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Scientists predict the food of 2030 on World Food Day

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scientists predict the food of 2030 on world food day

Scientists have shared their predictions for the food of 2030, from insect toppings and meat grown in the lab, to vegan food for our pets.   

Experts from around the world have been speaking during an online event as part of the Oxfordshire Science Festival to mark World Food Day on Friday. 

One Dutch scientist says lab-grown meat will knock plant burgers off the shelves, while another Australian animal expert thinks it’s time to seriously consider vegan pet food.

And an Oxford psychologist thinks 2030 will bring sensory dining experiences to people’s homes that were only previously found in high-end restaurants.    

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Pictured, cricket protein power added to a stew. Insect-based protein is growing globally with smaller environmental impacts than meat

Pictured, cricket protein power added to a stew. Insect-based protein is growing globally with smaller environmental impacts than meat

‘Food is going to change more in the next 10 years than it has in 10,000 years, due to new innovations in food technologies and biotechnologies,’ said Ryan Bethencourt, CEO at dog food company Wild Earth. 

‘I think we’re going to see multiple million dollar companies in the plant-based space.’

It’s possible that climatic and environmental changes and ‘ecological devastation’ will force a cultural shift toward lifestyles that respect the planet’s resources, rather than exploiting them.  

MailOnline has provided a breakdown of some of the most outlandish predictions for the diets and dining habits of the Earthlings of 2030.  

 IN VITRO MEAT

Lab-grown meat is set to become more ubiquitous in the next 10 years, transforming from a niche concept to a common fridge staple. 

Professor Mark Post at Maastricht University in the Netherlands unveiled the world’s first lab-grown burger from cow muscle cells, in 2013.

He’s now pioneering a ‘kinder and cleaner’ way of making beef with his firm, Mosa Meat, which created the world’s first hamburger without slaughtering an animal. 

The company extracts cells from the muscle of an animal, such as a cow for beef, when the animal is under anaesthesia.  

Dutch company Mosa Meat made the world’s first lab-grown meat burger back in 2013, Pictured, an uncooked Mosa Meat patty

Dutch company Mosa Meat made the world’s first lab-grown meat burger back in 2013, Pictured, an uncooked Mosa Meat patty

The cells then are placed in a dish containing nutrients and naturally-occurring growth factors, and allowed to proliferate just as they would inside an animal, until there are trillions of cells from a small sample. 

These cells later form muscle cells, which naturally merge to form primitive muscle fibres and edible tissue.  

From one sample from a cow, the firm can produce 800 million strands of muscle tissue, which is enough to make 80,000 quarter pounders. 

Mosa Meat has also created cultured fat that it adds to its tissue to form the finished product, which simply tastes ‘like meat’, the company says. 

Professor Post think this product will be so popular with animal welfare activists and burger fans alike it will eventually displace plant-based substitutes, like soy burgers, that are increasingly common in UK supermarkets. 

‘Novel technologies such as the ones developed in cellular agriculture are part of the solution, next to reducing food waste and changing consumer behaviour,’ Professor Post told MailOnline. 

The cooked Mosa Meat patty looks similar to conventionally-made beef burgers. The company says it tastes 'like meat'

The cooked Mosa Meat patty looks similar to conventionally-made beef burgers. The company says it tastes ‘like meat’

‘A good example of strong trend in consumer behaviour is increased vegetarianism among young generations to unprecedented numbers. 

‘Most likely, this trend will continue and spread towards other age groups and eventually will lead to disappearance of plant-based meat substitutes.’

Mosa Meat received $55 million in funding last month to scale up production of cultured meat. 

The funding will help extend the firm’s current pilot production facility in the Dutch city of Maastricht and develop an industrial-sized production line.  

‘SONIC SEASONING’  

Sonic seasoning is a relatively new term describing the use of audio stimulus to enhance our experience of eating – most famously used in British chef Heston Blumenthal’s three Michelin starred restaurant The Fat Duck in Berkshire. 

At the Fat Duck, diners in the past have listened to the sounds of the sea through an iPod while eating a seafood course to ‘enhance the sense of taste’.  

Professor Charles Spence, Head of Oxford University’s Crossmodal Research Laboratory thinks there could be more digital technology at the family dining room table – not just at posh restaurants. 

Heston Blumenthal's Sounds of the Sea dish, which consists of sashimi, tapioca ‘sand’ and sea foam, served with a conch shell containing an iPod gently playing the sounds of sea gulls and waves falling against the sand

Heston Blumenthal’s Sounds of the Sea dish, which consists of sashimi, tapioca ‘sand’ and sea foam, served with a conch shell containing an iPod gently playing the sounds of sea gulls and waves falling against the sand

Dining will go ‘hand in hand’ with deviices, he believes, and ‘sonic seasoning’ will involve music and soundscapes to digitally enrich and season our food and drink.  

‘Whatever the future of food, it will undoubtedly be more playful, experiential, and multisensory,’ he told MailOnline 

‘There’s been a huge expansion of pairing music with flavour, part of our broader interest in pairing sensations – food and drink, flavour and sound,’ he said.

According to hospitality company HGEM, low frequency sounds can add the perception of a bitterness to food, and higher frequencies bring sweetness. 

Exaggerated sound effects like the scrunch of a crisp packet and the fizz of a carbonated drink as it’s poured into a glass of ice-cubes can make them seem fresher. 

In the years ahead, we will be eating off our tablet-plate hybrids, which may recognise and identify different mouthfulls or hors d’oeuvres, and using augmented reality (AR) to help us choose what to eat. 

AR – which overlays computer-generated objects on real-world environment – could help give us a better impression of the size of a item on a food menu on delivery apps like Deliveroo or Uber Eats. 

The technology could also enhance food’s appearance by giving it a sheen or making it ‘look metallic’ for fun, or making portion sizes look bigger than they actually are for dietary management. 

Mukbang is a Korean phenomenon where the host of an eating show consumes large quantities of food while interacting with the audience. Pictured is Bethany Gaskin, who has 2.2 million subscribers to her Bloveslife channel on YouTube

Mukbang is a Korean phenomenon where the host of an eating show consumes large quantities of food while interacting with the audience. Pictured is Bethany Gaskin, who has 2.2 million subscribers to her Bloveslife channel on YouTube

There’s also been a huge increase in Mukbang – online eating shows where the host consumes large quantities of food while interacting with the audience – and digital drinks parties, triggered by the coronavirus pandemic.

Online events involving eating and talking about food with the follow participants of a video chat may well continue in tandem with future pandemics. 

INSECT TOPPINGS 

Last year, Henry Dimbleby, co-founder of Leon restaurants, said edible insects could form part of the country’s first national food strategy for 75 years. 

And in 2018, Sainsbury’s became Britain’s first supermarket to sell insects on its shelves, offering ‘smoky BBQ’ crunchy crickets. 

Crickets, worms and ants are environmentally friendly, because they take up fewer natural resources than rearing livestock, and are also a healthy alternative to meat. 

They’ve already been touted as the next ‘superfood’ because they’re packed full of protein, nutrients, potassium, magnesium and three times more fatty acids than omega-3 in salmon.  

More than 1,000 insect species are eaten around the world and recent research suggests that the global edible insect market is set to explode. 

It could be worth $8 billion by 2030, up from less than $1 billion in 2019, according to a report from Barclays last year. 

Professor Spence feels that insects are worthy food items – however, he doesn’t think they’ll be anything more than a niche topping for soups and pizzas.  

Crickets are already being sold by Sainsbury's. These particular crickets are described as having a rich and smoky flavour

Crickets are already being sold by Sainsbury’s. These particular crickets are described as having a rich and smoky flavour

VEGAN PET FOOD  

According to a study by UCLA, meat-eating by dogs and cats creates the equivalent of about 64 million tons of carbon dioxide a year, which has about the same climate impact as a year’s worth of driving from 13.6 million cars. 

Cats and dogs are also responsible for 25 to 30 per cent of the environmental impact of meat consumption in the US, the study, published in PLOS One found. 

Andrew Knight, an Australian professor of animal welfare at the University of Winchester, believes a more flexible approach of how to feed our pets could reduce their footprint. 

‘We are just starting to realise the very substantial environmental impacts of the pet food sector,’ he told MailOnline. 

‘Pet ownership is also rising worldwide, and pets are also increasingly being fed on premium cuts of meat – which have greater animal welfare and environmental impacts. 

‘We must explore more sustainable, and ethical, alternatives, including diets based on plant, yeast, algal and lab grown meat sources.’ 

Mars, which owns the Pedigree and Whiskas pet food brands, last year revealed it is developing meat-free pet food amid rising concerns over its environmental impact.

It’s experimenting with high-protein and plant-based replacements for chicken, beef and rabbit.  

Feeding cats and dogs vegetarian or vegan pet food is a controversial and divisive issue among experts, however. 

Mars is looking to duck into the vegan pet food market, which already accounts for one fifth of meat production

It is currently dominated by small start ups including Halo and Zuke's

Mars is looking to duck into the vegan and vegetarian pet food market, which already accounts for one fifth of meat production. It is currently dominated by small start ups including Halo and Zuke’s

This June, Dr Sarah Dodd, from the University of Guelph Ontario Veterinary College in Canada said ‘unconventional’ diets made of plant matter may lead to health problems.

‘Home-made raw food diets pose an additional risk of infection in the absence of chemical or heat treatment steps to kill potentially harmful bacteria,’ she said.  

Cats and dogs that are being fed nutritionally complete alternative diets are at least as healthy as those on conventional meat-based diets, Professor Knight argued, however.

He is currently completing the largest study to date in the field of alternative diets for pets, and the preliminary results are ‘very promising’.    

‘The current rapid explosion of new plant-based and alternate pet foods will have consolidated into a large market, with well-established, major brands,’ he said

‘Multiple, large studies will have settled old questions about whether pets can be healthy on such diets. 

‘These diets will occupy a large market share, similar to vegetarian products for people perhaps 10 years ago.’      

CAN A DOG OR CAT EAT A VEGAN DIET?

Mars is understood to be looking into making vegan pet food

Mars is understood to be looking into making vegan pet food

While dogs can eat a vegan diet as they are omnivorous, organisations have warned that cat owners should be more careful.

The RSPCA has said that veganism will not harm your dog. 

‘Dogs are omnivores and can eat a wide variety of food types, so they can survive on a vegetarian diet as long as the diet is well-balanced,’ the charity said.

For cats, however, owners will need to be more careful as their pets are natural carnivores.

‘If an owner is considering switching their pet’s diet to a vegetarian option, they should consult their vet to make sure it will meet all their nutritional needs, which will depend on many factors such as age, health and lifestyle.’

Expert on animal nutrition, Marge Chandler, also reminded readers that it would be animal cruelty to give their pet an improper diet, as they need to get vital nutrients and minerals.

The British Veterinary Association remains unconvinced that the vegan movement is a good thing for cats and dogs.  

Junior Vice President Daniella Dos Santos said: ‘It is important to remember that meat contains vital vitamins and nutrients needed by your cat or dog.’

She added that more studies are needed to make sure the nutrients in animal-free pet foods are safe and can meet a pet’s dietary requirements.

‘Any changes to a pet’s diet should be undertaken under the advice of a vet with in-depth nutritional knowledge.’

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Robot judges will replace humans in the courtroom ‘in 50 years’

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robot judges will replace humans in the courtroom in 50 years

Robots that analyse a defendant’s body language to determine signs of guilt will replace judges by the year 2070, according to an artificial intelligence expert. 

Writer and speaker on AI Terence Mauri believes the machines will be able to detect physical and psychological signs of dishonesty with 99.9 per cent accuracy. 

He claims they will be polite, speak every known language fluently and will be able to detect signs of lying that couldn’t be detected by a human.

Robot judges will have cameras that capture and identify irregular speech patterns, unusually high increases in body temperature and hand and eye movements. 

Terence Mauri (pictured) is an AI expert, author and founder of Hack Future Lab, a global think tank. He believes robots could replace the majority of human judges and become a common feature of most criminal and civil hearings in England and Wales by the early 2070s

Terence Mauri (pictured) is an AI expert, author and founder of Hack Future Lab, a global think tank. He believes robots could replace the majority of human judges and become a common feature of most criminal and civil hearings in England and Wales by the early 2070s

Terence Mauri (pictured) is an AI expert, author and founder of Hack Future Lab, a global think tank. He believes robots could replace the majority of human judges and become a common feature of most criminal and civil hearings in England and Wales by the early 2070s

Data will be then analysed to provide an ‘error-free’ judgement of whether a defendant or witness is telling the truth.

Mauri expects the machines to be ‘commonplace’ in most criminal and civil hearings in England and Wales in 50 years, according to the Telegraph, based on his two-year study. 

‘AI has created unprecedented changes in the way that people live and work by performing complex problems with a level of consistency and speed that is unmatched by human intelligence,’ said Mauri, who runs London-based policy institute Hack Future Lab.

‘In a legal setting, AI will usher in a new, fairer form of digital justice whereby human emotion, bias and error will become a thing of the past.

‘Hearings will be quicker and the innocent will be far less likely to be convicted of a crime they did not commit.’

Robot judges will mean innocent people in the courtroom will be far less likely to be convicted of a crime they did not commit

Robot judges will mean innocent people in the courtroom will be far less likely to be convicted of a crime they did not commit

Robot judges will mean innocent people in the courtroom will be far less likely to be convicted of a crime they did not commit

Most senior judges won’t have their jobs taken, however, because they will be needed to set legally binding precedents, create new laws and oversee appeals.

And while barristers will be safe to argue their client’s case, other legal roles – including solicitors, chartered legal executives, paralegals, legal secretaries, and court clerks – will become taken by machines too by 2070.

AI will also replace human judges in criminal and civil hearings in the magistrates courts, county courts and family courts where a jury is not required, Mauri thinks.

Last year, former Justice Secretary David Gauke said AI could provide ‘simple tools to provide straightforward justice’. 

However, he said the UK is ‘some way off from seeing bewigged robot judges presiding in court rooms’. 

Former Secretary of State for Justice David Gauke backed the idea of technology like AI 'providing straightforward justice'

Former Secretary of State for Justice David Gauke backed the idea of technology like AI 'providing straightforward justice'

Former Secretary of State for Justice David Gauke backed the idea of technology like AI ‘providing straightforward justice’

‘We cannot ignore the speed at which technology is spreading and being integrated into all of our lives is throwing up some big ethical, regulatory and social questions,’ Gauke told an audience of legal professionals. ‘We need to tackle these head on.’

‘Human lawyers have emotional intelligence and are regulated, with bias that is accounted for. 

‘AI, on the other hand, operates on facts and numbers alone, is currently unregulated and data is only as unbiased as the hands and heads of its creators.’

The government announced £2 million in funding for new emerging technologies in the legal sector in June 2019, but was tight-lipped on what these technologies would be or if it would include robot personnel in the courtroom. 

The fledgling technology has already been used in Estonia, where an AI-powered judge has been used to settle small court claims of up to £6,000, freeing up human professionals to work on bigger cases.

The judge is fed legal documents, which it analyses before coming to a decision based on its pre-programmed algorithms. 

Meanwhile, China has been using a system of artificial-intelligence judges, cyber-courts and verdicts delivered on chat apps since 2017. 

A 'mobile court' offered on popular Chinese social media platform WeChat has handled more than three million legal cases or other judicial procedures since its launch in March

A 'mobile court' offered on popular Chinese social media platform WeChat has handled more than three million legal cases or other judicial procedures since its launch in March

A ‘mobile court’ offered on popular Chinese social media platform WeChat has handled more than three million legal cases or other judicial procedures since its launch in March

In a demonstration, authorities showed how the Hangzhou Internet Court operates, featuring an online interface with litigants appearing by video chat as an AI judge, complete with on-screen avatar, that prompts them to present their cases.  

Cases handled at the court include online trade disputes, copyright cases, and e-commerce product liability claims. 

The ‘cyber court’ is offered on popular social media platform WeChat, which is better known for its chat and mobile payment capabilities. 

China is encouraging digitisation to streamline case-handling within its sprawling court system using cyberspace and technologies like blockchain and cloud computing, China’s Supreme People’s Court said in a policy paper. 

WILL YOUR JOB BE TAKEN BY A ROBOT? PHYSICAL JOBS ARE AT THE GREATEST RISK

Physical jobs in predictable environments, including machine-operators and fast-food workers, are the most likely to be replaced by robots.

Management consultancy firm McKinsey, based in New York, focused on the amount of jobs that would be lost to automation, and what professions were most at risk.

The report said collecting and processing data are two other categories of activities that increasingly can be done better and faster with machines. 

This could displace large amounts of labour – for instance, in mortgages, paralegal work, accounting, and back-office transaction processing.

Conversely, jobs in unpredictable environments are least are risk.

The report added: ‘Occupations such as gardeners, plumbers, or providers of child- and eldercare – will also generally see less automation by 2030, because they are technically difficult to automate and often command relatively lower wages, which makes automation a less attractive business proposition.’

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LG’s rollable 65-inch TV with a OLED 8K screen goes on sale for an eye-watering $87,000

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lgs rollable 65 inch tv with a oled 8k screen goes on sale for an eye watering 87000

LG’s new rollable OLED 65-inch TV with an 8K screen will cost a staggering $87,000 (around £67,000), the tech firm has revealed.

The Signature OLED R, which descends into an aluminium base when not in use and takes up a ‘minimal amount of real estate’, is now available in South Korea.

Manufactured in LG’s Gumi facility, each TV is painstakingly assembled ‘with craftsman-like skill with attention to every detail’, LG said.  

The firm called the TV an ‘exquisite creation’ and ‘a work of art that will enhance any space and complement any lifestyle’. 

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LG announced the launch of the world’s first rollable TV, the LG Signature OLED R for $87,000

LG announced the launch of the world’s first rollable TV, the LG Signature OLED R for $87,000

LG announced the launch of the world’s first rollable TV, the LG Signature OLED R for $87,000

WHAT IS 8K?

 8K TVs pack a higher number of pixels in the display for better image quality.

The resolution on an 8K TV is 7,680 x 4,320 for a total of 33,177,600 pixels. 

This enormous number of pixels means an 8K TV can display incredibly sharp, crisp images that show more detail than a 4K TV could manage. 

An 8K TV has four times the number of pixels of a 4K TV, which, in turn, has four times the number of pixels of an HD TV. 

Source: Which? 

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LG is displaying the TV at seven premium consumer electronics stores located in major retail centres throughout its home country. 

It’s only available in South Korea for now but LG aims to bring it to other countries in the future. 

‘The seamless marriage of technological and design innovation demonstrated in LG Signature OLED R is an unprecedented feat that genuinely deserves to be called a work of art,’ said Park Hyoung-sei, president of LG Home Entertainment Company. 

‘This is a true luxury product that reimagines what television can be.’  

LG admitted that the TV is ‘the very definition of exclusive’ and it’s likely the price-tag will turn off all but the most wealthy of buyers.  

Signature OLED R, which was originally unveiled more than two years ago at the Consumer Electronics Show 2018, lets its owners ‘curate their living environment’.

Owners have more freedom as to where the device can go due to its roll away ability.  

The design aims to optimise space, allowing the large screen to be packed away in a more compact form when it’s not in use.  

Users can choose from three modes – full view, line view and and zero view.  

The high-end device gives users the freedom that a projector offers by dispensing of the big black screen that may be an eyesore when not in use

The high-end device gives users the freedom that a projector offers by dispensing of the big black screen that may be an eyesore when not in use

The high-end device gives users the freedom that a projector offers by dispensing of the big black screen that may be an eyesore when not in use

At a mind-melting $87,000, the device may only appeal to millionaires and corporate organisations

At a mind-melting $87,000, the device may only appeal to millionaires and corporate organisations

At a mind-melting $87,000, the device may only appeal to millionaires and corporate organisations

LG said: 'Not just an exceptional feat of engineering and user-centric design, this TV is a work of art that will enhance any space and complement any lifestyle'

LG said: 'Not just an exceptional feat of engineering and user-centric design, this TV is a work of art that will enhance any space and complement any lifestyle'

LG said: ‘Not just an exceptional feat of engineering and user-centric design, this TV is a work of art that will enhance any space and complement any lifestyle’

Users can choose from three modes - full view, line view and and zero view In full view, the TV rolls out to show the whole 65-inch display

Users can choose from three modes - full view, line view and and zero view In full view, the TV rolls out to show the whole 65-inch display

Users can choose from three modes – full view, line view and and zero view In full view, the TV rolls out to show the whole 65-inch display

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8234162 8858399 image a 14 1603180333487

In line view, the TV screen disappears partially to reveal a dashboard showing the weather and other daily updates

8234164 8858399 image a 1 1603187258241

8234164 8858399 image a 1 1603187258241

In zero view, the TV screen disappears completely to hide inside a base that’s essentially a massive speaker

In full view, the TV rolls out to show the whole 65-inch display, in line view it is partially unrolled and in zero view the screen disappears and hides inside a base that is essentially a massive speaker.

‘Line view allows the LG Signature OLED TV R to be partially unrolled, allowing for management of specific tasks that do not require the full TV screen,’ LG said.  

‘Even in zero view, users can enjoy music and other audio content which resonate from the 4.2-channel, 100W front-firing Dolby Atmos audio system.’

Customers can have their choice of four shades of covering – ‘signature black’, ‘moon grey’, ‘topaz blue’ or ‘toffee brown’ – and personalise their unit with an engraving of a name or message on the aluminium base.  

The TV is also supported by Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant – users just hold down the Prime Video button on the remote to activate Alexa and switch channels, search for content and perform other commands. 

The TV’s OLED (organic light remitting diode) display features self-lit pixel technology, meaning each pixel in the TV works independently to emit its own light. 

WHAT IS OLED? 

OLED is an improvement on LED technology. LED TV uses backlights. But with OLED there’s no backlight. LG OLED screen technology uses self-lit pixels which work independently to emit their own light

OLED is an improvement on LED technology. LED TV uses backlights. But with OLED there’s no backlight. LG OLED screen technology uses self-lit pixels which work independently to emit their own light

OLED is an improvement on LED technology. LED TV uses backlights. But with OLED there’s no backlight. LG OLED screen technology uses self-lit pixels which work independently to emit their own light

OLED, or organic light-emitting diodes, works by putting electricity through certain materials that glow red, green and blue.

It is the only TV technology to create colour like this. LCDs, for instance, use colour filters and liquid crystals that block light to create an image.

Meanwhile, plasmas use UV light by triggering pockets of gas that create red, green and blue phosphors.

This means that OLEDs can be thinner and more flexible than any other television technology currently on the market.

LG says: ‘If you’re watching a film with a typical LED TV, black is not dark enough and the details of the night scenes are not clear enough.

‘This is because LED TVs cannot achieve perfect blacks, creating an imprecise level of darkening which results in a halo effect around brightly lit objects on dark background.

‘LG OLED TVs create the richest, deepest shades of black. Night battle scenes are detailed and realistic. Flares blazing against a black sky. Dense woodland packed with detail.’

LED TV uses backlights. But with OLED there’s no backlight. LG OLED screen technology uses self-lit pixels which work independently to emit their own light.  

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Startup develops edible ketchup packets made from SEAWEED for condiments

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startup develops edible ketchup packets made from seaweed for condiments

Humans produce more than 300 million tons of plastic a year, half of which is single-use and 

About 26.8 million tons goes into landfills but more than eight million tons finds its way into the ocean.

Now a UK startup is doing its part to break our global plastic addiction with an eco-friendly casing that can be used for ketchup, mustard, soy sauce, or any condiment.

Made from seaweed, Ooho sachets from Notpla are biodegradable, compostable and even edible.

Seaweed farmed in northern France is dried out and ground into powder before undergoing a patented process that turns it into a clear goopy substance which can be molded like plastic.

Seaweed grows faster than paper or starch, and doesn’t compete for land or fresh water.

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Made from seaweed extract, Notpla's Ooho sachets can be used in place of ketchup, soy sauce or salad dressing packets. The packaging is biodegradable, compostable and even edible

Made from seaweed extract, Notpla’s Ooho sachets can be used in place of ketchup, soy sauce or salad dressing packets. The packaging is biodegradable, compostable and even edible

‘Seaweed is a fantastic base material due to its sustainability credentials and fast growth,’ COO Lise Honsinger told Packaging Europe. ‘By using a natural material as an input, it makes us a carbon recycler, rather than plastics which obviously come from non-renewable oil.’

Notpla co-founder Rodrigo Garcia Gonzalez says one strain of seaweed the company uses grows up three feet a day.

‘Can you imagine something growing that fast?’ he tells Business Insider. ‘You don’t need fertilizer, you don’t need to put water on it, and it’s a resource that we have been using for a long time.’

The sachets come in a variety of sizes, from a third of an ounce to two ounces.

The 'Ooho' name comes from the sound people make when they see it for the first time, Garcia says

The ‘Ooho’ name comes from the sound people make when they see it for the first time, Garcia says

The ‘Ooho’ name comes from the sound people make when they see it for the first time, Garcia says. 

The company has partnered with Just Eat, a British food delivery app, on a trial program using Ooho packets for Hellmann’s ketchup, barbecue sauce and other condiments.

According to Unilever,  Hellman’s parent company, over 90 percent of customers felt the sachets were just as easy to use as regular plastic packets and would like to see more takeaway sauces in Ooho packaging.   

‘This trial is a great example of collaboration driving game-changing innovation,’ said Unilever’s Hazel Detsiny. ‘We’re creating a new and exciting experience for Just Eat customers who can enjoy the same great tasting Hellmann’s – but with zero plastic waste.’        

Notpla has already developed Oohos for beverages: In lieu of a bottle cap or pull tab, you just bite off the corner and drink. 

Glenlivet tested Oohos filled with whiskey and Oohos filled with water were given out at the London Marathon.

In early March, a vending machine that dispenses Oohos filled with an Lucozade energy drink was installed at a gym in London.  

A vending machine dispenses one-ounce Ooho capsules filled with Lucozade sports drink.

A vending machine dispenses one-ounce Ooho capsules filled with Lucozade sports drink.

After raising more than $1 million in a crowdfunding campaign last year, Notpla raised more than $5 million in venture capital earlier this year. 

Next, it’s taking a bite out of another environmental menace – carryout containers – with a line of disposable takeout boxes, coming to market later this year.

Most cardboard takeaway containers are treated with polylactic acid, or PLA, which can take centuries to decompose.

The Notpla Box is treated with seaweed and plant extracts to make it waterproof and greaseproof.

Treated with seaweed and plant extracts to make it waterproof and greaseproof, the Notpla carryout box biodegrades in three to six weeks

Treated with seaweed and plant extracts to make it waterproof and greaseproof, the Notpla carryout box biodegrades in three to six weeks

It completely breaks down in just three to six weeks.

‘What we’ve done is replace the PLA with our natural material, so even if it does enter nature, it will degrade naturally like a piece of fruit or a vegetable,’ Juno Wilson, Notpla’s projects and business manager, told Business Insider. 

How much plastic winds up in the ocean every year?

Of the 30 billion plastic bottles used by UK households each year, only 57 percent is recycled.  

Around 700,000 a day end up as litter.

And 95 percent of plastic packaging – is thrown out after a single use, according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. 

More than 8.8 million tons of plastic finds its way into the ocean each year, equivalent to a truckload every minute. 

At current rates, that will increase to four truckloads per minute in 2050, by which time plastic will outnumber marine life in the world’s waters.  

It is estimated that about eight million metric tons of plastic find their way into the world's oceans every year

More than 8.8 million tons of plastic finds its way into the ocean each year 

More than half of the plastic waste in the ocean comes from just five countries: China, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam and Sri Lanka.  

China alone is responsible for 2.4 million tons of plastic in the ocean, nearly 28 percent of the global total.

The United States contributes just 77,000 tons, or less than one percent.

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