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Sensor-fitted mouthpiece enables tongue-controlled joystick

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sensor fitted mouthpiece enables tongue controlled joystick

A new device lets users control images on a screen with just a flick of the tongue.

Designed as a master thesis, [In] Brace is a mouth piece fitted with sensors that detect the location of a small sphere the wearer moves with their tongue.

The device is constructed from a customized plastic retainer that is connected to a Wi-Fi transmitter, which is placed around the ear.

The creator of [In] Brace sees it as a way to help those with disabilities interact with technology or doing complex tasks where hands are occupied with other devices.

Designed as a master thesis, [In] Brace is a mouth piece fitted with sensors that detect the location of a small sphere the wearer moves with their tongue

Designed as a master thesis, [In] Brace is a mouth piece fitted with sensors that detect the location of a small sphere the wearer moves with their tongue

Designed as a master thesis, [In] Brace is a mouth piece fitted with sensors that detect the location of a small sphere the wearer moves with their tongue

The technology was designed and developed by Dorothee Clasen for her thesis in Human-Computer Interaction design and research, Gizmodo reports.

The plastic base is similar to that of an average retainer, but is customized to fit in the user’s mouth.

Along the top are a number of sensors with a small joystick attached that can be controlled by the tongue.

Users place the brace in their mouth, wrap the Wi-Fi modular around their ear, which also houses the battery, and sends input signals to other devices such as a computer.

The device is constructed from a customized plastic retainer

The device is constructed from a customized plastic retainer

It is The device is constructed from a customized plastic retainer that is connected to a Wi-Fi transmitter, which is placed around the ear

It is The device is constructed from a customized plastic retainer that is connected to a Wi-Fi transmitter, which is placed around the ear

The device is constructed from a customized plastic retainer that is connected to a Wi-Fi transmitter, which is placed around the ear

Users place the brace in their mouth, wrap the Wi-Fi modular around their ear, which also houses the battery, and sends input signals to other devices such as a computer.

Users place the brace in their mouth, wrap the Wi-Fi modular around their ear, which also houses the battery, and sends input signals to other devices such as a computer.

Users place the brace in their mouth, wrap the Wi-Fi modular around their ear, which also houses the battery, and sends input signals to other devices such as a computer.

However, there is a wire that travels from the mouth to the ear that may make wearing the system uncomfortable – but [In] Brace is still in its early stages.

To test the device, Clasen setup the game ‘tong’ that is based on one of the most iconic games ever to be released – pong.

She chose this game due to the idea that pong is played with a single joystick, similar to what is inside [In] Brace.

However, playing tong required users to develop a new skill – tongue-eye coordination.

To test the device, Clasen setup the game ¿tong¿ that is based on one of the most iconic games ever to be released ¿ pong

To test the device, Clasen setup the game ¿tong¿ that is based on one of the most iconic games ever to be released ¿ pong

To test the device, Clasen setup the game ‘tong’ that is based on one of the most iconic games ever to be released – pong

Clasen shared that the first game was difficult to play, but skills improved as she practised. She foresees [In] Brace being used in physiotherapy to help patients re-train their tongue movement

Clasen shared that the first game was difficult to play, but skills improved as she practised. She foresees [In] Brace being used in physiotherapy to help patients re-train their tongue movement

Clasen shared that the first game was difficult to play, but skills improved as she practised. She foresees [In] Brace being used in physiotherapy to help patients re-train their tongue movement

Clasen shared that the first game was difficult to play, but skills improved as she practised.

She foresees [In] Brace being used in physiotherapy to help patients re-train their tongue movement.

Another application is for specific jobs or performances where a user’s eyes, feet and hands are already occupied by other tasks.

The technology could also be used for those with disabilities, such as paraplegia, allowing them to interact with the digital world.

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People who can afford exciting experiences believe they have lived longer, study reveals 

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people who can afford exciting experiences believe they have lived longer study reveals

Studies have shown that wealthy people live longer, but new research suggests it may be their novel experiences that makes them believe they do.

A team at the Norwegian University of Science and Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories.

The team found that enjoyable experiences, such as vacations and hobbies, create ‘time codes’ in the brain that are more memorable and are easier to recall than events that are boring – making it seem we have been on the Earth longer.

On the other hand, their work also shows that the brain typically does not stamp events that are mundane or constantly repeated, leaving us less to look back on.

Researchers suggest that when you recall on a memory where you whisked away to a tropical island or spent an afternoon tinkering on a vintage car, life ‘feels longer in retrospect.’

The team found that enjoyable experiences, such as vacations and hobbies, create ¿time codes¿ in the brain that are more memorable and are easier to recall than events that are boring ¿ making it seem we have been on the Earth longer. When you recall on a memory where you whisked away to a tropical island or spent an afternoon tinkering on a vintage car, life ¿feels longer in retrospect'

The team found that enjoyable experiences, such as vacations and hobbies, create ¿time codes¿ in the brain that are more memorable and are easier to recall than events that are boring ¿ making it seem we have been on the Earth longer. When you recall on a memory where you whisked away to a tropical island or spent an afternoon tinkering on a vintage car, life ¿feels longer in retrospect'

The team found that enjoyable experiences, such as vacations and hobbies, create ‘time codes’ in the brain that are more memorable and are easier to recall than events that are boring – making it seem we have been on the Earth longer. When you recall on a memory where you whisked away to a tropical island or spent an afternoon tinkering on a vintage car, life ‘feels longer in retrospect’

Valtteri Arstila, a professor of philosophy at the University of Helsinki, told National Geographic: ‘I think like the main thing is that wealthy people have the option of getting rid of their daily routines.’

Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Kavli Institute for Systems found the area of the brain that creates these time codes is located in the medial entorhinal cortex.

They conducted experiments with two groups of rats while monitor this region.

In one experiment, a rat was introduced to a wide range of experiences and options for action.

A team at the Norwegian University of Science and Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories.

A team at the Norwegian University of Science and Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories.

A team at the Norwegian University of Science and Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories.

It was free to run around, investigate and chase bits of chocolate while visiting a series of open space environments.

PhD candidate Jørgen Sugar said: ‘’The uniqueness of the time signal during this experiment suggests that the rat had a very good record of time and temporal sequence of events throughout the two hours the experiment lasted.’

‘We were able to use the signal from the time-coding network to track exactly when in the experiment various events had occurred.’

In the second experiment, the task was more structured with a narrower range of experiences and options for action.

The rat was trained to chase after bits of chocolate while turning left or right in a figure-eight maze.

Albert Tsao with Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience said: ‘With this activity, we saw the time-coding signal change character from unique sequences in time to a repetitive and partly overlapping pattern.’

‘On the other hand, the time signal became more precise and predictable during the repetitive task. 

According to Sugar, the data shows that the brain is not willing to waste time memorizing moments that are boring.

So the rats seemed to create more memories when they were engaging in free or varied actions, rather than something that is though out and predictable, he added.

Sugar also explained to National Geographic that there are differences between how short-term memory feels in the moment.

They conducted experiments with two groups of rats while monitor this region. The rats seemed to create more memories when they were engaging in free or varied actions, rather than something that is though out and predictable

They conducted experiments with two groups of rats while monitor this region. The rats seemed to create more memories when they were engaging in free or varied actions, rather than something that is though out and predictable

They conducted experiments with two groups of rats while monitor this region. The rats seemed to create more memories when they were engaging in free or varied actions, rather than something that is though out and predictable

He gives the example of students sitting in two different lectures- one was boring and the other interesting.

The pupil in the boring discussion saw time inching by while the other thought it was flying.

When recalling both events, the boring class created fewer time codes that the brain eliminated after a period of time.

The interesting lecture was full of memories and felt longer in retrospect.

However, other experts not involved in the study are not convinced.

Adrian Bejan, a professor of thermodynamics at Duke University, said the novelty of exciting experiences will eventually wear off and the wealth do not have the power to trick time into slowing down.

Benja told National Geographic that although taking fun trips may slow time for a bit, it will lose its charm.

The rich individual will become bored at some point and want to return to the office, which will again speed up time.

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Wildfires in California could mean consumers will sip smoky-tasting wine , say experts

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wildfires in california could mean consumers will sip smoky tasting wine say

Wildfires have been blazing in California since August and the intense smoke is not just filling the air, but is making its way into grapes used to produce wine.

As wood burns during these fires, it releases aromatic compounds that permeate the grape’s skin and bonds with sugars inside.

Because the blazes were so intense this season, experts say consumers can expect to sip on smoky flavored wine for years to come.

Wine industry expert Burak Kazaz said: ‘There are ways that winemakers can attempt to ‘mask’ the smoky taste, but it’s literally permeated everything from the grapes themselves to the wooden crates and barrels used to store grapes and the finished wine product.’

Wildfires have been blazing in California since August and the intense smoke is not just filling the air, but is making its way into grapes used to make wine

Wildfires have been blazing in California since August and the intense smoke is not just filling the air, but is making its way into grapes used to make wine

Winemakers have been very concerned about smoke taint over the past few years, as experts warn climate change will only contribute to the number of wildfires each year.

A number of wineries across the world have already been hit hard, with Chile suffering the worst in 2017 that damaged more than 100 vineyards, Wine Spectator reports.

Wildfires have become more common in California and the seasons are starting sooner each year and ending later, which is tainting the state’s prized grapes.

Smoke taint of grapes occurs when wood release compounds called volatile phenols that are capable of breaking into a grape’s cuticle and bonding with sugars inside to form glycosides.

As wood burns during these fires, it releases aromatic compounds that permeate the grape’s skin and bonds with sugars inside. Because the blazes were so intense this season, experts say consumers can expect to sip on smoky flavored wine for years to come

As wood burns during these fires, it releases aromatic compounds that permeate the grape’s skin and bonds with sugars inside. Because the blazes were so intense this season, experts say consumers can expect to sip on smoky flavored wine for years to come

And the entire process goes undetected – the only way vintners know the grapes have been compromised is when tasting the finished wine.

‘Heavy smoke and a burnt flavor is hard to remove, and the effect is cumulative as the state has been hit hard by wildfires for the past few years,’ Kazaz explained. 

Experts suggest monitoring smoke density and how long it lingers in an area to predict whether or not it will happen.

Kerry Wilkinson, a leading researcher in smoke taint at the University of Adelaide in Australia, told Wine Spectator: ‘If you are close to the fire but the smoke is blown away from you quickly, the risk of smoke taint is less.’

Wine industry expert Burak Kazaz said: ‘There are ways that winemakers can attempt to 'mask' the smoky taste, but it's literally permeated everything from the grapes themselves to the wooden crates and barrels used to store grapes and the finished wine product

Wine industry expert Burak Kazaz said: ‘There are ways that winemakers can attempt to ‘mask’ the smoky taste, but it’s literally permeated everything from the grapes themselves to the wooden crates and barrels used to store grapes and the finished wine product

‘Whereas you could be farther away from the fire, but if the smoke drifts in and lingers in your vineyard, then the risk will increase.’

Researchers at the University of British Colombia unveiled a new innovation in February – a spray that could protect grapes from smoke taint.

The team found that applying an agricultural spray composed of phospholipids — typically used to prevent cracking in cherries — to wine grapes one week before exposing them to simulated forest fire smoke significantly reduced the levels of volatile phenols measured in smoke-exposed grapes at commercial maturity.

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NASA images of asteroid Bennu reveal ‘extremely bright’ chunks of another asteroid on the surface 

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nasa images of asteroid bennu reveal extremely bright chunks of another asteroid on the surface

NASA spotted pieces of asteroid Vesta ranging in size from five to 14 feet scattered across Bennu’s southern hemisphere and near its center.

The boulders were detected in images from the OSIRIS-Rex and appear much brighter than the surrounding area of dark, rich carbon.

The team analyzed the chunks using an on-board spectrometer and found signs of the mineral pyroxene – a known compound on Vesta.

NASA theorizes the material came from Bennu’s parent asteroid that was struck by a fragment from Vesta.

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NASA spotted pieces of asteroid Vesta ranging in size from five to 14 feet scattered across Bennu's southern hemisphere and near its center. The boulders were detected in images from the OSIRIS-Rex and appear much brighter than the surrounding area of dark, rich carbon

NASA spotted pieces of asteroid Vesta ranging in size from five to 14 feet scattered across Bennu’s southern hemisphere and near its center. The boulders were detected in images from the OSIRIS-Rex and appear much brighter than the surrounding area of dark, rich carbon

Hannah Kaplan of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, said: ‘Our leading hypothesis is that Bennu inherited this material from its parent asteroid after a vestoid (a fragment from Vesta) struck the parent.’

‘Then, when the parent asteroid was catastrophically disrupted, a portion of its debris accumulated under its own gravity into Bennu, including some of the pyroxene from Vesta.’

NASA launched OSIRIS-Rex (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification and Security Regolith Explorer) to asteroid Bennu in 2018 to study the object up close.

During spring 2019, the device snapped images showing odd pieces stuck in the ‘rubble pile’ that is Bennu.

The team analyzed the chunks using an on-board spectrometer and found signs of the mineral pyroxene - a known compound on Vesta. NASA theorizes the material came from Bennu's parent asteroid that was struck by a fragment from Vesta

The team analyzed the chunks using an on-board spectrometer and found signs of the mineral pyroxene – a known compound on Vesta. NASA theorizes the material came from Bennu’s parent asteroid that was struck by a fragment from Vesta

Daniella DellaGiustina of the Lunar & Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, said: ‘We found six boulders ranging in size from 5 to 14 feet (about 1.5 to 4.3 meters) scattered across Bennu’s southern hemisphere and near the equator.’

The pieces appear to be a much brighter than the rocks on Bennu, which NASA notes some are nearly ten times brighter than their surroundings.

After a further investigation in the compounds of the odd structures, it was found that they contain traces of mineral pyroxene found on Vesta.

This mineral usually forms when rocky structures melt at high temperatures and because Bennu is composed of water-bearing minerals NASA was able to rule out out the idea of the boulders coming from Bennu.

Previous observation have determined that it is no uncommon.

The new result helps pin down the complex journey Bennu and other asteroids have traced through the solar system. Based on its orbit, several studies indicate Bennu was delivered from the inner region of the Main Asteroid Belt

The new result helps pin down the complex journey Bennu and other asteroids have traced through the solar system. Based on its orbit, several studies indicate Bennu was delivered from the inner region of the Main Asteroid Belt 

The Dawn spacecraft observing Vesta found dark material on crater walls, a black boulder was seen by the Hayabusa spacecraft on Itokawa and material from S-type asteroids observed by Hayabusa2 at Ryugu.

All of these discoveries show that ‘asteroids are participating in a complex orbital dance that sometimes results in cosmic mashups,’ NASA shares in a statement. 

As asteroids move through the solar system, their orbits can be altered in many ways, including the pull of gravity from planets and other objects, meteoroid impacts, and even the slight pressure from sunlight.

The new result helps pin down the complex journey Bennu and other asteroids have traced through the solar system.

Based on its orbit, several studies indicate Bennu was delivered from the inner region of the Main Asteroid Belt via a well-known gravitational pathway that can take objects from the inner Main Belt to near-Earth orbits.

NASA launched OSIRIS-Rex (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification and Security Regolith Explorer) to asteroid Bennu in 2018 to study the object up close

NASA launched OSIRIS-Rex (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification and Security Regolith Explorer) to asteroid Bennu in 2018 to study the object up close

Scientists have found two inner Main Belt asteroid families, Polana and Eulalia that are dark and rich in carbon like Bennu.  

Eulalia is the parent of a family that formed 900 to 1,500 million years ago and Polana formed over 2,000 million years ago – bother are likely candidate for Bennu’s parent.  

Dante Lauretta, OSIRIS-REx principal investigator at the University of Arizona, said: ‘Future studies of asteroid families, as well as the origin of Bennu, must reconcile the presence of Vesta-like material as well as the apparent lack of other asteroid types.’

‘We look forward to the returned sample, which hopefully contains pieces of these intriguing rock types.’

‘This constraint is even more compelling given the finding of S-type material on asteroid Ryugu. 

‘This difference shows the value in studying multiple asteroids across the solar system.’ 

HOW WILL NASA’S OSIRIS-REX MISSION TO TAKE SAMPLES FROM AN ASTEROID WORK?

493817E700000578 0 image a 42 1518641287764

Osiris-Rex is the first US mission designed to return a piece of an asteroid to Earth.  

Scientists say the ancient asteroid could hold clues to the origin of life. 

It’s believed to have formed 4.5 billion years ago, a remnant of the solar system’s building blocks.

The spacecraft launched on September 8, 2016 at 19:05 EST aboard an Atlas V rocket.

After a careful survey of Bennu to characterise the asteroid and locate the most promising sample sites, Osiris-Rex will collect between 2 and 70 ounces (about 60 to 2,000 grams) of surface material with its robotic arm and return the sample to Earth via a detachable capsule in 2023.

To capture samples on the surface, the craft will hover over a specific area and ‘will be sent down at a very slow and gently’ 4 inches (10 cm) per second. 

The spacecraft will also carry a laser altimeter, a suite of cameras provided by the University of Arizona, spectrometers and lidar, which is similar to radar, using light instead of radio waves to measure distance. 

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