discovered the creatures Saturday morning

Thousands of starfish washed ashore Navarre Beach after Hurricane Sally ripped through Florida last week. Residents discovered the creatures Saturday morning

Danny Fureigh, chief of Navarre Beach Fire Rescue, told Pensacola News Journal: ‘You have this big surge of water coming inland from several miles out, and then washing back out with everything it touches.’

‘It’s like a big toilet bowl, pretty much. We were the only beach flying double red flags because of the water quality.’

‘We wouldn’t want our families swimming in that.’

A teacher in a video on the Navarre Beach Marine Science Station Facebook said this was the first time she has seen anything like this, but notes it does happen.  

A teacher in a video on the Navarre Beach Marine Science Station Facebook said this was the first time she has seen anything like this, but notes it does happen

The surge also brought a pin clam ashore, which situates itself vertically in the ground to filter feed on plankton floating by

A teacher in a video on the Navarre Beach Marine Science Station Facebook said this was the first time she has seen anything like this, but notes it does happen

The species of starfish Astropecten articulatus, commonly known as the Royal Starfish that was named for its bold colors. This type of starfish is found in the western part of the Atlantic Ocean and is one of the most common living around the coast of the US

The species of starfish Astropecten articulatus, commonly known as the Royal Starfish that was named for its bold colors. This type of starfish is found in the western part of the Atlantic Ocean and is one of the most common living around the coast of the US

These starfish, which are related to sand dollars, live in the inner tidal zone of the ocean and were brought to shore with the big surge from the hurricane. 

Another post by the Science Station says ‘these are royal starfish. 

The species of starfish Astropecten articulatus, commonly known as the Royal Starfish that was named for its bold colors. 

This type of starfish is found in the western part of the Atlantic Ocean and is one of the most common living around the coast of the US. 

It has a purple granulated disk, which is the central region of the sea star, and the purple color continues to extend to its five flat rays, which are its arms.’

A pin clam was also found in the white sand that situates itself into the bottom of the ocean and filter feeds, along with a number of clear jellyfish – all of which had died since being stranded on land.

Biology experts say these marine animals live in the inner tidal zone of the ocean and the hurricane shifted currents that left them stranded on land.

Biology experts say these marine animals live in the inner tidal zone of the ocean and the hurricane shifted currents that left them stranded on land.

Biology experts say these marine animals live in the inner tidal zone of the ocean and the hurricane shifted currents that left them stranded on land

Another video on the Navarre Beach Marine Science Station Facebook page shows an oyster toadfish that Hurricane Sally also brought ashore. This creature has a mouth full of teeth that it uses to crush shells of oysters and other crustaceans

Another video on the Navarre Beach Marine Science Station Facebook page shows an oyster toadfish that Hurricane Sally also brought ashore. This creature has a mouth full of teeth that it uses to crush shells of oysters and other crustaceans 

Another video on the Navarre Beach Marine Science Station Facebook page shows an oyster toadfish that Hurricane Sally also brought ashore.

‘He is a species we find commonly enough. This little guy washed ashore during the hurricane,’ the scientist said in the clip.

‘What is really cool about the oyster toadfish is his teeth.’

Hurricane Sally made landfall Wednesday near areas located near the Gulf Shores and was recorded as a Category 2 storm that pushed a surge of water onto the coast and brought torrential rain that flooded the Florida Panhandle to Mississippi

Hurricane Sally made landfall Wednesday near areas located near the Gulf Shores and was recorded as a Category 2 storm that pushed a surge of water onto the coast and brought torrential rain that flooded the Florida Panhandle to Mississippi

Pointing to the creature’s mouth, the scientist explained that it uses tiny white teeth to break open shell fish like mollusks and oysters along the bottom of the ocean.

‘He has that nice big mouth to suck in the prey and really chomp down on it.’

‘Another really unique thing about this fish is on his dorsal fin, it is flattened from being out in the sun a few days, which is actually venomous.’

Hurricane Sally made landfall Wednesday near areas located near the Gulf Shores and was recorded as a Category 2 storm that pushed a surge of water onto the coast and brought torrential rain that flooded the Florida Panhandle to Mississippi.

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Hundreds of teeth found in the Sahara Desert reveal the Spinosaurus dinosaur had aquatic lifestyle

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hundreds of teeth found in the sahara desert reveal the spinosaurus dinosaur had aquatic lifestyle

A trove of more than a thousand dinosaur teeth in the Sahara Desert confirms that the largest carnivorous dinosaur on record spent most of its time in the water.

Larger than the Tyrannosaurus, the 50-foot, seven-ton Spinosaurus lived in North Africa some 95 to 100 million years ago.

With a limited fossil record to analyze, scientists have long believed it was a land dweller.

But the discovery of a Spinosaurus tail in the prehistoric Kem Kem riverbeds in Morocco, reported in April in the journal Nature, bolstered the theory that Spinosaurus was semiaquatic and used the appendage to move through the water like an oar.

Now researchers have identified hundreds of Spinosaurus teeth in the same riverbeds, confirming the giant lizard was a real-life ‘river monster.”  

According to their report, published in the journal Cretaceous Research, the massive predator was the most common dinosaur in the Kem Kem, which flowed through the Sahara 100 million years ago.

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Spinosaurus (right) faces off against a T-rex in the movie Jurassic Park III. The 50-foot, seven-ton Spinosaurus, was the largest known carnivorous dinosaur and lived in North Africa 100 million years ago

Spinosaurus (right) faces off against a T-rex in the movie Jurassic Park III. The 50-foot, seven-ton Spinosaurus, was the largest known carnivorous dinosaur and lived in North Africa 100 million years ago 

Scientists from the University of Portsmouth say the Spinosaurus teeth were easy to identify from among the 1,200 dental remains discovered in the Kem Kem.

‘They have a smooth round cross section which glints when held up to the light,’ said researcher Aaron Quigley.

Some 1,200 teeth were sorted by species and nearly half were from Spinosaurus.

‘The huge number of teeth we collected … reveals that Spinosaurus was there in huge numbers, accounting for 45 percent of the total dental remains,’ said University of Portsmouth paleobiologist David Martill.

A team from the University of Portsmouth recovered more than 1,200 dinosaur teeth from the Kem Kem riverbeds in Morocco and nearly half belonged to Spinosauruses. That abundance, researchers say, 'is a reflection of their aquatic lifestyle'

A team from the University of Portsmouth recovered more than 1,200 dinosaur teeth from the Kem Kem riverbeds in Morocco and nearly half belonged to Spinosauruses. That abundance, researchers say, ‘is a reflection of their aquatic lifestyle’

That abundance ‘is a reflection of their aquatic lifestyle,’ Martill added.

Terrestrial dinosaurs constituted less than one percent of the dental fragments at one Kem Kem site, and barely 5 percent at another, according to the report.

‘An animal living much of its life in water is much more likely to contribute teeth to the river deposit than those dinosaurs that perhaps only visited the river for drinking and feeding along its banks,’ Martill said.

A rendering of Spinosaurus hunting a group of sawfish. The discovery of a Spinosaurus tail, first reported in April, bolstered the theory the fearsome predator spent most of its time in the river

A rendering of Spinosaurus hunting a group of sawfish. The discovery of a Spinosaurus tail, first reported in April, bolstered the theory the fearsome predator spent most of its time in the river

 ‘From this research we are able to confirm this location as the place where this gigantic dinosaur not only lived but also died. The results are fully consistent with the idea of a truly water-dwelling, ‘river monster.” 

Spinosaurus was first uncovered by German paleontologist Ernst Stromer during excavations in Egypt between 1910 and 1914.

Longer than an adult Tyrannosaurus rex, it had an elongated snout atop a crocodile-like maw that bristled with conical teeth that made it easier for it to grasp prey.

Stromer named the creature Spinosaurus, or ‘spine lizard,’ after the long distinctive spines on its back.

He brought dozens of Spinosaurus fossils back to Munich’s Paleontological Museum but they were destroyed when the city was bombed by allies in World War II.

Drawings, photos, and descriptions were all that remained until recently.

How did the fearsome Spinosaurus hunt underwater?

Spinosaurus could grow up to 50 feet long and weigh up to seven tons. 

The beasts were so large and fearsome that the adults of the species had no natural predators. 

Pictured, an artist's impression from National Geographic of two Spinosaurus hunting sawfish. Adult Spinosaurus are known to reach up to 50 feet long and weight seven tons

Pictured, an artist’s impression from National Geographic of two Spinosaurus hunting sawfish. Adult Spinosaurus are known to reach up to 50 feet long and weight seven tons

It had several adaptations that allowed it to survive and hunt underwater. 

Its nostrils were far back on its head, allowing it to breath with only a small portion of its head poking above the water level. 

Its bones were extremely dense, similar to penguins, which allowed it to carefully control its position in the water, striking a careful balance between buoyancy and submersion. 

Large, flat feet that were most probably webbed allowed it to lumber across the soft land around the river banks, while locomotion in water was similar to crocodiles. 

Its flat tail moved laterally and propelled the dinosaur forward.   

It was a therepod, the same group of dinosaurs that includes Tyranosaurus rex. 

It is the only dinosaur that is known to have swum and had huge jaws packed with six inch long razor sharp teeth. 

The teeth were conical and not blade-like, which were well adapted to hold on to the slippery prey it hunted. 

Its snout is more similar to that of crocodiles than to other predatory dinosaurs. This housed sensory structures able to capture the waves produced by swimming prey.

This organ functioned like a sonar – allowing the animal to hunt even in murky waters. 

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